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EX-32.2 - EX-32.2 - ENNIS, INC.ebf-ex322_11.htm
EX-32.1 - EX-32.1 - ENNIS, INC.ebf-ex321_9.htm
EX-31.2 - EX-31.2 - ENNIS, INC.ebf-ex312_10.htm
EX-31.1 - EX-31.1 - ENNIS, INC.ebf-ex311_7.htm
EX-23 - EX-23 - ENNIS, INC.ebf-ex23_8.htm
EX-21 - EX-21 - ENNIS, INC.ebf-ex21_6.htm
EX-4.1 - EX-4.1 - ENNIS, INC.ebf-ex41_229.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the fiscal year ended February 29, 2020

OR

Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the transition period from __________ to __________

Commission File Number 1-5807

 

ENNIS, INC.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

Texas

 

75-0256410

(State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

2441 Presidential Pkwy., Midlothian, Texas

 

76065

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(Zip code)

(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code) (972) 775-9801

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Trading

Symbol(s)

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, par value $2.50 per share

 

EBF

 

New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes   No

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.   Yes    No

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes    No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes    No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated Filer

 

 

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

 

 

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company.

 

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes    No

The aggregate market value of voting stock held by non-affiliates of the Registrant as of August 31, 2019 was approximately $507 million. Shares of voting stock held by executive officers, directors and holders of more than 10% of the outstanding voting stock have been excluded from this calculation because such persons may be deemed to be affiliates. Exclusion of such shares should not be construed to indicate that any of such persons possesses the power, direct or indirect, to control the Registrant, or that any such person is controlled by or under common control with the Registrant.

The number of shares of the Registrant’s Common Stock, par value $2.50, outstanding at April 27, 2020 was 26,099,594.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the Registrant’s Proxy Statement for the 2020 Annual Meeting of Shareholders are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Report.

 

 

 


ENNIS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

FORM 10-K

FOR THE PERIOD ENDED FEBRUARY 29, 2020

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I:

 

 

Item 1

Business

4

Item 1A

Risk Factors

7

Item 1B

Unresolved Staff Comments

12

Item 2

Properties

12

Item 3

Legal Proceedings

14

Item 4

Mine Safety Disclosures

14

 

 

 

PART II:

 

 

Item 5

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer
Purchases of Equity Securities

14

Item 6

Selected Financial Data

16

Item 7

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

17

Item 7A

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

27

Item 8

Consolidated Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

27

Item 9

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

27

Item 9A

Controls and Procedures

27

Item 9B

Other Information

28

 

 

 

PART III:

 

 

Item 10

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

29

Item 11

Executive Compensation

29

Item 12

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related
Stockholder Matters

29

Item 13

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

29

Item 14

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

29

 

 

 

PART IV:

 

 

Item 15

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

30

 

Signatures

32

 

 

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Cautionary Statements Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

All of the statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, other than historical facts, are forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, the statements made in the “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” particularly under the caption “Overview.”  As a general matter, forward-looking statements are those focused upon anticipated events or trends, expectations, and beliefs relating to matters that are not historical in nature.  The words “could,” “should,” “feel,” “anticipate,” “aim,” “preliminary,” “expect,” “believe,” “estimate,” “intend,” “intent,” “plan,” “will,” “foresee,” “project,” “forecast,” or the negative thereof or variations thereon, and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements.

The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 provides a “safe harbor” for these forward-looking statements.  In order to comply with the terms of the safe harbor, Ennis, Inc. notes that forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors relating to its operations and business environment, all of which are difficult to predict and many of which are beyond the control of Ennis, Inc.  These known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors could cause actual results to differ materially from those matters expressed in, anticipated by or implied by such forward-looking statements.

These statements reflect the current views and assumptions of management with respect to future events.  Ennis, Inc. does not undertake, and hereby disclaims, any duty to update these forward-looking statements, even though its situation and circumstances may change in the future.  Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this report.  The inclusion of any statement in this report does not constitute an admission by Ennis, Inc. or any other person that the events or circumstances described in such statement are material.

We believe these forward-looking statements are based upon reasonable assumptions.  All such statements involve risks and uncertainties, and as a result, actual results could differ materially from those projected, anticipated or implied by these statements. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, including but not limited to, general economic, business and labor conditions and the potential impact on our operations; our ability to implement our strategic initiatives and control our operational costs; dependence on a limited number of key suppliers; our ability to recover the rising cost of raw materials and other costs (including energy, freight, labor, and benefit costs) in markets that are highly price competitive and volatile; the impact of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic or future pandemics on the U.S. and local economies, our business operations, our workforce, our supply chain and our customer base; our ability to timely or adequately respond to technological changes in the industry; the impact of the Internet and other electronic media on the demand for forms and printed materials; the impact of foreign competition, tariffs, trade regulations and import restrictions; customer credit risk; competitors’ pricing strategies; a decline in business volume and profitability could result in an impairment in our reported goodwill negatively impacting our operational results; our ability to retain key management personnel; our ability to identify, manage or integrate acquisitions; and changes in government regulations including measures intended to minimize the impact of COVID-19.  

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PART I

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS

Overview

Ennis, Inc. (formerly Ennis Business Forms, Inc.) (collectively with its subsidiaries, the “Company,” “Registrant,” “Ennis,” or “we,” “us,” or “our”) was organized under the laws of Texas in 1909. We and our subsidiaries print and manufacture a broad line of business forms and other business products.  We distribute business products and forms throughout the United States primarily through independent distributors.  This distributor channel encompasses independent print distributors, commercial printers, direct mail, fulfillment companies, payroll and accounts payable software companies, and advertising agencies, among others.  We also sell products to many of our competitors to satisfy their customers’ needs.

Business Overview

Our management believes we are the largest provider of business forms, pressure-seal forms, labels, tags, envelopes, and presentation folders to independent distributors in the United States.

We are in the business of manufacturing, designing and selling business forms and other printed business products primarily to distributors located in the United States. We operate 61 manufacturing plants throughout the United States in 21 strategically located states as one reportable segment. Approximately 95% of the business products we manufacture are custom and semi-custom products, constructed in a wide variety of sizes, colors, number of parts and quantities on an individual job basis, depending upon the customers’ specifications.

The products we sell include snap sets, continuous forms, laser cut sheets, tags, labels, envelopes, integrated products, jumbo rolls and pressure sensitive products in short, medium and long runs under the following labels: Ennis®, Royal Business Forms®, Block Graphics®, Specialized Printed Forms®, 360º Custom LabelsSM, ColorWorx®, Enfusion®, Uncompromised Check Solutions®, VersaSeal®, Ad ConceptsSM, FormSource LimitedSM, Star Award Ribbon Company®, Witt Printing®, B&D Litho®, Genforms®, PrintGraphics®, Calibrated Forms®, PrintXcel®, Printegra®, Falcon Business FormsSM, Forms ManufacturersSM, Mutual Graphics®, TRI-C Business FormsSM, Major Business SystemsSM, Independent PrintingSM, Hoosier Data Forms®, Hayes Graphics®, Wright Business GraphicsSM, Wright 360SM, Integrated Print & GraphicsSM, the Flesh CompanySM, Impressions DirectSM, and Ace FormsSM.  We also sell the Adams McClure® brand (which provides Point of Purchase advertising for large franchise and fast food chains as well as kitting and fulfillment); the Admore®, Folder Express® and Independent Folders® brands (which provide presentation folders and document folders); Ennis Tag & LabelSM (which provides custom printed, high performance labels and custom and stock tags); Allen-Bailey Tag & LabelSM, Atlas Tag & Label®, Kay Toledo Tag®, and Special Service Partners® (SSP) (which provides custom and stock tags and labels); Trade Envelopes®, Block Graphics®, Wisco®, and National Imprint Corporation® (which provide custom and imprinted envelopes) and Northstar® and General Financial Supply® (which provide financial and security documents).

We sell predominantly through independent distributors, as well as to many of our competitors. Northstar Computer Forms, Inc., one of our wholly-owned subsidiaries, also sells direct to a small number of customers, generally large banking organizations (where a distributor is not acceptable or available to the end-user).  Adams McClure, LP, a wholly-owned subsidiary, also sells direct to a small number of customers, where sales are generally through advertising agencies.

The printing industry generally sells its products either predominantly to end users, a market dominated by a few large manufacturers, such as R.R. Donnelley and Sons, Staples, Inc., Standard Register Co. (a subsidiary of Taylor Corporation), and Cenveo, Inc., or, like the Company, through a variety of independent distributors and distributor groups. While it is not possible, because of the lack of adequate public statistical information, to determine the Company’s share of the total business products market, management believes the Company is the largest producer of business forms, pressure-seal forms, labels, tags, envelopes, and presentation folders in the United States distributing primarily through independent distributors.

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There are a number of competitors that operate in this segment, ranging in size from single employee-owned operations to multi-plant organizations. We believe our strategic locations and buying power permit us to compete on a favorable basis within the distributor market on competitive factors, such as service, quality, and price.

Distribution of business forms and other business products throughout the United States is primarily done through independent distributors, including business forms distributors, resellers, direct mail, commercial printers, payroll and accounts payable software companies, and advertising agencies.

Raw materials principally consist of a wide variety of weights, widths, colors, sizes, and qualities of paper for business products purchased primarily from one major supplier at favorable prices based on the volume of business.

