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EX-10.23 - EXHIBIT 10.23 - Oaktree Strategic Income Corpex10-23_seventhamendment.htm
EX-32.2 - EXHIBIT 32.2 - Oaktree Strategic Income Corpocsi-ex322_2017093010xk.htm
EX-32.1 - EXHIBIT 32.1 - Oaktree Strategic Income Corpocsi-ex321_2017093010xk.htm
EX-31.2 - EXHIBIT 31.2 - Oaktree Strategic Income Corpocsi-ex312_2017093010xk.htm
EX-31.1 - EXHIBIT 31.1 - Oaktree Strategic Income Corpocsi-ex311_2017093010xk.htm
EX-14.2 - EXHIBIT 14.2 - Oaktree Strategic Income Corpocsl-ex142_coexoctober2017.htm
EX-14.1 - EXHIBIT 14.1 - Oaktree Strategic Income Corpocsl-ex141_2017093010xk.htm
EX-10.22 - EXHIBIT 10.22 - Oaktree Strategic Income Corpex10-22_sixthamendment.htm
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20549
Form 10-K
(Mark One)
 
þ
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
 
For the fiscal year ended September 30, 2017
OR
 
¨

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
COMMISSION FILE NUMBER: 1-35999
Oaktree Strategic Income Corporation
(EXACT NAME OF REGISTRANT AS SPECIFIED IN ITS CHARTER)
 
DELAWARE
(State or jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
61-1713295
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
 
 
333 South Grand Avenue, 28th Floor
Los Angeles, CA
(Address of principal executive office)
 
90071
(Zip Code)
REGISTRANT’S TELEPHONE NUMBER, INCLUDING AREA CODE:
(213) 830-6300
SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OF THE ACT:
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange
on Which Registered
Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share
 
The NASDAQ Global Select Market
SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(g) OF THE ACT: None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ¨        No  þ
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨        No  þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter periods as the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  þ        No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  ¨        No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filer  o
 
Accelerated filer  þ
 
Non-accelerated filer  o
 
Smaller reporting company  o
 
 
 
 
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Emerging growth company  þ

 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act þ


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act)    Yes  ¨        No  þ



The aggregate market value of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of March 31, 2017 is $190,396,952. For the purposes of calculating the aggregate market value of common stock held by non-affiliates, the registrant has excluded (1) shares held by its current directors and officers and (2) those reported to be held by Fifth Street Holdings L.P. and Leonard M. Tannenbaum and his other affiliates. The registrant had 29,466,768 shares of common stock outstanding as of December 7, 2017.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the registrant’s definitive Proxy Statement relating to the registrant’s 2018 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days following the end of the Company’s fiscal year, are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K as indicated herein.


 









OAKTREE STRATEGIC INCOME CORPORATION
FORM 10-K FOR THE YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2017



TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
 
 
 
PART I
 
Item 1.
Item 1A.
Item 1B.
Item 2.
Item 3.
Item 4.
 
PART II
 
Item 5.
Item 6.
Item 7.
Item 7A.
Item 8.
Item 9.
Item 9A.
Item 9B.
 
PART III
 
Item 10.
Item 11.
Item 12.
Item 13.
Item 14.
 
PART IV
 
Item 15.





 




PART I

Item 1.     Business
General
Oaktree Strategic Income Corporation (formerly known as Fifth Street Senior Floating Rate Corp. through October 17, 2017), a Delaware corporation, or together with its subsidiaries, where applicable, the Company, which may also be referred to as "we", "us" or "our", is a specialty finance company dedicated to providing customized capital solutions for middle-market companies in both the syndicated and private placement markets. We were formed in May 2013 as a Delaware corporation, commenced operations on June 29, 2013, and currently operate as a closed-end, externally managed, non-diversified management investment company that has elected to be regulated as a business development company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended, or the 1940 Act. In addition, we have qualified and elected to be treated as a regulated investment company, or RIC, under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or the Code, for tax purposes. See “Taxation as a Regulated Investment Company.” As a RIC, we generally will not have to pay corporate-level U.S. federal income taxes on any net ordinary income or net realized capital gains that we distribute to our stockholders if we meet certain source-of-income, income distribution and asset diversification requirements. Also, we are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or JOBS Act, and take advantage of the exemption for emerging growth companies allowing us to temporarily forgo the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We do not take advantage of other disclosure or reporting exemptions for emerging growth companies under the JOBS Act.
As of October 17, 2017, we are externally managed by Oaktree Capital Management, L.P., which we also refer to as “Oaktree” or our “Investment Adviser,” pursuant to an Investment Advisory Agreement, dated October 17, 2017, or the New Investment Advisory Agreement, between the Company and Oaktree. Oaktree is a subsidiary of Oaktree Capital Group, LLC, or OCG, a global investment manager specializing in alternative investments. Oaktree Fund Administration, LLC, which we refer to as “Oaktree Administrator” or “OFA”, a subsidiary of our Investment Adviser, also provides certain administrative and other services necessary for us to operate. Prior to October 17, 2017, we were externally managed and advised by Fifth Street Management LLC, which we refer to as our “Former Adviser” or “Fifth Street Management.” For more information about the New Investment Advisory Agreement and Oaktree see “-The Investment Adviser” below.
We seek to generate a stable source of current income while minimizing the risk of principal loss and, to a lesser extent, capital appreciation by providing middle-market companies with primarily first lien secured debt financings that pay us interest at rates which are determined periodically on the basis of a floating base lending rate. We invest in companies across a variety of industries that typically possess business models we expect to be resilient in the future with underlying fundamentals that will provide strength in future downturns. We intend to deploy capital across credit and economic cycles with a focus on long-term results, which we believe will enable us to build lasting partnerships with financial sponsors and management teams. Under normal market conditions, through January 18, 2018, at least 80% of the value of our net assets plus borrowings for investment purposes will be invested in floating rate senior loans, which include both first and second lien secured debt financings. We may also invest in unsecured loans, including subordinated loans, issued by private middle-market companies and, to a lesser extent, senior and subordinated loans issued by public companies and equity investments.
We have invested primarily in senior secured loans, including first lien, unitranche and second lien debt instruments, that pay interest at rates which are determined periodically on the basis of a floating base lending rate, primarily the London-Interbank Offered Rate, or LIBOR, plus a premium. The senior loans in which we invest are typically made to U.S. and, to a limited extent, non-U.S. corporations, partnerships and other business entities in the middle-market which operate in various industries and geographical regions. We generally invest in securities that are rated below investment grade by rating agencies or that would be rated below investment grade if they were rated. Below investment grade securities, which are often referred to as “high yield” and “junk,” have predominantly speculative characteristics with respect to the issuer’s capacity to pay interest and repay principal. Our Former Adviser targeted middle-market companies with approximately $20 million to $120 million of EBITDA (generally defined as Earnings before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization).
Our Investment Adviser intends to reposition our portfolio in the near-term in order to (1) rotate out of a small number of investments that it views as challenged, (2) focus on increasing the size of our core private investments and (3) supplement the portfolio with broadly syndicated and select privately placed loans. We expect that our Investment Adviser will focus on middle-market companies, which we define as companies with enterprise values of between $100 and $750 million. Going forward, we expect our portfolio to include primarily first lien floating rate senior secured financings.

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From inception through September 30, 2017, we originated over $2.0 billion of funded debt investments. Our portfolio totaled $560.4 million at fair value as of September 30, 2017 and was comprised of 67 portfolio companies, including our investment in subordinated notes and limited liability company, or LLC, equity interests in FSFR Glick JV LLC, or FSFR Glick JV. At fair value as of September 30, 2017, 89.5% of our portfolio consisted of senior secured floating rate debt investments, 10.3% of the portfolio consisted of investments in the subordinated notes and LLC equity interests of FSFR Glick JV and 0.2% consisted of equity investments in other portfolio companies. The weighted average annual yield of our debt investments as of September 30, 2017, including the return on our subordinated note investment in FSFR Glick JV, was approximately 7.5%, including 7.3% representing cash payments. The weighted average annual yield of our debt investments is determined before the payment of, and therefore does not take into account, our (and our consolidated subsidiaries’) expenses and the payment by an investor of any stockholder transaction expenses, and does not represent the return on investment for our stockholders.
We are permitted to, and expect to continue to, finance our investments through borrowings. However, as a business development company, we are generally only allowed to borrow amounts such that our asset coverage, as defined in the 1940 Act, equals at least 200% after such borrowing. The amount of leverage that we employ will depend on our assessment of market conditions and other factors at the time of any proposed borrowing, such as the maturity, covenant package and rate structure of the proposed borrowings, our ability to raise funds through the issuance of shares of our common stock and the risks of such borrowings within the context of our investment outlook. Ultimately, we only intend to use leverage if the expected returns from borrowing to make investments will exceed the cost of such borrowing. As of September 30, 2017, we had a debt to equity ratio of 0.90x (i.e., one dollar of equity for each $0.90 of debt outstanding).
Joint Venture
We and GF Equity Funding 2014 LLC, or GF Equity Funding, also co-invest through an unconsolidated, Delaware limited liability company, FSFR Glick JV. FSFR Glick JV was formed in October 2014 and began investing in April 2015 primarily in senior secured loans of middle market companies. We co-invest in these securities with GF Equity Funding through our investment in FSFR Glick JV. FSFR Glick JV is managed by a four person board of directors, two of whom are selected by us and two of whom are selected by GF Equity Funding. FSFR Glick JV is capitalized as transactions are completed, and all portfolio decisions and investment decisions in respect of FSFR Glick JV must be approved by its investment committee consisting of one representative selected by us and one representative selected by GF Equity Funding (with approval of each required). The members provide capital to FSFR Glick JV in exchange for LLC equity interests, and the Company and GF Debt Funding 2014 LLC, or GF Debt Funding, an entity advised by affiliates of GF Equity Funding, provide capital to FSFR Glick JV in exchange for subordinated notes, or the Subordinated Notes. Additionally, FSFR Glick JV has a senior revolving credit facility with Deutsche Bank AG, New York Branch, or the Deutsche Bank facility, with a stated maturity date of April 17, 2023, which, as of September 30, 2017, permits up to $200.0 million of borrowings. As of September 30, 2017 and September 30, 2016, FSFR Glick JV had total capital commitments of $100.0 million, $87.5 million of which was from the Company and the remaining $12.5 million from GF Equity Funding and GF Debt Funding. At September 30, 2017, we had funded approximately $71.4 million of our commitment. As of September 30, 2017, our investment in FSFR Glick JV was approximately $57.6 million at fair value. We do not consolidate FSFR Glick JV in our Consolidated Financial Statements.
Organizational Structure
The following diagram shows a simplified organizational structure reflecting our relationship with Oaktree and OFA, our Investment Adviser and administrator, respectively, as of October 17, 2017 and our direct and indirect ownership interest in certain of our subsidiaries as of such date:

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ocsi1017.jpg
Our principal executive office is located at 333 South Grand Avenue, 28th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90071 and our telephone number is (213) 830-6300.
The Investment Adviser
As of October 17, 2017, we are externally managed and advised by Oaktree, a registered investment adviser under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended, or the Advisers Act. Oaktree, subject to the overall supervision of our Board of Directors, manages our day-to-day operations, and provides investment advisory services to us pursuant to the New Investment Advisory Agreement.
Our Investment Adviser was formed in April 1995 and is a premier credit manager and leader among alternative investment managers headquartered in Los Angeles, California. Oaktree has $99.5 billion in assets under management as of September 30, 2017, with approximately 70% in credit strategies. The firm has an extensive global investment platform with more than 900 employees, including over 250 investment professionals who have significant origination, structuring and underwriting expertise. Oaktree’s disciplined investment philosophy and commitment to credit investing and lending have been demonstrated across market cycles for more than 20 years. Oaktree emphasizes an opportunistic, value-oriented and risk-controlled approach to investments in distressed debt, corporate debt (including mezzanine finance, high yield debt and senior loans), control investing, real estate, convertible securities and listed equities. Oaktree manages assets for a wide variety of clients, including many of the most significant investors in the world. As of September 30, 2017, this client base includes 75 of the 100 largest U.S. pension plans, the main pension fund of 38 states in the United States, over 400 corporations, over 350 university, charitable and other endowments and foundations, over 350 non-U.S. institutional investors and 16 sovereign wealth funds.
Members of our Investment Adviser’s Strategic Credit team have, in the aggregate, over 50 years of investment experience and include professionals who have experience structuring new investments and restructuring existing capital structures in order to maximize recoveries. Our Investment Adviser’s Strategic Credit team is comprised of individuals with a diversity of backgrounds, including, as of the date hereof, former investment bankers, corporate/restructuring lawyers, a doctor, private equity investors, and management consultants. We believe this diversity of experience helps enhance the investment process by bringing different perspectives to credit discussions.
The Transaction and the New Investment Advisory Agreement with Oaktree
On July 13, 2017, Oaktree, entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement, or the Purchase Agreement, with our Former Adviser, and for certain limited purposes, Fifth Street Asset Management Inc., or FSAM, the indirect, partial owner of our Former Adviser, and Fifth Street Holdings L.P., the direct, partial owner of our Former Adviser.
In order to ensure that the transactions contemplated by the Purchase Agreement, or the Transaction, complied with Section 15(f) of the 1940 Act, our Investment Adviser and our Former Adviser agreed to certain conditions. First, for a period of three years after the closing of the Transaction, at least 75% of the members of our Board of Directors must not be interested persons of Oaktree or our Former Adviser. Second, an “unfair burden” must not be imposed on us as a result of the closing of the Transaction or any express or implied terms, conditions or understandings applicable thereto during the two-year period after the closing of the Transaction. In addition, for the two-year period commencing on October 17, 2017, Oaktree will waive,

