Attached files

file filename
EX-32.2 - EX-32.2 - VICAL INCvicl-ex322_6.htm
EX-32.1 - EX-32.1 - VICAL INCvicl-ex321_8.htm
EX-31.2 - EX-31.2 - VICAL INCvicl-ex312_9.htm
EX-31.1 - EX-31.1 - VICAL INCvicl-ex311_10.htm
EX-23.1 - EX-23.1 - VICAL INCvicl-ex231_7.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017.

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from             to             .

Commission file number: 000-21088

 

VICAL INCORPORATED

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Delaware

 

93-0948554

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

10390 Pacific Center Court, San Diego, California

 

92121-4340

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (858) 646-1100

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $0.01 par value

 

The Nasdaq Capital Market

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes      No

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act.      Yes      No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.      Yes      No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).      Yes      No

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ).  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).      Yes      No

The aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, based upon the last sale price of the registrant’s common stock reported on the Nasdaq Capital Market on June 30, 2017, was approximately $24,080,765.

The number of shares of common stock outstanding as of February 28, 2018, was 21,812,807.

 

Documents Incorporated by Reference:

 

Document

 

Part of Form 10-K

Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of

Stockholders to be held May 23, 2018

 

Part III

 

 

 

 

 


VICAL INCORPORATED

FORM 10-K

INDEX

 

PART I.

 

 

ITEM 1.

Business

 

3

ITEM 1A.

Risk Factors

 

15

ITEM 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

27

ITEM 2.

Properties

 

27

ITEM 3.

Legal Proceedings

 

27

ITEM 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

27

PART II.

 

 

ITEM 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity
Securities

 

28

ITEM 6.

Selected Financial Data

 

29

ITEM 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

30

ITEM 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

37

ITEM 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

39

ITEM 9.

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

63

ITEM 9A.

Controls and Procedures

 

63

ITEM 9B.

Other Information

 

64

PART III.

 

 

ITEM 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

64

ITEM 11.

Executive Compensation

 

64

ITEM 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

64

ITEM 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

64

ITEM 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

 

64

PART IV.

 

 

ITEM 15.

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

65

Signatures

 

68

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

In addition to historical information, this Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, including statements regarding our business, our financial position, the research and development of biopharmaceutical products, the timing of on-going clinical trials and other statements describing our goals, expectations, intentions or beliefs. Such statements reflect our current views and assumptions and are subject to risks and uncertainties, particularly those inherent in the process of developing and commercializing biopharmaceutical products. Actual results could differ materially from those discussed in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, those identified in Item 1A entitled “Risk Factors” beginning on page 15 of this report, as well as those discussed in our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, including our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. As a result, you are cautioned not to unduly rely on these forward-looking statements. We disclaim any duty to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances that occur after the date on which such statement is made.

 

 

2


PART I

 

 

ITEM 1.

BUSINESS

Overview

We research and develop biopharmaceutical products, including those based on our patented DNA delivery technologies, for the prevention and treatment of serious or life-threatening diseases.

We currently have three active development programs in the area of infectious disease comprised of:

 

An ongoing Phase 2 trial of our HSV-2 therapeutic vaccine, VCL-HB01, to treat patients with symptomatic genital herpes infection. The vaccine candidate is currently being evaluated in a Phase 2 study in adult subjects, 18 to 50 years of age who are randomized 2:1 to receive either vaccine or placebo. Recruitment of 261 subjects at 15 U.S. clinical sites was completed in April 2017 and dosing was completed in July 2017. Following the 4th vaccination, each subject entered a 12-month surveillance period during which each new lesion recurrence is assessed in the clinic by the investigator. After the last subject has completed a minimum of 9 months of surveillance, the primary endpoint of annualized recurrence rate will be calculated based on recurrences that are both clinically - and virologically - confirmed. This endpoint provides important information on the number of recurrences over time in this chronic disease setting and is clinically meaningful for both patients and treating physicians. We expect to deliver top-line results during the second quarter of 2018.

 

An ongoing Phase 2 trial of our novel antifungal VL-2397, for the treatment of patients with invasive aspergillosis. The multicenter, open label randomized clinical study, will compare the efficacy and safety of VL-2397 to standard treatment for invasive aspergillosis in acute leukemia patients and recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). The global Phase 2 trial will enroll approximately 200 patients and will be randomized on a 2:1 basis with approximately 134 patients treated with VL-2397 and 66 patients treated with a standard treatment course of their physician's choice of voriconazole, isavuconazole or liposomal amphotericin B. The patients in the VL-2397 arm will receive daily treatment with VL-2397 for 4 weeks, followed by a 2-week course of physician’s choice of the comparator. The primary endpoint of all-cause mortality will be measured at 4 weeks and again at 6 weeks for the key secondary endpoint. The trial will be conducted at selected sites in North America, Europe and Asia. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has advised that VL 2397 would be eligible for a Limited Use Indication (LUI) approval assuming a successful outcome of a single Phase 2 trial carried out in accordance with a protocol and statistical analysis plan consistent with the Agency's advice. The final determination whether the drug is approvable will be made by FDA after review of all relevant data. The LUI is a provision of the Limited Population Pathway established under the 21st Century Cures Act of 2016. The FDA has granted Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP), Orphan Drug and Fast Track designations for VL-2397 in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis.

 

An ongoing early stage development program of a novel treatment for chronic hepatitis B virus (CHB) infection based on our DNA and lipid-delivery technologies. The initial stage of this program will be to demonstrate preclinical proof of concept for inhibiting hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a mouse model in the second half of 2018. The ultimate aim of this program would be to demonstrate eradication of persistent HBV infection in CHB patients. This preclinical development effort is being conducted in collaboration with our strategic partner, AnGes, Inc. of Osaka, Japan.

Corporate Information

We were incorporated in Delaware in 1987. Our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to these reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, are available free of charge on our website at www.vical.com as soon as reasonably practicable after such reports and amendments are electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC. We also make available copies of our news releases and other financial information about us on our website.

Our Core Technology

The key discovery leading to our core DNA delivery technology was that muscle tissues can take up polynucleotide genetic material, such as DNA or RNA, directly, without the use of viral components or other delivery vehicles or technologies, and subsequently express the proteins encoded by the genetic material for periods ranging from weeks to more than a year. Our approach typically involves designing and constructing closed loops of DNA called plasmids. These

3


plasmids contain a DNA segment encoding the protein of interest, as well as short segments of DNA that control protein expression. Plasmids can be manufactured using uniform methods of fermentation and processing. This could result in faster development and production times than technologies that require development of product-specific manufacturing processes.

Since the initial discovery of our DNA delivery technology, our researchers have improved the design of our plasmids to increase efficiency of gene expression and immunogenicity. We own broad patent rights in the United States and in key foreign markets to certain non-viral polynucleotide delivery technologies. Our patents and patent applications cover, for example, specific DNA constructs and formulations of gene-based product candidates, methods for producing pharmaceutical-grade DNA, and several families of lipid molecules and their uses in DNA delivery. Benefits of our DNA delivery technologies may include the following, which may enable us to offer novel treatment alternatives for diseases that are currently poorly addressed:

 

Broad Applicability. Our DNA delivery technologies may be useful in vaccines for infectious diseases, in which the expressed protein induces an immune response, and for therapeutic protein delivery, in which the expressed protein is a therapeutic agent;

 

Convenience. Our DNA-based biopharmaceutical product candidates are intended to be administered on an outpatient basis;

 

Safety. Our product candidates contain no infectious components that may cause unwanted immune responses, infections, or malignant and permanent changes in the targeted cells’ genetic makeup;

 

Repeat Administration. Our product candidates contain no infectious components that may preclude multiple dosing with a single product or use in multiple products;

 

Ease of Manufacturing. Our DNA product candidates are manufactured using uniform fermentation and purification procedures; and

 

Cost-Effectiveness. Our DNA delivery technologies may be more cost-effective than other approaches. They may also cause fewer potential side effects, which may reduce per patient treatment costs.

Infectious Diseases

We are focusing our development efforts on infectious disease indications. DNA vaccines use portions of the genetic code of a pathogen to cause the host to produce proteins of the pathogen that may induce an immune response. Compared with conventional vaccines that use live, weakened, or killed pathogens to produce an immune response, this method potentially offers superior safety and ease of manufacturing, as well as convenient storage and handling characteristics. DNA vaccines have the potential to induce potent T-cell responses against target pathogens as well as trigger production of antibodies. Over the past decade, many scientific publications have documented the effectiveness of DNA vaccines in contributing to immune responses in dozens of species, including fish, nonhuman primates and humans. We believe important steps in the validation of DNA vaccines occurred in 2005 when our licensee Aqua Health received Canadian approval to market its proprietary product, Apex®-IHN, a DNA vaccine to protect farm-raised salmon against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, or IHNV, and again in late 2009, when our licensee Merial received approval from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, or USDA, to sell a therapeutic DNA vaccine, ONCEPT®, designed to aid in extending the survival time of dogs with oral melanoma.

Vaccines are generally recognized as the most cost-effective approach for infectious disease healthcare. However, the technical limitations of conventional vaccine approaches have constrained the development of effective vaccines for many diseases. Development of vaccines based on conventional methods requires significant infrastructure in research and manufacturing. In addition, the safety risks associated with certain conventional vaccine approaches may offset their potential benefits. We believe our potential vaccine products may be simpler to manufacture than vaccines made using live viruses or protein subunit approaches, including those involving mammalian, avian or insect cell, or egg-based, culture procedures. In addition, our DNA delivery technologies may accelerate certain aspects of vaccine product development such as nonclinical evaluation and manufacturing.

In the broader vaccine marketplace, it is important to note a changing dynamic. Traditionally, vaccines have been predominantly focused on the pediatric market, intended to protect children from diseases that could cause them serious harm. Today, there is a growing interest in vaccines against diseases that may affect adolescents and adults, which include both sexually transmitted diseases and infections that strike opportunistically, such as during pregnancy or in immunocompromised individuals. We believe our technologies, because of their potential safety and development timeline advantages, could be ideally suited for this new generation of vaccines.

4


Business Strategy

There are two basic elements to our business strategy:

Develop Products Independently

We are currently focusing our resources on the development of our HSV-2 therapeutic vaccine and our antifungal drug candidate. The selection of targets for our development programs is driven by three key criteria: the complexity of the product development program, competition, and commercial opportunities. We intend to retain significant participation in the commercialization of any independently developed proprietary DNA vaccines and therapeutics that receive regulatory approval, although we may choose to enlist the support of partners to accelerate product development and commercialization.

We are also focusing our resources on VL-2397, a therapeutic antifungal product candidate we in-licensed from Astellas Pharma Inc. (“Astellas”). We believe our technologies may lead to the development of novel preventive or therapeutic products for infectious disease targets. DNA vaccines may help combat diseases for which conventional vaccine methods have been unsuccessful.

Expand the Applications of Our Technologies through Strategic Collaborations

We have collaborated with major pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies and government agencies, providing us access to complementary technologies or greater resources. These collaborations are intended to provide us with mutually beneficial opportunities to expand or advance our product pipeline and serve significant unmet medical needs. We have licensed our intellectual property to other companies to leverage our technologies for applications that may not be appropriate for our independent product development.

Product Development

The table below summarizes our active development programs.

 

Product/Concept

 

Intended Use

 

Development Status1

 

VCL-HB01therapeutic vaccine for HSV-2

 

Prevent and protect against lesion recurrence

 

Phase 2

 

VL-2397 antifungal

 

Treatment of invasive fungal infections

 

Phase 2

 

Chronic hepatitis B

 

Eradication of persistent HBV infection

 

Preclinical

 

 

 

1

“Preclinical” (or “nonclinical”) indicates that a specific product candidate is undergoing in vitro testing and/or in vivo testing in animals. “Phase 1” clinical trials are typically conducted with a small number of patients or healthy subjects to evaluate safety, determine a safe dosage range, identify side effects, and, if possible, gain early evidence of effectiveness. “Phase 2” clinical trials are conducted with a larger group of patients to evaluate effectiveness of an investigational product for a defined patient population, and to determine common short-term side effects and risks associated with the product candidate. “Phase 3” clinical trials involve large scale, multi-center, comparative trials that are conducted with patients afflicted with a target disease to evaluate the overall benefit-risk relationship of the investigational product and to provide an adequate basis for product labeling.

HSV–2 Program

In June 2016, we announced the initiation of a Phase 2 trial of our HSV-2 therapeutic vaccine, VCL-HB01, to treat patients with symptomatic genital herpes infection. The vaccine candidate is currently being evaluated in adult subjects, 18 to 50 years of age who are randomized 2:1 to receive either vaccine or placebo. Recruitment of 261 subjects at 15 U.S. clinical sites was completed in April 2017 and dosing was completed in July 2017. Following the 4th vaccination, each subject entered a 12-month surveillance period during which each new lesion recurrence is assessed in the clinic by the investigator. After the last subject has completed a minimum of 9-months of surveillance, the primary endpoint of annualized recurrence rate will be calculated based on recurrences that are both clinically - and virologically - confirmed. This endpoint provides important information on the number of recurrences over time in this chronic disease setting and is clinically meaningful for both patients and treating physicians. We expect to deliver top-line results during the second quarter of 2018.

In June 2015, we announced top-line results from our Phase 1/2 trial of our VCL-HB01. A total of 165 HSV-2-seropositive patients were enrolled in the trial. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluated safety,

5


tolerability and efficacy in otherwise healthy patients aged 18 to 50 years who had experienced two to nine genital herpes recurrences within the prior year. This trial tested the effectiveness of two HSV-2 vaccines, a monovalent vaccine and VCL-HB01, a bivalent vaccine, by comparing the viral shedding rate prevaccination (baseline) to the viral shedding rate postvaccination of each subject. In addition to this primary efficacy endpoint, this trial also evaluated several secondary outcome measures, including genital lesion rate change from baseline, the HSV viral load (or copy numbers) change from baseline, as well as the immunological responses over time from baseline.

Neither the monovalent nor VCL-HB01 met the primary endpoint (reduction of viral shedding from baseline).  However, VCL-HB01-vaccinated patients achieved statistically significant reductions in the clinically meaningful secondary endpoint of genital lesion rate at 3 months after their final dose. All patients were also followed for safety for 12 months after their final vaccine dose. In addition, we collected clinical efficacy data including lesion rate at 9 months after their final dose.  VCL-HB01 continued to achieve statistically significant reductions in the genital lesion rate when compared to the pre-vaccination period at the nine-month time point after the patients’ final dose. Neither the placebo nor the monovalent vaccine groups achieved statistical significance on this endpoint at nine months after vaccination.

About HSV-2

HSV-2 is a member of the herpes virus family and is the leading cause of recurrent genital herpes worldwide. About 400 million people aged 15-49 years are living with HSV-2 worldwide, and about 20 million are newly infected every year.  About one in six adults 14 to 49 years of age in the United States are infected with HSV-2. Even higher infection rates are evident in developing countries, with further complications in people also infected with HIV. HSV-2 infections are permanent and result in periodic virus shedding. There is no approved vaccine for HSV-2. Although antiviral regimens have become a standard of care in developed countries, we believe their inconvenience and cumulative cost underscore the need for safe, new approaches to reducing HSV-2 lesions, shedding, and transmission.