Business products usage in the printing industry is generally not seasonal. General economic conditions and contraction of the traditional business forms industry are the predominant factors in quarterly volume fluctuations.

Recent Acquisitions

We have completed a number of acquisitions in recent years.  On July 15, 2019, we acquired all the outstanding stock of The Flesh Company (“Flesh”) for approximately $9.9 million (which includes potential earn-out consideration of up to $500,000) plus the assumption of trade payables, subject to final working capital and certain other adjustments.  The earn-out consideration is capped at $500,000 and is payable over the four years following the closing if certain minimum operating income levels are achieved.  We recorded intangible assets with definite lives of approximately $1.2 million in connection with the transaction.  Flesh, together with its wholly owned subsidiary, Impressions Direct, Inc. (“Impressions Direct”), is a printing company with two locations, with the St. Louis location containing Flesh’s corporate office and the direct mail operations of Impressions Direct, and the Parsons, Kansas location containing Flesh’s main manufacturing facility and warehouse. The acquisition of Flesh, which prior to the acquisition generated approximately $31.0 million in sales for its fiscal year ended September 30, 2018, expands our operations with respect to business forms, checks, direct mail services, integrated products and labels.  

 

On March 16, 2019, we acquired the assets of Integrated Print & Graphics (“Integrated”), which is based in South Elgin, Illinois, for $8.9 million in cash plus the assumption of trade payables, subject to certain adjustments.  Goodwill of $893,000 recognized as a part of the acquisition is deductible for tax purposes.  We also recorded intangible assets with definite lives of approximately $1.8 million in connection with the transaction.  The acquisition of Integrated, which prior to the acquisition generated approximately $20.0 million in sales for its fiscal year ended December 31, 2018, creates additional capabilities within our high color commercial print product line.

On July 31, 2018, we acquired, by way of a merger, all of the outstanding equity interests of Wright Business Forms, Inc., d/b/a Wright Business Graphics (“Wright”), a printing company headquartered in Portland, Oregon with additional locations in Washington and California.  As partial consideration for the acquisition, we issued an aggregate of 829,126 shares of our common stock to the stockholders of Wright, valued at approximately $16.2 million at the time of issuance under the merger agreement.  An additional $19.7 million in cash was paid to the stockholders of Wright, subject to a final working capital adjustment, and $2.6 million was paid to extinguish outstanding debt.  The goodwill recognized as a part of the transaction is not deductible for tax purposes.  Wright produces forms, pressure seal, packaging, direct mail, checks, statement processing and commercial printing and sells mainly through distributors and resellers. Wright, prior to the acquisition, generated approximately $58.0 million in sales for its fiscal year ended March 31, 2018 and continues to operate under its brand names.

On April 30, 2018, we acquired the assets of Allen-Bailey Tag & Label (“ABTL”), a tag and label operation located in New York for $4.7 million in cash plus the assumption of trade payables, subject to a working capital adjustment.  In addition, contingent consideration of up to $500,000 is payable to the sellers if certain sales levels are maintained over the next three years.  Prior to the acquisition, ABTL generated approximately $12.0 million in sales for the twelve months ended December 31, 2017.  On July 7, 2017, we acquired the assets of a separate tag operation located in Ohio for $1.4 million in cash plus the assumption of certain accrued liabilities.  Management considers both of these acquisitions immaterial.

 

 

5


Patents, Licenses, Franchises and Concessions

Other than the patent for our VersaSeal® product, we do not have any significant patents, licenses, franchises, or concessions.

Intellectual Property

We market our products under a number of trademarks and trade names. The protection of our trademarks is important to our business.  We believe that our registered and common law trademarks have significant value and these trademarks are important to our ability to create and sustain demand for our products. We have registered trademarks in the United States for Ennis®, EnnisOnlineSM, B&D Litho of AZ®, B&D Litho®, ACR®, Block Graphics®, Enfusion®, 360º Custom LabelsSM, Admore®, CashManagementSupply.comSM, Securestar®, Northstar®, MICRLink®, MICR ConnectionTM, Ennisstores.comTM, General Financial Supply®, Calibrated Forms®, PrintXcelSM, Printegra®, Trade Envelopes®, Witt Printing®, Genforms®, Royal Business Forms®, Crabar/GBFSM, BF&SSM, Adams McClure®, Advertising ConceptsTM, ColorWorx®, Allen-Bailey Tag & LabelSM, Atlas Tag & Label®, PrintgraphicsSM, Uncompromised Check Solutions®, VersaSeal®, VersaSeal SecureX®, Folder Express®, Wisco®, National Imprint Corporation®, Star Award Ribbon®, Kay Toledo Tag®, Falcon Business FormsSM, Forms ManufacturersSM, Mutual Graphics®, TRI-C Business FormsSM, SSP®, EOSTouchpoint®, Printersmall®, Check Guard®, Envirofolder®, Independent®, Independent Checks®, Independent Folders®, Independent Large Format Solutions®, Wright Business GraphicsSM, Wright 360SM, Integrated Print & GraphicsSM, the Flesh CompanySM, Impressions DirectSM, Ace FormsSM, MegaformSM, Safe®, and variations of these brands as well as other trademarks. We have similar trademark registrations internationally.

Customers

No single customer accounts for as much as five percent of our consolidated net sales or accounts receivable.

Backlog

At February 29, 2020, our backlog of firm orders was approximately $21.8 million, compared to approximately $22.5 million at February 28, 2019.  Due to the impact of COVID-19 on all businesses, our backlog as of April 30, 2020 was $17.5 million.

Research and Development

While we seek new products to sell through our distribution channel, there have been no material amounts spent on research and development in fiscal years 2020, 2019 or 2018.

Environment

We are subject to various federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations concerning, among other things, wastewater discharges, air emissions and solid waste disposal. Our manufacturing processes do not emit substantial foreign substances into the environment. We do not believe that our compliance with federal, state, or local statutes or regulations relating to the protection of the environment has any material effect upon capital expenditures, earnings or our competitive position. There can be no assurance, however, that future changes in federal, state, or local regulations, interpretations of existing regulations or the discovery of currently unknown problems or conditions will not require substantial additional expenditures. Similarly, the extent of our liability, if any, for past failures to comply with laws, regulations, and permits applicable to our operations cannot be determined.

Employees

At February 29, 2020, we had 2,505 employees.  242 employees are represented by labor unions under collective bargaining agreements, which are subject to periodic negotiations.  We believe we have a good working relationship with all of the unions that represent our employees.

Available Information

Our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 are

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available free of charge under the Investors Relations page on our website, www.ennis.com, as soon as reasonably practicable after such reports are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).  Information on our website is not included as a part of, or incorporated by reference into, this report. Our SEC filings are also available through the SEC’s website, www.sec.gov.

ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS

You should carefully consider the risks described below, as well as the other information included or incorporated by reference in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, before making an investment in our common stock. The risks described below are not the only ones we face in our business.  Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently believe to be immaterial may also impair our business operations. If any of the following risks occur, our business, financial condition or operating results could be materially harmed. In such an event, our common stock could decline in price and you may lose all or part of your investment.

 

Our business may be adversely affected by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.


       In December 2019, a novel strain of coronavirus (COVID-19) was reported in Wuhan, China, and by early 2020, the virus had spread to other countries, including the United States.  The COVID-19 pandemic is a significant threat to the health and economic wellbeing affecting our customers, suppliers and workforce.  Federal, state and local authorities have recommended social distancing and have imposed, or are considering, quarantine and isolation measures on large portions of the population, including mandatory closures of businesses deemed “non-essential” in certain jurisdictions.  As of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, our plants are deemed “essential,” largely due to our business’s support of many important sectors of the economy, including healthcare, government, food and beverage and banking, and thus most of our plants are currently operating at close-to-normal utilization levels.  As the virus continues to evolve, however, authorities could take new steps to control the outbreak, which could result in the determination that our plants are no longer “essential” and therefore must close, among other outcomes.  Even if our plants are not forced to close by government regulation, the virus, in addition to prolonged stay-at-home orders or other related regulations, could depress consumer demand or disrupt our supply chain.  Depending on these developments and others, we may deem it necessary to close plants, furlough or lay off employees or take other cost-cutting measures.

 

The extent of the impact of COVID-19 on our business and financial results will depend on future developments, including the duration and spread of the outbreak within the markets in which we operate, the related impact on our customers and suppliers and the possibility of an economic recession after the virus has subsided, all of which are highly uncertain and ever-changing.  Any of these factors could materially increase our costs, negatively impact our sales and damage our results of operations and liquidity.  The severity and duration of any such impacts, including after the virus has subsided, cannot be predicted.

Our results and financial condition are affected by global and local market conditions, and competitors’ pricing strategies, which can adversely affect our sales, margins, and net income.

Our results of operations can be affected by local, national and worldwide market conditions.  The consequences of domestic and international economic uncertainty or instability, volatility in commodity markets, and domestic or international policy uncertainty, all of which we have seen in the past, can all impact economic activity.  Unfavorable conditions can depress the demand for our products and thus sales in a given market and may prompt competitor’s pricing strategies that adversely affect our margins or constrain our operating flexibility.  Certain macroeconomic events, such as the past crisis in the financial markets, could have a more wide-ranging and prolonged impact on the general business environment, which could also adversely affect us.  In particular, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has negatively impacted local, national and worldwide economies, introduced extreme market volatility and, depending on severity and duration, may potentially trigger a prolonged nationwide or global recession.  Whether we can manage these risks effectively depends on several factors, including (i) our ability to manage movements in commodity prices and the impact of government actions to manage national economic conditions such as consumer spending, inflation rates and unemployment levels, particularly given the past volatility in the global financial markets, (ii) the impact on our margins of labor costs given our labor-intensive business model, the trend toward higher wages in both mature and developing markets and the potential impact of union organizing efforts on day-to-day operations of our manufacturing facilities and (iii) other factors, which may be beyond our control.