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to the extent necessary, any management or incentive fees payable under the New Investment Advisory Agreement that exceed what would have been paid to the Former Adviser in the aggregate under the Former Investment Advisory Agreement.
On September 7, 2017, we held a special meeting of stockholders, or the Special Meeting. At the Special Meeting, our stockholders approved the New Investment Advisory Agreement to take effect upon the closing of the Transaction. Our stockholders also approved, contingent upon the closing of the Transaction, the election of John B. Frank, Marc H. Gamsin, Craig Jacobson, Richard G. Ruben and Bruce Zimmerman to serve on our Board of Directors, each of whom commenced serving on our Board of Directors on October 17, 2017. In addition, in connection with the Transaction, Edgar Lee became our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Investment Officer, Mathew Pendo became our Chief Operating Officer, Mel Carlisle became our Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer and Kimberly Larin became our Chief Compliance Officer.
Upon the closing of the Transaction on October 17, 2017, Oaktree became the investment adviser to each of Oaktree Specialty Lending Corporation (formerly known as Fifth Street Finance Corp.), or OCSL, and us, and Oaktree paid gross cash consideration of $320 million to our Former Adviser. The closing of the Transaction resulted in an assignment for purposes of the 1940 Act of the investment advisory agreement between our Former Adviser and us, or the Former Investment Advisory Agreement, and, as a result, its immediate termination. The material terms of the services to be provided under the New Investment Advisory Agreement, other than the fee structure, are substantially the same as the Former Investment Advisory Agreement, except that services are provided by Oaktree.
On October 17, 2017, each of Bernard D. Berman, James Castro-Blanco, Richard P. Dutkiewicz, Alexander C. Frank and Jeffrey R. Kay resigned as a member of our Board of Directors. In addition, on October 17, 2017, each of Mr. Berman, our former Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Steven Noreika, our former Chief Financial Officer, and Ms. Kerry Acocella, our former Secretary and Chief Compliance Officer, resigned from his or her role as an officer of the Company.
Our Former Adviser and Administrator
Prior to October 17, 2017, we were externally managed and advised by our Former Adviser, which was a registered investment adviser under the Advisers Act. Subject to the overall supervision of our Board of Directors, our Former Adviser managed our day-to-day operations and provided us with investment advisory services similar to those now provided by Oaktree as described below under “-New Investment Advisory Agreement.” FSC CT LLC, or our Former Administrator, was a wholly-owned subsidiary of our Former Adviser. Our Former Administrator provided administrative services necessary for us to operate pursuant to an administrative and loan services agreement, or the Former Administration Agreement. See “- Former Administration Agreement.”
The following diagram shows a simplified organizational structure reflecting our relationship with our Former Adviser and Former Administrator and our direct and indirect ownership interest in certain of our subsidiaries as of September 30, 2017:
fsfr930.jpg




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Market Opportunity
We believe that the middle market represents a significant opportunity for direct lending for many reasons, including:

Large Market. According to the National Center for the Middle Market, as of the second quarter of 2017, there were nearly 200,000 businesses with annual revenues of $50 million to $1 billion or EBITDA of $10 million to $50 million, which businesses represented one-third of private sector U.S. gross domestic product and accounted for nearly 48 million jobs in the United States.
Demand From Middle-Market Companies. According to Thomson Reuters Q3’17 Middle Market Lender Outlook, over the past five years, middle-market lending has averaged $170 billion annually, much of which we believe has been used to finance leveraged buyouts, recapitalizations, capital expenditures and acquisitions. While the market for middle-market lending has attracted increased capital flows and competition, we believe that the market remains robust and growing and that new market participants may not have the same experience in direct lending and investing across credit cycles as our Investment Adviser. We believe that the market for middle-market lending is relatively less efficient and less well-trafficked, which may provide us with opportunities for incremental returns on our investments relative to the risk of such investments.
Reduced Focus From Banks on Middle-Market Lending. We believe that many commercial banks have decreased their lending to middle-market companies in recent years, which has created an opportunity for non-traditional market participants. According to the Standard & Poor’s Leveraged Commentary & Data Leveraged Lending Review - Q2’17, banks account for just 10% of middle-market loans as of September 30, 2017.
Business Strategy
We seek to generate a stable source of current income while minimizing the risk of principal loss and, to a lesser extent, capital appreciation. We invest in companies across a variety of industries that typically possess business models we expect to be resilient in the future with underlying fundamentals that will provide strength in future downturns. We intend to deploy capital across credit and economic cycles with a focus on long-term results, which we believe will enable us to build lasting partnerships with financial sponsors and management teams. Our Investment Adviser intends to implement the following business strategy to achieve our investment objective:
Portfolio Repositioning.    Our Investment Adviser intends to reposition our portfolio in the near-term in order to (1) rotate out of a small number of investments that it views as challenged, (2) focus on increasing the size of our core private investments and (3) supplement the portfolio with broadly syndicated and select privately placed loans. In the longer-term, our Investment Adviser intends to generate consistent income to support sustainable dividends through (1) providing larger, more liquid first lien loans in the established middle market, (2) minimizing risk of principal loss, with reduced focus on opportunities for capital appreciation, (3) mitigating interest rate risk by targeting floating-rate loans and (4) strategically accessing the broadly syndicated and private placement markets.
Emphasis on Proprietary Deals.    Our Investment Adviser is primarily focused on proprietary opportunities as well as partnering with other lenders as appropriate and, to a lesser extent strategically accessing the broadly syndicated and private placement markets. Dedicated sourcing professionals of our Investment Adviser are in continuous contact with financial sponsors and corporate clients to originate proprietary deals and seek to leverage the networks and relationships of Oaktree’s over 250 investment professionals with management teams and corporations to originate non-sponsored transactions. Since 2005, our Investment Adviser has invested more than $10 billion in over 200 directly originated loans, and the Oaktree platform has the capacity to invest in large deals and to solely underwrite transactions.
Focus On Quality Companies And Extensive Diligence. Our Investment Adviser seeks to maintain a conservative approach to investing with discipline around fundamental credit analysis and downside protection. Our Investment Adviser intends to focus on companies with business models we expect to be resilient in the future, underlying fundamentals that will provide strength in future downturns, significant asset or enterprise value and seasoned management teams, although not all portfolio companies will meet each of these criteria. Our Investment Adviser intends to leverage its deep credit and deal structuring expertise to lend to companies that have unique needs, complex business models or specific business challenges. Our Investment Adviser conducts diligence on underlying collateral value, including cash flows, hard assets or intellectual property, and will typically model exit scenarios as part of the diligence process, including assessing potential “work-out” scenarios.
Disciplined Portfolio Management. Our Investment Adviser monitors our portfolio on an ongoing basis to manage risk and take preemptive action to resolve potential problems where possible. Our Investment Adviser intends to seek to reduce the impact of individual investment risks by limiting positions to no more than 5% of our portfolio.
Manage Risk Through Loan Structures. Our Investment Adviser seeks to leverage its experience in identifying structural risks in prospective portfolio companies and developing creative solutions in an effort to enhance downside

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protection where possible. Our Investment Adviser has the expertise to structure comprehensive, flexible and creative solutions for companies of all sizes across numerous industry sectors. Our Investment Adviser employs a rigorous due diligence process and seeks to include covenant protections designed to ensure that we, as the lender, can negotiate with a portfolio company before a deal reaches impairment. The Oaktree platform has the ability to address a wide range of borrower needs, with capability to invest across the capital structure and to fund large loans, and our Investment Adviser pays close attention to market trends. Our Investment Adviser provides certainty to borrowers by seeking to provide fully underwritten financing commitments and has expertise in both performing credit as well as restructuring and turnaround situations, which we expect will allow us to invest and lend during times of market stress when our competitors may halt investment activity.
Concentrate on Floating Rate Senior Loans. We intend to concentrate on first lien secured loans that bear interest based on a floating rate. We believe that these loans, which are supported by a pledge of collateral, minimize the risk of principal loss. In addition, with interest rates near historically low levels, we believe that investing in floating rate loans provides us with positive exposure in a rising interest rate environment.
Our Investment Adviser’s emphasis is on fundamental credit analysis, consistency and downside protection, all of which are key tenets of its investment philosophy. We believe this philosophy strongly aligns with the interests of our stockholders. Our Investment Adviser controls primarily for risk, rather than return. Although this may lead us to underperform in bullish markets, we expect that prudence across the economic cycle and limiting losses will allow us to achieve our investment objectives.
Investment Criteria
Our Investment Adviser has identified the following investment criteria and guidelines for identifying and investing in prospective portfolio companies. However, not all of these criteria will be met by each prospective portfolio company in which we invest.
Equity Cushion.   We generally expect to invest in loans that have covenants that may help to minimize our risk of capital loss and meaningful equity investments in the portfolio company. We intend to target investments that have strong credit protections, including default penalties, information rights and affirmative, negative and financial covenants, such as limitations on debt incurrence, lien protection and prohibitions on dividends.
Sustainable Cash Flow. Our investment philosophy places emphasis on fundamental analysis from an investor’s perspective and has a distinct value orientation. We intend to focus on companies with significant asset or enterprise value in which we can invest at relatively low multiples of normalized operating cash flow. Additionally, we anticipate investing in companies with a demonstrated ability or credible plan to de-lever. Typically, we will not invest in start-up companies, companies having speculative business plans or structures that could impair capital over the long-term although we may target certain earlier stage companies that have yet to reach profitability.
Experienced Management Team.  We generally will look to invest in portfolio companies with an experienced management team and proper incentive arrangements, including equity compensation, to induce management to succeed and to act in concert with our interests as investors.
Strong Relative Position In Its Market.    We intend to target companies with what we believe to be established and leading market positions within their respective markets and well-developed long-term business strategies.
Exit Strategy.    We generally intend to invest in companies that we believe will provide us with the opportunity to exit our investments in three to eight years, including through (1) the repayment of the remaining principal outstanding at maturity, (2) the recapitalization of the company resulting in our debt investments being repaid and (3) the sale of the company resulting in the repayment of all of its outstanding debt.
Geography. As a business development company, we will invest at least 70% of our investments in U.S. companies. To the extent we invest in non-U.S. companies, we intend to do so in accordance with 1940 Act limitations and only in jurisdictions with established legal frameworks and a history of respecting creditor rights.
Investment Process
Our investment process consists of the following five distinct stages.
Source.
Oaktree’s Strategic Credit team has dedicated sourcing professionals and also leverages its strong market presences and relationships across Oaktree’s global platform, which includes more than 250 highly-experienced investment professionals, to gain access to opportunities from advisers, sponsors, banks, management teams, capital raising advisers and other sources. Our Investment Adviser is a trusted partner to financial sponsors and management teams based on its long-term commitment and focus on lending across economic cycles. We believe this will give us access to proprietary deal flow and first looks at

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investment opportunities and that we are well-positioned for difficult and complex transactions. In 2016, Oaktree’s Strategic Credit team evaluated more than 200 potential direct lending opportunities with total transaction value of approximately $30 billion. More than 85% of these potential direct lending opportunities were for transactions of $50 million or larger, and Oaktree’s Strategic Credit team continues to see a meaningful pipeline of sizeable transactions.
Screen Using Investment Criteria.
We expect to be highly selective in making new investments. The initial screening process will typically include a review of the proposed capital structure of the portfolio company, including level of assets or enterprise value coverage, an assessment by our Investment Adviser of the company’s management team and its equity ownership levels as well as the viability of its long-term business model, and a review of forecasted financial statements and liquidity profile. In addition, our Investment Adviser may assess the prospect of industry or macroeconomic catalysts that may create enhanced value in the investment as well as the potential ability to enforce creditor rights, particularly where collateral is located outside of the United States.
Research.
Prior to making any new investment, our Investment Adviser intends to engage in an extensive due diligence process led by investment analysts assigned to each transaction. The analysts will assess a company’s products, services, competitive position in its markets, barriers to entry and operating and financial performance, as well as the growth potential of its markets. In performing this evaluation, the analysts may use financial, descriptive and other due diligence materials provided by the target company, commissioned third party reports and internal sources, including members of the investment team, industry participants and experts with whom our Investment Adviser has relationships. As part of the research process, our Investment Adviser’s analysts typically perform a “what-if” analysis that explores a range of values for each proposed investment and a range of potential credit events.
Evaluate.
Our Investment Adviser assesses each potential investment through a robust, collaborative decision-making process. Our Investment Adviser applies disciplined investment criteria and evaluates potential risk and reward of each investment with significant focus on downside risk. Our Investment Adviser sizes investments at the portfolio level across a variety of characteristics, including based on the investment criteria described above.
Monitor.
Our Investment Adviser prioritizes managing risk. In managing our portfolio, our Investment Adviser intends to closely monitor each portfolio company and be well-positioned to make hold and exit decisions when credit events occur, our collateral becomes overvalued or opportunities with more attractive risk/reward profiles are identified. Investment analysts will be assigned to each investment to monitor industry developments, review company financial statements, attend company presentations and regularly speak with company management. In circumstances where a particular investment is underperforming, our Investment Adviser intends to employ a variety of strategies to maximize its recovery based on the specific facts and circumstances of the underperforming investment, including actively working with the management to restructure all or a portion of the business, explore the possibility of a sale or merger of all or a portion of the assets, recapitalize or refinance the balance sheet, negotiate deferrals or other concessions from existing creditors and arrange new liquidity or new equity contributions. We believe that our Investment Adviser’s experience with restructurings and our access to our Investment Adviser’s deep knowledge, expertise and contacts in the distressed debt area will help us preserve the value of our investments.
Due Diligence Process
As part of the underwriting process, our Investment Adviser completes a rigorous due diligence process that focuses on four key areas:
Company Analysis. Our Investment Adviser actively engages and assesses company management teams. The focus of this analysis also includes identifying and understanding key business and demand drivers. Our Investment Adviser strives to evaluate core risks within businesses and industries and to complete the analysis by thinking like company ownership when evaluating cash flows.
Financial Analysis. Our Investment Adviser analyzes the consistency, stability and reliability of cash flows in addition to evaluating the quality of earnings and conversion of EBITDA to cash. Our Investment Adviser also reviews historical performance through economic cycles, analyzes the potential impact of a downturn in the prospective portfolio company’s end markets and compares the prospective portfolio company’s key metrics to those of its competitors.