Antifungal Program

In February 2018, we initiated a Phase 2 trial of our novel antifungal VL-2397, for the treatment of patients with invasive aspergillosis. The multicenter, open label randomized clinical study, will compare the efficacy and safety of VL-2397 to standard treatment for invasive aspergillosis in acute leukemia patients and recipients of allogeneic HCT. The global Phase 2 trial will enroll approximately 200 patients and will be randomized on a 2:1 basis with approximately 134 patients treated with VL-2397 and 66 patients treated with a standard treatment course of their physician's choice of voriconazole, isavuconazole, or liposomal amphotericin B. The patients in the VL-2397 arm will receive daily treatment with VL-2397 for 4 weeks, followed by a 2-week course of physician’s choice of the comparator. The primary endpoint of all-cause mortality will be measured at 4 weeks and again at 6 weeks for the key secondary endpoint. The trial will be conducted at selected sites in North America, Europe and Asia. The U.S. FDA has advised that VL 2397 would be eligible for a Limited Use Indication (LUI) approval assuming a successful outcome of a single Phase 2 trial carried out in accordance with a protocol and statistical analysis plan consistent with the Agency's advice. The final determination whether the drug is approvable will be made by FDA after review of all relevant data. The LUI is a provision of the Limited Population Pathway established under the 21st Century Cures Act of 2016. In the case of VL-2397, the LUI approval would be for patients for whom alternative regimens are not available to treat their invasive aspergillosis.  A Phase 3 trial would be required to support full approval of VL-2397 for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis in a broader population. The FDA has granted Vical Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP), Orphan Drug and Fast Track designations for VL-2397 in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis.

VL-2397 represents a potential new class of antifungal compound to address invasive aspergillus infections, which are major causes of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, including transplant recipients. In preclinical studies to date, it has demonstrated faster fungicidal activity than marketed drugs and activity against azole-resistant fungal pathogens. Current treatment options have limited efficacy, as approximately 50-60% of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with invasive aspergillosis infections die within 12 weeks. Over the past 30 years, only one new class of antifungal drugs (echinocandins) has been introduced.

About Invasive Aspergillosis

Invasive aspergillosis is a life-threatening infection that typically affects immunocompromised patients, including those with acute leukemia and recipients of allogeneic HCT or lung transplants. Infection typically starts in the lungs and rapidly disseminates to other tissues. An estimated 200,000 cases of invasive aspergillosis are diagnosed annually worldwide.

6


Other Infectious Disease Programs

Ebola

In January 2015, we and AnGes announced a collaboration to develop and commercialize an equine polyclonal antibody therapy for patients afflicted with Ebola virus disease. We developed and provided to AnGes a DNA vaccine encoding the glycoprotein antigen of the 2014 Zaire strain of Ebola virus, formulated with our proprietary Vaxfectin® adjuvant. AnGes received the right to exclusively develop and commercialize the equine polyclonal antibody therapy in Japan and will be responsible for all development costs. We received an upfront payment and are eligible to receive royalties on net sales and a percentage of payments received by AnGes under any sub-licensing agreements.  Characterization studies of the equine polyclonal antibodies are ongoing.

Adjuvant Development

DNA Vaccines with Vaxfectin®

Vaxfectin® is our proprietary, cationic lipid formulation optimized to increase the immune response to vaccines. Vaxfectin® formulations have demonstrated safety and adjuvant activity in DNA vaccine applications in multiple animal models, including nonhuman primates. Studies of Vaxfectin®-formulated DNA vaccines against CMV and measles have shown enhanced immunogenicity in rodents and nonhuman primates. Vaxfectin®-formulated DNA vaccines have also been tested in approximately 400 healthy human subjects receiving influenza, dengue, or HSV-2 vaccines, and collectively, these Phase 1 trials indicate favorable safety profiles of these vaccines. We believe Vaxfectin® is an important potentiator of both antibody and T-cell mediated immune responses to DNA vaccines.

Other Vaxfectin® Applications

In 2013, we entered into a nonexclusive license with Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, or BMS, for our patented platform DNA immunization technology and our Vaxfectin® adjuvant for use in the production of antibodies. Under the agreement, BMS is using our technology to generate antibodies with potential therapeutic uses in humans. We also agreed to provide specified quantities of our Vaxfectin® adjuvant to BMS from time to time.

Collaboration and Licensing Agreements

We have entered into various arrangements with corporate, academic, and government collaborators, licensors, licensees, and others. In addition to the agreements summarized below, we conduct ongoing discussions with potential collaborators, licensors and licensees.

In-licensing

Astellas. In March 2015, we entered into a license agreement with Astellas, granting us exclusive worldwide license to develop and commercialize our novel antifungal candidate, VL-2397.  As consideration for the rights under the license, we issued 86,121 shares of our common stock to Astellas and made an up-front payment of $250,000 in cash. The license agreement provides for potential development, regulatory and sales milestone payments totaling up to $99.0 million, as well as tiered single-digit royalty payments based on net sales of licensed products.  The royalty payments are subject to reduction on a country-by-country basis in certain circumstances where there is not exclusivity in the country. We are responsible for the worldwide development, manufacturing and commercialization of licensed products, at our cost, and we are required to use commercially reasonable efforts with respect to such development and commercialization activities.

The license agreement, unless terminated earlier, will continue until expiration of our royalty obligations with respect to licensed products. Either party may terminate the license agreement earlier if the other party materially breaches the agreement and does not cure the breach within a specified notice period, or upon the other party’s insolvency.  Astellas may terminate the license agreement earlier if we or any of our affiliates or sublicensees oppose or challenge any of the licensed patents. We may terminate the license agreement on a country-by-country basis for reasonable scientific, regulatory, commercial, financial, ethical or other reasons.

CytRx. In 2001, we entered into an exclusive agreement with CytRx Corporation, or CytRx, which grants us rights to use or sublicense CytRx’s poloxamer technology to enhance viral or non-viral delivery of polynucleotides in all nonexcluded preventive and therapeutic human and animal health applications, including CMV. In addition, the agreement permits our use of CytRx’s technology to enhance the delivery of proteins in prime-boost vaccine applications that involve

7


the use of polynucleotides. As part of the agreement, we made a $3.8 million up-front payment and agreed to make potential future milestone and royalty payments. As of December 31, 2017, we had paid CytRx $5.5 million under the agreement.

The agreement with CytRx expires upon the expiration of our royalty obligations, unless earlier terminated as set forth in the agreement. Each party may terminate the agreement early upon the bankruptcy or insolvency of, or the material breach of the agreement by, the other party, upon prior written notice to the other party. Subject to certain conditions, we may terminate the agreement early upon prior written notice to CytRx.

As of December 31, 2017, the aggregate potential milestone payments that we could be obligated to pay under our active in-license agreements total approximately $99.0 million. These amounts assume that all remaining milestones associated with the milestone payments are met. Although we believe that some of the milestones contained in the in-license agreements may be achieved, it is highly unlikely that a significant number of them will be achieved. Because the milestones are highly contingent and we have limited control over whether the regulatory milestones will be achieved, we are not in a position to reasonably estimate how much, if any, of the potential milestone payments will ultimately be paid, or when. Additionally, under these in-license agreements, many of the milestone events are related to progress in clinical trials which will take several years to achieve.

Under these in-license agreements, we may also be obligated to pay royalties based on net sales of any products which incorporate the in-licensed technology. These royalties are based on percentages of net sales in the single digit range. Our obligations to pay any royalty payments under our in-license agreements are contingent upon the successful development and commercialization of products incorporating the in-licensed technology. Before any products incorporating the in-licensed technology may be sold, such products must be approved by U.S. or foreign regulatory authorities, which will require a substantial amount of additional research and development. Even if such product candidates are advanced through clinical trials, the results of such trials may not support approval by the FDA or comparable foreign agencies. Consequently, we are not in a position to reasonably estimate when or to what extent we will be obligated to pay any royalties under our in-license agreements.

Intellectual Property

Patents and other proprietary rights are essential to our business. We file patent applications to protect our technologies, inventions, and improvements to our inventions that we consider important to the development of our business. We believe we have a comprehensive patent portfolio in the United States and in key foreign markets. We also rely upon trade secrets, know-how, continuing technological innovations and licensing opportunities to develop and maintain our competitive position.

Our patents and patent applications cover, for example, specific DNA constructs and formulations of gene-based product candidates, methods for producing pharmaceutical-grade DNA, and several families of lipid molecules and their uses in DNA delivery, as described more fully below:

 

Core DNA Delivery Technology. We either co-owned or had rights to issued U.S. patents covering our core DNA delivery technology, including patents on methods of administering DNA sequences for the purposes of expressing therapeutic proteins or for inducing immune responses and the administration of DNA sequences into blood vessels and the heart. These patents are now expired, but we maintain patents covering specific product applications as described below.

 

Lipid Technologies. We are the sole assignee of issued U.S. patents covering numerous examples of cationic lipid compounds that are used to facilitate delivery of plasmids to some tissues. Our HSV-2 therapeutic vaccine candidate and our Vaxfectin® adjuvant are protected in-part by lipid technology and/or lipid compound patents that extend up to March 24, 2020. Patent protection of these key lipids also has been obtained in Europe, Canada and Japan. Under the Hatch-Waxman Act, a U.S. patent term extension for up to 5 years may be available under certain conditions.

 

Specific DNA Products. Protection for our therapeutic vaccine candidate for HSV-2 includes issued patents in the U.S. and Japan and other foreign counterparts pending in Australia, Canada, and Europe, all of which will expire on July 20, 2027. These patents are co-owned with the University of Washington. Under the Hatch-Waxman Act, a U.S. patent term extension for up to 5 years may be available under certain conditions.

 

Antifungal Technology. We have been granted the exclusive right to Astellas patents which claim the composition of matter of, and methods of making or using, VL-2397. All of these issued U.S. patents and foreign counterparts will expire on March 13, 2029.    

8


As of December 31, 2017, we were the assignee or co-assignee of 46 issued U.S. and foreign patents. We maintain our issued patents by paying maintenance fees to the patent office in each country when due. Where appropriate, we participate in legal proceedings to vigorously defend against the revocation or withdrawal of our patents. The scope and nature of these proceedings generally differ depending on the country in which they are initiated.

As of December 31, 2017, we were also prosecuting one pending patent application in the United States and one in Canada that cover various aspects of our proprietary technologies, not including patent applications for which we are a co-assignee and that are being prosecuted by our partners.

See “Risk Factors—Our patents and proprietary rights may not provide us with any benefit and the patents of others may prevent us from commercializing our products,” and “The legal proceedings to obtain and defend patents, and litigation of third-party claims of intellectual property infringement, could require us to spend money and could impair our operations.”

Commercialization and Manufacturing

We intend to develop and commercialize products both on our own and through collaborators. We intend to develop and commercialize products in well-defined specialty markets, including infectious diseases. Where appropriate, we intend to rely on strategic marketing and distribution alliances.

We believe our plasmids can be produced in commercial quantities through uniform methods of fermentation and processing that are applicable to all plasmids. In addition, our formulations consist of components that are synthesized chemically using traditional, readily scalable organic synthesis procedures.

Competition

We are aware of several development-stage and established enterprises, including major pharmaceutical and biotechnology firms, which are actively engaged in infectious disease vaccine research and development. These include Sanofi, GlaxoSmithKline plc, MedImmune, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of AstraZeneca, Merck and Pfizer Inc., among others. We may also experience competition from companies that have acquired or may acquire technologies from companies, universities and other research institutions. These companies may develop proprietary technologies which may materially and adversely affect our business.

In addition, a number of companies are developing products to address the same diseases that we are targeting. For example, Sanofi, Genocea Biosciences, Inc. and others have products or development programs for HSV-2 treatment. Amplyx Pharmaceuticals, F2G Ltd, Cidera, Inc., and Scynexis, Inc. and others have products or development programs for treatment of invasive fungal infections. If these or any other companies develop products with efficacy or safety profiles significantly better than our products, we may not be able to commercialize our products, and sales of any of our commercialized products could be harmed.

Some of our competitors and potential competitors have substantially greater product development capabilities and financial, scientific, marketing and human resources than we do. Competitors may develop products earlier, obtain FDA approvals for products more rapidly, or develop products that are more effective than those under development by us. We will seek to expand our technological capabilities to remain competitive; however, research and development by others may render our technologies or products obsolete or noncompetitive, or result in treatments or cures superior to ours.

Our competitive position will be affected by the disease indications addressed by our product candidates and those of our competitors, the timing of market introduction for these products and the stage of development of other technologies to address these disease indications. For us and our competitors, proprietary technologies, the ability to complete clinical trials on a timely basis and with the desired results, and the ability to obtain timely regulatory approvals to market these product candidates are likely to be significant competitive factors. Other important competitive factors will include the efficacy, safety, ease of use, reliability, availability and price of products and the ability to fund operations during the period between technological conception and commercial sales.  

The FDA and other regulatory agencies may expand current requirements for public disclosure of DNA-based product development data, which may harm our competitive position with foreign and U.S. companies developing DNA-based products for similar indications.

9


Government Regulation

FDA Review and Approval

Any products we develop will require regulatory clearances prior to conducting clinical trials and additional regulatory approvals prior to commercialization. New gene-based products for vaccine or therapeutic applications are subject to extensive regulation by the FDA and comparable agencies in other countries. The precise regulatory requirements with which we will have to comply are uncertain at this time due to the novelty of the gene-based products and indications, or uses, that are currently under development. In the United States, the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act and the Public Health Service Act and their implementing regulations govern, among other things, biopharmaceutical testing, manufacturing, safety, efficacy, labeling, storage, record keeping, advertising, and other promotional practices.

Obtaining FDA approval is a costly and time-consuming process. Generally, FDA approval requires that preclinical studies be conducted in the laboratory and in animal model systems to gain preliminary information on efficacy and to identify any major safety concerns. The results of these studies are submitted as a part of an IND which the FDA must review and allow before human clinical trials can start. The IND includes a detailed description of the proposed clinical investigations.

A company must submit an IND for each proposed product and must conduct clinical studies to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the product necessary to obtain FDA approval. The FDA receives reports on the progress of each phase of clinical testing and may require the modification, suspension, or termination of clinical trials if an unwarranted risk is presented to patients.

To obtain FDA approval prior to marketing a biopharmaceutical product in the United States typically requires several phases of clinical trials to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the product candidate. Clinical trials are the means by which experimental treatments are tested in humans, and are conducted following preclinical testing. Clinical trials may be conducted within the United States or in foreign countries. If clinical trials are conducted in foreign countries, the products under development as well as the trials are subject to regulations of the FDA and/or its regulatory counterparts in the other countries. Upon successful completion of clinical trials, approval to market the treatment for a particular patient population may be requested from the FDA in the United States and/or its counterparts in other countries.

Clinical trials for therapeutic products are normally done in three phases. Phase 1 clinical trials are typically conducted with a small number of patients or healthy subjects to evaluate safety, determine a safe dosage range, identify side effects, and, if possible, gain early evidence of effectiveness. Phase 2 clinical trials are conducted with a larger group of patients to evaluate effectiveness of an investigational product for a defined patient population, and to determine common short-term side effects and risks associated with the drug. Phase 3 clinical trials involve large scale, multi-center, comparative trials that are conducted to evaluate the overall benefit-risk relationship of the investigational product and to provide an adequate basis for product labeling. In some special cases where the efficacy testing of a product may present a special challenge to testing in humans, such as in the case of a vaccine to protect healthy humans from a life-threatening disease that is not a naturally occurring threat, effectiveness testing may be required in animals.

After completion of clinical trials of a new product, FDA marketing approval must be obtained. If the product is regulated as a biologic, a Biologics License Application, or BLA, is required. If the product is classified as a new drug, a New Drug Application, or NDA is required. The NDA or BLA must include results of product development activities, preclinical studies, and clinical trials in addition to detailed chemistry, manufacturing and control information.

Applications submitted to the FDA are subject to an unpredictable and potentially prolonged approval process. Despite good-faith communication and collaboration between the applicant and the FDA during the development process, the FDA may ultimately decide, upon final review of the data, that the application does not satisfy its criteria for approval or requires additional product development or further preclinical or clinical studies. Even if FDA regulatory clearances are obtained, a marketed product is subject to continual review, and later discovery of previously unknown problems or failure to comply with the applicable regulatory requirements may result in restrictions on the marketing of a product or withdrawal of the product from the market as well as possible civil or criminal sanctions.