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The terms and conditions of our credit facility impose certain restrictions on our operations.  We may not be able to raise additional capital, if needed, for proposed expansion projects.

The terms and conditions of our credit facility impose certain restrictions on our ability to incur additional debt, make capital expenditures, acquisitions and asset dispositions, as well as impose other customary covenants, such as requiring that our fixed charge coverage ratio not be less than 1.25:1.00 and our total leverage ratio not exceed 3.00:1:00.  Our ability to comply with the covenants may be affected by events beyond our control, such as distressed and volatile financial and/or consumer markets, including due to the impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.  A breach of any of these covenants could result in a default under our credit facility.  In the event of a default, the bank could elect to declare the outstanding principal amount of our credit facility, all interest thereon, and all other amounts payable under our credit facility to be immediately due and payable.  As of February 29, 2020, we were in compliance with all terms and conditions of our credit facility, which matures on November 11, 2021.

Challenging financial market conditions and continued decline in long-term interest rates could adversely impact the funded status of our pension plan.

We maintain a noncontributory defined benefit retirement plan (the “Pension Plan”) covering approximately 16% of our employees.  Included in our financial results are Pension Plan costs that are measured using actuarial valuations.  The actuarial assumptions used may differ from actual results.  In addition, as our Pension Plan assets are invested in marketable securities, severe fluctuations in market values could potentially negatively impact our funded status, recorded pension liability, and future required minimum contribution levels.  A decline in long-term debt interest rates puts downward pressure on the discount rate used by plan sponsors to determine their pension liabilities.  Each 10 basis point change in the discount rate impacts our computed pension liability by about $930,000.  Similar to fluctuations in market values, a drop in the discount rate could potentially negatively impact our funded status, recorded pension liability and future contribution levels.  Also, continued changes in the mortality tables could potentially impact our funded status.  As of February 29, 2020, the Pension Plan was 87.2% funded on a projected benefit obligation (PBO) basis and 95.7% on an accumulated benefit obligation (ABO) basis.

We may be unable to identify or to complete acquisitions or to successfully integrate the businesses we acquire.

We have evaluated, and may continue to evaluate, potential acquisition transactions.  We attempt to address the potential risks inherent in assessing the attractiveness of acquisition candidates, as well as other challenges such as retaining the employees and integrating the operations of the businesses we acquire.  Integrating acquired operations involves significant risks and uncertainties, including maintenance of uniform standards, controls, policies and procedures; diversion of management’s attention from normal business operations during the integration process; unplanned expenses associated with integration efforts; and unidentified issues not discovered in due diligence, including legal contingencies.  Due to these risks and others, there can be no guarantee that the businesses we acquire will lead to the cost savings or increases in net sales that we expect or desire.  Additionally, there can be no assurance that suitable acquisition opportunities will be available in the future, which could harm our strategic business plan as acquisitions are part of our strategy to offset normal print attrition.

We may be required to write down goodwill and other intangible assets, which could cause our financial condition and results of operations to be negatively affected in the future.

When we acquire a business, a portion of the purchase price may be allocated to goodwill and other identifiable intangible assets.  The amount of the purchase price which is allocated to goodwill and other intangible assets is the excess of the purchase price over the net identifiable tangible assets acquired.  The annual impairment test is based on several factors requiring judgment.  An impairment may be caused by any number of factors outside our control, such as a decline in market conditions, including due to the COVID-19 pandemic, another pandemic or some other event, protracted recovery from poor market conditions, or other factors that may be tied to such negative economic events, including changes to a competitor’s pricing strategies.  To date, we have not been required to take an impairment charge relating to our existing business, but continued sale-side pressures due to technology transference, competitor pricing pressures, and economic uncertainties could result in a determination that a portion of the recorded value of goodwill and intangible assets may be required to be written down. Although such a charge impairment charge relating to our existing business, but continued sale-side pressures due to technology would be a noncash expense, it would impact our reported operating results and financial position. The Company has mitigated some of this risk by changing from indefinite lives to definite lives accounting for all intangibles assets.

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Under definite lives accounting, the value of intangible assets is gradually amortized over time, instead of being left on the Company’s books in full and only being written down when an impairment event is deemed to have occurred.  At February 29, 2020, our consolidated goodwill and other intangible assets were approximately $82.5 million and $56.6 million, respectively.

Digital technologies will continue to erode the demand for our printed business documents.

The increasing sophistication of software, internet technologies, and digital equipment combined with our customers’ general preference, as well as governmental influences for paperless business environments will continue to reduce the number of traditional printed documents sold.  Moreover, the documents that will continue to coexist with software applications will likely contain less value-added print content.

Many of our custom-printed documents help companies control their internal business processes and facilitate the flow of information.  These applications will increasingly be conducted over the internet or through other electronic payment systems.  The predominant method of our customers’ communication to their customers is by printed information.  As their customers become more accepting of internet communications, our clients may increasingly opt for what is perceived to be less costly electronic option, which would reduce our revenue.  The pace of these trends is difficult to predict.  These factors will tend to reduce the industry-wide demand for printed documents and require us to gain market share to maintain or increase our current level of print-based revenue which could place pressure on our operating margins.  

In response to the gradual obsolescence of our standardized forms business, we continue to develop our capability to provide custom and full-color products. If new printing capabilities and new product introductions do not continue to offset the obsolescence of our standardized business forms products, and we are unable to increase our market share, our sales and profits will be affected.  Decreases in sales of our standardized business forms and products due to obsolescence could also reduce our gross margins or impact the value of our recorded goodwill and intangible assets. This reduction could in turn adversely impact our profits, unless we are able to offset the reduction through the introduction of new high margin products and services or realize cost savings in other areas.

Our distributor customers may be acquired by other manufacturers who redirect business within their plants.

Some of our customers are being absorbed by the distribution channels of some of our manufacturing competitors.  However, we do not believe this will significantly impact our business model.  We have continued to sell to some of these customers even after they were absorbed by our competition because of the breadth of our product line and our geographic diversity.  

Our distributors face increased competition from various sources, such as office supply superstores. Increased competition may require us to reduce prices or to offer other incentives in order to enable our distributors to attract new customers and retain existing customers.

Low price, high value office supply chain stores offer standardized business forms, checks and related products. Because of their size, these superstores have the buying power to offer many of these products at competitive prices. These superstores also offer the convenience of “one-stop” shopping for a broad array of office supplies that our distributors do not offer. In addition, superstores have the financial strength to reduce prices or increase promotional discounts to expand market share. This could result in us reducing our prices or offering incentives in order to enable our distributors to attract new customers and retain existing customers, which could reduce our profits.

Technological improvements may reduce our competitive advantage over some of our competitors, which could reduce our profits.

Improvements in the cost and quality of digital print technology is enabling some of our competitors to gain access to products of complex design and functionality at competitive costs. Increased competition from these competitors could force us to reduce our prices in order to attract and retain customers, which could reduce our profits.

We could experience labor disputes that could disrupt our business in the future.

As of February 29, 2020, approximately 10% of our employees are represented by labor unions under collective bargaining agreements, which are subject to periodic negotiations.  While we believe we have a good working

9


relationship with all of the unions, there can be no assurance that any future labor negotiations will prove successful, which may result in a significant increase in the cost of labor, or may break down and result in the disruption of our business or operations.

We obtain our raw materials from a limited number of suppliers, and any disruption in our relationships with these suppliers, or any substantial increase in the price of raw materials or material shortages could have a material adverse effect on us.

We currently purchase the majority of our paper products from one major supplier at favorable costs based on the volume of business, and traditionally we have purchased our paper products from a limited number of suppliers, all of which must meet stringent quality and on-time delivery standards under long-term contracts.  Fluctuations in the quality of our paper, unexpected price changes or other factors that relate to our suppliers could have a material adverse effect on our operating results.  In particular, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic may make it more expensive or more difficult to source raw materials for our products, whether from our existing suppliers or new suppliers, and these challenges could negatively impact the cost or availability of our raw materials.

Paper is a commodity that is subject to frequent increases or decreases in price, and these fluctuations are sometimes significant.  Domestic paper prices have increased and decreased in recent years due to global market conditions.  There is no effective market of derivative instruments to insulate us against unexpected changes in price of paper in a cost-effective manner, and negotiated purchase contracts provide only limited protection against price increases.  Generally, when paper prices increase, we attempt to recover the higher costs by raising the prices of our products to our customers.  In the price-competitive marketplaces in which we operate, however, we may not always be able to pass through any or all of the higher costs.  As such, any significant increase in the price of paper or shortage in its availability, whether due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the strength of the U.S. dollar, changes in mill ownership or other factors, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

We face intense competition to gain market share, which may lead some competitors to sell substantial amounts of goods at prices against which we cannot profitably compete.