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Down-side Focus. Our Investment Adviser considers the impact on the prospective portfolio company’s business and cash flows under a number of downside case scenarios and develops an exit strategy in the event of the downside case. There is also a focus on potential risks to business models. Following this analysis, our Investment Adviser considers appropriate risk mitigants, including the structure of the investment and affirmative, negative and financial covenants.
Value. Our Investment Adviser analyzes the risk/reward potential of each new investment relative to other opportunities in the industry and market as well as overall industry valuation trends as compared to the industry risk profile. As part of this analysis, our Investment Adviser considers the cost of capital to competitors as well as alternative investment options. Our Investment Adviser also considers the value of liquidity to our business and operations as well as appropriate illiquidity premiums where we are unlikely to acquire liquid securities.
Investments
We seek to generate a stable source of current income while minimizing the risk of principal loss and, to a lesser extent, capital appreciation by providing middle-market companies primarily with first lien senior secured debt financings that pay us interest at a floating rate. We seek to structure our debt investments to provide downside protection through strong credit protections, including default penalties, information rights and affirmative, negative and financial covenants, such as limitations on debt incurrence, lien protection and prohibitions on dividends, although not all of our investments will meet each of these criteria. Our Investment Adviser has expertise in creative, efficient structuring and institutional knowledge of bankruptcy and restructurings enabling our Investment Adviser to focus on risk control. Going forward, we expect most of our debt investments to be collateralized by a first lien on the assets of the portfolio company. As of September 30, 2017, 89.5% of our portfolio at fair value consisted of debt investments that were secured by first or second priority liens on the assets of the portfolio company.
Debt Investments
We intend to tailor the terms of each investment by negotiating a structure that seeks to protect our rights and manage our risk while creating incentives for the portfolio company to achieve its business plan. A substantial source of return is monthly or quarterly cash interest that we collect on our debt investments. We expect that our Investment Adviser will focus on middle-market companies, which we define as companies with enterprise values of between $100 and $750 million. Going forward, we expect our portfolio to include primarily first lien senior secured floating rate loans although we may also make other investments.
First Lien Loans.    Our first lien loans generally have terms of three to seven years, provide for a variable or fixed interest rate, contain prepayment penalties and are secured by a first priority security interest in all existing and future assets of the borrower. We target first lien loans where interest is paid on a floating rate basis, often with a floor, based on the LIBOR rate. Our first lien loans may take many forms, including revolving lines of credit, term loans and acquisition lines of credit.
Unitranche Loans.    Our unitranche loans generally have terms of five to seven years and provide for a variable or fixed interest rate, contain prepayment penalties and are generally secured by a first priority security interest in all existing and future assets of the borrower. Our unitranche loans may take many forms, including revolving lines of credit, term loans and acquisition lines of credit.
Second Lien Loans.    Our second lien loans generally have terms of five to eight years, provide for a variable or fixed interest rate, contain prepayment penalties and are secured by a second priority security interest in all existing and future assets of the borrower. Our second lien loans may include payment-in-kind, or PIK, interest, which represents contractual interest accrued and added to the principal that generally becomes due at maturity.
Unsecured Loans.    Our unsecured investments generally have terms of five to ten years and provide for a fixed interest rate. We may make unsecured investments on a stand-alone basis, or in connection with a senior secured loan, a junior secured loan or a “one-stop” financing. Our unsecured investments may include PIK interest and an equity component, such as warrants to purchase common stock in the portfolio company.
Equity Investments
When we make a debt investment, we may be granted equity in the company in the same class of security as the sponsor receives upon funding. In addition, from time to time we may make non-control, equity co-investments in connection with private equity sponsors. We generally seek to structure our equity investments, such as direct equity co-investments, to provide us with minority rights provisions and event-driven put rights. We also seek to obtain limited registration rights in connection with these investments, which may include “piggyback” registration rights.


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FSFR Glick JV
We have invested in FSFR Glick JV, which as of September 30, 2017, consisted of a portfolio of loans to 23 different borrowers in industries similar to the companies in our portfolio. FSFR Glick JV invests in middle-market and other corporate debt securities, including traditional senior debt that are secured by some or all of the company’s assets.
Portfolio Management
Active Involvement in our Portfolio Companies
As a business development company, we are obligated to offer to provide significant managerial assistance to our portfolio companies and to provide it if requested. We provide managerial assistance to most of our portfolio companies as a general practice and we seek investments where such assistance is appropriate. We monitor the financial trends of each portfolio company to assess the appropriate course of action for each company and to evaluate overall portfolio quality. We have several methods of evaluating and monitoring the performance of our investments, including the following:
Review of monthly and quarterly financial statements and financial projections for portfolio companies;
Periodic and regular contact with portfolio company management to discuss financial position requirements and accomplishments;
Attendance at board meetings;
Periodic formal update interviews with portfolio company management and, if appropriate, the private equity sponsor; and
Assessment of business development success, including product development, profitability and the portfolio company’s overall adherence to its business plan.
Valuation of Portfolio Investments
As a business development company, we generally invest in illiquid senior loans issued by private middle-market companies. All of our Level 3 investments are recorded at fair value as determined in good faith by our Board of Directors. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Critical Accounting Policies- Investment Valuation” for a description of our investment valuation processes and procedures.
Competition
We compete for investments with other business development companies, public and private funds (including hedge funds, mezzanine funds and collateralized loan obligations) and private equity funds (to the extent they provide an alternative form of financing), as well as traditional financial services companies such as commercial and investment banks, commercial financing companies and other sources of financing. Many of these entities have greater financial and managerial resources than we do. We believe we are able to be competitive with these entities primarily on the basis of the experience and contacts of our management team, our responsive and efficient investment analysis and decision-making processes, the investment terms we offer, and our willingness to make smaller investments.
We believe that some of our competitors make loans with total rates of returns that are comparable to or lower than the returns that we target. Therefore, we do not seek to compete solely on the interest rates that we offer to potential portfolio companies. See “Risk Factors - Risks Relating to Our Business and Structure - We may face increasing competition for investment opportunities, which could reduce returns and result in losses.”
Employees
We do not have any employees. Our day-to-day investment operations are managed by Oaktree Capital Management, L.P. as our Investment Adviser. See “-New Investment Advisory Agreement.” Our Investment Adviser and its affiliates employ more than 250 investment professionals. In addition, we reimburse our administrator, Oaktree Administrator, for the allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by it in performing its obligations under an administration agreement, or the New Administration Agreement, including our allocable portion of the costs of compensation of our Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer, their staffs and other non-investment professionals at Oaktree that perform duties for us. See “- New Administrative Services Agreement.”
Properties
We do not own any real estate or other physical properties material to our operations. Our administrative and principal executive offices are located at 333 South Grand Avenue, 28th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90071. We believe that our office facilities are suitable and adequate for our business as it is presently conducted.

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New Investment Advisory Agreement
The following is a description of the New Investment Advisory Agreement, which has been in effect since October 17, 2017.
Management Services
Oaktree is registered as an investment adviser under the Advisers Act. Subject to the overall supervision of our Board of Directors since October 17, 2017, Oaktree has managed our day-to-day operations and provided us with investment advisory services. Under the New Investment Advisory Agreement, Oaktree:
determines the composition of our portfolio, the nature and timing of the changes to our portfolio and the manner of implementing such changes;
identifies, evaluates and negotiates the structure of the investments we make;
executes, closes, monitors and services the investments we make;
determines what securities and other assets we purchase, retain or sell; and
performs due diligence on prospective portfolio companies.
The New Investment Advisory Agreement provides that Oaktree’s services are not exclusive to us and Oaktree is generally free to furnish similar services to other entities so long as its services to us are not impaired.
Management Fee
Under the New Investment Advisory Agreement, we pay Oaktree a fee for its services under the investment advisory agreement consisting of two components: a base management fee and an incentive fee. The cost of both the base management fee payable to Oaktree and any incentive fees earned by Oaktree is ultimately borne by our common stockholders.
Base Management Fee
Under the New Investment Advisory Agreement, the base management fee on total gross assets, including any investment made with borrowings, but excluding cash and cash equivalents, is 1.00%.
Incentive Fee
The incentive fee consists of two parts. Under the New Investment Advisory Agreement, the first part of the incentive fee, which is referred to as the incentive fee on income, is calculated and payable quarterly in arrears based upon our “pre-incentive fee net investment income” for the immediately preceding quarter. The payment of the incentive fee on income is subject to payment of a preferred return to investors each quarter (i.e., a “hurdle rate”), expressed as a rate of return on the value of our net assets at the end of the most recently completed quarter, of 1.50%, subject to a “catch up” feature.
For this purpose, “pre-incentive fee net investment income” means interest income, dividend income and any other income (including any other fees such as commitment, origination, structuring, diligence and consulting fees or other fees that we receive from portfolio companies, other than fees for providing managerial assistance) accrued during the fiscal quarter, minus our operating expenses for the quarter (including the base management fee, expenses payable under the New Administration Agreement and any interest expense and dividends paid on any issued and outstanding preferred stock, but excluding the incentive fee). Pre-incentive fee net investment income includes, in the case of investments with a deferred interest feature (such as original issue discount, or OID, debt instruments with PIK interest and zero coupon securities), accrued income that we have not yet received in cash. Pre-incentive fee net investment income does not include any realized capital gains, realized capital losses or unrealized capital appreciation or depreciation.
Under the New Investment Advisory Agreement, the calculation of the incentive fee on income for each quarter is as follows:
No incentive fee is payable to Oaktree in any quarter in which our pre-incentive fee net investment income does not exceed the preferred return rate of 1.50% (the “preferred return”) on net assets.
100% of our pre-incentive fee net investment income, if any, that exceeds the preferred return but is less than or equal to 1.8182% in any fiscal quarter is payable to Oaktree. We refer to this portion of the incentive fee on income as the “catch-up” provision, and it is intended to provide Oaktree with an incentive fee of 17.5% on all of our pre-incentive fee net investment income when our pre-incentive fee net investment income reaches 1.8182% on net assets in any fiscal quarter.

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For any quarter in which our pre-incentive fee net investment income exceeds 1.8182% on net assets, the subordinated incentive fee on income is equal to 17.5% of the amount of our pre-incentive fee net investment income, as the preferred return and catch-up will have been achieved.
There is no accumulation of amounts on the hurdle rate from quarter to quarter and accordingly there is no clawback of amounts previously paid if subsequent quarters are below the quarterly hurdle.
The following is a graphical representation of the calculation of the incentive fee on income under the New Investment Advisory Agreement:

Quarterly Incentive Fee on Income
Pre-incentive fee net investment income
(expressed as a percentage of net assets)
percentageofpreincentivefeeg.jpg
Percentage of pre-incentive fee net investment income
allocated to the incentive fee on income
Under the New Investment Advisory Agreement, the second part of the incentive fee will be determined and payable in arrears as of the end of each fiscal year (or upon termination of the investment advisory agreement, as of the termination date) commencing with the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019 and will equal 17.5% of our realized capital gains, if any, on a cumulative basis from the beginning of the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019 through the end of each fiscal year, computed net of all realized capital losses and unrealized capital depreciation on a cumulative basis, less the aggregate amount of any previously paid capital gain incentive fees under the New Investment Advisory Agreement. Any realized capital gains, realized capital losses, unrealized capital appreciation and unrealized capital depreciation with respect to the Company’s portfolio as of the end of the fiscal year ending September 30, 2018 will be excluded from the calculations of the second part of the incentive fee.
Examples of Quarterly Incentive Fee Calculation under the New Investment Advisory Agreement (A) 
Example 1: Incentive Fee on Income for Each Quarter
Alternative 1
Assumptions
Investment income (including interest, dividends, fees, etc.) = 1.75%
Preferred return under the New Investment Advisory Agreement1 = 1.50%
Management fee under the New Investment Advisory Agreement2 = 0.25%
Other expenses (legal, accounting, custodian, transfer agent, etc.) = 0.20%
Pre-incentive fee net investment income
(investment income - (management fee + other expenses)) = 1.30%

Pre-incentive fee net investment income does not exceed the preferred return under the New Investment Advisory Agreement, therefore there is no incentive fee on income under the New Investment Advisory Agreement.
Alternative 2
Assumptions
Investment income (including interest, dividends, fees, etc.) = 2.25%
Preferred return under the New Investment Advisory Agreement1 = 1.50%
Management fee under the New Investment Advisory Agreement2 = 0.25%
Other expenses (legal, accounting, custodian, transfer agent, etc.) = 0.20%
Pre-incentive fee net investment income
(investment income - (management fee + other expenses)) = 1.80%
Incentive fee = 17.5% × pre-incentive fee net investment income, subject to “catch-up”3 

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= 100% × (1.80% - 1.50%)
= 0.30%

Alternative 3
Assumptions
Investment income (including interest, dividends, fees, etc.) = 3.5%
Preferred return under the New Investment Advisory Agreement1 = 1.50%
Management fee under the New Investment Advisory Agreement2 = 0.25%
Other expenses (legal, accounting, custodian, transfer agent, etc.) = 0.20%
Pre-incentive fee net investment income
(investment income - (management fee + other expenses)) = 3.05%
Incentive fee = 17.5% × pre-incentive fee net investment income, subject to “catch-up”3 
Incentive fee = 100% × “catch-up” + (17.5% × (pre-incentive fee net investment income - 1.8182%))
Catch-up = 1.8182% - 1.50% = 0.3182%
Incentive fee = (100% × 0.3182%) + (17.5% × (3.05% - 1.8182%))
= 0.3182% + (17.5% × 1.2318%)
= 0.3182% + 0.2158%
= 0.534%
Example 2: Incentive Fee on Capital Gains under the New Investment Advisory Agreement
Assumptions
Year 1: $10 million investment made in Company A (“Investment A”), $10 million investment made in Company B (“Investment B”), $10 million investment made in Company C (“Investment C”), $10 million investment made in Company D (“Investment D”) and $10 million investment made in Company E (“Investment E”).
Year 2: Investment A sold for $20 million, fair market value (“FMV”) of Investment B determined to be $8 million, FMV of Investment C determined to be $12 million, and FMV of Investments D and E each determined to be $10 million.
Year 3: FMV of Investment B determined to be $8 million, FMV of Investment C determined to be $14 million, FMV of Investment D determined to be $14 million and FMV of Investment E determined to be $16 million.
Year 4: Investment D sold for $12 million, FMV of Investment B determined to be $10 million, FMV of Investment C determined to be $16 million and FMV of Investment E determined to be $14 million.
Year 5: Investment C sold for $20 million, FMV of Investment B determined to be $14 million and FMV of Investment E determined to be $10 million.
Year 6: Investment B sold for $16 million and FMV of Investment E determined to be $8 million.
Year 7: Investment E sold for $8 million and FMV.