Before marketing clearance for a product can be secured, the facility in which the product is manufactured must be inspected by the FDA and must comply with the FDA’s current Good Manufacturing Practices, or cGMP, regulations. In addition, after marketing clearance is secured, the manufacturing facility must be inspected periodically for cGMP compliance by FDA inspectors, and, if the facility is located in California, by inspectors from the Food and Drug Branch of the California Department of Health Services.

10


In addition to the FDA requirements, the NIH has established guidelines for research involving human genetic materials, including recombinant DNA molecules. The FDA cooperates in the enforcement of these guidelines, which apply to all recombinant DNA research that is conducted at facilities supported by the NIH, including proposals to conduct clinical research involving gene therapies. The NIH review of clinical trial proposals and safety information is a public process and often involves review and approval by the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee of the NIH.

Sponsors of clinical trials are required to register, and report results for, all controlled, clinical investigations, other than Phase 1 investigations, of a product subject to FDA regulation. Trial registration may require public disclosure of confidential commercial development data resulting in the loss of competitive secrets, which could be commercially detrimental.

Under the Orphan Drug Act, the FDA may grant orphan designation to a drug or biological product intended to treat a rare disease or condition, which is generally a disease or condition that affects fewer than 200,000 individuals in the United States, or more than 200,000 individuals in the United States and for which there is no reasonable expectation that the cost of developing and making a drug or biological product available in the United States for this type of disease or condition will be recovered from sales of the product. Orphan designation must be requested before submitting an NDA or BLA. Orphan designation does not convey any advantage in or shorten the duration of the regulatory review and approval process. If a product that has orphan designation subsequently receives the first FDA approval for such drug or biological product for the disease or condition for which it has such designation, the product is entitled to orphan product exclusivity, which means that the FDA may not approve any other applications to market the same drug or biological product for the same indication for seven years, except in limited circumstances, such as a showing of clinical superiority to the product with orphan exclusivity. Competitors, however, may receive approval of different products for the indication for which the orphan product has exclusivity or obtain approval for the same product but for a different indication for which the orphan product has exclusivity. If a drug or biological product designated as an orphan product receives marketing approval for an indication broader than what is designated, it may not be entitled to orphan product exclusivity.

We received QIDP, Orphan Drug, and Fast Track designation for VL-2397 for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis. With Qualified Infectious Disease Product designation, if VL-2397 for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis is approved by FDA, the FDA will extend by an additional five years any non-patent marketing exclusivity period awarded. FDA’s Fast Track Drug Development Program is a process designed to facilitate the development and expeditious review of drugs to treat serious conditions and fill an unmet medical need. This designation allows for companies to interact with the FDA review team frequently to discuss critical development issues such as study design, required safety data necessary to support approval, and structure and content of an application. Additionally, should the FDA determine that a Fast Track product may be effective after their preliminary evaluation of clinical data submitted by a sponsor, the FDA may also consider reviewing portions of a marketing application before the sponsor submits the complete application, known as a “rolling” submission.

Fraud and Abuse, Data Privacy and Security, and Transparency Laws and Regulations

We may also be subject to additional healthcare regulation and enforcement by the federal government and by authorities in the states and foreign jurisdictions in which we conduct our business. These additional healthcare regulations could affect our current and future arrangements with healthcare professionals, principal investigators, consultants, customers and third-party payors. Such laws potentially applicable to our operations include:

 

The federal Anti‑Kickback Statute makes it illegal for any person or entity, including a prescription drug manufacturer (or a party acting on its behalf), to knowingly and willfully, directly or indirectly, overtly or covertly, solicit, receive, offer, or pay any remuneration that is intended to induce the referral of business, including the purchase, order, or lease of any good, facility, item or service for which payment may be made under a federal healthcare program, such as Medicare or Medicaid. The term “remuneration” has been broadly interpreted to include anything of value. Several courts have interpreted the statute’s intent requirement to mean that if any one purpose of an arrangement involving remuneration is to induce referrals of federal healthcare covered business, the Anti‑Kickback Statute has been violated. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act, collectively the Affordable Care Act or ACA, among other things, amended the intent requirement of the federal Anti-Kickback Statute such that a person or entity no longer needs to have actual knowledge of the statute or specific intent to violate, in order to commit a violation.

 

Federal false claims and false statement laws, including the federal civil False Claims Act, which may be enforced through whistleblower or qui tam actions, prohibit, among other things, any person or entity from

11


 

knowingly presenting, or causing to be presented, for payment to, or approval by, federal programs, including Medicare and Medicaid, claims for items or services, including drugs, that are false or fraudulent or not provided as claimed. Entities can be held liable under these laws if they are deemed to “cause” the submission of false or fraudulent claims by, for example, providing inaccurate billing or coding information to customers, promoting a product off‑label, or for providing medically unnecessary services or items.

 

The federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, or HIPAA, created additional federal criminal statutes that prohibit among other actions, knowingly and willfully executing, or attempting to execute, a scheme to defraud any healthcare benefit program, including private third‑party payors, knowingly and willfully embezzling or stealing from a healthcare benefit program, willfully obstructing a criminal investigation of a healthcare offense, and knowingly and willfully falsifying, concealing or covering up a material fact or making any materially false, fictitious or fraudulent statement in connection with the delivery of or payment for healthcare benefits, items or services.

 

HIPAA, as amended by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act, or HITECH, and their implementing regulations, require certain types of individuals and entities to protect the privacy, security, and electronic exchange of certain patient data.

 

The federal Physician Payments Sunshine Act requires certain manufacturers of drugs, devices, biologics and medical supplies for which payment is available under Medicare, Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program, with specific exceptions, to report annually to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, or CMS, information related to payments or other transfers of value made to physicians and teaching hospitals, and applicable manufacturers and applicable group purchasing organizations to report annually to CMS ownership and investment interests held by the physicians and their immediate family members.

 

Analogous state and foreign laws and regulations, such as state anti‑kickback and false claims laws, may apply to sales or marketing arrangements and claims involving healthcare items or services reimbursed by third party payors, including private insurers. Additionally, we may be subject to state laws that require pharmaceutical companies to comply with the pharmaceutical industry’s voluntary compliance guidelines and the relevant compliance guidance promulgated by the federal government. Further, we may be subject to state laws that require drug manufacturers to report information related to payments and other transfers of value to physicians, other healthcare providers and healthcare entities, or marketing expenditures, as well as state and foreign laws governing the privacy and security of health information in some circumstances, many of which differ from each other in significant ways and often are not preempted by HIPAA, thus complicating compliance efforts.

If our operations are found to be in violation of any of these federal, state, local or foreign laws or regulations, we may be subject to penalties, including without limitation, administrative or civil penalties, imprisonment, damages, fines, disgorgement, individual imprisonment, exclusion from participation in government healthcare programs, contractual damages, reputational harm, diminished profits and future earnings, additional integrity obligations, or the curtailment or restructuring of our operations.

Reimbursement and Health Reform

Significant uncertainty exists as to the coverage and reimbursement status of any product candidate that receives regulatory approval. In the United States and markets in other countries, sales of our product candidates, if approved, will depend, in part, on the extent to which third‑party payors provide coverage and establish adequate reimbursement levels.

In the United States, third‑party payors include federal and state healthcare programs, government authorities, private managed care providers, private health insurers and other organizations. Third‑party payors are increasingly challenging the price, examining the medical necessity and reviewing the cost‑effectiveness of medical drug products and medical services, in addition to questioning their safety and efficacy. Such payors may limit coverage to specific drug products on an approved list, also known as a formulary, which might not include all of the FDA‑approved drugs for a particular indication.

Moreover, the process for determining whether a third‑party payor will provide coverage for a drug product may be separate from the process for setting the price of a drug product or for establishing the reimbursement rate that such a payor will pay for the drug product. A payor’s decision to provide coverage for a drug product does not imply that an adequate reimbursement rate will be approved. Further, one payor’s determination to provide coverage for a drug product does not assure that other payors will also provide coverage for the drug product.

12


The United States and some foreign jurisdictions are considering or have enacted legislative and regulatory proposals to contain healthcare costs, as well as to improve quality and expand access. For example, in March 2010, ACA was signed into law that included a number of provisions of importance to the pharmaceutical industry. Since its enactment there have been judicial and Congressional challenges to certain aspects of the ACA, as well as recent efforts by the Trump administration to repeal or replace certain aspects of the ACA. Since January 2017, President Trump has signed two Executive Orders and other directives designed to delay the implementation of certain provisions of the ACA or otherwise circumvent some of the requirements for health insurance mandated by the ACA. While Congress has not passed comprehensive repeal legislation, two bills affecting the implementation of certain taxes under the ACA have been signed into law, including the repeal, effective January 1, 2019, of the tax-based shared responsibility payment imposed by the ACA on certain individuals who fail to maintain qualifying health coverage for all or part of a year that is commonly referred to as the “individual mandate”. Additionally, on January 22, 2018, President Trump signed a continuing resolution on appropriations for fiscal year 2018 that delayed the implementation of certain fees mandated by the ACA, including the so-called “Cadillac” tax on certain high cost employer-sponsored insurance plans, the annual fee imposed on certain health insurance providers based on market share, and the medical device excise tax on non-exempt medical devices. Moreover, the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, among other things, amends the ACA, effective January 1, 2019, to increase from 50% to 70% the point-of-sale discount that is owed by pharmaceutical manufacturers who participate in Medicare Part D and to close the coverage gap in most Medicare drug plans, commonly referred to as the “donut hole”. Congress also could consider subsequent legislation to repeal or repeal and replace elements of the ACA.

In addition, there has been increasing legislative and enforcement interest in the United States with respect to specialty drug pricing practices. Specifically, there have been several recent U.S. Congressional inquiries and proposed bills designed to, among other things, bring more transparency to drug pricing, review the relationship between pricing and manufacturer patient programs, reduce the cost of drugs under Medicare, and reform government program reimbursement methodologies for drugs. At the federal level, the Trump administration’s budget proposal for fiscal year 2019 contains additional drug price control measures that could be enacted during the 2019 budget process or in other future legislation, including, for example, measures to permit Medicare Part D plans to negotiate the price of certain drugs under Medicare Part B, to allow some states to negotiate drug prices under Medicaid and to eliminate cost sharing for generic drugs for low-income patients. While any proposed measures will require authorization through additional legislation to become effective, Congress and the Trump administration have each indicated that it will continue to seek new legislative and/or administrative measures to control drug costs.  At the state level, legislatures are increasingly passing legislation and implementing regulations designed to control pharmaceutical and biological product pricing, including price or patient reimbursement constraints, discounts, restrictions on certain product access and marketing cost disclosure and transparency measures, and, in some cases, designed to encourage importation from other countries and bulk purchasing.

Further, other legislative changes have been proposed and adopted since the ACA was enacted. For example, in August 2011, the Budget Control Act of 2011 was enacted, which, among other things, created the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction to recommend to Congress proposals in spending reductions. The Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction did not achieve a targeted deficit reduction of at least $1.2 trillion for fiscal years 2012 through 2021, triggering the legislation’s automatic reduction to several government programs. This includes aggregate reductions to Medicare payments to providers of up to 2% per fiscal year, which went into effect beginning on April 1, 2013 and, following passage of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, will stay in effect through 2027 unless additional Congressional action is taken. Additionally, in January 2013, the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 was signed into law, which, among other things, reduced Medicare payments to several providers, including hospitals and imaging centers. We expect that healthcare reform measures that may be adopted in the future may result in more rigorous coverage criteria and lower reimbursement, and in additional downward pressure on the price that may be charged for any of our product candidates, if approved.

We also are subject to various federal, state and local laws, regulations, and recommendations relating to safe working conditions, laboratory and manufacturing practices, the experimental use of animals, and the use and disposal of hazardous or potentially hazardous substances, including radioactive compounds and infectious disease agents, used in connection with our research. The extent of government regulation that might result from any future legislation or administrative action cannot be accurately predicted.

Employees

As of December 31, 2017, we had 74 full-time employees, including 7 with doctorate degrees and two medical doctors. Of these full-time employees, 54 were engaged in, or directly supporting, research and development and manufacturing activities, and 20 were in general and administrative positions. A significant number of our management and

13


other employees have prior experience with pharmaceutical and/or biotechnology companies. None of our employees is covered by collective bargaining agreements, and our management considers relations with our employees to be good.

Executive Officers of the Registrant

Our executive officers and other executives are as follows:

 

Name

 

Age1 

 

Position

Vijay B. Samant2

 

65

 

President, Chief Executive Officer and Director

Keith D. Hall

 

56

 

Vice President, Operations

Mammen P. Mammen, Jr., M.D.2

 

54

 

Sr. Vice President, Clinical Development

Anthony A. Ramos2

 

51

 

Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

Larry R. Smith, Ph.D.2

 

57

 

Sr. Vice President, Research

 

1

As of December 31, 2017.

2

Executive officer.

Vijay B. Samant joined us as President and Chief Executive Officer in November 2000. Previously, he held various positions at Merck from 1977 to 2000. From 1998 to 2000, he was Chief Operating Officer of the Merck Vaccine Division. From 1990 to 1998, he served in the Merck Manufacturing Division as Vice President of Vaccine Operations, Vice President of Business Affairs and Executive Director of Materials Management. From 1977 to 1990, Mr. Samant held a variety of positions of increasing responsibility in manufacturing, process engineering, production planning and control, business development and loss prevention in several Merck operating divisions. Mr. Samant holds a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from the University of Bombay, India, an M.S. degree in chemical engineering from Columbia University and an S.M. degree from the Sloan School of Management at MIT. Mr. Samant currently serves on the Board of Directors for AmpliPhi Biosciences and was a member of the board of directors of Raptor Pharmaceutical Corporation from 2011 to 2014. Mr. Samant was a member of the Board of Trustees for the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases and the International Vaccine Institute in Seoul, South Korea from 2008 to 2012. Mr. Samant was also a Director of the Aeras Global TB Vaccine Foundation from 2001 to 2010.

Keith D. Hall joined us as Director Quality Control and Assay Development in February 2003 and was named Vice President, Operations in April 2016. From 2000 to 2003 he served as Director of Manufacturing for Agennix in Houston, TX where he oversaw drug substance and product manufacture, and the design, construction and commissioning of a recombinant human lactoferrin bulk drug substance manufacturing facility in Italy. From 1994 to 2000 he served as Senior Manager, Quality Control and Analytical Development for Valentis/GeneMedicine in The Woodlands, TX. Prior to 1994, Mr. Hall served in various development and manufacturing positions of increasing responsibilities at Hybritech and Amgen. He earned a master’s degree in business administration from the C.T. Bauer College of Business at the University of Houston, and a bachelor’s degree in microbiology from the University of California at Santa Barbara.

Mammen P. Mammen, Jr., M.D., joined us as Vice President, Clinical Vaccines, in November 2012 and was named Senior Vice President, Clinical Development in May 2017. Prior to joining us, he served as Infectious Disease Consultant and Chief, Pandemic Warning Team, U.S. Department of Defense, Fort Detrick, Maryland. From 2006 to 2010, he served as the Army’s Product Manager for vaccines in Advanced Development against dengue, hepatitis E, and HIV viruses for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, Maryland. As Chief, Department of Virology, the Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Thailand, from 2001 to 2006, Dr. Mammen managed a number of the Army’s FDA-regulated vaccine studies. Dr. Mammen received his M.D. degree from the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and is Board-certified in Infectious Diseases. He has been elected as Fellow by the Infectious Disease Society of America and the American College of Physicians. He received his Internal Medicine and Infectious Disease clinical training from the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. He earned a B.A. degree in mathematics from Williams College. Dr. Mammen has authored or co-authored nearly 50 scientific publications spanning multiple emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases.