Our marketing strategy is to differentiate ourselves by providing quality service and quality products to our customers.  Even if this strategy is successful, the results may be offset by reductions in demand or price declines due to competitors’ pricing strategies or other micro or macro-economic factors.  We face the risk of our competition following a strategy of selling its products at or below cost in order to cover some amount of fixed costs, especially in stressed economic times.

Environmental regulations may impact our future operating results.

We are subject to extensive and changing federal, state and foreign laws and regulations establishing health and environmental quality standards, concerning, among other things, wastewater discharges, air emissions and solid waste disposal, and may be subject to liability or penalties for violations of those standards. We are also subject to laws and regulations governing remediation of contamination at facilities currently or formerly owned or operated by us or to which we have sent hazardous substances or wastes for treatment, recycling or disposal. We may be subject to future liabilities or obligations as a result of new or more stringent interpretations of existing laws and regulations. In addition, we may have liabilities or obligations in the future if we discover any environmental contamination or liability at any of our facilities, or at facilities we may acquire.

We are subject to taxation related risks.

Tax laws are dynamic and subject to change as new laws are passed and new interpretations of the law are applied.  On December 22, 2017, the U.S. government enacted the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the "Tax Act"). The Tax Act includes significant changes to the U.S. corporate income tax system including, among other things, a federal corporate rate reduction from 35% to 21%; limitations on the deductibility of interest expense and executive compensation and the transition of U.S. international taxation from a worldwide tax system to a modified territorial tax system.  In the future, we may be subject to increased taxes under the Tax Act, including due to the aforementioned limitations on deductions.  Also, we may be required to make material adjustments to provisional items recorded.  There can be no assurance that U.S. tax laws, including the corporate income tax rate, which the Tax Act lowered to 21%, would not undergo additional changes in the future.  The final impact of the Tax Act on

10


the Company may differ from the estimates previously reported, possibly materially, due to such factors as changes in interpretations and assumptions made, additional guidance that may be issued, and actions taken by the Company as a result of the Tax Act, among other factors.  All of these factors and uncertainties may adversely affect our results of operations, financial position and cash flows.

We are exposed to the risk of non-payment by our customers on a significant amount of our sales.

Our extension of credit involves considerable judgment and is based on an evaluation of each customer’s financial condition and payment history.  We monitor our credit risk exposure by periodically obtaining credit reports and updated financials on our customers.  We generally see a heightened amount of bankruptcies by our customers during economic downturns.  In particular, the COVID-19 pandemic, and its impact on our customers, could have a negative impact on our collection efforts.  While we maintain an allowance for doubtful receivables for potential credit losses based upon our historical trends and other available information, in times of economic turmoil, there is heightened risk that our historical indicators may prove to be inaccurate.  The inability to collect on sales to significant customers or a group of customers could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

Our business incurs significant freight and transportation costs.

We incur transportation expenses to ship our products to our customers.  Significant increases in the costs of freight and transportation could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, as there can be no assurance that we could pass on these increased costs to our customers.  Government regulations can and has impacted the availability of drivers, which will be a significant challenge to the industry.  Costs to employ drivers have increased and transportation shortages have become more prevalent.

We depend upon the talents and contributions of a limited number of individuals, many of whom would be difficult to replace.

The loss or interruption of the services of our Chief Executive Officer, Executive Vice President or Chief Financial Officer could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. Although we maintain employment agreements with these individuals, it cannot be assured that the services of such individuals will continue.

If our internal controls are found to be ineffective, our financial results or our stock price could be adversely affected.

We believe that we currently have adequate internal control procedures in place.  However, increased risk of internal control breakdowns generally exists in a business environment that is decentralized.  In addition, if our internal control over financial reporting is found to be ineffective, investors may lose confidence in the reliability of our financial statements, which may adversely affect our stock price.

Our services depend on the reliability of computer systems we and our vendors maintain.  If these systems fail, our operations may be adversely affected.

We depend on information technology and data processing systems to operate our business, and a significant malfunction or disruption in the operation of our systems may disrupt our business and adversely affect our ability to operate and compete in the markets we serve.  These systems include systems that we own and operate, as well as systems of our vendors.  Such systems are susceptible to malfunctions and interruptions.  We also periodically upgrade and install new systems, which if installed or programmed incorrectly, may cause significant disruptions.  The disruptions could interrupt our operations and adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

11


We may suffer a data breach of sensitive information, which may result in significant costs to investigate and remediate the breach, litigation expenses and government enforcement actions and penalties, all of which could have an adverse effect on our operations and reputation.

It is critically important for us to maintain the confidentiality, integrity and availability of our systems, software and solutions.  Many of our clients provide us with information they consider confidential or sensitive, and many of our client’s industries have established standards for safeguarding the confidentiality, integrity and availability of information relating to their businesses and customers.  Confidential and sensitive information stored in our systems or available through web portals are susceptible to cybercrime or intentional disruption, which generally have increased across all industries in terms of sophistication and frequency.  Disclosure of confidential information maintained on our systems or available through web portals due to human error, breach of our systems through cybercrime, a leak of confidential information due to employee misconduct or similar events may damage our reputation, subject us to regulatory enforcement action and cause significant reputational harm for our clients.  Any of these outcomes may adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

Increases in the cost of employee benefits could impact our financial results and cash flow.

Our expenses relating to employee health benefits are significant.  Unfavorable changes in the cost of such benefits could impact our financial results and cash flow.  Healthcare costs have risen significantly in recent years, and recent legislative and private sector initiatives regarding healthcare reform could result in significant changes to the U.S. healthcare system.  Additionally, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic may result in temporary or permanent healthcare reform measures, would could result in significant cost increases and other negative impacts to our business. While the Company has various cost controls measures in place and employs an outside oversight review on larger claims, employee health benefits have been and are expected to continue to be a significant cost to the Company.  At the beginning of the 2017 calendar year, the Company made significant changes to its medical reimbursement program to address unexpected cost increases.  Even with these remedial measures, which have been successful thus far, medical costs will continue to be a significant expense to the Company and may increase due to factors outside the Company’s control.

ITEM 1B.  UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

There are no unresolved SEC staff comments.

ITEM 2.  PROPERTIES

Our corporate headquarters are located in Midlothian, Texas, and we operate manufacturing facilities throughout the United States. See the table below for additional information regarding our locations.

All of our properties are used for the production, warehousing and shipping of business products, including the following: business forms, flexographic printing, advertising specialties and Post-it® Notes (Wolfe City, Texas); presentation products (Macomb, Michigan; De Pere, Wisconsin and Columbus, Kansas); printed and electronic promotional media (Denver, Colorado); envelopes (Portland, Oregon; Columbus, Kansas; Tullahoma, Tennessee and Claysburg, Pennsylvania); financial forms (Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota; Nevada, Iowa and Bridgewater, Virginia); and pressure seal products (Visalia, California; Chino, California and Clarksville, Tennessee).

Our plants are operated at production levels required to meet our forecasted customer demands.  Production levels fluctuate with market demands and depend upon the product mix at any given point in time. Equipment is added as existing machinery becomes obsolete or not repairable, and as new equipment becomes necessary to meet market demands; however, at any given time, these additions and replacements are not considered to be material additions to property, plant and equipment, although such additions or replacements may increase a plant’s efficiency or capacity.

All of our facilities are believed to be in good condition. We do not anticipate that substantial expansion, refurbishing, or re-equipping of our facilities will be required in the near future.

All of our rented property is held under leases with original terms of one or more years, expiring at various times through February 2027.  Presently, we believe we will be able to maintain or renew leases as they expire without significant difficulty.

12


 

 

 

 

Approximate Square Footage

 

Location

 

General Use

 

Owned

 

 

Leased

 

Ennis, Texas

 

Three Manufacturing Facilities *

 

 

325,118

 

 

 

 

Chatham, Virginia

 

Two Manufacturing Facilities

 

 

127,956

 

 

 

 

Paso Robles, California

 

Manufacturing

 

 

94,120

 

 

 

 

DeWitt, Iowa

 

Two Manufacturing Facilities

 

 

95,000

 

 

 

 

Ft. Scott, Kansas

 

Manufacturing

 

 

86,660

 

 

 

 

Portland, Oregon

 

Two Manufacturing Facilities

 

 

 

 

 

261,765

 

Wolfe City, Texas

 

Two Manufacturing Facilities

 

 

119,259

 

 

 

 

Coshocton, Ohio

 

Manufacturing

 

 

24,750

 

 

 

 

Macomb, Michigan

 

Manufacturing

 

 

56,350

 

 

 

 

Denver, Colorado

 

Four Manufacturing Facilities

 

 

60,000

 

 

 

117,575

 

Brooklyn Park, Minnesota

 

Manufacturing

 

 

94,800

 

 

 

 

Coon Rapids, Minnesota

 

Warehouse

 

 

 

 

 

4,800

 

Roseville, Minnesota

 

Manufacturing

 

 

 

 

 

41,300

 

Nevada, Iowa

 

Two Manufacturing Facilities

 

 

232,000

 

 

 

 

Nevada, Iowa

 

Held for Sale

 

 

58,752

 

 

 

 

Bridgewater, Virginia

 

Manufacturing

 

 

 

 

 

27,000

 

Columbus, Kansas

 

Two Manufacturing Facilities and Warehouse

 

 

174,089

 

 

 

 