These assumptions are summarized in the following chart:
 
Investment A
Investment B
Investment C
Investment D
Investment E
Cumulative Unrealized Capital Depreciation
Cumulative Realized Capital Losses
Cumulative Realized Capital Gains
Year 1
$10 million (cost basis)
$10 million (cost basis)
$10 million (cost basis)
$10 million (cost basis)
$10 million (cost basis)
--
--
--
Year 2
$20 million (sale price)
$8 million
FMV
$12 million FMV
$10 million FMV
$10 million FMV
$2 million
--
$10 million
Year 3
--
$8 million
FMV
$14 million FMV
$14 million FMV
$16 million FMV
$2 million
--
$10 million
Year 4
--
$10 million FMV
$16 million FMV
$12 million (sale price)
$14 million FMV
--
--
$12 million
Year 5
--
$14 million FMV
$20 million (sale price)
--
$10 million FMV
--
--
$22 million
Year 6
--
$16 million (sale price)
--
--
$8 million FMV
$2 million
--
$28 million
Year 7
--
--
--
--
$8 million (sale price)
--
$2 million
$28 million

The Incentive Fee on Capital Gains under the New Investment Advisory Agreement would be:
Year 1:    None

Year 2:    Capital Gains Fee = 17.5% multiplied by ($10 million realized capital gains on sale of Investment A less $2 million cumulative capital depreciation) = $1.4 million


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Year 3:    Capital Gains Fee = (17.5% multiplied by ($10 million cumulative realized capital gains less $2 million cumulative capital depreciation)) less $1.4 million cumulative Capital Gains Fee previously paid = $1.4 million less $1.4 million = $0.00 million

Year 4:    Capital Gains Fee = (17.5% multiplied by ($12 million cumulative realized capital gains)) less $1.4 million cumulative Capital Gains Fee previously paid = $2.1 million less $1.4 million = $0.7 million

Year 5:    Capital Gains Fee = (17.5% multiplied by ($22 million cumulative realized capital gains)) less $2.1 million cumulative Capital Gains Fee previously paid = $3.85 million less $2.1 million = $1.75 million

Year 6:    Capital Gains Fee = (17.5% multiplied by ($28 million cumulative realized capital gains less $2 million cumulative capital depreciation)) less $3.85 million cumulative Capital Gains Fee previously paid = $4.55 million less $3.85 million = $0.70 million

Year 7:    Capital Gains Fee = (17.5% multiplied by ($28 million cumulative realized capital gains less $2 million cumulative realized capital losses)) less $4.55 million cumulative Capital Gains Fee previously paid = $4.55 million less $4.55 million = $0.00 million
__________ 
(A) Solely for purposes of these illustrative examples, we have assumed that the Company has not incurred any leverage. However, we have in the past and expect to continue in the future to use leverage to partially finance our investments.

1.
Represents 6.0% annualized preferred return.
2.
Represents 1.0% annualized management fee.
3.
The “catch-up” provision is intended to provide our Investment Adviser with an incentive fee of 17.5% on all of our pre-incentive fee net investment income as if a preferred return did not apply when our net investment income exceeds 1.50% in any calendar quarter and is not applied once our Investment Adviser has received 17.5% of investment income in a quarter. The “catch-up” portion of our pre-incentive fee net investment income is the portion that exceeds the 1.50% preferred return but is less than or equal to approximately 1.8182% (that is, 1.50% divided by (1 - 0.175)) in any fiscal quarter.
Collection and Disbursement of Fees Owed to Our Former Adviser
Under the Former Investment Advisory Agreement described below, both the base management fee and incentive fee on income were calculated and paid to our Former Adviser at the end of each quarter. In order to ensure that our Former Adviser receives any compensation earned during the quarter ending December 31, 2017, the initial payment of the base management fee and incentive fee on income under the New Investment Advisory Agreement will cover the entire quarter in which the New Investment Advisory Agreement became effective, and be calculated at a blended rate that will reflect fee rates under the respective investment advisory agreements for the portion of the quarter in which our Former Adviser and Oaktree were serving as investment adviser. This structure will allow Oaktree to pay our Former Adviser in early 2018, the pro rata portion of the fees that were earned by, but not paid to, our Former Adviser for services rendered to us prior to October 17, 2017.
Duration and Termination
Unless earlier terminated as described below, the New Investment Advisory Agreement will remain in effect until October 17, 2019 and thereafter from year-to-year if approved annually by our Board or by the affirmative vote of the holders of a majority of our outstanding voting securities, including, in either case, approval by a majority of our directors who are not interested persons. The New Investment Advisory Agreement will automatically terminate in the event of its assignment. The New Investment Advisory Agreement may be terminated by either party without penalty upon 60 days’ written notice to the other. The New Investment Advisory Agreement may also be terminated, without penalty, upon the vote of a majority of our outstanding voting securities.
Indemnification
The New Investment Advisory Agreement provides that, absent willful misfeasance, bad faith or gross negligence in the performance of their respective duties or by reason of the reckless disregard of their respective duties and obligations, Oaktree and its officers, managers, partners, agents, employees, controlling persons, members (or their owners) and any other person or entity affiliated with it, are entitled to indemnification from us for any damages, liabilities, costs and expenses (including reasonable attorneys’ fees and amounts reasonably paid in settlement) arising from the rendering of Oaktree’s services under the New Investment Advisory Agreement or otherwise as our investment adviser.

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Fee Waiver

         For the two-year period commencing on October 17, 2017, Oaktree will waive, to the extent necessary, any management or incentive fees payable under the New Investment Advisory Agreement that exceed what would have been paid to the Former Adviser in the aggregate under the Former Investment Advisory Agreement.
Organization of our Investment Adviser
Our Investment Adviser is a Delaware limited partnership that is registered as an investment adviser under the Advisers Act. The principal address of our Investment Adviser is 333 South Grand Avenue, 28th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90071.
Board Approval of the New Investment Advisory Agreement
The then-current members of our Board of Directors met in person with Oaktree to consider the New Investment Advisory Agreement on June 20, 2017 and July 13, 2017. At the in person meeting held on July 13, 2017, such members of the Board of Directors, including all of the then-current independent directors, unanimously approved the New Investment Advisory Agreement. Such independent directors met separately with independent counsel on multiple occasions in connection with their review of the New Investment Advisory Agreement and the Transaction. In reaching its decision to approve the New Investment Advisory Agreement, our Board of Directors, including all of the then-current independent directors, reviewed a significant amount of information, which had been furnished by Oaktree at the request of independent counsel, on behalf of the independent directors. In reaching a decision to approve the New Investment Advisory Agreement, the then-current members of our Board of Directors considered, among other things:

the nature, extent and quality of services to be performed by Oaktree;
the investment performance of us and funds managed by Oaktree;
the expected costs of services to be provided and the anticipated profits to be realized by Oaktree and its affiliates from their relationship with us;
the possible economies of scale that would be realized due to our growth;
whether fee levels reflect such economies of scale for the benefit of investors; and
comparisons of services to be rendered to and fees to be paid by us with the services provided by and the fees paid to other investment advisers and the services provided to and the fees paid by other Oaktree clients.
The then-current members of our Board of Directors noted that the terms of the New Investment Advisory Agreement would in comparison to the Former Investment Advisory Agreement:

maintain the base management fee at 1.00% of gross assets;
decrease the rate of the income incentive fee from 20.0% to 17.5%;
decrease the rate of the capital gains incentive fee from 20.0% to 17.5%;
increase the catch-up rate from 50.0% to 100.0%, which may have the effect of increasing the income-based incentive fee payable to Oaktree; and
eliminate a capital gains incentive fee until the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019.
The Board of Directors also considered other investment management services to be provided to us, such as the provision of managerial assistance, monitoring adherence to our investment restrictions and monitoring compliance with various of our policies and procedures and with applicable securities laws and regulations. The then-current members of our Board of Directors discussed Oaktree’s cyber security programs and those of its service providers. Based on the factors above, as well as those discussed below, the then-current members of our Board of Directors concluded that they were satisfied with the nature, extent and quality of the services to be provided to us by Oaktree.
No single factor was determinative of the decision of the Board of Directors, including all of the then-current independent directors, to approve the New Investment Advisory Agreement and individual directors may have weighed certain factors differently. Throughout the process, the independent directors were advised by independent counsel. Following this process, the then-current members of the Board of Directors, including all of the then-current independent directors, unanimously voted to approve the New Investment Advisory Agreement subject to stockholder approval. Our stockholders approved the New Investment Advisory Agreement at the Special Meeting.

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Payment of Our Expenses
Our primary operating expenses are the payment of (i) a base management fee and any incentive fees as described below in “-Former Investment Advisory Agreement” with respect to the period prior to October 17, 2017 and as described above in “-New Investment Advisory Agreement” with respect to the period subsequent to that date and (ii) the allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by our Former Administrator or Oaktree Administrator, as applicable, in performing its obligations under the Former Administration Agreement or New Administration Agreement, as applicable. Our management fee compensates our investment adviser for its work in identifying, evaluating, negotiating, executing and servicing our investments. We generally bear all other expenses of our operations and transactions, including (without limitation) fees and expenses relating to:

expenses of offering our debt and equity securities;
the investigation and monitoring of our investments;
the cost of calculating our net asset value;
the cost of effecting sales and repurchases of shares of our common stock and other securities;
management and incentive fees payable pursuant to the investment advisory agreement;
fees payable to third parties relating to, or associated with, making investments and valuing investments (including third-party valuation firms);
transfer agent, trustee and custodial fees;
interest payments and other costs related to our borrowings;
fees and expenses associated with marketing efforts (including attendance at investment conferences and similar events);
federal and state registration fees;
any exchange listing fees;
federal, state and local taxes;
independent directors’ fees and expenses;
brokerage commissions;
costs of mailing proxy statements, stockholders’ reports and notices;
costs of preparing government filings, including periodic and current reports with the SEC;
fidelity bond, liability insurance and other insurance premiums; and
printing, mailing, independent accountants and outside legal costs and all other direct expenses incurred by either our administrator or us in connection with administering our business, including payments under the administration agreement.
Former Investment Advisory Agreement
The following is a description of the Former Investment Advisory Agreement, which was terminated on October 17, 2017. The Former Investment Advisory Agreement, dated June 27, 2013, was most recently approved by our Board of Directors on August 7, 2017, and was effective June 27, 2013 through its termination on October 17, 2017.
Management Fee
Through October 17, 2017, we paid our Former Adviser a fee for its services under the Former Investment Advisory Agreement consisting of two components: a base management fee and an incentive fee. The cost of both the base management fee paid to our Former Adviser and any incentive fees earned by our Former Adviser were ultimately borne by our common stockholders.
Base Management Fee
The base management fee was calculated at an annual rate of 1.0% of our gross assets, including any borrowings for investment purposes but excluding cash and cash equivalents. The base management fee was payable quarterly in arrears and the fee for any partial month or quarter was appropriately prorated.
Incentive Fee
The incentive fee paid to our Former Adviser had two parts. The first part was calculated and payable quarterly in arrears based on our pre-incentive fee net investment income for the immediately preceding fiscal quarter. Pre-incentive fee net investment income, expressed as a rate of return on the value of our net assets at the end of the immediately preceding quarter, was compared to a “hurdle rate” of 1.5% per quarter, subject to a “catch-up” provision measured as of the end of each quarter. Our net investment income used to calculate this part of the incentive fee was also included in the amount of our gross assets used to calculate the 1.0% base management fee. The operation of the incentive fee with respect to our pre-incentive fee net investment income for each quarter was as follows:

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No incentive fee was payable to the Former Adviser in any fiscal quarter in which our pre-incentive fee net investment income did not exceed the preferred return rate of 1.5% (the “preferred return”);
50% of our pre-incentive fee net investment income, if any, that exceeded the preferred return rate but was less than or equal to 2.5% in any fiscal quarter was payable to our Former Adviser. We refer to this portion of our pre-incentive fee net investment income (which exceeds the preferred return rate but is less than or equal to 2.5%) as the “catch-up.” The “catch-up” provision was intended to provide our Former Adviser with an incentive fee of 20% on all of our pre-incentive fee net investment income as if a preferred return rate did not apply when our pre-incentive fee net investment income exceeded 2.5% in any quarter; and
20% of the amount of our pre-incentive fee net investment income, if any, that exceeds 2.5% in any quarter is payable to our Former Adviser once the preferred return is reached and the catch-up is achieved (20% of all pre-incentive fee net investment income thereafter is allocated to Fifth Street Management).
There was no accumulation of amounts on the hurdle rate from quarter to quarter and accordingly there was no clawback of amounts previously paid if subsequent quarters were below the quarterly hurdle and there was no delay of payment if prior quarters were below the quarterly hurdle.