Anthony A. Ramos joined us as Corporate Controller in February 2005 and was named Chief Accounting Officer in July 2010, Vice President of Finance in December 2013 and Chief Financial Officer in May 2017. From January 1999 until joining Vical, Mr. Ramos held various positions at Copper Mountain Networks, Inc., a publicly held network communications company, most recently as Vice President of Finance with broad responsibilities in finance, accounting, treasury, risk management and corporate governance. From April 1996 until joining Copper Mountain Networks, Mr. Ramos was Accounting Manager at Viasat, Inc., a publicly held digital communications company, where he held

14


accounting and financial reporting responsibilities. From January 1990 until joining Viasat, Mr. Ramos served as an audit manager at PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, where his clients included life sciences, computer software and telecommunications companies as well as government contractors. Mr. Ramos received his bachelor’s degree in business administration and accounting from San Diego State University and is a Certified Public Accountant.

Larry R. Smith, Ph.D., joined us as Executive Director, Vaccinology in September 2003, and was named Vice President, Vaccine Research in October 2006 and Senior Vice President, Research in May 2017. Prior to joining Vical, Dr. Smith was Director of Viral Vaccines Research at Wyeth Vaccines, where he oversaw the immunogenicity testing of various viral vaccines including a number of recombinant viral vectors. Prior to joining Wyeth in 1996, Dr. Smith was a Scientific Investigator at Immune Response, where he identified autoreactive T-cell targets in psoriasis and multiple sclerosis which led to the clinical testing of several therapeutic vaccine candidates. Dr. Smith received a B.S. degree in biology from Purdue University, a Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology from the University of Texas Medical Branch, and was a postdoctoral fellow in the Immunology Department at Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation.

 

 

ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS

You should consider carefully the risks described below, together with all of the other information included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and in our other filings with the SEC, before deciding whether to invest in or continue to hold our common stock. The risks described below are all material risks currently known, expected or reasonably foreseeable by us. If any of these risks actually occur, our business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flow could be seriously harmed. This could cause the trading price of our common stock to decline, resulting in a loss of all or part of your investment.

None of our product candidates has been approved for sale, and we have a limited number of product candidates in clinical trials. If we do not develop commercially successful products, we may be forced to curtail or cease operations.

All of our product candidates are either in research or development. We must conduct a substantial amount of additional research and development before any U.S. or foreign regulatory authority will approve any of our product candidates. Limited data exist regarding the efficacy of DNA vaccines or therapeutics compared with conventional vaccines or therapeutics. Results of our research and development activities may indicate that our product candidates are unsafe or ineffective. In this case, we may stop development and regulatory authorities will not approve them. For example, in 2018 development of ASP0113, an investigational CMV therapeutic vaccine developed by us and based on our DNA delivery technology, was terminated following negative results from a Phase 3 trial.

We have on-going Phase 2 clinical trials of VCL-HB01, our HSV-2 vaccine, and VL-2397, our novel antifungal, but the results of the Phase 2 clinical trials may not be positive and the favorable results or trends observed in our previously completed clinical trials of these product candidates may not continue in the Phase 2 clinical trials. Our ongoing Phase 2 clinical trials and any future trials may not demonstrate sufficient safety or efficacy to support further product development. Because we have a limited number of clinical-stage product candidates, if we experience a significant delay, set-back or failure in the development of any of our product candidates, it could have a material adverse impact on our business prospects.

All of the product candidates we are developing will require significant costs to advance through the development stages. If such product candidates are advanced through clinical trials, the results of such trials may not support approval by the FDA or comparable foreign agencies. Even if approved, our products may not be commercially successful, particularly if they do not gain market acceptance among physicians, patients, healthcare payers and relevant medical communities. If we fail to develop and commercialize our product candidates, we may be forced to curtail or cease operations.

Our clinical trials or those of our partners may fail to demonstrate adequately the safety and efficacy of any of our product candidates, which would prevent or delay regulatory approval and commercialization.

Before obtaining regulatory approvals for the commercial sale of our product candidates, we must demonstrate through lengthy, complex and expensive preclinical testing and clinical trials that our product candidates are both safe and effective for use in each target indication. Clinical testing is expensive and can take many years to complete, and its outcome is inherently uncertain. Failure can occur at any time during the clinical trial process. The results of preclinical studies and early clinical trials of our product candidates may not be predictive of the results of later-stage clinical trials. There is typically an extremely high rate of attrition from the failure of product candidates proceeding through clinical trials. Product candidates in later stages of clinical trials may fail to show the desired safety and efficacy profile despite having

15


progressed through preclinical studies and initial clinical trials. We and our licensees have in the past suffered significant setbacks in advanced clinical trials due to lack of efficacy, notwithstanding promising results in earlier trials. For example, in 2013 we ceased development of Allovectin®, an investigational intratumoral cancer immunotherapy, following negative results from a Phase 3 trial. In June 2015, we announced that our HSV-2 product candidates did not meet the primary endpoint in a Phase 1/2 clinical study. In September 2016, we and Astellas announced that ASP0113 did not meet its primary endpoint in a Phase 2 clinical study in kidney transplant patients and in January 2018, we and Astellas announced that ASP0113 did not meet its primary endpoint in a Phase 3 clinical study in CMV end organ disease, after which Astellas informed us that it was terminating further development. Most product candidates that commence clinical trials are never approved as products.

There are a number of factors that could cause a clinical study to fail or be delayed, including:

 

the clinical study may not be designed properly or may produce negative or inconclusive results;

 

regulators, monitoring boards or other entities may not grant permission to start a clinical study or require that we hold, suspend or terminate clinical research for safety, ethical or regulatory reasons, including adverse events, or AEs, reported during the trial;

 

we may encounter delays in reaching agreement with regulators on final clinical study design;

 

we may decide, or regulators may require us, to conduct additional preclinical testing or clinical studies;

 

enrollment in our clinical studies may be slower than we anticipate;

 

we may encounter delays in engaging prospective clinical research organizations and clinical trial sites to conduct our clinical studies or may have disagreements with these entities;

 

the cost of our clinical studies may be greater than we anticipate;

 

we may not be able to raise funding necessary to initiate or complete our on-going or planned clinical studies; and

 

the supply or quality of our product candidates or other materials necessary to conduct our clinical studies may be insufficient, inadequate or delayed.

If initiation or completion of our clinical studies or those of our collaborators are delayed, our development costs may increase, the approval process for our product candidates would be delayed, any periods during which we may have the exclusive right to commercialize our product candidates may be reduced and our competitors may have more time to bring products to market or establish market positions.

In addition, even if clinical trials are successfully completed, we cannot guarantee that the FDA or foreign regulatory authorities will interpret the results as sufficient to demonstrate that a product is safe and efficacious, and more trials could be required before we submit our product candidates for approval. To the extent that the results of the trials are not satisfactory to the FDA or foreign regulatory authorities for support of a marketing application, approval of our product candidates may be significantly delayed, or we may be required to expend significant additional resources, which may not be available to us, to conduct additional trials in support of potential approval of our product candidates.

Our product candidates may cause undesirable side effects or have other properties that could delay or prevent their regulatory approval, limit the commercial profile of the approved labeling, or result in significant negative consequences following marketing approval, if any.

There is risk that our product candidates may induce AEs, many of which may be unknown at this time. If an unacceptable frequency and/or severity of AEs are reported in clinical studies for our product candidates, our ability to obtain regulatory approval for may be negatively impacted. Even if we receive regulatory approval, AEs associated with any approved products could have significant negative consequences, including:

 

regulatory authorities may approve the product only with a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy (REMS), potentially with restrictions on distribution and other elements to assure safe use (ETASU);

 

regulatory authorities may withdraw their approval of the product or impose restrictions on its distribution in a form of a modified REMS;

16


 

regulatory authorities may require the addition of labeling statements, such as warnings or contraindications;

 

we may be required to change the way the product is administered or to conduct additional clinical studies;

 

we could be sued and held liable for harm caused to patients; and

 

our reputation may suffer.

Any of these events could prevent us from achieving or maintaining regulatory approvals or market acceptance of the affected product candidate and could substantially increase the costs of commercializing our product candidates.

Our revenues have depended on the development and commercialization of products in collaboration with others to whom we have licensed our technologies. If we are unable to find additional collaborators or licensees, or if future collaborators or licensees do not successfully develop and commercialize products covered by such arrangements, we may not be able to derive collaboration and licensing revenues, we may lose opportunities to validate our DNA delivery technologies, or we may be forced to curtail our development and commercialization efforts in these areas.

We have licensed, and may continue to license, our technologies to corporate collaborators and licensees for the research, development and commercialization of specified product candidates. Our revenues have partially depended upon the ability of these collaborators and licensees to successfully develop and commercialize products covered by these arrangements. For example, our licensee Astellas recently exercised its rights to terminate the license agreements related to ASP0113, an investigational CMV therapeutic vaccine, following negative results from a Phase 3 clinical trial. The revenue received by us under this collaboration accounted for a significant amount of our revenue generated over the past three years. During the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015, we recognized $0.3 million, $1.5 million and $1.8 million, respectively, of revenue related to license fees, and $13.5 million, $12.5 million and $14.7 million, respectively, of revenue related to contract services and product supply. If we are unable to enter into new collaboration or licensing arrangements with third parties, we will not receive additional revenues from these sources and our financial results will be negatively impacted. The development and commercialization efforts of our collaborators and licensees are subject to the same risks and uncertainties described above with respect to our independently developed product candidates.

Some collaborators or licensees may not succeed in their product development efforts. It is possible that our collaborators or licensees may be unable to obtain regulatory approval of product candidates using our technologies or successfully market and commercialize any such products for which regulatory approval is obtained. Other collaborators or licensees may not devote sufficient time or resources to the programs covered by these arrangements, and we may have limited or no control over the time or resources allocated by these collaborators or licensees to these programs. The occurrence of any of these events may cause us to derive little or no revenue from these arrangements, lose opportunities to validate our DNA delivery technologies, or force us to curtail or cease our development and commercialization efforts in these areas.

Our collaborators and licensees may breach or terminate their agreements with us, including some that may terminate their agreements without cause at any time subject to certain prior written notice requirements, and we may be unsuccessful in entering into and maintaining other collaborative arrangements for the development and commercialization of products using our technologies. If we are unable to maintain existing collaboration arrangements or enter into new ones, our ability to generate licensing, milestone or royalty revenues would be materially impaired.

Some of our independent product candidates and some of those under development by our sublicensees incorporate technologies we have licensed from others. If we are unable to retain rights to use these technologies, we or our sublicensees may not be able to market products incorporating these technologies on a commercially feasible basis, if at all.

We have licensed certain technologies from corporate collaborators and research institutions, and sublicensed certain of such technologies to others, for use in the research, development and commercialization of product candidates. Our product development efforts and those of our sublicensees partially depend upon continued access to these technologies. For example, we or our licensors may breach or terminate our agreements, or disagree on interpretations of those agreements, which could prevent continued access to these technologies. If we were unable to resolve such matters on satisfactory terms, or at all, we or our sublicensees may be unable to develop and commercialize our products, and we may be forced to curtail or cease operations.

17


We licensed rights to patents and know-how for VL-2397 from Astellas pursuant to an in-license agreement that contains obligations to pay Astellas regulatory and sales milestone payments relating to VL-2397, as well as royalties on net sales of VL-2397.  If we fail to make a required payment to Astellas or otherwise materially breach our in-license agreement with Astellas and do not cure the failure within the required time period, Astellas may be able to terminate the license to the VL-2397 patents and know-how, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We have a history of net losses. We expect to continue to incur net losses and we may not achieve or maintain profitability.

To date, we have not sold, or received approval to sell, any pharmaceutical products. We do not expect to sell any pharmaceutical products for at least the next several years. Our net losses were approximately $13.0 million, $9.0 million and $9.2 million for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015, respectively. As of December 31, 2017, we had incurred cumulative net losses totaling approximately $426.7 million. Moreover, we expect that our net losses will continue and may increase for the foreseeable future. We may not be able to achieve projected results if we generate lower revenues or receive lower investment income than expected, or we incur greater expenses than expected, or all of the above. Over the past several years our revenues have been largely dependent on manufacturing and research services performed under our license agreement with Astellas. In February 2018, Astellas exercised its rights to terminate the ASP0113 license agreements, and we will therefore not receive any further payments under these agreements. We also do not expect to enter into additional manufacturing services arrangements with other parties, and as a result revenues from manufacturing activities will not cover our costs of maintaining our manufacturing capabilities, which could increase our net losses. We may never generate sufficient product revenue to become profitable. We also expect to have quarter-to-quarter fluctuations in revenues, expenses, and losses, some of which could be significant.

We may need additional capital in the future. If additional capital is not available, we may have to curtail or cease operations.

We may need to raise more money to continue the research and development necessary to bring our products to market and to establish marketing and additional manufacturing capabilities. We may seek additional funds through public and private stock offerings, government contracts and grants, arrangements with corporate collaborators, borrowings under lines of credit or other sources. We currently have on file a shelf registration statement that allows us to raise up to an aggregate of $95.7 million from the sale of common stock, preferred stock, debt securities and/or warrants, subject to limitations on the amount of securities we may sell under the registration statement in any 12-month period. However, we may not be able to raise additional funds on favorable terms, or at all. Conditions in the credit markets and the financial services industry may make equity and debt financing more difficult to obtain, and may negatively impact our ability to complete financing transactions. To the extent that we raise additional funds by issuing equity securities, our stockholders may experience significant dilution. Any debt financing, if available, may involve restrictive covenants, such as limitations on our ability to incur additional indebtedness and other operating restrictions that could adversely impact our ability to conduct our business.

In October 2016, we also entered into an At-The-Market Issuance Sales Agreement, or the ATM Agreement, with IFS Securities, Inc. (doing business as Brinson Patrick, a division of IFS Securities, Inc.), or BP, under which we may issue and sell up to $10.0 million of shares of our common stock from time to time. As of December 31, 2017, there was $5.7 million of our common stock available to be sold under the BP ATM Agreement.  However, BP is not obligated to sell any shares that we may request to be sold, and any attempt to sell shares under this facility, if made, may not be successful or generate sufficient proceeds to meet our capital requirements.

If we are unable to obtain additional funds, we may have to scale back our development of new products, reduce our workforce or license to others products or technologies that we otherwise would seek to commercialize ourselves. The amount of money we may need would depend on many factors, including:

 

The progress of our research and development programs;

 

The scope and results of our preclinical studies and clinical trials;

 

The amount of our legal expenses and any settlement or damages payments associated with litigation; and

 

The time and costs involved in: obtaining necessary regulatory approvals; filing, prosecuting and enforcing patent claims; scaling up our manufacturing capabilities; and the commercial arrangements we may establish.

18


If we do not realize the expected benefits and successfully manage the transition from the restructuring that we announced in January 2018, our operations and financial condition may be negatively impacted.

In January 2018, we implemented a restructuring designed to conserve capital and focus our efforts on our VL-2397 antifungal drug product candidate and VCL-HB01 vaccine candidate. If we are unable to realize the expected operational efficiencies and cost savings from our restructuring, our operating results and financial condition would be adversely affected. We cannot guarantee that we will not have to undertake additional restructuring activities or that any of our restructuring efforts will be successful.

We will also need to effectively manage our operations and facilities in order to advance our drug development programs and support our collaboration arrangements. Following our January 2018 restructuring, it is possible that our infrastructure may be inadequate to support our future efforts and business strategy or to maintain effective operational, financial and management controls and reporting systems and procedures. If we cannot successfully manage the transition of our restructured operations, we may be unsuccessful in executing our business strategy.

The regulatory approval process is expensive, time consuming and uncertain, which may prevent us and our collaborators and licensees from obtaining required approvals for the commercialization of our products.

Our product candidates under development and those of our collaborators and licensees are subject to extensive and rigorous regulations by numerous governmental authorities in the United States and other countries. The regulatory approval process takes many years and will require us to expend substantial resources.

U.S. or foreign regulations evolve and could prevent or delay regulatory approval of our products or limit our and our collaborators and licensees’ ability to develop and commercialize our products. Delays could:

 

Impose costly procedures on our activities and those of our collaborators and licensees;

 

Delay or prevent our receipt of developmental or commercial milestones from our collaborators and licensees;

 

Diminish any competitive advantages that we or our products attain; or

 

Otherwise negatively affect our results of operations and cash flows.