El Dorado Springs, Missouri

 

Manufacturing

 

 

70,894

 

 

 

 

Princeton, Illinois

 

Manufacturing

 

 

 

 

 

44,190

 

Arlington, Texas

 

Two Manufacturing Facilities

 

 

69,935

 

 

 

 

Tullahoma, Tennessee

 

Two Manufacturing Facilities

 

 

142,061

 

 

 

 

Caledonia, New York

 

Manufacturing

 

 

191,730

 

 

 

 

Sun City, California

 

Two Manufacturing Facilities

 

 

52,617

 

 

 

 

Livermore, California

 

Sales Office

 

 

 

 

 

650

 

Chino, California

 

Manufacturing

 

 

 

 

 

63,016

 

Neenah, Wisconsin

 

Two Manufacturing Facilities & One Warehouse

 

 

72,354

 

 

 

97,161

 

Claysburg, Pennsylvania

 

Manufacturing

 

 

 

 

 

69,000

 

Vandalia, Ohio

 

Held for Sale

 

 

47,820

 

 

 

 

Fairport, New York

 

Two Manufacturing Facilities

 

 

 

 

 

40,800

 

Indianapolis,  Indiana

 

Two Manufacturing Facilities

 

 

 

 

 

38,000

 

Smyrna, Georgia

 

Manufacturing

 

 

 

 

 

65,000

 

Clarksville, Tennessee

 

Manufacturing

 

 

51,900

 

 

 

 

Fairhope, Alabama

 

Manufacturing

 

 

65,000

 

 

 

 

Toledo, Ohio

 

Three Manufacturing Facilities

 

 

120,947

 

 

 

 

Visalia, California

 

Manufacturing

 

 

 

 

 

56,000

 

Corsicana, Texas

 

Manufacturing

 

 

39,685

 

 

 

 

Girard, Kansas

 

Manufacturing

 

 

69,474

 

 

 

 

Powell, Tennessee

 

Manufacturing

 

 

43,968

 

 

 

 

Houston, Texas

 

Manufacturing

 

 

 

 

 

29,668

 

DePere, Wisconsin

 

Manufacturing & One Warehouse

 

 

 

 

 

142,347

 

Mosinee, Wisconsin

 

Manufacturing & One Warehouse

 

 

 

 

 

5,700

 

Kent, Washington

 

Manufacturing

 

 

 

 

 

48,789

 

South Elgin, Illinois

 

Manufacturing

 

 

 

 

 

70,500

 

Parsons, Kansas

 

Manufacturing & One Warehouse

 

 

122,740

 

 

 

40,000

 

Fenton, Missouri

 

Manufacturing**

 

 

 

 

 

26,847

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,709,979

 

 

 

1,290,108

 

Corporate Offices

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ennis, Texas

 

Administrative Offices

 

 

9,300

 

 

 

 

Midlothian, Texas

 

Executive and Administrative Offices

 

 

28,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

37,300

 

 

 

 

 

 

Totals

 

 

2,747,279

 

 

 

1,290,108

 

 

*

22,000 square feet of Ennis, Texas location leased

**

21,477 square feet of Fenton, Missouri location leased

13


ITEM 3.  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

From time to time we are involved in various litigation matters arising in the ordinary course of our business. We do not believe the disposition of any current matter will have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position or results of operations.

ITEM 4.  MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

PART II

ITEM 5.  MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Our common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) under the trading symbol “EBF”. The following table sets forth the high and low sales prices, the common stock trading volume as reported by the NYSE and dividends per share paid by the Company for the periods indicated:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Stock

 

 

Dividends

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading Volume

 

 

per share of

 

 

 

Common Stock Price Range

 

 

(number of shares

 

 

Common

 

 

 

High

 

 

Low

 

 

in thousands)

 

 

Stock

 

Fiscal Year Ended February 29, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter

 

$

21.99

 

 

$

18.30

 

 

 

1,989

 

 

$

0.225

 

Second Quarter

 

 

21.10

 

 

 

18.48

 

 

 

2,220

 

 

$

0.225

 

Third Quarter

 

 

21.49

 

 

 

18.66

 

 

 

2,135

 

 

$

0.225

 

Fourth Quarter

 

 

22.20

 

 

 

19.83

 

 

 

2,655

 

 

$

0.225

 

Fiscal Year Ended February 28, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter

 

$

20.70

 

 

$

17.65

 

 

 

1,116

 

 

$

0.200

 

Second Quarter

 

 

22.95

 

 

 

18.20

 

 

 

1,552

 

 

$

0.225

 

Third Quarter

 

 

21.90

 

 

 

18.55

 

 

 

2,153

 

 

$

0.225

 

Fourth Quarter

 

 

21.36

 

 

 

17.36

 

 

 

2,422

 

 

$

0.225

 

 

On April 27, 2020, the last reported sale price of our common stock on the NYSE was $17.82, and there were approximately 718 shareholders of record.

 

Cash dividends may be paid, or repurchases of our common stock may be made, from time to time as our Board of Directors (“Board”) deems appropriate, after considering our growth rate, operating results, financial condition, cash requirements, restrictive lending covenants, and such other factors as the Board may deem appropriate.

 

A dividend of $0.225 per share of common stock was paid in each quarter of fiscal year 2020.  A dividend of $0.20 per share was paid in the first quarter of fiscal year 2019, and a dividend of $0.225 per share was paid in each subsequent quarter of fiscal year 2019.

  

Our Board has authorized the repurchase of the Company’s outstanding common stock through a stock repurchase program, which authorized amount is currently up to $40.0 million in the aggregate.  Under the repurchase program, purchases may be made from time to time in the open market or through privately-negotiated transactions, depending on market conditions, share price, trading volume and other factors.  Repurchases may be commenced or suspended at any time or from time to time without prior notice, provided that any purchases must be made in accordance with applicable insider trading rules and securities laws and regulations.  Since the program’s inception in October 2008, we have repurchased 1,816,354 common shares under the program at an average price of $15.91 per share. During our fiscal year 2020, we repurchased 126,330 shares of common stock at an average price of $19.56 per share.  As of February 29, 2020, $11.1 million remained available to repurchase shares of common stock under the program.  No additional shares of common stock were repurchased under the program in the three months ended February 29, 2020.

14


Stock Performance Graph

The graph below matches our cumulative 5-year total shareholder return on common stock with the cumulative total returns of the S&P 500 Index and the Russell 2000 Index. The graph tracks the performance of a $100 investment in our common stock and in each of the indexes (with the reinvestment of all dividends) from February 28, 2015 to February 29, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

2015

 

 

 

2016

 

 

 

2017

 

 

 

2018

 

 

 

2019

 

 

 

2020

 

Ennis, Inc.

 

$

100.00

 

 

$

147.47

 

 

$

137.68

 

 

$

171.90

 

 

$

195.21

 

 

$

193.42

 

S&P 500

 

 

100.00

 

 

 

93.81

 

 

 

117.24

 

 

 

137.29

 

 

 

143.71

 

 

 

155.49

 

Russell 2000

 

 

100.00

 

 

 

85.03

 

 

 

115.73

 

 

 

127.89

 

 

 

135.03

 

 

 

128.38

 

 

The stock price performance included in this graph is not necessarily indicative of future stock price performance.

15


ITEM 6.  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following tables set forth key operating metrics as of and for the periods indicated and have been derived from our audited historical consolidated financial statements for the five years ended February 29, 2020.  Our consolidated financial statements and notes thereto as of February 29, 2020, February 28, 2019, and for the three years in the period ended February 29, 2020, and the reports of Grant Thornton LLP are included in Item 15 of this Report. The selected financial data should be read in conjunction with Item 7 — “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in Item 15 of this Report.

 

 

 

Fiscal Years Ended

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

(Dollars and shares in thousands, except per share and ratio amounts)

 

Operating results:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

$

438,412

 

 

$

400,782

 

 

$

370,171

 

 

$

356,888

 

 

$

385,946

 

Gross profit margin

 

 

128,924

 

 

 

123,360

 

 

 

117,202

 

 

 

104,730

 

 

 

116,829

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

 

78,173

 

 

 

73,490

 

 

 

69,222

 

 

 

62,537

 

 

 

65,356

 

Earnings from continuing operations

 

 

38,292

 

 

 

37,437

 

 

 

32,758

 

 

 

26,417

 

 

 

32,258

 

Earnings (loss) from discontinued

   operations, net of tax

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

147

 

 

 

(24,637

)

 

 

3,478

 

Net earnings (loss)

 

$

38,292

 

 

$

37,437

 

 

$

32,905

 

 

$

1,780

 

 

$

35,736

 

Earnings (loss) and dividends per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and Diluted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continuing operations

 

$

1.47

 

 

$

1.45

 

 

$

1.29

 

 

$

1.03

 

 

$

1.25

 

Discontinued operations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.01

 

 

 

(0.96

)

 

 

0.14

 

Net earnings (loss)

 

$

1.47

 

 

$

1.45

 

 

$

1.30

 

 

$

0.07

 

 

$

1.39

 

Dividends

 

$

0.90

 

 

$

0.875

 

 

$

0.875

 

(1)

$

2.20

 

(1)

$

0.70

 

Weighted average shares outstanding:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

 

26,036

 

 

 

25,830

 

 

 

25,392

 

 

 

25,735

 

 

 

25,688

 

Diluted

 