The following is a graphical representation of the calculation of the income-related portion of the incentive fee:

Quarterly Incentive Fee on Income based on Pre-incentive fee net investment income
(expressed as a percentage of net assets)

percentageofpreincentiveform.jpg
Percentage of pre-incentive fee net investment income
allocated to income-related portion of incentive fee
The second part of the incentive fee was determined and payable in arrears as of the end of each fiscal year (or upon termination of the Former Investment Advisory Agreement, as of the termination date) commencing on September 30, 2013 and equaled 20% of our realized capital gains, if any, on a cumulative basis from inception through the end of each fiscal year, computed net of all realized capital losses and unrealized capital depreciation on a cumulative basis, less the aggregate amount of any previously paid capital gain incentive fees.
Duration and Termination
The Former Investment Advisory Agreement terminated pursuant to its terms on October 17, 2017.
Indemnification
The Former Investment Advisory Agreement provided indemnification similar to that described above under “-New Investment Advisory Agreement-Indemnification.”
New Administrative Services Agreement
We entered into the New Administration Agreement with Oaktree Administrator on October 17, 2017. Pursuant to the New Administration Agreement, Oaktree Administrator provides administrative services to us necessary for our operations, which include providing office facilities, equipment, clerical, bookkeeping and record keeping services at such facilities and such other services as Oaktree Administrator, subject to review by our Board of Directors, shall from time to time deem to be necessary or useful to perform its obligations under the New Administration Agreement. Oaktree Administrator may, on behalf of us, conduct relations and negotiate agreements with custodians, trustees, depositories, attorneys, underwriters, brokers and dealers, corporate fiduciaries, insurers, banks and such other persons in any such other capacity deemed to be necessary or desirable. Oaktree Administrator will make reports to our Board of Directors of its performance of obligations under the New Administration Agreement and furnish advice and recommendations with respect to such other aspects of our business and affairs, in each case, as it shall determine to be desirable or as reasonably required by our Board of Directors; provided that Oaktree Administrator shall not provide any investment advice or recommendation.

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Oaktree Administrator will also provide portfolio collection functions for interest income, fees and warrants and is responsible for the financial and other records that we are required to maintain, and prepares, prints and disseminates reports to our stockholders and all other materials filed with the SEC. In addition, Oaktree Administrator will assist us in determining and publishing our net asset value, overseeing the preparation and filing of our tax returns, and generally overseeing the payment of our expenses and the performance of administrative and professional services rendered to us by others. Oaktree Administrator may also offer to provide, on our behalf, managerial assistance to our portfolio companies.
For providing these services, facilities and personnel, we will reimburse Oaktree Administrator the allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by Oaktree Administrator in performing its obligations under the New Administration Agreement, including our allocable portion of the rent of the Company’s principal executive offices at market rates and the Company’s allocable portion of the costs of compensation and related expenses of our Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer, their staffs and other non-investment professionals at Oaktree that perform duties for us. Such reimbursement is at cost, with no profit to, or markup by, Oaktree Administrator.
The New Administration Agreement provides that, absent willful misfeasance, bad faith or gross negligence in the performance of their respective duties or by reason of the reckless disregard of their respective duties and obligations, Oaktree Administrator and its officers, managers, partners, agents, employees, controlling persons, members (or their owners) and any other person or entity affiliated with it, are entitled to indemnification from us for any damages, liabilities, costs and expenses (including reasonable attorneys’ fees and amounts reasonably paid in settlement) arising from the rendering of Oaktree Administrator’s services under the New Administration Agreement or otherwise as our administrator. Unless earlier terminated as described below, the New Administration Agreement will remain in effect until October 17, 2019 and thereafter from year-to-year if approved annually by our Board of Directors or by the affirmative vote of the holders of a majority of our outstanding voting securities, including, in either case, approval by a majority of our directors who are not interested persons. The New Administration Agreement may be terminated by either party without penalty upon 60 days’ written notice to the other. The New Administration Agreement may also be terminated, without penalty, upon the vote of a majority of our outstanding voting securities.
Former Administration Agreement
The Former Administration Agreement was in effect throughout our 2017 fiscal year and terminated by its terms on October 17, 2017. Our Former Administrator was a wholly-owned subsidiary of Fifth Street Management. Pursuant to the Former Administration Agreement, our Former Administrator provided services substantially similar to those provided by Oaktree Administrator as described above under “-New Administrative Services Agreement.” For providing these services, facilities and personnel, we reimbursed the Former Administrator the allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by it in performing its obligations under the Former Administration Agreement, including rent and our allocable portion of the costs of compensation and related expenses of our Chief Financial Officer and Chief Compliance Officer and their staffs. Such reimbursement was at cost, with no profit to, or markup by, our Former Administrator. Our allocable portion of our Former Administrator’s costs was determined based upon costs attributable to our operations versus costs attributable to the operations of other entities for which our Former Administrator provided administrative services.
The Former Administration Agreement provided indemnification similar to that described under "- New Administrative Services Agreement."
License Agreement
We were party to a license agreement with an affiliate of our Former Adviser pursuant to which such affiliate granted us a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to use the name “Fifth Street” for so long as our Former Adviser or one of its affiliates remained our investment adviser. That license agreement terminated on October 17, 2017.
Material Conflicts of Interest
Our executive officers and directors, and certain members of our Investment Adviser, serve or may serve as officers, directors or principals of entities that operate in the same or a related line of business as we do or of investment funds managed by our affiliates. For example, Oaktree presently serves as the investment adviser to OCSL, a publicly-traded business development company with a portfolio of approximately $1.5 billion at fair value as of September 30, 2017. OCSL has historically invested in debt and equity of small and mid-sized companies, primarily in connection with investments by private equity sponsors, including in middle-market leveraged companies similar to those we target for investment. In addition, though not the primary focus of its investment portfolio, OCSL’s investments also include floating rate senior loans. Therefore, there may be certain investment opportunities that satisfy the investment criteria for both OCSL and us. OCSL operates as a distinct and separate public company and any investment in our common stock will not be an investment in OCSL. In addition, all of

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our executive officers and four of our independent directors serve in substantially similar capacities for OCSL. Oaktree and its affiliates also manage and sub-advise private investment funds and accounts, and may manage other such funds and accounts in the future, which have investment mandates that are similar, in whole and in part, with ours. Accordingly, they may have obligations to investors in those entities, the fulfillment of which might not be in the best interests of us or our stockholders. For example, the personnel of our Investment Adviser may face conflicts of interest in the allocation of investment opportunities to us and such other funds and accounts.
Oaktree has investment allocation guidelines that govern the allocation of investment opportunities among the investment funds and accounts managed or sub-advised by Oaktree and its affiliates. To the extent an investment opportunity is appropriate for us or OCSL or any other investment fund or account managed or sub-advised by Oaktree or its affiliates, Oaktree will adhere to its investment allocation guidelines in order to determine a fair and equitable allocation. We may invest alongside funds and accounts managed or sub-advised by our Investment Adviser and its affiliates in certain circumstances where doing so is consistent with applicable law and SEC staff interpretations. For example, we may invest alongside such accounts consistent with guidance promulgated by the staff of the SEC permitting us and such other accounts to purchase interests in a single class of privately placed securities so long as certain conditions are met, including that our Investment Adviser, acting on our behalf and on behalf of other clients, negotiates no term other than price or terms related to price.
In addition, on October 18, 2017, our Investment Adviser received exemptive relief from the SEC to allow certain managed funds and accounts, each of whose investment adviser is Oaktree or an investment adviser controlling, controlled by or under common control with Oaktree, to participate in negotiated co-investment transactions where doing so is consistent with the applicable registered fund’s or business development company’s investment objective and strategies as well as regulatory requirements and other pertinent factors, and pursuant to the conditions of the exemptive relief. Each potential co-investment opportunity that falls under the terms of the exemptive relief and is appropriate for us and any affiliated fund or account, and satisfies the then-current board-established criteria, will be offered to us and such other eligible funds and accounts. If there is a sufficient amount of securities to satisfy all participants, the securities will be allocated among the participants in accordance with their proposed order size and if there is an insufficient amount of securities to satisfy all participants, the securities will be allocated pro rata based on the investment proposed by the applicable investment adviser to such participant, up to the amount proposed to be invested by each, which is reviewed and approved by an independent committee of legal, compliance and accounting professionals at our Investment Adviser.
Although Oaktree will endeavor to allocate investment opportunities in a fair and equitable manner, we and our common stockholders could be adversely affected to the extent investment opportunities are allocated among us and other investment vehicles managed or sponsored by, or affiliated with, our executive officers, directors and members of our Investment Adviser. We might not participate in each individual opportunity, but will, on an overall basis, be entitled to participate equitably with other entities managed by Oaktree and its affiliates. Oaktree seeks to treat all clients fairly and equitably such that none receive preferential treatment vis-à-vis the others over time, in a manner consistent with its fiduciary duty to each of them; however, in some instances, especially in instances of limited liquidity, the factors may not result in pro rata allocations or may result in situations where certain funds or accounts receive allocations where others do not.
Pursuant to the New Investment Advisory Agreement, our Investment Adviser’s liability is limited and we are required to indemnify our Investment Adviser against certain liabilities. This may lead our Investment Adviser to act in a riskier manner in performing its duties and obligations under the New Investment Advisory Agreement than it would if it were acting for its own account, and creates a potential conflict of interest.
Pursuant to the New Administration Agreement, the Oaktree Administrator furnishes us with the facilities, including our principal executive office, and administrative services necessary to conduct our day-to-day operations. We pay the Oaktree Administrator its allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by the Oaktree Administrator in performing its obligations under the New Administration Agreement, including, without limitation, a portion of the rent at market rates and compensation of our Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer, their respective staffs and other non-investment professionals at Oaktree that perform duties for us.
Available Information
We maintain a website at www.oaktreestrategicincome.com. The information on our website is not incorporated by reference in this annual report on Form 10-K. We make available on or through our website certain reports and amendments to those reports that we file with or furnish to the SEC in accordance with the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act. These include our annual reports on Form 10-K, our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and our current reports

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on Form 8-K. We make this information available on our website free of charge as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file the information with, or furnish it to, the SEC.
Business Development Company Regulations
We have elected to be regulated as a business development company under the 1940 Act. The 1940 Act contains prohibitions and restrictions relating to transactions between business development companies and their affiliates, principal underwriters and affiliates of those affiliates or underwriters. The 1940 Act requires that a majority of our directors be persons other than “interested persons,” as that term is defined in the 1940 Act. In addition, the 1940 Act provides that we may not change the nature of our business so as to cease to be, or to withdraw our election as, a business development company unless approved by a majority of our outstanding voting securities.
The 1940 Act defines “a majority of the outstanding voting securities” as the lesser of (i) 67% or more of the voting securities present at a meeting if the holders of more than 50% of our outstanding voting securities are present or represented by proxy or (ii) more than 50% of our outstanding voting securities.
On October 18, 2017, our Investment Adviser received exemptive relief from the SEC to allow certain managed funds and accounts, each of whose investment adviser is Oaktree or an investment adviser controlling, controlled by or under common control with Oaktree, to participate in negotiated co-investment transactions where doing so is consistent with the applicable registered fund’s or business development company’s investment objective and strategies, as well as regulatory requirements and other pertinent factors, and pursuant to the conditions of the exemptive relief.
We may invest up to 100% of our assets in securities acquired directly from issuers in privately negotiated transactions. With respect to such securities, we may, for the purpose of public resale, be deemed an “underwriter” as that term is defined in the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act. Our intention is to not write (sell) or buy put or call options to manage risks associated with the publicly traded securities of our portfolio companies, except that we may enter into hedging transactions to manage the risks associated with interest rate and foreign exchange fluctuations. However, we may purchase or otherwise receive warrants to purchase the common stock of our portfolio companies in connection with acquisition financing or other investments. Similarly, in connection with an acquisition, we may acquire rights to require the issuers of acquired securities or their affiliates to repurchase such securities under certain circumstances. We also do not intend to acquire securities issued by any investment company that exceed the limits imposed by the 1940 Act. Under these limits, we generally cannot acquire more than three percent of the voting stock of any registered investment company, invest more than five percent of the value of our total assets in the securities of one registered investment company or invest more than 10% of the value of our total assets in the securities of registered investment companies. With regard to that portion of our portfolio invested in securities issued by investment companies, it should be noted that such investments might subject our stockholders to additional expenses. None of these policies is fundamental, and all may be changed without stockholder approval.
Qualifying Assets
Under the 1940 Act, a business development company may not acquire any asset other than assets of the type listed in Section 55(a) of the 1940 Act, which are referred to as qualifying assets, unless, at the time the acquisition is made, qualifying assets represent at least 70% of the company’s total assets. The principal categories of qualifying assets relevant to our business are any of the following:
(1) Securities purchased in transactions not involving any public offering from the issuer of such securities, which issuer (subject to certain limited exceptions) is an eligible portfolio company, or from any person who is, or has been during the preceding 13 months, an affiliated person of an eligible portfolio company, or from any other person, subject to such rules as may be prescribed by the SEC. An eligible portfolio company is defined in the 1940 Act as any issuer which:
(a) is organized under the laws of, and has its principal place of business in, the United States;
(b) is not an investment company (other than a small business investment company wholly owned by the business development company) or a company that would be an investment company but for certain exclusions under the 1940 Act; and
(c) satisfies any of the following:
(i) does not have any class of securities that is traded on a national securities exchange;
(ii) has a class of securities listed on a national securities exchange, but has an aggregate market value of outstanding voting and non-voting common equity of less than $250 million;