We have no experience in submitting a BLA or an NDA to the FDA. Because these applications must be submitted to and approved by the FDA before any of our product candidates may be commercialized, our lack of experience may impede our ability to obtain FDA approval in a timely manner, if at all, which in turn would delay or prevent us from commercializing those products. Similarly, our lack of experience with respect to obtaining regulatory approvals in countries other than the United States may impede our ability to commercialize our products in those countries.

The FDA and comparable foreign regulatory bodies will regulate separately each product containing a particular gene depending on its intended use. Presently, to commercialize any product we and our collaborators and licensees must file a regulatory application for each proposed use. We and our collaborators and licensees must conduct clinical studies to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the product necessary to obtain FDA or foreign regulatory authority approval. The results obtained so far in our clinical trials and those of our collaborators and licensees may not be replicated in ongoing or future trials, or the results may be subject to varying interpretation on whether they are sufficient to support approval for commercialization. This may prevent any of our product candidates from receiving approval for commercial sale.

If any of our product candidates receive regulatory approval, the FDA or other foreign regulatory agencies may still impose significant restrictions on the indicated uses or marketing of our product candidates or impose ongoing requirements for potentially costly post-approval studies. In addition, regulatory agencies subject a product, its manufacturer and the manufacturer’s facilities to continual review and periodic inspections. If a regulatory agency discovers previously unknown problems with a product or a product class, including AEs of unanticipated severity or frequency, or problems with the facility where the product is manufactured, a regulatory agency may impose restrictions on that product or product class, our collaborators and licensees or us, including requiring withdrawal of a product from the market. Our product candidates will also be subject to ongoing FDA and other foreign regulatory agency requirements for the labeling, packaging, storage, advertising, promotion, record-keeping and submission of safety and other post-market information on the product. If we or our collaborators and licensees fail to maintain regulatory compliance after receiving marketing approval, we or our collaborators and licensees may be unable to market our products and our business could suffer.

19


Adverse events or the perception of adverse events in the field of gene therapy, or with respect to our product candidates, may negatively impact regulatory approval or public perception of our products.

The commercial success of some of our product candidates will depend in part on public acceptance of the use of gene therapy for preventing or treating human diseases. Serious AEs, including patient deaths, have occurred in clinical trials utilizing viral delivery systems to deliver therapeutic genes to the patient’s targeted cells. Although none of our current products or studies utilize viral delivery systems, these AEs, as well as any other AEs in the field of gene therapy that may occur in the future, may negatively influence public perception of gene therapy in general. If public perception is influenced by claims that gene therapy is unsafe, our product candidates may not be accepted by the general public or the medical community.

Future AEs in gene therapy or the biotechnology industry could also result in greater governmental regulation, stricter labeling requirements and potential regulatory delays in the testing or approval of our potential products. Any increased scrutiny could delay or increase the costs of our product development efforts or clinical trials. In addition, any AEs that may occur in our clinical trials and any resulting publicity may cause regulatory delays or otherwise affect our product development efforts or clinical trials.

Some of our potential products may be administered to patients who are suffering from, or are vulnerable to, serious diseases or other conditions which can themselves be life-threatening and often result in the death of the patient. Patient deaths in our clinical trials, even if caused by pre-existing diseases or conditions, could negatively affect the perception of our product candidates. In addition, although we do not believe our vaccine candidates could cause the diseases they are designed to protect against, a temporal relationship between vaccination and disease onset could be perceived as causal. Some of our products are designed to stimulate immune responses, and those responses, if particularly strong or uncontrolled, could result in local or systemic AEs, including latent AEs.

Our patents and proprietary rights may not provide us with any benefit and the patents of others may prevent us from commercializing our products.

As of December 31, 2017, we were the assignee or co-assignee of 46 issued U.S. and foreign patents. We maintain our issued patents by paying maintenance fees to the patent office in each country when due. Where appropriate, we participate in legal proceedings to vigorously defend against the revocation or withdrawal of our patents. The scope and nature of these proceedings generally differ depending on the country in which they are initiated. If we are not successful in defending our patents, we may lose all or part of our proprietary rights related to those patents in these geographic regions.

As of December 31, 2017, we were also prosecuting one pending patent application in the United States and one in Canada that cover various aspects of our proprietary technologies, not including patent applications for which we are a co-assignee and that are being prosecuted by our partners.

We may not receive any patents from our current patent applications. Issued patents provide exclusivity for only a limited time period, after which they no longer serve to protect proprietary technologies or to provide any commercial advantage. Moreover, if patents are issued to us, governmental authorities may not allow claims sufficient to protect our technologies and products. Others may also challenge or seek to circumvent or invalidate our patents. In that event, the rights granted under our patents may be inadequate to protect our proprietary technologies or to provide any commercial advantage.

An inability to obtain, enforce, and defend patents covering our proprietary technologies would materially and adversely affect our business prospects and financial condition.

Some components of our gene-based product candidates are, or may become, patented by others. As a result, we may be required to obtain licenses to conduct research, to manufacture, or to market such products. Licenses may not be available on commercially reasonable terms, or at all, which may impede our ability to commercialize our products.

The legal proceedings to obtain and defend patents, and litigation of third-party claims of intellectual property infringement, could require us to spend money and could impair our operations.

Our and our collaborators’success will depend in part on our, or our collaborators’, ability to obtain patent protection for our products and processes, both in the United States and in other countries. The patent positions of biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, however, can be highly uncertain and involve complex legal and factual questions. Therefore, it is difficult to predict the breadth of claims allowed in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical fields.

20


We also rely on confidentiality agreements with our corporate collaborators, employees, consultants and certain contractors to protect our proprietary technologies. However, these agreements may be breached and we may not have adequate remedies for such breaches. In addition, our trade secrets may otherwise become known or independently discovered by our competitors.

Protecting intellectual property rights can be very expensive. Litigation may be necessary to enforce patents issued to us or to determine the scope and validity of third-party proprietary rights. If we or, as applicable, our commercialization partners, including Astellas pursuant to its first right to enforce patents licensed to it under our license agreements, choose to go to court to stop someone else from using our inventions, that individual or company has the right to ask the court to rule that the underlying patents are invalid and/or should not be enforced against that third party. Moreover, if a competitor were to file a patent application claiming technology also invented by us or our collaborators or licensees, we would have to participate in an interference proceeding before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to determine the priority of the invention. We or our collaborators or licensees may be drawn into interferences with third parties or may have to provoke interferences ourselves to unblock third-party patent rights to allow us or our collaborators or licensees to commercialize products based on our technologies. Litigation could result in substantial costs and the diversion of management’s efforts regardless of the results of the litigation. An unfavorable result in litigation could subject us to significant liabilities to third parties, require disputed rights to be licensed or require us to cease using some technologies.

Our products and processes may infringe, or be found to infringe, patents not owned or controlled by us. Patents held by others may require us to alter our products or processes, obtain licenses, or stop activities. If relevant claims of third-party patents are upheld as valid and enforceable, we or our collaborators or licensees could be prevented from practicing the subject matter claimed in the patents, or may be required to obtain licenses or redesign our products or processes to avoid infringement. In addition, we or our collaborators or licensees could be required to pay money damages. A number of genetic sequences or proteins encoded by genetic sequences that we are investigating are, or may become, patented by others. As a result, we or our collaborators or licensees may have to obtain licenses to test, use or market these products. Our business will suffer if we or our collaborators or licensees are not able to obtain licenses at all or on terms commercially reasonable to us or them and we or they are not able to redesign our products or processes to avoid infringement.

We have incurred costs in several legal proceedings involving our intellectual property rights in Europe, Japan and Canada. We may continue to incur costs to defend and prosecute patents and patent applications in these and other regions.

Competition and technological change may make our product candidates and technologies less attractive or obsolete.

We compete with companies, including major pharmaceutical and biotechnology firms that are pursuing other forms of treatment or prevention for diseases that we target. We also may experience competition from companies that have acquired or may acquire technologies from universities and other research institutions. As these companies develop their technologies, they may develop proprietary positions which may prevent us from successfully commercializing products.

Some of our competitors are established companies with greater financial and other resources than we have. Other companies may succeed in developing products and obtaining regulatory approval from the FDA or comparable foreign agencies faster than we do, or in developing products that are more effective than ours. Research and development by others may seek to render our technologies or products obsolete or noncompetitive or result in treatments or cures superior to any therapeutics developed by us.

The internet site ClinicalTrials.gov provides public access to information on clinical trials and their results for a wide range of diseases and conditions. Future disclosures of such confidential commercial information may result in loss of advantage of competitive secrets.

If we lose our key personnel or are unable to attract and retain additional personnel, we may not be able to achieve our business objectives.

We are highly dependent on our principal scientific, manufacturing, clinical, regulatory and management personnel, including Vijay B. Samant, our President and Chief Executive Officer. The loss of the services of these individuals might significantly delay or prevent the achievement of our objectives. For example, due to the loss of various scientific, clinical and regulatory personnel as a result of our January 2018 restructuring, we may be less effective in advancing our product candidates. We do not maintain “key person” life insurance on any of our personnel. We depend on our continued ability to attract, retain and motivate highly qualified management and scientific personnel. We face competition for qualified

21


individuals from other companies, academic institutions, government entities and other organizations in attracting and retaining personnel. To pursue our product development plans, we may need to hire additional management personnel and additional scientific personnel to perform research and development, as well as additional personnel with expertise in clinical trials, government regulation and manufacturing. However, due to the reasons noted above, we may not be successful in hiring or retaining qualified personnel and therefore we may not be able to achieve our business objectives.

We currently depend on third parties to conduct our clinical trials and may depend on third parties to manufacture our product candidates commercially.

We rely on third parties, including clinical research organizations, medical institutions and contract laboratories, to perform critical services for us in connection with our clinical trials. These third parties are responsible for many aspects of the trials, including finding and enrolling subjects for testing and administering the trials. Although we rely on these third parties to conduct our clinical trials, we are responsible for ensuring that each of our clinical trials is conducted in accordance with its protocol and applicable regulations, including good clinical practices established by the FDA and foreign regulatory authorities, which govern the conduct, monitoring, recording and reporting the results of clinical trials to ensure that the data and results are scientifically credible and accurate, and that trial subjects are adequately informed of the potential risks associated with participating in clinical trials. Our reliance on third parties does not relieve us of the responsibility to ensure these requirements are met. These third parties may not comply with all regulatory and contractual requirements or may not otherwise perform their services in a timely or acceptable manner, and we may need to enter into new arrangements with alternative third parties and our clinical trials may be extended, delayed or terminated. In addition, if such third parties fail to perform their obligations in compliance with our clinical trial protocols or applicable good clinical practice regulations, our clinical trials may not meet regulatory requirements or may need to be repeated, and we may not be able to obtain regulatory approval for or commercialize the product candidate being tested in such trials. These risks also apply to the development activities of our collaborators and licensees, and we do not control our collaborators’ and licensees’ research and development, clinical trials or regulatory activities.

We may also depend on collaborators, licensees or other third parties to manufacture our product candidates in commercial quantities. There are a limited number of third parties that could manufacture our product candidates. We may be unable to enter into any arrangement for the commercial manufacture of our product candidates, and any arrangement we secure may not meet our requirements for manufacturing quality or quantity. Our dependence on third parties for the commercial manufacture of our product candidates may also reduce our profit margins and our ability to develop and deliver products in a timely manner.

We have no marketing or sales experience, and if we are unable to develop our own sales and marketing capability, we may not be successful in commercializing our products.

Our current strategy is to market our proprietary products directly in the United States, but we currently do not possess pharmaceutical marketing or sales capabilities. To market and sell our proprietary products, we will need to develop a sales force and a marketing group with relevant pharmaceutical industry experience, or make appropriate arrangements with strategic partners to market and sell these products. Developing a marketing and sales force is expensive and time-consuming and could delay any product launch. If we are unable to successfully employ qualified marketing and sales personnel or develop other sales and marketing capabilities, we may not be able to generate sufficient product revenue to become profitable.

If we fail to comply with federal and state healthcare laws, including fraud and abuse, transparency, and health information privacy and security laws, we could face substantial penalties and our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects could be adversely affected.

Our business operations and current and future arrangements with investigators, healthcare professionals, consultants, third-party payors and customers may expose us to broadly applicable fraud and abuse and other healthcare laws and regulations. These laws may constrain the business or financial arrangements and relationships through which we conduct our operations, including how we research, market, sell and distribute any product for which we obtain marketing approval. Such laws include:

 

the federal Anti-Kickback Statute, which prohibits, among other things, persons and entities from knowingly and willfully soliciting, offering, receiving or providing remuneration, directly or indirectly, overtly or covertly, in cash or in kind, to induce or reward, or in return for, either the referral of an individual for, or the purchase, order or recommendation of, any good or service for which payment may be made under a federal healthcare program, such as Medicare or Medicaid;

22


 

the federal false claims and civil monetary penalties laws, including the civil False Claims Act and its qui tam or whistleblower provisions, which impose criminal and civil penalties against individuals or entities for, among other things, knowingly presenting, or causing to be presented, to the federal government, claims for payment that are false or fraudulent or making a false statement to avoid, decrease or conceal an obligation to pay money to the federal government;

 

the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, or HIPAA, which imposes criminal and civil liability for, among other things, executing a scheme to defraud any healthcare benefit program or making false statements relating to healthcare matters;

 

HIPAA, as amended by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act, or HITECH, and its implementing regulations, which imposes obligations, including mandatory contractual terms, on certain types of individuals and entities and their respective business associates with respect to safeguarding the privacy, security and transmission of individually identifiable health information;

 

the federal Physician Payments Sunshine Act, which requires certain manufacturers of drugs, devices, biologics and medical supplies for which payment is available under Medicare, Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program, with specific exceptions, to report annually to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, or CMS, information related to payments or other transfers of value made to physicians and teaching hospitals, and applicable manufacturers and applicable group purchasing organizations to report annually to CMS ownership and investment interests held by the physicians and their immediate family members; and

 

analogous state and foreign laws and regulations, such as state anti-kickback and false claims laws, which may apply to sales or marketing arrangements and claims involving healthcare items or services reimbursed by third-party payors, including private insurers; state laws that require pharmaceutical companies to comply with the pharmaceutical industry’s voluntary compliance guidelines and the relevant compliance guidance promulgated by the federal government; state laws that require drug manufacturers to report information related to payments and other transfers of value to physicians, other healthcare providers, and healthcare entities, or marketing expenditures; and state and foreign laws governing the privacy and security of health information in some circumstances, many of which differ from each other in significant ways and often are not preempted by HIPAA, thus complicating compliance efforts.

Efforts to ensure that our current and future business arrangements with third parties will comply with applicable healthcare laws and regulations will involve substantial costs. It is possible that governmental authorities will conclude that our business practices do not comply with current or future statutes, regulations, agency guidance or case law involving applicable healthcare laws. If our operations are found to be in violation of any of these or any other health regulatory laws that may apply to us, we may be subject to significant penalties, including the imposition of significant civil, criminal and administrative penalties, damages, monetary fines, disgorgement, individual imprisonment, possible exclusion from participation in Medicare, Medicaid and other federal healthcare programs, contractual damages, reputational harm, diminished profits and future earnings, additional integrity obligations, such as additional reporting and/or oversight requirements if we become subject to a corporate integrity agreement or similar agreement with a governmental authority, and curtailment of our operations, any of which could adversely affect our ability to operate our business and our results of operations. Defending against any such actions can be costly, time-consuming and may require significant financial and personnel resources. Therefore, even if we are successful in defending against any such actions that may be brought against us, our business may be impaired.

Healthcare reform and restrictions on reimbursement may limit our returns on potential products.