 

26,036

 

 

 

25,842

 

 

 

25,417

 

 

 

25,749

 

 

 

25,722

 

Financial Position:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working capital

 

$

111,915

 

 

$

134,542

 

 

$

133,773

 

 

$

119,282

 

 

$

135,441

 

Current assets

 

 

149,884

 

 

 

166,165

 

 

 

163,344

 

 

 

149,250

 

 

 

175,841

 

Total assets

 

 

365,699

 

 

 

363,085

 

 

 

329,439

 

 

 

324,285

 

 

 

390,044

 

Current liabilities

 

 

37,969

 

 

 

31,623

 

 

 

29,571

 

 

 

29,968

 

 

 

40,400

 

Long-term debt

 

 

 

 

 

30,000

 

 

 

30,000

 

 

 

30,000

 

 

 

40,000

 

Total liabilities

 

 

71,370

 

 

 

73,958

 

 

 

67,735

 

 

 

72,930

 

 

 

91,498

 

Shareholders' equity

 

 

294,329

 

 

 

289,127

 

 

 

261,704

 

 

 

251,355

 

 

 

298,546

 

Current ratio

 

3.95 to 1.0

 

 

5.25 to 1.0

 

 

5.52 to 1.0

 

 

4.98 to 1.0

 

 

4.35 to 1.0

 

Long-term debt to equity ratio

 

000 to 1.0

 

 

0.10 to 1.0

 

 

0.11 to 1.0

 

 

0.12 to 1.0

 

 

0.13 to 1.0

 

 

(1) Fiscal year 2018 included a special one-time cash dividend of $0.10 per share of common stock in response to the signing of the Tax Act.  Fiscal year 2017 included a special one-time cash dividend of $1.50 per share of common stock as a result of the Company’s sale of its apparel business, consisting of Alstyle Apparel, LLC and its subsidiaries, in May 2016.

16


ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

This Management’s Discussion and Analysis provides material historical and prospective disclosures intended to enable investors and other users to assess our financial condition and results of operations.  Statements that are not historical are forward-looking and involve risk and uncertainties, including those discussed under the caption “Risk Factors” in Item 1A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and elsewhere in this Report.  You should read this discussion and analysis in conjunction with our Consolidated Financial Statements and the related notes appearing elsewhere in this Report. The words “anticipate,” “preliminary,” “expect,” “believe,” “intend” and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements. We believe these forward-looking statements are based upon reasonable assumptions.  All such statements involve risks and uncertainties, and as a result, actual results could differ materially from those projected, anticipated, or implied by these statements.  

In view of such uncertainties, investors should not place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements since such statements may prove to be inaccurate and speak only as of the date when made. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

This Management’s Discussion and Analysis covers the continuing operations of the Company, which are comprised of the production and sale of business forms and other business products, and excludes the discontinued operations of the Company, consisting of Alstyle Apparel, LLC and its subsidiaries (the “Apparel Segment”), which the Company sold in May 2016.  This Management’s Discussion and Analysis includes the following sections:

 

Overview – An overall discussion regarding our Company, the business challenges and opportunities we believe are key to our success, and our plans for facing these challenges relating to our continuing operations.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates – A discussion of the accounting policies that require our most critical judgments and estimates relating to our continuing operations.  This discussion provides insight into the level of subjectivity, quality, and variability involved in these judgments and estimates.  This section also provides a summary of recently adopted and recently issued accounting pronouncements that have or may materially affect our business.

 

Results of Operations – An analysis of our consolidated results of operations and segment results for the three years presented in our consolidated financial statements. This analysis discusses material trends within our continuing business and provides important information necessary for an understanding of our continuing operating results.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources - An analysis of our cash flows and a discussion of our financial condition and contractual obligations.  This section provides information necessary to evaluate our ability to generate cash and to meet existing and known future cash requirements over both the short and long term.

References to 2020, 2019 and 2018 refer to the fiscal years ended February 29, 2020, February 28, 2019 and February 28, 2018, respectively.

Overview

The Company – Our management believes we are the largest provider of business forms, pressure-seal forms, labels, tags, envelopes, and presentation folders to independent distributors in the United States.

Our Business Challenges – Our industry is currently experiencing consolidation of traditional supply channels, product obsolescence, paper supplier capacity adjustments, and increased pricing and potential supply allocations due to demand/supply curve imbalance.  Technology advances have made electronic distribution of documents, internet hosting, digital printing and print-on-demand valid, cost-effective alternatives to traditional custom-printed documents and customer communications.  Improved equipment has become more accessible to our competitors due to the continued low interest rate environment.  We face highly competitive conditions throughout our supply chain in an already over-supplied, price-competitive print industry.  In addition to the risk factors discussed under the

17


caption “Risk Factors” in Item 1A of this Annual Report, some of the key challenges of our business include the following:

COVID-19 Pandemic –  In December 2019, a novel strain of coronavirus (COVID-19) was reported in Wuhan, China, and by early 2020, the virus had spread to other countries, including the United States.  This pandemic has significantly impacted health and economic conditions throughout the United States and the world, including the markets in which we operate.

In response to COVID-19, federal, state and local authorities have recommended social distancing and have imposed, or are considering, quarantine and isolation measures on large portions of the population, including mandatory closures of businesses deemed “non-essential” in certain jurisdictions.  As of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, our plants are deemed “essential,” largely due to our business’s support of many important sectors of the economy, including healthcare, government, food and beverage and banking, and thus most of our plants are currently operating at close-to-normal utilization levels.  With respect to our plants that are underutilized, we have made reductions in staffing levels as we deem appropriate, and we will continue to monitor the situation.

To date, the COVID-19 pandemic has not impacted, and we do not expect it to materially impact, the supply chain for products we sell.  Most of our products are sourced domestically from suppliers deemed “essential,” and therefore in operation, and we have been able to switch from impacted suppliers to non-impacted suppliers in several instances since the outbreak.  However, if one or more of our major suppliers are negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, through plant closures, deteriorating financial condition, or otherwise, it would adversely affect our operational results and financial condition.

Currently, we do not expect the COVID-19 pandemic to have a material impact on our liquidity.  As of February 29, 2020, we had over $68.0 million in cash and over $99.5 million available under our revolving credit facility, the maturity date of which was recently extended to November 11, 2021.  However, the ultimate impact of COVID-19 is difficult to predict, including due to factors discussed under the caption “Risk Factors” in Item 1A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Transformation of our portfolio of products While traditional business documents are essential in order to conduct business, many are being replaced through the use of cheaper paper grades or imported paper, or devalued with advances in digital technologies, causing steady declines in demand for a portion of our current product line.  Transforming our product offerings in order to continue to provide innovative, valuable solutions through lower labor and fixed charges to our customers on a proactive basis will require us to make investments in new and existing technology and to develop key strategic business relationships, such as print-on-demand services and product offerings that assist customers in their transition to digital business environments.  In addition, we will continue to look for new market opportunities and niches through acquisitions, such as the addition of our envelope offerings, tag offerings, folder offerings, healthcare wristbands, specialty packaging, direct mail, pressure seal products, secure document solutions, innovative in-mold label offerings and long-run integrated products with high color web printing, which provide us with an opportunity for growth and differentiate us from our competition.

Production capacity and price competition within our industry – The weakening of the U.S. dollar during the latter portion of fiscal year 2018 and first half of fiscal year 2019 resulted in the dissipation of the pricing advantage that foreign imports had held over domestic suppliers, which in turn led to lower volumes of imported paper and an increase in domestic exports in fiscal year 2019.  These factors give domestic paper producers more pricing power since they can control the supply of paper by eliminating capacity or changing the products produced on their large paper machines.  Also during fiscal year 2019, significant production capacity left the market, whether planned, for example due to the adoption of alternative paper products, or unplanned, for example due to bankruptcy.  Consequently, even with shrinking demand, a supply/demand imbalance resulted during the latter part of fiscal year 2019, with most mills running in excess of 90% of capacity across all grades.  Given these levels, consistent with historical practice, suppliers raised prices multiple times during the latter part of fiscal year 2019 and into the early part of fiscal year 2020.  These price increases occurred across all stages of the manufacturing process, from raw materials to supplies.  Additionally, some paper grades during fiscal year 2019 were placed on allocation given the tight supply environment. Given our long-term relationship with our major paper supplier, our financial strength and our size, we were able to avoid material disruptions to our supply chain during fiscal year 2019.

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For fiscal year 2020, with the strengthening of the U.S. dollar, imports began to flow back into the domestic marketplace.  This development, along with continued slowing of domestic demand, resulted in renewed marketing of certain paper grades that previously had been placed on allocation.  Consequently, spot pricing became very competitive.  The uncoated paper market is relatively balanced currently, but overall demand remains weak, and mills have dropped back to more normal operating levels.  With more capacity shuts/conversions planned, we expect operating rates to sustain in the lower 90% range.  With declining demand expected to continue, combined with rising imports, falling exports and a more balanced market, prices are expected to remain relatively stable until at least the second half of fiscal year 2021, although the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic could reduce demand much faster than the paper companies can adjust supply, thus impacting pricing.  Coated paper demand has dropped considerably and, even with several major capacity closures, operating rates are expected to remain low during the foreseeable future, despite a recent increase. Continued closures/conversions, while expected, are not expected to be enough to completely balance the market.  Imports are expected to drop with demand, but the high dollar could push imports even higher which could lead to pressure on coated paper pricing.  Foreign imports may not appear as quickly as previous years given the lack of containers in Asia and the overall disruption in shipping worldwide.   Regardless of these factors, many of which are cyclical, we intend to continue to focus on effectively managing and controlling our product costs, through the use of forecasting, production and costing models, as well as working closely with our domestic suppliers to reduce our procurement costs, in order to minimize effects on our operational results.  In addition, we will continue to look for ways to reduce and leverage our fixed costs.