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(iii) is controlled by a business development company or a group of companies including a business development company and the business development company has an affiliated person who is a director of the eligible portfolio company; or
(iv) is a small and solvent company having total assets of not more than $4 million and capital and surplus of not less than $2 million;
(2) Securities of any eligible portfolio company that we control;
(3) Securities purchased in a private transaction from a U.S. issuer that is not an investment company or from an affiliated person of the issuer, or in transactions incident thereto, if the issuer is in bankruptcy and subject to reorganization or if the issuer, immediately prior to the purchase of its securities was unable to meet its obligations as they came due without material assistance other than conventional lending or financing arrangements;
(4) Securities of an eligible portfolio company purchased from any person in a private transaction if there is no ready market for such securities and we already own 60% of the outstanding equity of the eligible portfolio company;
(5) Securities received in exchange for or distributed on or with respect to securities described in (1) through (4) above, or pursuant to the exercise of warrants or rights relating to such securities; or
(6) Cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities or high-quality debt securities maturing in one year or less from the time of investment.
In addition, a business development company must be operated for the purpose of making investments in the types of securities described in (1), (2) or (3) above.
Temporary Investments
Pending investment in other types of “qualifying assets,” as described above, our investments may consist of cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities or high-quality debt securities maturing in one year or less from the time of investment, which we refer to, collectively, as temporary investments, so that 70% of our assets are qualifying assets. We may invest in U.S. Treasury bills or in repurchase agreements, provided that such agreements are fully collateralized by cash or securities issued by the U.S. government or its agencies. A repurchase agreement (which is substantially similar to a secured loan) involves the purchase by an investor, such as us, of a specified security and the simultaneous agreement by the seller to repurchase it at an agreed-upon future date and at a price that is greater than the purchase price by an amount that reflects an agreed-upon interest rate. There is no percentage restriction on the proportion of our assets that may be invested in such repurchase agreements. However, if more than 25% of our total assets constitute repurchase agreements from a single counterparty, we would generally not meet the diversification tests in order to qualify as a RIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Thus, we do not intend to enter into repurchase agreements with a single counterparty in excess of this limit. Our Investment Adviser will monitor the creditworthiness of the counterparties with which we enter into repurchase agreement transactions.
Managerial Assistance to Portfolio Companies
Business development companies generally must offer to make available to the issuer of the securities significant managerial assistance, except in circumstances where either (i) the business development company controls such issuer of securities or (ii) the business development company purchases such securities in conjunction with one or more other persons acting together and one of the other persons in the group makes available such managerial assistance. Making available significant managerial assistance means, among other things, any arrangement whereby the business development company, through its directors, officers or employees (if any), offers to provide, and, if accepted, does so provide, significant guidance and counsel concerning the management, operations or business objectives and policies of a portfolio company.
Senior Securities
We are permitted, under specified conditions, to issue multiple classes of debt and one class of stock senior to our common stock if our asset coverage, as defined in the 1940 Act, is at least equal to 200% immediately after each such issuance. In addition, while any senior securities remain outstanding, we may be prohibited from making distributions to our stockholders or repurchasing such securities or shares unless we meet the applicable asset coverage ratios at the time of the distribution or repurchase. We may also borrow amounts up to 5% of the value of our total assets for temporary or emergency purposes without regard to asset coverage. For a discussion of the risks associated with leverage, see “Risk Factors — Risks Relating to Our Business and Structure — Regulations governing our operation as a business development company and RIC affect our ability to raise, and the way in which we raise, additional capital or borrow for investment purposes, which may have

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a negative effect on our growth” and “— Because we borrow money, the potential for loss on amounts invested in us will be magnified and may increase the risk of investing in us.”
Common Stock
We are not generally able to issue and sell our common stock at a price below net asset value per share. We may, however, sell our common stock, warrants, options or rights to acquire our common stock, at a price below the current net asset value of the common stock if our Board of Directors determines that such sale is in our best interests and that of our stockholders, and our stockholders approve such sale. In any such case, the price at which our securities are to be issued and sold may not be less than a price which, in the determination of our Board of Directors, closely approximates the market value of such securities (less any distributing commission or discount). We may also make rights offerings to our stockholders at prices per share less than the net asset value per share, subject to applicable requirements of the 1940 Act. See “Risk Factors — Risks Relating to Our Business and Structure — Regulations governing our operation as a business development company and RIC affect our ability to raise, and the way in which we raise, additional capital or borrow for investment purposes, which may have a negative effect on our growth.”
Code of Ethics
We have adopted a joint code of ethics with OCSL pursuant to Rule 17j-1 under the 1940 Act and we have also approved the investment adviser’s code of ethics that was adopted by it under Rule 17j-1 under the 1940 Act and Rule 204A-1 under the Advisers Act. These codes establish procedures for personal investments and restrict certain personal securities transactions. Personnel subject to the code may invest in securities for their personal investment accounts, including securities that may be purchased or held by us, so long as such investments are made in accordance with the code’s requirements. You may read and copy the codes of ethics at the SEC’s Public Reference Room located at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549. You may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. In addition, the codes of ethics are available on the EDGAR Database on the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov and are available at the Investors: Corporate Governance portion of our website at www.oaktreestrategicincome.com.
Compliance Policies and Procedures
We and our Investment Adviser have adopted and implemented written policies and procedures reasonably designed to prevent violation of the federal securities laws and are required to review these compliance policies and procedures annually for their adequacy and the effectiveness of their implementation. Our Chief Compliance Officer is responsible for administering these policies and procedures.
Proxy Voting Policies and Procedures
We have delegated our proxy voting responsibility to our Investment Adviser. The proxy voting policies and procedures of our investment adviser are set forth below. The guidelines are reviewed periodically by our Investment Adviser and our non-interested directors, and, accordingly, are subject to change.
Introduction
As an investment adviser registered under the Advisers Act, our Investment Adviser has a fiduciary duty to act solely in the best interests of its clients. As part of this duty, it recognizes that it must vote client securities in a timely manner free of conflicts of interest and in the best interests of its clients.
These policies and procedures for voting proxies for the investment advisory clients of our Investment Adviser are intended to comply with Section 206 of, and Rule 206(4)-6 under, the Advisers Act.
Proxy Voting Policies
Our Investment Adviser will vote proxies relating to our securities in the best interest of our stockholders. It will review on a case-by-case basis each proposal submitted for a stockholder vote to determine its impact on the portfolio securities held by us. The proxy voting decisions of our Investment Adviser with respect to any of our investments are made by the investment professionals responsible for monitoring such investment. To ensure that its vote is not the product of a conflict of interest, our Investment Adviser requires that: (a) anyone involved in the decision-making process disclose to its legal and compliance personnel any potential conflict that he or she is aware of and any contact that he or she has had with any interested party regarding a proxy vote; and (b) employees involved in the decision making process or vote administration are prohibited from revealing how our Investment Adviser intends to vote on a proposal in order to reduce any attempted influence from interested parties.

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Proxy Voting Records
You may obtain information, without charge, regarding how our Investment Adviser and Former Adviser voted proxies for us for the most recent 12-month period ended June 30, 2017 with respect to our portfolio securities by making a written request for proxy voting information to: Oaktree Specialty Lending Corporation, Chief Compliance Officer, 333 South Grand Avenue, 28th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90071.
Other
We are subject to periodic examination by the SEC for compliance with the 1940 Act.
We are required to provide and maintain a bond issued by a reputable fidelity insurance company to protect us against larceny and embezzlement. Furthermore, as a business development company, we are prohibited from protecting any director or officer against any liability to us or our stockholders arising from willful misfeasance, bad faith, gross negligence or reckless disregard of the duties involved in the conduct of such person’s office.
Securities Exchange Act and Sarbanes-Oxley Act Compliance
We are subject to the reporting and disclosure requirements of the Exchange Act, including the filing of quarterly, annual and current reports, proxy statements and other required items. In addition, we are subject to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which imposes a wide variety of regulatory requirements on publicly-held companies and their insiders. For example:
pursuant to Rule 13a-14 under the Exchange Act, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer are required to certify the accuracy of the financial statements contained in our periodic reports;
pursuant to Item 307 of Regulation S-K, our periodic reports are required to disclose our conclusions about the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures; and
pursuant to Rule 13a-15 under the Exchange Act, our management is required to prepare a report regarding its assessment of our internal control over financial reporting. Our independent registered public accounting firm is required to audit our internal control over financial reporting. When we are no longer an emerging growth company under the JOBS Act, our independent registered public accounting firm will be required to audit our internal control over financial reporting.
We will remain an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act until the earliest of:
September 30, 2018; or
the date on which we have, during the prior three-year period, issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt.
Stock Exchange Corporate Governance Regulations
The NASDAQ Global Select Market has adopted corporate governance regulations that listed companies must comply with. We are in compliance with such corporate governance regulations applicable to business development companies.
Taxation as a Regulated Investment Company
As a business development company, we have elected to be treated, and intend to continue to qualify annually, as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. As a RIC, we generally will not be subject to corporate-level U.S. federal income taxes on any income that we distribute (or are deemed to have distributed) to our stockholders as dividends for U.S. federal income tax purposes. To continue to qualify as a RIC, we must, among other things, meet certain source-of-income and asset diversification requirements (as described below). In addition, to qualify for RIC tax treatment we must distribute to our stockholders, for each taxable year, dividends of an amount generally equal to at least 90% of our “investment company taxable income,” which is generally our ordinary income plus the excess of our realized net short-term capital gains over our realized net long-term capital losses, determined without regard to any deduction for dividends paid, or the Annual Distribution Requirement.
If we qualify as a RIC and satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement, then we generally will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax on the portion of our income we distribute (or are deemed to distribute) to stockholders. We will be subject to U.S. federal income tax at the regular corporate rates on any income or capital gains not distributed (or deemed distributed) to our stockholders.
We will be subject to a 4% nondeductible U.S. federal excise tax on certain undistributed income unless we timely distribute dividends in respect of each calendar year of an amount at least equal to the sum of (1) 98% of our net ordinary income (taking into account certain deferrals and elections) for each calendar year, (2) 98.2% of our capital gain net income (adjusted for certain ordinary losses) for the one-year period ending October 31 in that calendar year and (3) any net ordinary

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income or capital gain net income recognized, but not distributed, in preceding years and on which we paid no U.S. federal corporate income tax, or the Excise Tax Avoidance Requirement. We generally will endeavor in each taxable year to make sufficient distributions to our stockholders to avoid any U.S. federal excise tax on our earnings.
In order to qualify as a RIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we must, among other things:
 
continue to maintain our election to be treated as a business development company under the 1940 Act at all times during each taxable year;
derive in each taxable year at least 90% of our gross income from dividends, interest, payments with respect to loans of certain securities, gains from the sale of stock or other securities, net income from certain “qualified publicly traded partnerships,” or other income derived with respect to our business of investing in such stock or securities, or the 90% Income Test; and
diversify our holdings so that at the end of each quarter of the taxable year:
at least 50% of the value of our assets consists of cash, cash equivalents, U.S. Government securities, securities of other RICs, and other securities if such other securities of any one issuer do not represent more than 5% of the value of our assets or more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of the issuer; and
no more than 25% of the value of our assets is invested in the securities, other than U.S. government securities or securities of other RICs, of one issuer, of two or more issuers that are controlled, as determined under applicable Code rules, by us and that are engaged in the same or similar or related trades or businesses or of certain “qualified publicly traded partnerships,” or the Diversification Tests.
Earnings considered qualifying income in determining our satisfaction of the 90% Income Test may exclude such income as management fees received in connection with potential outside managed funds and certain other fees.
We may be required to recognize taxable income in circumstances in which we do not receive cash. For example, if we hold debt instruments that are treated under applicable tax rules as having OID (such as debt instruments with PIK interest or, in certain cases, increasing interest rates or debt issued with warrants), we generally would be required to include in income each taxable year a portion of the OID that accrues over the life of the debt instrument, regardless of whether cash representing such income is received by us in the same taxable year. We also may be required to include in income other amounts that we have not yet received in cash, such as PIK interest and deferred loan origination fees that are paid after origination of a loan or are paid in non-cash compensation such as warrants or stock. Because any OID or other amounts accrued will be included in our investment company taxable income for the taxable year of accrual, we may be required to make a distribution to our stockholders in order to satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement or the Excise Tax Avoidance Requirement, even though we will not have received any corresponding cash amount.
Although we do not presently expect to do so, we are authorized to borrow funds and to sell assets in order to satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement or the Excise Tax Avoidance Requirement. However, under the 1940 Act, we are not permitted in certain circumstances to make distributions to our stockholders while our debt obligations and other senior securities are outstanding unless certain “asset coverage” tests are met. Moreover, our ability to dispose of assets to meet Annual Distribution Requirement or the Excise Tax Avoidance Requirement may be limited by (1) the illiquid nature of our portfolio and/or (2) other requirements relating to maintaining our status as a RIC. If we dispose of assets in order to meet the Annual Distribution Requirement or the Excise Tax Avoidance Requirement, we may make such dispositions at times that, from an investment standpoint, are not advantageous.

RISK FACTORS
Item 1A. Risk Factors
 
Investing in our securities involves a number of significant risks. In addition to the other information contained in this annual report on Form 10-K, you should consider carefully the following information before making an investment in our securities. The risks set out below are not the only risks we or other business development companies face. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or not presently deemed material by us might also impair our operations and performance. If any of the following events occur, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. In such case, our net asset value and the trading price of our securities could decline, and you may lose part or all of your investment. This section also describes the special risks of investing in business development companies, including the risks associated with investing in a portfolio of small and developing or financially troubled businesses.