Our ability to earn sufficient returns on our products will depend in part on how much, if any, reimbursement for our products and related treatments will be available from:

 

Government health administration authorities;

 

Government agencies procuring biodefense products for military or public use, including some for which we may become a sole-source vendor;

 

Private health coverage insurers;

 

Managed care organizations; and

 

Other organizations.

23


Such third-party payers decide which drugs and treatments they will cover and the amount of reimbursement, and no uniform policy exists. Therefore, coverage and reimbursement for products can differ significantly from payer to payer. Further, the coverage determination process is a time-consuming and costly process that will require us to provide scientific and clinical support for the use of our products to each payer separately. Patients rely on third-party payers to reimburse all or part of the cost associated with treatment. If we fail to obtain adequate reimbursement, we could be prevented from successfully commercializing our potential products.

There are ongoing efforts by governmental and third-party payers to contain or reduce the costs of healthcare through various reform measures. For example, in the United States, the Federal government passed comprehensive healthcare reform legislation, the ACA, in 2010. With respect to pharmaceutical products, the ACA, among other things, expanded and increased industry rebates for drugs covered by Medicaid and made changes to the coverage requirements under Medicare Part D, Medicare’s prescription drug benefits program.  Since its enactment there have been judicial and Congressional challenges to certain aspects of the ACA, as well as recent efforts by the Trump administration to repeal or replace certain aspects of the ACA. Since January 2017, President Trump has signed two Executive Orders and other directives designed to delay the implementation of any certain provisions of the ACA or otherwise circumvent some of the requirements for health insurance mandated by the ACA. While Congress has not passed comprehensive repeal legislation, two bills affecting the implementation of certain taxes under the ACA have been signed into law, including the repeal, effective January 1, 2019, of the tax-based shared responsibility payment imposed by the ACA on certain individuals who fail to maintain qualifying health coverage for all or part of a year that is commonly referred to as the “individual mandate”. Additionally, on January 22, 2018, President Trump signed a continuing resolution on appropriations for fiscal year 2018 that delayed the implementation of certain fees mandated by the ACA, including the so-called “Cadillac” tax on certain high cost employer-sponsored insurance plans, the annual fee imposed on certain health insurance providers based on market share, and the medical device excise tax on non-exempt medical devices. Moreover, the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, among other things, amends the ACA, effective January 1, 2019, to increase from 50% to 70% the point-of-sale discount that is owed by pharmaceutical manufacturers who participate in Medicare Part D and to close the coverage gap in most Medicare drug plans, commonly referred to as the “donut hole”. Congress may consider other legislation to repeal or repeal and replace elements of the ACA. We continue to evaluate the effect that the ACA and its possible repeal and replacement has on our business.

In addition, drug pricing by pharmaceutical companies has recently come under increased scrutiny. Specifically, there have been several recent U.S. Congressional inquiries and proposed federal and state legislation designed to, among other things, bring more transparency to drug pricing, reduce the out-of-pocket cost of prescription drugs, review the relationship between pricing and manufacturer patient programs, reduce the cost of drugs under Medicare, and reform government program reimbursement methodologies. At the federal level, the Trump administration’s budget proposal for fiscal year 2019 contains additional drug price control measures that could be enacted during the 2019 budget process or in other future legislation, including, for example, measures to permit Medicare Part D plans to negotiate the price of certain drugs under Medicare Part B, to allow some states to negotiate drug prices under Medicaid and to eliminate cost sharing for generic drugs for low-income patients. While any proposed measures will require authorization through additional legislation to become effective, Congress and the Trump administration have each indicated that it will continue to seek new legislative and/or administrative measures to control drug costs.  At the state level, legislatures are increasingly passing legislation and implementing regulations designed to control pharmaceutical and biological product pricing, including price or patient reimbursement constraints, discounts, restrictions on certain product access and marketing cost disclosure and transparency measures, and, in some cases, designed to encourage importation from other countries and bulk purchasing. The implementation of cost containment measures or other healthcare reforms may prevent us from being able to generate revenue, attain profitability, or commercialize our current product candidates and those for which we may receive regulatory approval in the future.

Further, third-party payers are increasingly challenging the price of medical products and services. If purchasers or users of our products are not able to obtain adequate reimbursement for the cost of using our products, they may forego or reduce their use. Significant uncertainty exists as to the reimbursement status of newly approved healthcare products, and whether adequate third-party coverage will be available.

We use hazardous materials in our business. Any claims relating to improper handling, storage or disposal of these materials could be time consuming and costly.

Our research and development processes involve the controlled storage, use and disposal of hazardous materials and biological materials. Our hazardous materials include certain compressed gases, flammable liquids, acids and bases, and other toxic compounds. We are subject to federal, state and local regulations governing the use, manufacture, storage,

24


handling and disposal of materials and waste products. Although we believe that our safety procedures for handling and disposing of these hazardous materials comply with the standards prescribed by law and regulation, the risk of accidental contamination or injury from hazardous materials cannot be completely eliminated. In the event of an accident, we could be held liable for any damages that result. We could incur significant costs to comply with current or future environmental laws and regulations.

We may have significant product liability exposure.

We face an inherent business risk of exposure to product liability and other claims in the event that our technologies or products are alleged to have caused harm. We also have potential liability for products manufactured by us on a contract basis for third parties. Although we currently maintain product liability insurance in the amount of $10 million in the aggregate plus additional coverage specific to the foreign countries where our clinical trials are being conducted, this insurance coverage may not be sufficient, and we may not be able to obtain sufficient coverage in the future at a reasonable cost. Our inability to obtain product liability insurance at an acceptable cost or to otherwise protect against potential product liability claims could prevent or inhibit the commercialization of any products developed by us or our collaborators, or our ability to manufacture products for third parties. If we are sued for any injury caused by our technologies or products, or by third-party products that we manufacture, our liability could exceed our insurance coverage and total assets.

The recently passed comprehensive tax reform bill could adversely affect our business and financial condition.

On December 22, 2017, President Trump signed into law new legislation that significantly revises the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.  The newly enacted federal income tax law, among other things, contains significant changes to corporate taxation, including reduction of the corporate tax rate from a top marginal rate of 35% to a flat rate of 21%, limitation of the tax deduction for interest expense to 30% of adjusted earnings (except for certain small businesses), limitation of the deduction for net operating losses to 80% of current year taxable income and elimination of net operating loss carrybacks, one time taxation of offshore earnings at reduced rates regardless of whether they are repatriated, elimination of U.S. tax on foreign earnings (subject to certain important exceptions), immediate deductions for certain new investments instead of deductions for depreciation expense over time, and modifying or repealing many business deductions and credits.  Notwithstanding the reduction in the corporate income tax rate, the overall impact of the new federal tax law is uncertain and our business and financial condition could be adversely affected.  In addition, it is uncertain if and to what extent various states will conform to the newly enacted federal tax law.  The impact of this tax reform on holders of our common stock is also uncertain and could be adverse.  We urge our stockholders to consult with their legal and tax advisors with respect to this legislation and the potential tax consequences of investing in or holding our common stock.

Our stock price could continue to be highly volatile and you may not be able to resell your shares at or above the price you pay for them.

The market price of our common stock, like that of many other life sciences companies, has been and is likely to continue to be highly volatile. From January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2017, our stock price has ranged from $1.66 to $15.50. The following factors, among others, could have a significant impact on the market price of our common stock:

 

The results of our preclinical studies and clinical trials or announcements regarding our plans for future studies or trials, or those of our collaborators, licensees or competitors;

 

Evidence or lack of evidence of the safety or efficacy of our potential products or those of our collaborators, licensees or competitors;

 

Our ability to enter into new collaboration and licensing agreements and the success of any collaborators and licensees in the development or commercialization of our product candidates;

 

The announcement by us or our collaborators, licensees or competitors of technological innovations or new products;

 

Developments concerning our patent or other proprietary rights or those of our collaborators, licensees or competitors, including litigation and challenges to our proprietary rights;

 

Other developments with our collaborators or licensees, including our entry into new collaborative or licensing arrangements;

 

Geopolitical developments, natural or man-made disease threats, or other events beyond our control;

 

U.S. and foreign governmental regulatory actions;

25


 

Changes or announcements in reimbursement policies;

 

Period-to-period fluctuations in our operating results;

 

Market conditions for life science stocks in general;

 

Changes in the collective short interest in our stock;

 

Changes in estimates of our performance by securities analysts; and

 

Our cash balances, need for additional capital, and access to capital.

We are at risk of future securities class action litigation due to our past and expected stock price volatility.

In the past, stockholders have brought securities class action litigation against a company following a decline in the market price of its securities. This risk is especially acute for us because life science companies have experienced greater than average stock price volatility in recent years and, as a result, have been subject to, on average, a greater number of securities class action claims than companies in other industries. Even if such claims are not successful, any litigation could result in substantial costs and divert our management’s attention and resources, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results or financial condition.

Anti-takeover provisions in our charter documents and under Delaware law could make an acquisition of us, which may be beneficial to our stockholders, more difficult and may prevent attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management.

Our certificate of incorporation and bylaws include anti-takeover provisions, such as a classified board of directors, a prohibition on stockholder actions by written consent, the authority of our board of directors to issue preferred stock without stockholder approval, and supermajority voting requirements for specified actions. In addition, because we are incorporated in Delaware, we are governed by the provisions of Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law, which generally prohibits stockholders owning in excess of 15% of our outstanding voting stock from merging or combining with us for a period of three years. These provisions may delay or prevent an acquisition of us, even if the acquisition may be considered beneficial by some stockholders. In addition, they may discourage or prevent any attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management by making it more difficult for stockholders to replace members of our board of directors, which is responsible for appointing the members of our management.

In addition, in August 2016, we completed a private placement of 1,841,420 shares of common stock to AnGes.  In connection with the private placement, AnGes agreed to vote all of its shares in accordance with the recommendations of our board of directors on any matter brought before our stockholders for a vote, subject to certain limitations.  This voting provision may also discourage or prevent attempts by other stockholders to replace members of our board of directors or engage in acquisition activities that our board of directors does not determine to be in the best interests of our stockholders.

The issuance of preferred stock could adversely affect our common stockholders.

We currently have on file a shelf registration statement that allows us to raise up to an aggregate of $95.7 million from the sale of common stock, preferred stock, debt securities and/or warrants and our restated certificate of incorporation authorizes us to issue up to 5,000,000 shares of preferred stock. The issuance of preferred stock could adversely affect the voting power of holders of our common stock, and reduce the likelihood that our common stockholders will receive dividend payments and payments upon liquidation. The issuance of preferred stock could also decrease the market price of our common stock, or have terms and conditions that could discourage a takeover or other transaction that might involve a premium price for our shares or that our stockholders might believe to be in their best interests.

 

 

 


26


 

ITEM 1B.

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

Not applicable.

 

 

ITEM 2.

PROPERTIES

We lease approximately 68,400 square feet of manufacturing, research laboratory and office space at a single site in San Diego, California.  In July 2016, the term of the lease was extended for 16 months through December 2018.

 

 

ITEM 3.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

We prosecute our intellectual property estate vigorously to obtain the broadest valid scope for our patents. Due to uncertainty of the ultimate outcome of these matters, the impact on future operating results or our financial condition is not subject to reasonable estimates.

In the ordinary course of business, we may become a party to additional lawsuits involving various matters. We are unaware of any such lawsuits presently pending against us which, individually or in the aggregate, are deemed to be material to our financial condition or results of operations.

 

 

ITEM 4.

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

 

 

27


PART II

ITEM 5.

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Our common stock is listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol VICL and until January 25, 2016 was listed on the Nasdaq Global Market. The following table presents quarterly information on the range of high and low sales prices for our common stock during the periods presented.

 

2017

 

High

 

 

Low

 

First Quarter

 

$

2.72

 

 

$

2.05

 

Second Quarter

 

 

2.76

 

 

 

2.08

 

Third Quarter

 

 

2.76

 

 

 

2.32

 

Fourth Quarter

 

 

3.70

 

 

 

1.66

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016

 

High

 

 

Low

 

First Quarter

 

$

4.70

 

 

$

2.81

 

Second Quarter

 

 

4.80

 

 

 

3.58

 

Third Quarter

 

 

4.57

 

 

 

2.84

 

Fourth Quarter

 

 

3.15

 

 

 

2.21

 

 

As of February 28, 2018, there were approximately 134 stockholders of record of our common stock and 21,812,807 shares of our common stock outstanding. We have never declared or paid any dividends and do not expect to pay any dividends in the foreseeable future. We did not repurchase any of our common stock in the fourth quarter of 2017.

Performance Graph

The following performance graph and related information shall not be deemed “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the SEC, nor shall such information be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act or Exchange Act, except to the extent that we specifically incorporate it by reference into such filing.

The following table compares total stockholder returns for Vical over the last five years to the Nasdaq U.S. and Foreign Index and the Nasdaq Pharmaceutical Stocks Index assuming a $100 investment made on December 31, 2012. Each of the two comparative measures of cumulative total return assumes reinvestment of dividends. The stock performance shown on the graph below is not necessarily indicative of future price performance.

 

 

28


ITEM 6.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following table summarizes certain selected financial data derived from our audited financial statements. The information presented should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our audited financial statements and notes thereto appearing elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

2013

 

 

 

(in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

Statement of Operations Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contract revenue

 

$

13,401

 

 

$

12,804

 

 

$

18,860

 

 

$

13,304

 

 

$

5,846

 

License and royalty revenue

 

 

418

 

 

 

1,727

 

 

 

2,090

 

 

 

1,913

 

 

 

1,872

 

Total revenues

 

 

13,819

 

 

 

14,531

 

 

 

20,950

 

 

 

15,217

 

 

 

7,718

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

14,391

 

 

 

10,355

 

 

 

11,061

 

 

 

11,467

 

 

 

14,558

 

Manufacturing and production

 

 

6,479

 

 

 

6,291

 

 

 

10,927

 

 

 

10,824

 

 

 

12,698

 

General and administrative

 

 

6,335

 

 

 

7,062

 

 

 

8,366

 

 

 

9,552

 

 

 

11,814

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

27,205

 

 

 

23,708

 

 

 

30,354

 

 

 

31,843

 

 

 

39,070

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(13,386

)

 

 

(9,177

)

 

 

(9,404

)

 

 

(16,626

)

 

 

(31,352

)

Investment and other income, net

 

 

426

 

 

 

204

 

 

 

166

 

 

 

134

 

 

 

114

 

Net loss

 

 

(12,960

)

 

 

(8,973

)

 

 

(9,238

)

 

 

(16,492

)

 

 

(31,238

)

Net loss per share (basic and diluted)

 

$

(1.01

)

 

$

(0.90

)

 

$

(1.01

)

 

$

(1.86

)

 

$

(3.60

)

Weighted average shares used in per share calculation

 

 

12,888

 

 

 

10,019

 

 

 

9,175

 

 

 

8,879

 

 

 

8,684

 

Balance Sheet Data (at end of period):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash, cash equivalents, marketable securities, long-term

   investments, including restricted

 

$

62,900

 

 

$

40,978

 

 

$

42,006

 

 

$

49,123

 

 

$

55,477

 

Working capital

 

 

59,400

 

 

 

40,722

 

 

 

40,336

 

 

 

46,129

 

 

 

54,434

 

Total assets

 

 

80,494

 

 

 

52,284

 

 

 

49,914

 

 

 

57,979

 

 

 

66,353

 

Long-term obligations , less current portion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

359

 

 

 

856

 

 

 

1,288

 

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

63,577

 

 

 

45,139

 

 

 

45,393

 

 

 

51,922

 

 

 

61,412

 

 

 

29


ITEM 7.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Overview

We research and develop biopharmaceutical products, including those based on our patented DNA delivery technologies, for the prevention and treatment of serious or life-threatening diseases. We currently have three active development programs in the area of infectious disease comprised of:

 

An ongoing Phase 2 trial of our HSV-2 therapeutic vaccine, VCL-HB01, to treat patients with symptomatic genital herpes infection. The vaccine candidate is currently being evaluated in a Phase 2 study in adult subjects, 18 to 50 years of age who are randomized 2:1 to receive either vaccine or placebo. Recruitment of 261 subjects at 15 U.S. clinical sites was completed in April 2017 and dosing was completed in July 2017. Following the 4th vaccination, each subject entered a 12-month surveillance period during which each new lesion recurrence is assessed in the clinic by the investigator. After the last subject has completed a minimum of 9-months of surveillance, the primary endpoint of annualized recurrence rate will be calculated based on recurrences that are both clinically - and virologically - confirmed. This endpoint provides important information on the number of recurrences over time in this chronic disease setting and is clinically meaningful for both patients and treating physicians. Vical remains on target to deliver top-line results during the second quarter of 2018.