Continued consolidation of our customers – Our customers are distributors, many of which are consolidating or are being acquired by competitors.  We continue to maintain a majority of the business we have had with our customers historically, but it is possible that these consolidations and acquisitions, which we expect to continue in the future, ultimately will impact our margins and sales.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

In preparing our consolidated financial statements, we are required to make estimates and assumptions that affect the disclosures and reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. We evaluate our estimates and judgments on an ongoing basis, including those related to allowance for doubtful receivables, inventory valuations, property, plant and equipment, intangible assets, pension plan obligations, accrued liabilities and income taxes. We base our estimates and judgments on historical experience and on various other factors that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results may differ materially from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. We believe the following accounting policies are the most critical due to their effect on our more significant estimates and judgments used in preparation of our consolidated financial statements.

We maintain the Pension Plan for employees. Included in our financial results are Pension Plan costs that are measured using actuarial valuations. The actuarial assumptions used may differ from actual results.  As our Pension Plan assets are invested in marketable securities, fluctuations in market values could potentially impact our funding status and associated liability recorded.

Amounts allocated to intangibles and goodwill are determined based on valuation analysis for our acquisitions. Amortizable intangibles are amortized over their expected useful lives. We evaluate these amounts periodically (at least once a year) to determine whether a triggering event has occurred during the year that would indicate potential impairment.

The Company historically has performed its annual impairment test as of November 30, the last day of the third quarter and during 2020 the Company changed its date to the first day of the fourth quarter, December 1.  Accordingly, the annual impairment test of goodwill was performed as of both November 30 and updated as of December 1 of fiscal year 2020 with no impact on the financial statements.  This change does not accelerate, delay, avoid or cause an impairment charge, nor does this change result in adjustments to the Company’s previously issued financial statements.  No impairment was recorded during fiscal year 2020.  The Company’s impairment tests indicated significant cushion between its carrying value and fair market value.

For fiscal year 2019, the Company used qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not (likelihood of more than 50%) that the fair value of a reporting unit exceeds its carrying amount, including goodwill. Some of the qualitative factors considered in applying this test include consideration of macroeconomic conditions,

19


industry and market conditions, cost factors affecting the business, overall financial performance of the business, and performance of the share price of the Company.

For fiscal year 2020, because qualitative factors were deemed insufficient to conclude that it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit exceeds its carrying value, and because enough time had elapsed that management believed it was prudent to perform a quantitative assessment, a one-step approach was applied to make an evaluation. This evaluation utilizes multiple valuation methodologies, including a market approach (market price multiples of comparable companies) and an income approach (discounted cash flow analysis). The computations require management to make significant estimates and assumptions, including, among other things, selection of comparable publicly traded companies, the discount rate applied to future earnings reflecting a weighted average cost of capital, and earnings growth assumptions. A discounted cash flow analysis requires management to make various assumptions about future sales, operating margins, capital expenditures, working capital, and growth rates. If the evaluation results in the fair value of the goodwill for the reporting unit being lower than the carrying value, an impairment charge is recorded.  A goodwill impairment charge was not required for fiscal year 2020 or fiscal year 2019.  

Subsequent to the evaluation described above, the COVID-19 outbreak occurred, causing major economic disruption and significant volatility in the stock markets.  As a result, the December 1, 2019 assessment performed with respect to fiscal year 2020 was updated by management through February 29, 2020.  Based on this updated qualitative assessment, no impairment to the Company’s recorded goodwill was deemed required.  

We recognize revenues from product sales upon shipment to the customer if the terms of the sale are freight on board (“FOB”) shipping point (and therefore title and all risks of ownership, including risk of loss, passes to the customer upon shipping) or, to a lesser extent, upon delivery to the customer if the terms of the sale are FOB destination (and therefore title and all risks of ownership, including risk of loss, passes to the customer upon delivery).  Net sales consist of gross sales invoiced to customers, less certain related charges, including discounts, returns and other allowances. Returns, discounts and other allowances have historically been insignificant. In some cases and upon customer request, we print and store custom print product for customer specified future delivery, generally within twelve months. In this case, risk of loss from obsolescence passes to the customer, the customer is invoiced under normal credit terms and revenue is recognized when manufacturing is complete. Approximately $11.0 million, $10.3 million, and $9.7 million of revenue were recognized under these agreements during fiscal years ended 2020, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

We maintain an allowance for doubtful receivables to reflect estimated losses resulting from the inability of customers to make required payments. On an on-going basis, we evaluate the collectability of accounts receivable based upon historical collection trends, current economic factors, and the assessment of the collectability of specific accounts. We evaluate the collectability of specific accounts using a combination of factors, including the age of the outstanding balances, evaluation of customers’ current and past financial condition and credit scores, recent payment history, current economic environment, discussions with our sales managers, and discussions with the customers directly.

Our inventories are valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value. We regularly review inventory values on hand, using specific aging categories, and write down inventory deemed obsolete and/or slow-moving based on historical usage and estimated future usage to its estimated net realizable value. As actual future demand or market conditions may vary from those projected by management, adjustments to inventory valuations may be required.

As part of the process of preparing our consolidated financial statements, we are required to estimate our income taxes in each jurisdiction in which we operate. This process involves estimating our actual current tax exposure together with assessing temporary differences resulting from different treatment of items for tax and financial reporting purposes. These differences result in deferred tax assets and liabilities, which are included in our consolidated balance sheets. We must then assess the likelihood that our deferred tax assets will be recovered based on our history of earnings expectations for future taxable income including taxable income in prior carry-back years, as well as future taxable income.  To the extent we believe that recovery is not likely, we must establish a valuation allowance. To the extent we establish a valuation allowance, we must include an expense within the tax provision in the consolidated statements of operations.  In the event that actual results differ from these estimates, our provision for income taxes could be materially impacted.

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The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic presents various global risks.  The full impact of the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve as of the date of this report.  Management is actively monitoring the situation as pertains to the Company’s financial condition, liquidity, operations, suppliers, industry and workforce.  Given the ongoing evolution of the pandemic and the global responses to control its spread, the Company is not able to estimate the ultimate effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on its results of operation, financial condition, or liquidity for fiscal year 2021.  Currently, the Company is considering deferring payments of payroll taxes to the extent allowable under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act.  The Company is also reviewing other provisions of the CARES Act and does not expect a significant tax impact.

On December 22, 2017, the U.S. government enacted the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the "Tax Act"). The Tax Act includes significant changes to the U.S. corporate income tax system including, among other things, a federal corporate rate reduction from 35% to 21%; limitations on the deductibility of interest expense and executive compensation and the transition of U.S. international taxation from a worldwide tax system to a modified territorial tax system.  A majority of the provisions in the Tax Act are effective January 1, 2018.  As a result of the reduction of the corporate tax rate to 21%, we revalued our deferred tax assets and liabilities as of the date of enactment, with resulting tax effects accounted for in the reporting period of enactment. This change in the statutory tax rate resulted in reduction in income tax expense being recognized of $3.6 million in the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2018 due to the adjustment of deferred tax liabilities based on the expected prevailing tax rate at the expected time of their realization.

In addition to the assessments described above, we also have to make assessments as to the adequacy of our accrued liabilities, more specifically our liabilities recorded in connection with our workers compensation and health insurance, as these plans are self-funded. To help us in this evaluation process, we routinely get outside third-party assessments of our potential liabilities under each plan.

Results of Operations

The following discussion provides information which we believe is relevant to understanding our results of operations and financial condition.  The discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the accompanying consolidated financial statements and notes thereto, which are incorporated herein by reference.  Unless otherwise indicated, this financial overview is for the continuing operations of the Company, which are comprised of the production and sales of business forms and other business products, and exclude the discontinued operations of our Apparel Segment, which we sold in May 2016.  The operating results of the Company for fiscal year 2020 and the comparative fiscal years 2019 and 2018 are included in the tables below.