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Risks Relating to Economic Conditions
Economic recessions or downturns may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations, and could impair the ability of our portfolio companies to repay debt or pay interest.
Economic recessions or downturns may result in a prolonged period of market illiquidity which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Unfavorable economic conditions also could increase our funding costs, limit our access to the capital markets or result in a decision by lenders not to extend credit to us. These events could limit our investment originations, limit our ability to grow and negatively impact our operating results. In addition, uncertainty with regard to economic recovery from recessions or downturns could also have a negative impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
When recessionary conditions exist, the financial results of small and mid-sized companies, like those in which we invest, typically experience deterioration, which could ultimately lead to difficulty in meeting debt service requirements and an increase in defaults. Additionally, the end markets for certain of our portfolio companies’ products and services would likely experience negative economic trends. Further, adverse economic conditions may decrease the value of collateral securing some of our loans and the value of our equity investments. As a result, we may need to modify the payment terms of our investments, including changes in PIK interest provisions and/or cash interest rates. The performances of certain of our portfolio companies have been, and may continue to be, negatively impacted by these economic or other conditions, which may result in our receipt of a reduced level of interest income from our portfolio companies and/or losses or charge offs related to our investments, and, in turn, may adversely affect distributable income and have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.
Global economic, political and market conditions, including downgrades of the U.S. credit rating, may adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition, including our revenue growth and profitability.
The current worldwide financial market situation, as well as various social and political tensions in the United States and around the world, may contribute to increased market volatility, may have long-term effects on the United States and worldwide financial markets and may cause economic uncertainties or deterioration in the U.S. and worldwide. The impact of downgrades by rating agencies to the U.S. government’s sovereign credit rating or its perceived creditworthiness as well as potential government shutdowns could adversely affect the U.S. and global financial markets and economic conditions. Since 2010, several European Union, or EU, countries have faced budget issues, some of which may have negative long-term effects for the economies of those countries and other EU countries. There is continued concern about national-level support for the Euro and the accompanying coordination of fiscal and wage policy among European Economic and Monetary Union member countries. In addition, the fiscal policy of foreign nations, such as Russia and China, may have a severe impact on the worldwide and U.S. financial markets. The decision made in the United Kingdom referendum to leave the EU (the so-called "Brexit") has led to volatility in global financial markets and may lead to weakening in consumer, corporate and financial confidence in the United Kingdom and Europe. The extent and process by which the United Kingdom will exit the EU remain unclear at this time and could lead to political and economic uncertainty and periods of exacerbated volatility in both the United Kingdom and in wider European markets. Additionally, volatility in the Chinese stock markets and global markets for commodities may affect other financial markets worldwide. We cannot predict the effects of these or similar events in the future on the U.S. and global economies and securities markets or on our investments. We monitor developments and seek to manage our investments in a manner consistent with achieving our investment objective, but there can be no assurance that we will be successful in doing so.
Risks Relating to Our Business and Structure

Our Investment Adviser has limited experience operating under the constraints imposed on us as a business development company, which may hinder the achievement of our investment objectives.
The 1940 Act imposes numerous constraints on the operations of business development companies that do not apply to other investment vehicles managed by Oaktree and its affiliates. Business development companies are required, for example, to invest at least 70% of their total assets primarily in securities of U.S. private or thinly-traded public companies, cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities and other high-quality debt instruments that mature in one year or less from the date of investment. Our Investment Adviser does not have any experience operating under these constraints, which may hinder our ability to take advantage of attractive investment opportunities and to achieve our investment objective. Our Investment Adviser's track record and achievements are not necessarily indicative of the future results it will achieve. Accordingly, we can offer no assurance that we will replicate the historical performance of other investment companies with which our investment professionals have been affiliated and we caution that our investment returns could be substantially lower than the returns achieved by such other companies.

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Changes in interest rates, changes in the method for determining LIBOR and the potential replacement of LIBOR may affect our cost of capital and net investment income.
General interest rate fluctuations and changes in credit spreads on floating rate loans may have a substantial negative impact on our investments and investment opportunities and, accordingly, may have a material adverse effect on our rate of return on invested capital, our net investment income, our net asset value and the market price of our common stock. The majority of our debt investments have, and are expected to have, variable interest rates that reset periodically based on benchmarks such as the London Interbank Offered Rate, or LIBOR, or the federal funds rate, or prime rate, so an increase in interest rates may make it more difficult for our portfolio companies to service their obligations under the debt investments that we will hold and increase defaults even where our investment income increases. In addition, any increase in interest rates would make it more expensive to use debt to finance our investments. Decreases in credit spreads on debt that pays a floating rate of return would have an impact on the income generation of our floating rate assets. Trading prices for debt that pays a fixed rate of return tend to fall as interest rates rise. Trading prices tend to fluctuate more for fixed rate securities that have longer maturities.
In addition, because we borrow to fund our investments, a portion of our net investment income is dependent upon the difference between the interest rate at which we borrow funds and the interest rate at which we invest these funds. Portions of our investment portfolio and our borrowings have floating rate components. As a result, a significant change in market interest rates could have a material adverse effect on our net investment income. In periods of rising interest rates, our cost of funds could increase, which would reduce our net investment income. We may hedge against interest rate fluctuations by using standard hedging instruments such as interest rate swap agreements, futures, options and forward contracts, subject to applicable legal requirements, including all necessary registrations (or exemptions from registration) with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. These activities may limit our ability to participate in the benefits of lower interest rates with respect to the hedged borrowings. Adverse developments resulting from changes in interest rates or hedging transactions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
As a result of concerns about the accuracy of the calculation of LIBOR, a number of British Bankers’ Association, or BBA, member banks entered into settlements with certain regulators and law enforcement agencies with respect to the alleged manipulation of LIBOR. Actions by the BBA, regulators or law enforcement agencies as a result of these or future events, may result in changes to the manner in which LIBOR is determined. Potential changes, or uncertainty related to such potential changes may adversely affect the market for LIBOR-based securities, including our portfolio of LIBOR-indexed, floating-rate debt securities and our borrowings. In addition, changes or reforms to the determination or supervision of LIBOR may result in a sudden or prolonged increase or decrease in reported LIBOR, which could have an adverse impact on the market for LIBOR-based securities or the value of our portfolio of LIBOR-indexed, floating-rate debt securities and our borrowings.
In July 2017, the head of the United Kingdom Financial Conduct Authority announced the desire to phase out the use of LIBOR by the end of 2021. There is currently no definitive information regarding the future utilization of LIBOR or of any particular replacement rate. As such, the potential effect of any such event on our cost of capital and net investment income cannot yet be determined.
A general increase in interest rates will likely have the effect of increasing our net investment income, which would make it easier for our Investment Adviser to receive incentive fees.
Any general increase in interest rates would likely have the effect of increasing the interest rate that we receive on many of our debt investments. Accordingly, a general increase in interest rates may make it easier for our Investment Adviser to meet the quarterly hurdle rate for payment of income incentive fees under the New Investment Advisory Agreement and may result in a substantial increase in the amount of incentive fee on income payable to our New Investment Adviser.
A significant portion of our investment portfolio is and will continue to be recorded at fair value as determined in good faith by our Board of Directors and, as a result, there is and will continue to be uncertainty as to the value of our portfolio investments.
Under the 1940 Act, we are required to carry our portfolio investments at market value or, if there is no readily available market value, at fair value as determined by our Board of Directors. Typically, there is not a public market for the securities of the privately held companies in which we have invested and will generally continue to invest. As a result, we value these securities quarterly at fair value as determined in good faith by our Board of Directors. The fair value of such securities may change, potentially materially, between the date of the fair value determination by our Board of Directors and the release of the financial results for the corresponding period or the next date at which fair value is determined.
Certain factors that may be considered in determining the fair value of our investments include the nature and realizable value of any collateral, the portfolio company’s earnings and its ability to make payments on its indebtedness, the markets in which the portfolio company does business, comparison to comparable publicly-traded companies, discounted cash flow and

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other relevant factors. Because such valuations, and particularly valuations of private securities and private companies, are inherently uncertain, may fluctuate over short periods of time and may be based on estimates, our determinations of fair value may differ materially from the values that would have been used if a ready market for these securities existed. In addition, any investments that include OID or PIK interest may have unreliable valuations because their continuing accruals require ongoing judgments about the collectability of their deferred payments and the value of their underlying collateral. Due to these uncertainties, our fair value determinations may cause our net asset value on a given date to materially understate or overstate the value that we may ultimately realize upon the sale of one or more of our investments. As a result, investors purchasing our common stock based on an overstated net asset value would pay a higher price than the realizable value of our investments might warrant.
Our ability to achieve our investment objective depends on our Investment Adviser’s ability to support our investment process; if our Investment Adviser were to lose any of its key personnel, our ability to achieve our investment objective could be significantly harmed.
We depend on the investment expertise, skill and network of business contacts of the senior personnel of our Investment Adviser. Our Investment Adviser evaluates, negotiates, structures, executes, monitors and services our investments. Key personnel of our Investment Adviser could depart at any time. Our Investment Adviser’s capabilities in structuring the investment process, providing competent, attentive and efficient services to us, and facilitating access to financing on acceptable terms depend on the employment of investment professionals in adequate number and of adequate sophistication to match the corresponding flow of transactions. The departure of key personnel or of a significant number of the investment professionals or partners of our Investment Adviser, could have a material adverse effect on our ability to achieve our investment objective. Our Investment Adviser may need to hire, train, supervise and manage new investment professionals to participate in our investment selection and monitoring process and may not be able to find investment professionals in a timely manner or at all.
Our business model depends to a significant extent upon strong referral relationships, and the inability of the personnel associated with our Investment Adviser to maintain or develop these relationships, or the failure of these relationships to generate investment opportunities, could adversely affect our business.
We expect that personnel associated with our Investment Adviser will maintain and develop their relationships with intermediaries, banks and other sources, and we will rely to a significant extent upon these relationships to provide us with potential investment opportunities. If these individuals fail to maintain their existing relationships or develop new relationships with other sources of investment opportunities, we may not be able to grow or maintain our investment portfolio. In addition, individuals with whom the personnel associated with our Investment Adviser have relationships are not obligated to provide us with investment opportunities, and, therefore, there is no assurance that such relationships will generate investment opportunities for us. The failure of the personnel associated with our Investment Adviser to maintain existing relationships, grow new relationships, or for those relationships to generate investment opportunities could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We may face increasing competition for investment opportunities, which could reduce returns and result in losses.
We compete for investments with other business development companies, public and private funds (including hedge funds, mezzanine funds and collateralized loan obligations) and private equity funds (to the extent they provide an alternative form of financing), as well as traditional financial services companies such as commercial and investment banks, commercial financing companies and other sources of financing. Many of our competitors are substantially larger and have considerably greater financial, technical and marketing resources than we do. For example, some competitors may have a lower cost of capital and access to funding sources that are not available to us. In addition, some of our competitors may have higher risk tolerances or different risk assessments than we have. These characteristics could allow our competitors to consider a wider variety of investments, establish more relationships and offer better pricing and more flexible structuring than we are able to do. We may lose investment opportunities if we do not match our competitors’ pricing, terms and structure. If we are forced to match our competitors’ pricing, terms and structure, we may not be able to achieve acceptable returns on our investments or may bear substantial risk of capital loss. A significant increase in the number and/or the size of our competitors in this target market could force us to accept less attractive investment terms. Furthermore, many of our competitors are not subject to, the regulatory restrictions that the 1940 Act imposes on us as a business development company.

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Our incentive fee may induce our Investment Adviser to make speculative investments.
The incentive fee payable by us to our Investment Adviser may create an incentive for it to make investments on our behalf that are risky or more speculative than would be the case in the absence of such compensation arrangement, which could result in higher investment losses, particularly during cyclical economic downturns. The incentive fee payable to our Investment Adviser is calculated separately in two components as a percentage of the income (subject to a hurdle rate) and as a percentage of the realized gain on invested capital, which may encourage our Investment Adviser to use leverage to increase the return on our investments or otherwise manipulate our income so as to recognize income in quarters where the hurdle rate is exceeded and may result in an obligation for us to pay an incentive fee to the Investment Adviser even if we have incurred a loss for an applicable period. Under certain circumstances, the use of leverage may increase the likelihood of default, which would disfavor the holders of our common stock.
The incentive fee payable by us to our Investment Adviser also may create an incentive for our Investment Adviser to invest on our behalf in instruments that have a deferred interest feature. Under these investments, we would accrue the interest over the life of the investment but would not receive the cash income from the investment until the end of the investment’s term, if at all. Our net investment income used to calculate the income portion of our incentive fee, however, includes accrued interest. Thus, a portion of the incentive fee would be based on income that we have not yet received in cash and may never receive in cash if the portfolio company is unable to satisfy such interest payment obligation to us. While we may make incentive fee payments on income accruals that we may not collect in the future and with respect to which we do not have a formal “clawback” right against our Investment Adviser, the amount of accrued income written off in any period will reduce the income in the period in which such write-off was taken and thereby reduce such period’s incentive fee payment.
In addition, commencing with the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019, our Investment Adviser will receive an incentive fee based upon net capital gains realized on our investments. Unlike the portion of the incentive fee based on income, there is no performance threshold applicable to the portion of the incentive fee based on net capital gains. As a result, our Investment Adviser may have a tendency to invest more in investments that are likely to result in capital gains as compared to income producing securities. Such a practice could result in our investing in more speculative securities than would otherwise be the case, which could result in higher investment losses, particularly during economic downturns.
Given the subjective nature of the investment decisions made by our Investment Adviser on our behalf, we will be unable to monitor these potential conflicts of interest between us and our Investment Adviser.
Our base management fee may induce our Investment Adviser to incur leverage.
The fact that our base management fee is payable based upon our gross assets, which includes borrowings for investment purposes, may encourage our Investment Adviser to use leverage to make additional investments. Under certain circumstances, the use of increased leverage may increase the likelihood of default, which would disfavor holders of our common stock. Given the subjective nature of the investment decisions made by our Investment Adviser on our behalf, we may not be able to monitor this potential conflict of interest.
The incentive fee we pay to our Investment Adviser relating to capital gains may be effectively greater than 17.5%.
Commencing with the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019, the Investment Adviser can earn an incentive fee based on our capital gains, calculated on a cumulative basis from the beginning of the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019 through the end of each fiscal year. As a result of the operation of the cumulative method of calculating such capital gains portion of the incentive fee, the cumulative aggregate capital gains fee received by our Investment Adviser could be effectively greater than 17.5%, depending on the timing and extent of subsequent net realized capital losses or net unrealized depreciation. This result would occur to the extent that, following receipt by the Investment Adviser of a capital gain incentive fee, we subsequently recognize capital depreciation and capital losses in excess of cumulative recognized capital gains. We cannot predict whether, or to what extent, this payment calculation would affect your investment in our stock.