 

An ongoing Phase 2 trial of our novel antifungal VL-2397, for the treatment of patients with invasive aspergillosis. The multicenter, open label randomized clinical study, will compare the efficacy and safety of VL-2397 to standard treatment for invasive aspergillosis in acute leukemia patients and recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). The global Phase 2 trial will enroll approximately 200 patients and will be randomized on a 2:1 basis with approximately 134 patients treated with VL-2397 and 66 patients treated with a standard treatment course of their physician's choice of voriconazole, isavuconazole, or liposomal amphotericin B. The patients in the VL-2397 arm will receive daily treatment with VL-2397 for 4 weeks, followed by a 2-week course of physician’s choice of the comparator. The primary endpoint of all-cause mortality will be measured at 4 weeks and again at 6 weeks for the key secondary endpoint. The trial will be conducted at selected sites in North America, Europe and Asia. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has advised that VL 2397 would be eligible for a Limited Use Indication (LUI) approval assuming a successful outcome of a single Phase 2 trial carried out in accordance with a protocol and statistical analysis plan consistent with the Agency's advice. The final determination whether the drug is approvable will be made by FDA after review of all relevant data. The LUI is a provision of the Limited Population Pathway established under the 21st Century Cures Act of 2016. The FDA has granted Vical Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP), Orphan Drug and Fast Track designations for VL-2397 in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis.

 

An ongoing early stage development program of a novel treatment for chronic hepatitis B virus (CHB) infection based on our DNA and lipid-delivery technologies. The initial stage of this program will be to demonstrate preclinical proof of concept for inhibiting HBV infection in a mouse model in the second half of 2018. The ultimate aim of this program would be to demonstrate eradication of persistent HBV infection in CHB patients. This preclinical development effort is being conducted in collaboration with Vical’s strategic partner, AnGes, Inc. of Osaka, Japan.

In addition, we have licensed complementary technologies from leading research institutions and biopharmaceutical companies.

30


Research, Development and Manufacturing Programs

To date, we have not received revenues from the sale of our independently developed pharmaceutical products and have received minimal revenues from the sale of commercially marketed products by our licensees. We have previously earned revenues by performing services under research and development contracts, grants, manufacturing contracts, and from licensing access to our proprietary technologies. Since our inception, we have received approximately $288.0 million in revenues from these sources. Revenues by source for each of the three years ended December 31, 2017, were as follows (in millions):

 

Source

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

Astellas contract

 

$

12.9

 

 

$

12.5

 

 

$

14.7

 

IPPOX contract

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.1

 

Other contracts

 

 

0.5

 

 

 

0.3

 

 

 

0.1

 

Total contract revenue

 

 

13.4

 

 

 

12.8

 

 

 

18.9

 

Astellas license

 

 

0.3

 

 

 

1.5

 

 

 

1.8

 

AnGes license

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.1

 

Other royalties and licenses

 

 

0.1

 

 

 

0.2

 

 

 

0.2

 

Total royalty and license revenues

 

 

0.4

 

 

 

1.7

 

 

 

2.1

 

Total revenues

 

$

13.8

 

 

$

14.5

 

 

$

21.0

 

 

In January 2018, we and Astellas announced that ASP0113 did not meet its primary endpoint in a Phase 3 clinical study in CMV end organ disease, after which Astellas informed us that it was terminating further development.  As a result, we do not expect additional collaboration or license revenue absent new agreements with third parties.

 

Research, development, manufacturing and production costs by major program, as well as other expenses for each of the three years ended December 31, 2017, were as follows (in millions):

 

Program

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

CMV

 

 

9.4

 

 

 

9.2

 

 

 

13.1

 

HSV-2

 

 

5.3

 

 

 

3.6

 

 

 

3.1

 

VL-2397

 

 

4.3

 

 

 

3.4

 

 

 

3.4

 

Other research, development, manufacturing and production

 

 

1.9

 

 

 

0.4

 

 

 

2.4

 

Total research, development, manufacturing and production

 

$

20.9

 

 

$

16.6

 

 

$

22.0

 

 

Since our inception through December 31, 2017, we estimate that we have spent approximately $582 million on research, development, manufacturing and production. Our current independent development focus is on a vaccine to treat HSV-2, our VL-2397 antifungal drug candidate and the early stage development of a novel treatment for chronic hepatitis B (“CHB”) virus infection. These programs will require significant additional funds to advance through development to commercialization. From inception through December 31, 2017, we have spent approximately $26 million on our HSV-2 program, $11 million on our VL-2397 program and $0.8 million on our CHB program.  The development of our CMV vaccine program has been terminated following negative ASP0113 trial results and we do not expect additional material spending on this program going forward.

We have other product candidates in the research stage. It can take many years to develop product candidates from the initial decision to screen product candidates, perform preclinical and safety studies, and perform clinical trials leading up to possible approval of a product by the FDA or comparable foreign agencies. The outcome of the research is unknown until each stage of the testing is completed, up through and including the registration clinical trials. Accordingly, we are unable to predict which potential product candidates we may proceed with, the time and cost to complete development, and ultimately whether we will have a product approved by the FDA or comparable foreign agencies.

As a result, we expect to incur substantial operating losses for at least the next several years, due primarily to the advancement of our research and development programs, the cost of preclinical studies and clinical trials, spending for outside services, costs related to maintaining our intellectual property portfolio, costs due to manufacturing activities, costs related to our facilities, and possible advancement toward commercialization activities.

31


Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

The preparation and presentation of financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires that management make a number of assumptions and informed estimates that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses in our financial statements and accompanying notes. Management bases its estimates on historical information and assumptions believed to be reasonable. Although these estimates are based on management’s best knowledge of current events and circumstances that may impact us in the future, they are inherently uncertain and actual results may differ materially from these estimates.

Our critical accounting policies are those that affect our financial statements materially and involve a significant level of judgment by management. Our critical accounting policies regarding revenue recognition are in the following areas: license and royalty agreements, manufacturing contracts, contract services and grant revenues. Our critical accounting policies also include recognition of research and development expenses and the valuation of long-lived and intangible assets.

Revenue Recognition

Revenue is recognized when the four basic criteria of revenue recognition are met: (1) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists; (2) delivery has occurred or services rendered; (3) the fee is fixed or determinable; and (4) collectability is reasonably assured. Certain of our revenue is generated through manufacturing contracts and stand-alone license agreements.

Contract Manufacturing Revenue

Revenue associated with contract manufacturing services is recognized once the service has been rendered and/or upon shipment (or passage of title) of the product to the customer.  On occasion, we recognize revenue on a “bill-and-hold” basis.  Revenue is recognized for such “bill-and-hold” arrangements in accordance with the authoritative guidance, which requires, among other things, the existence of a valid business purpose for the arrangement, that the “bill-and-hold” arrangement is at the request of the customer, that title and risk of ownership pass to the customer, that the product is complete and ready for shipment, a fixed delivery date that is reasonable and consistent with the customer’s business practices, that the product has been separated from our inventory, and that no further performance obligations by us exist.

Multiple-element arrangements

We have entered into multiple-element arrangements. In order to account for the multiple-element arrangements, we identify the deliverables included within the agreement and evaluate which deliverables represent separate units of accounting. Analyzing the arrangement to identify deliverables requires the use of judgment, and each deliverable may be an obligation to deliver services, a right or license to use an asset, or another performance obligation.

The delivered item(s) must have value to the customer on a standalone basis and, if the arrangement includes a general right of return relative to the delivered item, delivery or performance of the undelivered item(s) is considered probable and substantially in our control.

A delivered item is considered a separate unit of accounting when the delivered item has value to the partner on a standalone basis based on the consideration of the relevant facts and circumstances for each arrangement. Factors considered in this determination include the research capabilities of the partner and the availability of research expertise in this field in the general marketplace. Arrangement consideration is allocated at the inception of the agreement to all identified units of accounting based on their relative selling price. The relative selling price for each deliverable is determined using vendor specific objective evidence, or VSOE, of selling price or third-party evidence of selling price if VSOE does not exist. If neither VSOE nor third-party evidence of selling price exists, we use our best estimate of the selling price for the deliverable. The amount of allocable arrangement consideration is limited to amounts that are fixed or determinable. The consideration received is allocated among the separate units of accounting, and the applicable revenue recognition criteria are applied to each of the separate units. Changes in the allocation of the sales price between delivered and undelivered elements can impact revenue recognition but do not change the total revenue recognized under any agreement. If facts and circumstances dictate that the license has standalone value from the undelivered items, which generally include research and development services and the manufacture of drug products, the license is identified as a separate unit of accounting and the amounts allocated to the license are recognized upon the delivery of the license, assuming the other revenue recognition criteria have been met. However, if the amounts allocated to the license through the relative selling price allocation exceed the upfront license fee, the amount recognized upon the delivery of the license is

32


limited to the upfront fee received. If facts and circumstances dictate that the license does not have standalone value, the transaction price, including any upfront license fee payments received, are allocated to the identified separate units of accounting and recognized as those items are delivered.

The terms of our license and collaboration agreements provide for milestone payments upon achievement of certain regulatory and commercial events. We recognize consideration that is contingent upon the achievement of a milestone in its entirety as revenue in the period in which the milestone is achieved only if the milestone is substantive in its entirety. A milestone is considered substantive when it meets all of the following three criteria: 1) The consideration is commensurate with either the entity’s performance to achieve the milestone or the enhancement of the value of the delivered item(s) as a result of a specific outcome resulting from the entity’s performance to achieve the milestone, 2) The consideration relates solely to past performance, and 3) The consideration is reasonable relative to all of the deliverables and payment terms within the arrangement. A milestone is defined as an event (i) that can only be achieved based in whole or in part on either the entity’s performance or on the occurrence of a specific outcome resulting from the entity’s performance, (ii) for which there is substantive uncertainty at the date the arrangement is entered into that the event will be achieved and (iii) that would result in additional payments being due to us.

Contract Services and Royalty Revenue

We recognize revenue from contract services during the period in which the related expenditures are incurred and related payments for those services are received or collection is reasonably assured. Royalties to be received based on sales of licensed products by our partners incorporating our licensed technology are recognized when received.

Research and Development Expenses

Research and development expenses consist of expenses incurred in performing research and development activities including salaries and personnel-related costs, supplies and materials, outside services, costs of conducting preclinical and clinical trials, facilities costs and amortization of intangible assets. Research and development expenses are charged to operations as they are incurred.

We assess our obligations to make milestone payments that may become due for licensed or acquired technology to determine whether the payments should be expensed or capitalized. We charge milestone payments to research and development expense when:

 

The technology is in the early stage of development and has no alternative uses;

 

There is substantial uncertainty of the technology or product being successful;

 

There will be difficulty in completing the remaining development; and

 

There is substantial cost to complete the work.

Capitalization and Valuation of Long-Lived Assets

Intangible assets with finite useful lives consist of capitalized costs incurred in connection with patents, patent applications pending and technology license agreements. Payments to acquire a license to use a proprietary technology are capitalized if the technology is expected to have alternative future use in research and development projects. We amortize costs of approved patents, patent applications pending and license agreements over their estimated useful lives, or terms of the agreements, whichever are shorter.

For patents pending, we amortize the costs over the shorter of a period of twenty years from the date of filing the application or, if licensed, the term of the license agreement. We re-assess the useful lives of patents when they are issued, or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the useful lives may have changed. For patents and patent applications pending that we abandon, we charge the remaining unamortized accumulated costs to research and development expense.

33


Intangible assets and long-lived assets are evaluated for impairment at least annually or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying value may not be recoverable. If the review indicates that intangible assets or long-lived assets are not recoverable, their carrying amount would be reduced to fair value. Factors we consider important that could trigger an impairment review include the following:

 

A significant change in the manner of our use of the acquired asset or the strategy for our overall business; and/or

 

A significant negative industry or economic trend.

In the event we determine that the carrying value of intangible assets or long-lived assets is not recoverable based upon the existence of one or more of the above indicators of impairment, we may be required to record impairment charges for these assets. As of December 31, 2017, our largest group of intangible assets with finite lives included issued patents and patents pending for our DNA delivery technology, consisting of intangible assets with a net carrying value of approximately $0.7 million.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

For information on the recent accounting pronouncements which may impact our business, see Note 1 of the Notes to Financial Statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Results of Operations

Year Ended December 31, 2017, Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2016

Total Revenues. Total revenues decreased $0.7 million, or 4.9%, to $13.8 million in 2017 from $14.5 million in 2016.  Our license revenue decreased $1.3 million which was the result of the recognition of $0.3 million of revenue related to our ASP0113 license agreement with Astellas in 2017, compared to $1.5 million in license revenue recognized in 2016.  This was offset by an increase in our contract revenue of $0.6 million which was primarily the result of a $0.4 million increase in contract revenue recognized under our ASP0113 agreement with Astellas and a $0.2 million increase in contract revenue recognized relating to our research collaboration agreement with AnGes.

In February 2018, Astellas exercised its rights to terminate the ASP0113 license agreements following negative results from a Phase 3 clinical trial. The revenue received by us under this collaboration accounted for a significant amount of our revenue generated over the past three years. During the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015, we recognized $0.3 million, $1.5 million and $1.8 million, respectively, related to license fees, and $12.9 million, $12.5 million and $14.7 million, respectively, of revenue related to contract services and product supply.

Research and Development Expenses. Research and development expenses increased $4.0 million, or 39.0%, to $14.4 million for 2017 from $10.4 million for 2016. This increase was primarily due to an increase in clinical trial expenses relating to our HSV-2 and VL-2397 trials.  

Manufacturing and Production Expenses. Manufacturing and production expenses increased $0.2 million, or 3.0%, to $6.5 million for 2017 from $6.3 million for 2016. This increase was primarily due to an increase in wages of $0.4 million and a $0.5 million net decrease in deferred contract costs capitalized, which was offset by a decrease in scientific supplies of $0.8 million.

General and Administrative Expenses. General and administrative expenses decreased $0.7 million, or 10.3%, to $6.3 million for 2017 from $7.1 million for 2016. This decrease was primarily due to a decrease in audit fees and miscellaneous operating expenses.

Investment and Other Income. Investment and other income increased $0.2 million, or 108.8%, to $0.4 million for 2017 from $0.2 million for 2016. This increase was primarily the result of an increase in yields realized on short-term investments during the year ended December 31, 2017.

Year Ended December 31, 2016, Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2015

Total Revenues. Total revenues decreased $6.4 million, or 30.6%, to $14.5 million in 2016 from $20.9 million in 2015. Our contract revenue decreased by $6.1 million which was primarily the result of the recognition of $4.1 million of

34


non-recurring revenue related to our contract manufacturing agreement with the IPPOX Foundation to manufacture HIV-antigen plasmid DNA in 2015. The remaining decrease was primarily due to the deferred recognition of contract revenue in 2016 related to drug manufacturing under our ASP0113 license agreement with Astellas.

Research and Development Expenses. Research and development expenses decreased $0.7 million, or 6.4%, to $10.4 million for 2016 from $11.1 million for 2015.  This decrease was primarily due to the recognition of $1.7 million in expenses related to the in-license of ASP2397 in 2015, which was partially offset by an increase in clinical trial costs related to our ongoing HSV-2 Phase 2 clinical trial in 2016.