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Consolidated Summary

 

Consolidated Statements of

 

Fiscal years ended

 

Operations - Data (in thousands,

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

except per share amounts)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

$

438,412

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

$

400,782

 

 

 

100.0

%

 

$

370,171

 

 

 

100.0

%

Cost of goods sold

 

 

309,488

 

 

 

70.6

 

 

 

277,422

 

 

 

69.2

 

 

 

252,969

 

 

 

68.3

 

Gross profit margin

 

 

128,924

 

 

 

29.4

 

 

 

123,360

 

 

 

30.8

 

 

 

117,202

 

 

 

31.7

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

 

78,173

 

 

 

17.8

 

 

 

73,490

 

 

 

18.3

 

 

 

69,222

 

 

 

18.8

 

(Gain) loss from disposal of assets

 

 

(87

)

 

 

 

 

 

(217

)

 

 

(0.1

)

 

 

162

 

 

 

 

Income from operations

 

 

50,838

 

 

 

11.6

 

 

 

50,087

 

 

 

12.4

 

 

 

47,818

 

 

 

12.9

 

Other income (expense), net

 

 

413

 

 

 

0.1

 

 

 

(153

)

 

 

 

 

 

(909

)

 

 

(0.2

)

Earnings from continuing operations before income taxes

 

 

51,251

 

 

 

11.7

 

 

 

49,934

 

 

 

12.4

 

 

 

46,909

 

 

 

12.7

 

Provision for income taxes

 

 

12,959

 

 

 

3.0

 

 

 

12,497

 

 

 

3.1

 

 

 

14,151

 

 

 

3.8

 

Earnings from continuing operations

 

 

38,292

 

 

 

8.7

 

 

 

37,437

 

 

 

9.3

 

 

 

32,758

 

 

 

8.9

 

Earnings from discontinued operations, net of tax

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

147

 

 

 

-

 

Net earnings

 

$

38,292

 

 

 

8.7

%

 

$

37,437

 

 

 

9.3

%

 

$

32,905

 

 

 

8.9

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earnings per share - diluted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continuing operations

 

$

1.47

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

1.45

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

1.29

 

 

 

 

 

Discontinued operations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.01

 

 

 

 

 

Net earnings

 

$

1.47

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

1.45

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

1.30

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Sales.  Our net sales increased from $400.8 million for fiscal year 2019 to $438.4 million for fiscal year 2020, an increase of 9.4%.  The recent increase in supply of cheaper foreign paper imports, due to the strengthening of the U.S. dollar, unseasonal weather conditions in parts of the country and current domestic pricing levels, continues to provide the elements for a challenging marketplace.  Each of these factors negatively impacted sales.  In particular, our competition was able to be more price-competitive due to the availability of cheaper materials, and some of our sales were negatively impacted by weather conditions.  The acquisitions of Integrated, which was completed in March 2019, and Flesh, which was completed in July 2019, were integral parts of our strategy to offset normal industry revenue declines due to print attrition and other changes.  Our acquisitions during fiscal years 2020 and 2019 positively impacted our net sales by approximately $55.3 million during fiscal year 2020.

 

Our net sales increased from $370.2 million for fiscal year 2018 to $400.8 million for fiscal year 2019, an increase of 8.3%.  The market continued to be fairly soft with competitive pricing pressures in fiscal year 2019.  However, during fiscal year 2019, the value of the U.S. dollar made domestic paper production more attractive internationally.  The attractiveness of domestic paper production, coupled with the shrinking domestic mill capacity, resulted in an environment conducive for paper and other material price increases domestically.  Those increases, if able to be timely passed along to customers, would help offset some of the normal industry sales attrition.  The acquisitions of Wright, which was completed in July 2018, and ABTL, which was completed in April 2018, contributed over $44.7 million in net sales during fiscal year 2019.

Cost of Goods Sold.  Our manufacturing costs increased from $277.4 million for fiscal year 2019 to $309.5 million for fiscal year 2020, or 11.6%.  Our gross profit margin (“margin”) decreased from 30.8% for fiscal year 2019 to 29.4% for fiscal year 2020.  Our margin during the period continues to be impacted for the most part by the dilutive impact of the acquisitions completed in the last year and to a lesser extent to the numerous raw material price increases taken last fiscal year, some of which could not be completely passed through to the customer.  During the previous fiscal year, tight supply conditions allowed for multiple price increases on raw materials which could be passed through to the customer due to apportionment of paper, as well as other items in the manufacturing process.  Historically price increases have been less frequent, which allowed manufacturers the ability to pass the required pricing adjustments through to the marketplace in a timely manner.  However, the size and number of increases impacted manufacturers’ abilities to timely pass these price adjustments to the end-users.  We believe

22


these price increases will continue to have a negative impact on margins until the excess costs are able to be passed through to the marketplace, or until material costs decline in the marketplace.  Recently, due to current pricing levels and the strengthening U.S. dollar, imports have increased and created an excess supply condition domestically.  This historically has led to some normalization/stability in the marketplace which is starting to be seen as material prices have become softer.  Our acquisitions completed during the past year have had a dilutive impact on our margins as we transition them into our enterprise resource planning system. Without the impact of the acquisitions completed over the past 18 months, the margins from our other plants continued to be above 30.8% during the period, comparable to historical levels.  Once we have the opportunity to fully analyze the business cost structure and implement our costs systems, we believe margins at the recently acquired plants will improve to levels closer to the rest of our business.

Our manufacturing costs increased from $253.0 million for fiscal year 2018 to $277.4 million for fiscal year 2019, or 9.6%.  Our margin decreased from 31.7% for fiscal year 2018 to 30.8% for fiscal year 2019.  Our margin during the period was impacted primarily by the increased cost of raw materials, and to a lesser extent by the acquisition of ABTL and Wright, which had a dilutive impact on the Company’s reported margin.  The industry continued to be challenged by raw material and freight cost increases.  The tight supply conditions during fiscal year 2019 allowed for multiple price increases on raw materials, as well as other items in the manufacturing process.  Historical price increases were less frequent, which allowed manufacturers the ability to pass the required pricing adjustments through to the marketplace in a timely manner.  However, the size and number of increases impacted manufacturers’ ability to timely pass these price adjustments to the end-users.  These price increases continued to have a negative impact on margins.  The acquisition of Wright and ABTL had a dilutive impact on our margins.  We believe once we have the opportunity to fully analyze relevant cost structures and implement our costs systems, the margins of Wright and ABTL will improve to levels closer to the rest of our business.

Selling, general, and administrative expenses. Our selling, general, and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses increased approximately 6.4%, from $73.5 million for fiscal year 2019 to $78.2 million for fiscal year 2020.  As a percentage of sales, SG&A expenses declined from 18.3% in fiscal year 2019 to 17.8% for fiscal year 2020.  Our acquisitions negatively impacted our SG&A expenses by approximately $6.6 million during fiscal year 2020. We continue to seek ways to more fully leverage our SG&A expenses, and to reduce SG&A expenses following acquisitions through the implementation of our systems and processes, which allows us to integrate many of our acquired companies’ back-office processes.

Our SG&A expenses increased approximately 6.2%, from $69.2 million for fiscal year 2018 to $73.5 million for fiscal year 2019.  As a percentage of sales, SG&A expenses declined from 18.8% in fiscal year 2018 to 18.3% for fiscal year 2019.  The acquisitions of Wright and ABTL added approximately $5.7 million and $1.7 million, respectively, in SG&A expenses during fiscal year 2019.

(Gain) loss from disposal of assets. The $0.1 million gain from disposal of assets for fiscal year 2020 is primarily attributed to the sale of a manufacturing facility.  The $0.2 million gain from disposal of assets for fiscal year 2019 is primarily attributed to the sale of an unused manufacturing facility and manufacturing equipment.  The $0.2 million loss from disposal of assets for fiscal year 2018 related primarily to the sale of manufacturing equipment as well as the closing and consolidation of manufacturing facilities.

Income from operations. Primarily due to factors described above, our income from continuing operations for fiscal year 2020 was $50.8 million, or 11.6% of net sales, compared to $50.1 million, or 12.5% of net sales, for fiscal year 2019.  Our acquisitions contributed approximately $6.2 to our operational income during fiscal year 2020.

Our income from continuing operations for fiscal year 2019 was $50.1 million, or 12.4% of net sales, compared to $47.8 million, or 12.9% of net sales, for fiscal year 2018.  Our acquisitions contributed approximately $4.5 million to our operational income during fiscal year 2020, or 8.8%.

23


Other income (expense).  Other income was $0.4 million for fiscal year 2020 compared to expense of $0.2 million for fiscal year 2019.  The decrease in expense related primarily to approximately $0.5 million less in interest expense due to the payoff of the Credit Facility at the end of the second quarter of fiscal year 2020.  Other expense was $0.2 million for fiscal year 2019 compared to $0.9 million for fiscal year 2018.  This decrease related primarily to the $0.8 million increase of interest income in fiscal year 2019.  

Provision for income taxes. Our effective tax rates for fiscal years 2020, 2019 and 2018 were 25.3%, 25.0%, and 30.2%, respectively.  The slightly higher effective tax rate for fiscal year 2020 was primarily due to the establishment of a reserve against our foreign tax credits.  The lower effective tax rate for fiscal year 2019 compared to fiscal year 2018 was primarily due to the enactment of the Tax Act which was in effect for all of fiscal year 2019, but only in effect for a small portion of fiscal year 2018.  

Net earnings (loss). Our net earnings from continuing operations were $38.3 million, or $1.47 per diluted share for fiscal year 2020, $32.8 million, or $1.29 per diluted share for fiscal year 2018, and $37.4 million, or $1.45 per diluted share, for fiscal year 2019.  Net earnings from discontinued operations for fiscal year 2018 was $0.01 per diluted share, which consisted of a write-off of a $2.0 million receivable ($1.4 million, net of tax) relating to the escrowed purchase price from the sale of our Apparel Segment and a $1.6 million tax benefit related to the determination of the final tax basis on assets sold in the sale of the Apparel Segment.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

 

 

Fiscal Years Ended

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

Working Capital

 

$

111,915

 

 

$

134,542

 

 

$

133,773

 

Cash

 

$

68,258

 

 

$

88,442

 

 

$

96,230

 

 

Working Capital.