Manufacturing and Production Expenses. Manufacturing and production expenses decreased $4.6 million, or 42.4%, to $6.3 million for 2016 from $10.9 million for 2015. This decrease was primarily due to a $6.3 million net increase in deferred contract costs capitalized, which was partially offset by an increase in wages, equipment and scientific supplies.

General and Administrative Expenses. General and administrative expenses decreased $1.3 million, or 15.6%, to $7.1 million for 2016 from $8.4 million for 2015. This decrease was primarily due to a decrease in employee stock based compensation and legal fees related to the securities class action litigation that was concluded in 2015.

Investment and Other Income. Investment and other income increased $38,000, or 22.9%, to $204,000 for 2016 from $166,000 for 2015. This increase was primarily the result of an increase in yields realized on short-term investments during the year ended December 31, 2016.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Since our inception, we have financed our operations primarily through private placements and public offerings of equity securities, and revenues from our operations. From our inception through December 31, 2017, we have received approximately $288.0 million in revenues from performing services under research and development and manufacturing contracts, from grants and from licensing access to our proprietary technologies, and we have raised net proceeds of approximately $463.8 million from the sale of equity securities. Cash, cash equivalents, marketable securities, and long-term investments, including restricted cash, totaled $63.0 million at December 31, 2017, compared with $41.0 million at December 31, 2016. The increase in our cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities for the year ended December 31, 2017, was due primarily to $26.4 million in net proceeds received from the public offering of common stock and pre-funded warrants and $4.2 million in net proceeds from the sale of common stock under our ATM Agreement in 2017, offset by the use of cash to fund our operations.

Net cash used in operating activities was $8.6 million and $8.4 million for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. The increase in net cash used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2017, compared with the prior year period, was the result of increased research and development costs of $4.0 million, offset by the collection of receivables related to the manufacture of drug substance for which revenue was deferred.

Net cash used in investing activities was $5.3 million and $7.7 million for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. The decrease in net cash used in investing activities for the year ended December 31, 2017, compared with the prior year, was primarily the result of a reduction in the purchases of marketable securities.

Net cash provided by financing activities was $30.5 million and $7.7 for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. The increase in net cash provided by financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2017, compared with the prior year period, was the result of $26.4 million in net proceeds received from the public offering of common stock and pre-funded warrants and $4.2 million in net proceeds from the sale of common stock under our ATM Agreement in 2017, offset by $7.8 million in net proceeds received from the sale of common stock to AnGes in August 2016.

A discussion of our exposure to auction rate securities is included in Part II, Item 7A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K under the heading “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.”

In the long-term, we expect to incur substantial additional research and development expenses, manufacturing and production expenses, and general and administrative expenses, including increases in costs related to personnel, preclinical and clinical testing, outside services, facilities, intellectual property and possible commercialization. Our future capital requirements will depend on many factors, including continued scientific progress in our research and development programs, the scope and results of preclinical testing and clinical trials, the time and costs involved in obtaining regulatory

35


approvals, the costs involved in filing, prosecuting, enforcing and defending patent claims, the impact of competing technological and market developments, the cost of manufacturing scale-up and validation, and possible commercialization activities and arrangements. We may seek additional funding through research and development relationships with suitable potential corporate collaborators. We may also seek additional funding through public or private financings. For example, in November 2017, we sold 9,194,286 shares of our common stock and pre-funded warrants to purchase 7,234,285 shares of our common stock in a public offering for gross proceeds of approximately $28.7 million.

We currently have on file an effective shelf registration statement that allows us to raise up to $95.7 million from the sale of common stock, preferred stock, debt securities and/or warrants, subject to limitations on the amount of securities that we may sell under the registration statement in any 12-month period.  In October 2016, we also entered into an At-The-Market Issuance Sales Agreement, or the ATM Agreement, with IFS Securities, Inc. (doing business as Brinson Patrick, a division of IFS Securities, Inc.), or BP, under which we may issue and sell up to $10.0 million of shares of our common stock from time to time. As of December 31, 2017, there was $5.7 million of our common stock available to be sold under the BP ATM Agreement. Under the ATM Agreement, we may deliver placement notices that will set the parameters for the sale of shares, including the number of shares to be issued, the time period during which sales are requested to be made, any limitation on the number of shares that may be sold in any one trading day and any minimum price below which sales may not be made. Subject to the terms and conditions of the ATM Agreement, BP may sell the shares only by methods deemed to be an “at the market” offering as defined in Rule 415 promulgated under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, including without limitation sales made directly through the Nasdaq Capital Market, on any other existing trading market for our common stock or to or through a market maker. BP will use commercially reasonable efforts consistent with its normal trading and sales practices to sell the shares in accordance with the terms of the ATM Agreement and any applicable placement notice. The ATM Agreement may be terminated by us upon prior notice to BP or by BP upon prior notice to us, or at any time under certain circumstances, including but not limited to the occurrence of a material adverse effect on our Company. We have no obligation to sell any shares under the ATM Agreement, and both we and BP may at any time suspend the sale of shares under the ATM Agreement. For the twelve months ended December 31, 2017, we sold 1,509,370 shares under the ATM Agreement and received gross proceeds of $4.3 million.  

Despite our current shelf registration statement and the ATM Agreement, additional financing through these or other means may not be available on favorable terms or at all. If additional financing is not available, we anticipate that our available cash and existing sources of funding will be adequate to satisfy our cash needs at least through December 31, 2019.

Contractual Obligations and Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

The following table sets forth our contractual obligations, including all off-balance sheet arrangements, as of December 31, 2017 (in thousands):

 

 

 

Payment Due by Period

 

 

 

Total

 

 

Less than

1 Year

 

 

2-3

Years

 

 

4-5

Years

 

 

After

5 Years

 

Contractual Obligations1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating lease obligations

 

$

2,411

 

 

$

2,411

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

Unconditional purchase obligations2

 

 

341

 

 

 

341

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total contractual obligations

 

$

2,752

 

 

$

2,752

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

1

Certain long-term liabilities reflected on our balance sheet are not presented in this table because they are already reflected in operating lease commitments or do not require cash settlement in the future.

2

Unconditional purchase obligations represent contractual commitments entered into for goods and services in the normal course of our business. The purchase obligations do not include potential severance payment obligations to our executive officers. For information regarding these severance arrangements, refer to the final paragraph in this Item 7.

We may be required to make future payments to our licensors based on the achievement of milestones set forth in various in-licensing agreements. In most cases, these milestone payments are based on the achievement of development or regulatory milestones, including the exercise of options to obtain licenses related to specific disease targets, commencement of various phases of clinical trials, filing of product license applications, approval of product licenses from the FDA or a foreign regulatory agency, and the first commercial sale of a related product. Payment for the achievement of milestones under our in-license agreements is highly speculative and subject to a number of contingencies.

36


The aggregate amount of additional milestone payments that we could be required to pay under our active in-license agreements in place at December 31, 2017, is approximately $99.0 million. These amounts assume that all remaining milestones associated with the milestone payments are met. In the event that product license approval for any of the related products is obtained, we may be required to make royalty payments in addition to these milestone payments. Although we believe that some of the milestones contained in our in-license agreements may be achieved, it is highly unlikely that a significant number of them will be achieved. Because the milestones are contingent, we are not in a position to reasonably estimate how much, if any, of the potential milestone payments will ultimately be paid, or when. Additionally, under the in-license agreements, many of the milestone events are related to progress in clinical trials which will take several years to achieve.

In addition, under the indemnification agreements with our officers and directors, we have agreed to indemnify those individuals for any expenses and liabilities in the event of a threatened, pending or actual investigation, lawsuit, or criminal or investigative proceeding.

We have employment agreements that contain severance arrangements with our chief executive officer, or CEO, and our four other executives. Under the agreement with our CEO, we are obligated to pay severance if we terminate the CEO’s employment without “cause,” or if the CEO resigns for “good reason,” as defined in the agreement, within the periods set forth therein. The severance for the CEO consists of continued base salary payments at the then-current rate, including the payment of health insurance premiums for 18 months, plus a payment equal to one and one-half times the CEO’s cash bonus in the previous year. In addition, the CEO receives accelerated vesting on all his unvested stock awards as if he had remained employed by us for 18 months from the date of termination. In the event that the termination occurs within 24 months of a “change in control,” as defined in the agreement, the severance for the CEO consists of a lump sum payment equal to 24 months of base salary at the then-current rate, the payment of health insurance premiums for 18 months, plus a payment equal to one and one-half times the CEO’s cash bonus in the previous year. In addition, all outstanding unvested stock awards will vest immediately. Under the agreements with our other four executives, we are obligated to pay severance if we terminate the executive’s employment without “cause,” or if the executive resigns for “good reason,” as defined in the agreements, within the periods set forth therein. The severance for the other executives consists of a lump-sum payment equal to 12 months of base salary at the then-current rate, including the payment of health insurance premiums for 12 months, plus a payment equal to the executive’s cash bonus in the previous year. In addition, the executive receives accelerated vesting on all his unvested stock awards as if he had remained employed by us for 12 months from the date of termination. In the event that the termination occurs within 12 months of a “change in control,” as defined in the agreements, the severance for the other executives consists of a lump sum payment equal to 18 months of base salary at the then-current rate, the payment of health insurance premiums for 12 months, plus a payment equal to the executive’s cash bonus in the previous year. In addition, all outstanding unvested stock awards will vest immediately. The maximum payments due under these employment agreements would have been $3.7 million if each such officer was terminated at December 31, 2017.

 

 

ITEM 7A.

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

We are subject to interest rate risk. Our investment portfolio is maintained in accordance with our investment policy which defines allowable investments, specifies credit quality standards and limits the credit exposure of any single issuer. Our investment portfolio consists of cash equivalents, both restricted and non-restricted, marketable securities and long-term investments. The average maturity of our investments, excluding our auction rate securities, is approximately four months. Our investments are classified as available-for-sale securities.

To assess our interest rate risk, we performed a sensitivity analysis projecting an ending fair value of our cash equivalents and current marketable securities using the following assumptions: a 12-month time horizon, a 4-month average maturity and a 150-basis-point increase in interest rates. This pro forma fair value would have been $300,000 lower than the reported fair value of our investments at December 31, 2017.

Our investment securities consist of auction rate securities, corporate debt securities and government agency securities. As of December 31, 2017, our long-term investments included a (at par value) $2.5 million auction rate security secured by municipal bonds. At December 31, 2017, the auction rate security we held maintained a Standard and Poor’s credit rating of A-. Our auction rate security is a debt instrument with a long-term maturity and with an interest rate that is reset in short intervals through auctions. The conditions in the global credit markets have prevented some investors from liquidating their holdings of auction rate securities because the amount of securities submitted for sale has exceeded the amount of purchase orders for such securities. If there is insufficient demand for the securities at the time of an auction, the auction may not be completed and the

37


interest rates may be reset to predetermined higher rates. When auctions for these securities fail, the investments may not be readily convertible to cash until a future auction of these investments is successful or they are redeemed or mature.

Since February 2008, there has been insufficient demand at auction for our auction rate security held at December 31, 2017. As a result, this security is currently not liquid, and we could be required to hold it until it is redeemed by the issuer or to maturity. As of December 31, 2017, we had recognized $0.4 million of losses related to the auction rate security by adjusting its carrying value. The market value of the security has partially recovered from the lows that created the losses. As of December 31, 2017, we had recorded cumulative unrealized gains of $0.4 million. Any future decline in market value may result in additional losses being recognized.

The valuation of our auction rate security is subject to uncertainties that are difficult to predict. The fair value of the security is estimated utilizing a discounted cash flow analysis or other type of valuation model as of December 31, 2017. The key drivers of the valuation model include the expected term, collateralization underlying the security investments, the creditworthiness of the counterparty, the timing of expected future cash flows, discount rates, and the expected holding period. The security was also compared, when possible, to other observable market data for securities with similar characteristics.

In the event we need to access the funds that are not currently liquid, we will not be able to do so without the possible loss of principal, until a future auction for these investments is successful or they are redeemed by the issuer or they mature. If we are unable to sell these securities in the market or they are not redeemed, then we may be required to hold them until 2038 when they mature. We do not anticipate a need to access these funds for operational purposes for the foreseeable future. We will continue to monitor and evaluate these investments on an ongoing basis for impairment. Based on our ability to access our cash and other short-term investments, our expected operating cash flows, and our other sources of cash, we do not anticipate that the potential illiquidity of these investments will affect our ability to execute our current business plan.

38


ITEM 8.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

 

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

 

 

 

 

39


Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Stockholders and the Board of Directors of Vical Incorporated

Opinion on the Financial Statements

We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Vical Incorporated (the Company) as of December 31, 2017 and 2016, the related statements of statements of operations, comprehensive loss, stockholders' equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2017, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “ financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company at December 31, 2017 and 2016, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2017, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

Basis for Opinion

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting.  Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

 

 

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2006.

 

 

 

 

 

San Diego, California

 

 

March 15, 2018

 

 

 

 

40


VICAL INCORPORATED

BALANCE SHEETS

(in thousands, except per share data)

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

24,841

 

 

$

5,069

 

Marketable securities, available-for-sale

 

 

35,658

 

 

 

30,552

 

Restricted cash

 

 

192

 

 

 

3,311

 

Deferred contract costs

 

 

10,502

 

 

 

5,513

 

Receivables and other assets

 

 

5,124

 

 

 

3,422

 

Total current assets

 

 

76,317

 

 

 

47,867

 

Long-term investments

 

 

2,209

 

 

 

2,046

 

Property and equipment, net

 

 

606

 

 

 

1,173

 

Intangible assets, net

 

 

703

 

 

 

810

 

Other assets

 

 

659

 

 

 

388

 

Total assets

 

$

80,494

 

 

$

52,284

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

 

$

5,217

 

 

$

4,127

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

11,700

 

 

 

3,018

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

16,917

 

 

 

7,145

 

Long-term liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies (Notes 6 and 7)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $0.01 par value, 5,000 shares authorized, none issued and

   outstanding

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock, $0.01 par value, 50,000 shares authorized, 21,802 and 11,052

   shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively

 

 

218

 

 

 

111

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

489,975

 

 

 

458,881

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(426,738

)

 

 

(413,878

)

Accumulated other comprehensive income

 

 

122

 

 

 

25

 

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

63,577

 

 

 

45,139

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

$

80,494

 

 

$

52,284

 

 

See accompanying notes to financial statements

 

 

41


VICAL INCORPORATED

STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(in thousands, except per share data)

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

Revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contract revenue

 

$

13,401

 

 

$

12,804

 

 

$

18,860

 

License and royalty revenue

 

 

418

 

 

 

1,727

 

 

 

2,090

 

Total revenues

 

 

13,819

 

 

 

14,531

 

 

 

20,950

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

14,391

 

 

 

10,355

 

 

 

11,061

 

Manufacturing and production

 

 

6,479

 

 

 

6,291

 

 

 

10,927

 

General and administrative

 

 

6,335

 

 

 

7,062

 

 

 

8,366

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

27,205

 

 

 

23,708

 

 

 

30,354

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(13,386

)

 

 

(9,177

)

 

 

(9,404

)

Other income:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investment and other income, net

 

 

426

 

 

 

204

 

 

 

166

 

Net loss

 

$

(12,960

)

 

$

(8,973

)

 

$

(9,238

)

Basic and diluted net loss per share

 

$

(1.01

)

 

$

(0.90

)

 

$

(1.01

)

Weighted average shares used in computing basic and diluted net loss

   per share

 

 

12,888

 

 

 

10,019

 

 

 

9,175

 

 

See accompanying notes to financial statements

 

 

42


VICAL INCORPORATED

STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE LOSS

(in thousands)

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

Net loss

 

$

(12,960

)

 

$

(8,973

)