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Because we borrow money, the potential for loss on amounts invested in us will be magnified and may increase the risk of investing in us.
Borrowings, also known as leverage, magnify the potential for loss on invested equity capital. If we continue to use leverage to partially finance our investments, through borrowings from banks and other lenders, you will experience increased risks of investing in our common stock. We borrow under our credit facility, have issued notes in our debt securitization and may issue other debt securities or enter into other types of borrowing arrangements in the future. If the value of our assets decreases, leveraging would cause net asset value to decline more sharply than it otherwise would have had we not leveraged. Similarly, any decrease in our income would cause net income to decline more sharply than it would have had we not borrowed. Such a decline could negatively affect our ability to make common stock distributions or scheduled debt payments. Leverage is generally considered a speculative investment technique and we only intend to use leverage if expected returns will exceed the cost of borrowing.

As of September 30, 2017, we had $76.5 million of outstanding indebtedness under our revolving credit facility with the lenders referred to therein, Citibank, N.A., as administrative agent, and Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as collateral agent and custodian, or the Citibank facility; $180.0 million of debt outstanding under our $309.0 million debt securitization, or the 2015 Debt Securitization; and $6.5 million outstanding under our $25 million senior secured revolving credit facility with the lenders referenced therein, U.S. Bank National Association, as Custodian, and East West Bank as Secured Lender, or the East West Bank Facility. These debt instruments require periodic payments of interest. The weighted average interest rate charged on our borrowings as of September 30, 2017 was 3.46% (exclusive of deferred financing costs). We will need to generate sufficient cash flow to make these required interest payments. In order for us to cover our annual interest payments on indebtedness, we must achieve annual returns on our September 30, 2017 total assets of at least 1.49%. If we are unable to meet the financial obligations under our credit facilities, the lenders under the credit facilities will have a superior claim to our assets over our stockholders.

As a business development company, under the 1940 Act we generally are not permitted to incur indebtedness unless immediately after such borrowing we have an asset coverage for total borrowings of at least 200% (i.e., the amount of debt may not exceed 50% of the value of our assets). If legislation to modify the 1940 Act and increase the amount of debt that business development companies may incur by modifying the asset coverage percentage were enacted into law, we would able to incur additional indebtedness.

Illustration.  The following table illustrates the effect of leverage on returns from an investment in our common stock assuming various annual returns, net of expenses. The calculations in the table below are hypothetical and actual returns may be higher or lower than those appearing below.

Assumed Return on Portfolio (Net of Expenses)
- 10%
- 5%
0%
5%
10%
Corresponding net return to common stockholder
-23.82%
-13.46%
-3.10%
7.27%
17.63%

For purposes of this table, we have assumed $608.7 million in total assets, $263.0 million in debt outstanding, $293.6 million in net assets as of September 30, 2017, and a weighted average interest rate of 3.46% as of September 30, 2017 (exclusive of deferred financing costs). Actual interest payments may be different.
Substantially all of our assets are subject to security interests under secured credit facilities or the 2015 Debt Securitization and if we default on our obligations under the facilities or the 2015 Debt Securitization, we may suffer adverse consequences, including foreclosure on our assets.
As of September 30, 2017, substantially all of our assets were pledged as collateral under our credit facilities or the 2015 Debt Securitization. If we default on our obligations under these facilities or the 2015 Debt Securitization, the lenders may have the right to foreclose upon and sell, or otherwise transfer, the collateral subject to their security interests or their superior claim. In such event, we may be forced to sell our investments to raise funds to repay our outstanding borrowings in order to avoid foreclosure and these forced sales may be at times and at prices we would not consider advantageous. Moreover, such deleveraging of our company could significantly impair our ability to effectively operate our business in the manner in which we have historically operated. As a result, we could be forced to curtail or cease new investment activities and lower or eliminate the distributions that we have historically paid to our stockholders.


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In addition, if the lenders exercise their right to sell the assets pledged under our credit facilities or the 2015 Debt Securitization, such sales may be completed at distressed sale prices, thereby diminishing or potentially eliminating the amount of cash available to us after repayment of the amounts outstanding under the credit facilities or 2015 Debt Securitization.
Because we intend to distribute at least 90% of our taxable income each taxable year to our stockholders in connection with our election to be treated as a RIC, we will continue to need additional capital to finance our growth.
In order to qualify for the tax benefits available to RICs and to minimize corporate-level U.S. federal income taxes, we intend to distribute to our stockholders at least 90% of our taxable income each taxable year, except that we may retain certain net capital gains for investment, and treat such amounts as deemed distributions to our stockholders. If we elect to treat any amounts as deemed distributions, we would be subject to income taxes at the corporate rate applicable to net capital gains on such deemed distributions on behalf of our stockholders. As a result of these requirements, we will likely need to raise capital from other sources to grow our business. As a business development company, we generally are required to meet a coverage ratio of total assets, less liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities, to total senior securities, which includes all of our borrowings and any outstanding preferred stock, of at least 200%. These requirements limit the amount that we may borrow. Because we will continue to need capital to grow our investment portfolio, these limitations may prevent us from incurring debt and require us to raise additional equity at a time when it may be disadvantageous to do so.
While we expect to be able to issue additional equity securities, we cannot assure you that equity financing will be available to us on favorable terms, or at all. Also, as a business development company, we generally are not permitted to issue equity securities priced below net asset value without stockholder approval. If additional funds are not available to us, we could be forced to curtail or cease new investment activities, and our net asset value and share price could decline.
Our ability to enter into transactions with our affiliates is restricted.
We are prohibited under the 1940 Act from participating in certain transactions with certain of our affiliates without the prior approval of the members of our independent directors and, in some cases, the SEC. Any person that owns, directly or indirectly, 5% or more of our outstanding voting securities is our affiliate for purposes of the 1940 Act and we are generally prohibited from buying or selling any securities (other than our securities) from or to such affiliate, absent the prior approval of our independent directors. The 1940 Act also prohibits certain “joint” transactions with certain of our affiliates, which could include investments in the same portfolio company (whether at the same or different times), without prior approval of our independent directors and, in some cases, the SEC. If a person acquires more than 25% of our voting securities, we will be prohibited from buying or selling any security (other than any security of which we are the issuer) from or to such person or certain of that person’s affiliates, or entering into prohibited joint transactions with such person, absent the prior approval of the SEC. Similar restrictions limit our ability to transact business with our officers or directors or their affiliates. As a result of these restrictions, we may be prohibited from buying or selling any security (other than any security of which we are the issuer) from or to any portfolio company of a private equity fund managed by our Investment Adviser without the prior approval of the SEC, which may limit the scope of investment opportunities that would otherwise be available to us.
Our Investment Adviser has received exemptive relief from the SEC to allow certain managed funds and accounts to co-invest, subject to the conditions of the relief granted by the SEC, where doing so is consistent with the applicable registered fund’s or business development company’s investment strategy as well as applicable law (including the terms and conditions of the exemptive order issued by the SEC). Under the terms of this exemptive relief permitting us to co-invest with other funds managed by our Investment Adviser and its affiliates, a “required majority” (as defined in Section 57(o) of the 1940 Act) of our independent directors must make certain conclusions in connection with a co-investment transaction, including that (1) the terms of the proposed transaction, including the consideration to be paid, are reasonable and fair to us and our stockholders and do not involve overreaching of us or our stockholders on the part of any person concerned, (2) the transaction is consistent with the interests of our stockholders and is consistent with our investment objectives and strategies and (3) the investment by other funds advised by our Investment Adviser or its affiliates would not disadvantage us and our participation would not be on a basis different from, or less advantageous than, that of any other fund advised by our Investment Adviser or its affiliates participating in the transaction. We intend to co-invest, subject to the conditions included in the exemptive order we received from the SEC, with certain of our affiliates. We may also invest alongside funds managed by our Investment Adviser and its affiliates in certain circumstances where doing so is consistent with applicable law and SEC staff interpretations. For example, we may invest alongside such accounts consistent with guidance promulgated by the staff of the SEC permitting us and such other accounts to purchase interests in a single class of privately placed securities so long as certain conditions are met, including that our Investment Adviser, acting on our behalf and on behalf of other clients, negotiates no term other than price.

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There are significant potential conflicts of interest that could adversely impact our investment returns.
Our executive officers and directors, and certain members of our Investment Adviser, serve or may serve as officers, directors or principals of entities that operate in the same or a related line of business as we do or of investment funds managed by our affiliates. For example, Oaktree presently serves as the investment adviser to OCSL, a publicly-traded business development company with a portfolio of approximately $1.5 billion at fair value as of September 30, 2017. OCSL has historically invested in debt and equity of small and mid-sized companies, primarily in connection with investments by private equity sponsors, including in middle-market companies similar to those we target for investment. In addition, though not the primary focus of its investment portfolio, OCSL’s investments also include floating rate senior loans. Therefore, there may be certain investment opportunities that satisfy the investment criteria for both OCSL and us. OCSL operates as a distinct and separate public company and any investment in our common stock will not be an investment in OCSL. In addition, all of our executive officers and four of our independent directors serve in substantially similar capacities for OCSL. Oaktree and its affiliates also manage and sub-advise private investment funds and accounts, and may manage other such funds and accounts in the future, which have investment mandates that are similar, in whole and in part, with ours. Accordingly, they may have obligations to investors in those entities, the fulfillment of which might not be in the best interests of us or our stockholders. For example, the personnel of our Investment Adviser may face conflicts of interest in the allocation of investment opportunities to us and such other funds and accounts.
Oaktree has investment allocation guidelines that govern the allocation of investment opportunities among the investment funds and accounts managed or sub-advised by Oaktree and its affiliates. To the extent an investment opportunity is appropriate for us or OCSL or any other investment fund or account managed or sub-advised by Oaktree or its affiliates, Oaktree will adhere to its investment allocation guidelines in order to determine a fair and equitable allocation.
We may invest alongside funds and accounts managed or sub-advised by our Investment Adviser and its affiliates in certain circumstances where doing so is consistent with applicable law and SEC staff interpretations. For example, we may invest alongside such accounts consistent with guidance promulgated by the staff of the SEC permitting us and such other accounts to purchase interests in a single class of privately placed securities so long as certain conditions are met, including that our Investment Adviser, acting on our behalf and on behalf of other clients, negotiates no term other than price or terms related to price.
In addition, on October 18, 2017, our Investment Adviser received exemptive relief from the SEC to allow certain managed funds and accounts, each of whose investment adviser is Oaktree or an investment adviser controlling, controlled by or under common control with Oaktree, to participate in negotiated co-investment transactions where doing so is consistent with the applicable registered fund’s or business development company’s investment objective and strategies as well as regulatory requirements and other pertinent factors, and pursuant to the conditions of the exemptive relief. Each potential co-investment opportunity that falls under the terms of the exemptive relief and is appropriate for us and any affiliated fund or account, and satisfies the then-current board-established criteria, will be offered to us and such other eligible funds and accounts. If there is a sufficient amount of securities to satisfy all participants, the securities will be allocated among the participants in accordance with their proposed order size and if there is an insufficient amount of securities to satisfy all participants, the securities will be allocated pro rata based on the investment proposed by the applicable investment adviser to such participant, up to the amount proposed to be invested by each, which is reviewed and approved by an independent committee of legal, compliance and accounting professionals at our Investment Adviser. Although Oaktree will endeavor to allocate investment opportunities in a fair and equitable manner, we and our common stockholders could be adversely affected to the extent investment opportunities are allocated among us and other investment vehicles managed or sponsored by, or affiliated with, our executive officers, directors and members of our Investment Adviser. We might not participate in each individual opportunity, but will, on an overall basis, be entitled to participate equitably with other entities managed by Oaktree and its affiliates. Oaktree seeks to treat all clients fairly and equitably such that none receive preferential treatment vis-à-vis the others over time, in a manner consistent with its fiduciary duty to each of them; however, in some instances, especially in instances of limited liquidity, the factors may not result in pro rata allocations or may result in situations where certain funds or accounts receive allocations where others do not.
Pursuant to the New Investment Advisory Agreement, our Investment Adviser’s liability is limited and we are required to indemnify our Investment Adviser against certain liabilities. This may lead our Investment Adviser to act in a riskier manner in performing its duties and obligations under the New Investment Advisory Agreement than it would if it were acting for its own account, and creates a potential conflict of interest.
Pursuant to the New Administration Agreement, the Oaktree Administrator furnishes us with the facilities, including our principal executive office, and administrative services necessary to conduct our day-to-day operations. We pay the Oaktree Administrator its allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by the Oaktree Administrator in performing its obligations under the New Administration Agreement, including, without limitation, a portion of the rent at market rates and the compensation of our Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer, their respective staffs and other non-investment

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professionals at Oaktree that perform duties for us. This arrangement creates conflicts of interest that our Board of Directors must monitor.
A failure on our part to maintain our qualification as a business development company would significantly reduce our operating flexibility.
If we fail to continuously qualify as a business development company, we might be subject to regulation as a registered closed-end investment company under the 1940 Act, which would significantly decrease our operating flexibility. In addition, failure to comply with the requirements imposed on business development companies by the 1940 Act could cause the SEC to bring an enforcement action against us. See “ -Business Development Company Regulations.”
Regulations governing our operation as a business development company and RIC affect our ability to raise, and the way in which we raise, additional capital or borrow for investment purposes, which may have a negative effect on our growth.
In order to qualify for the tax benefits available to RICs and to minimize corporate-level U.S. federal income taxes, we intend to distribute to our stockholders at least 90% of our taxable income each taxable year, except that we may retain certain net capital gains for investment, and treat such amounts as deemed distributions to our stockholders. If we elect to treat any amounts as deemed distributions, we would be subject to income taxes at the corporate rate on such deemed distributions on behalf of our stockholders.
As a business development company, we may issue “senior securities,” including borrowing money from banks or other financial institutions only in amounts such that our asset coverage, as defined in the 1940 Act, equals at least 200% after such incurrence or issuance. These requirements limit the amount that we may borrow, may unfavorably limit our investment opportunities and may reduce our ability in comparison to other companies to profit from favorable spreads between the rates at which we can borrow and the rates at which we can lend. If the value of our assets declines, we may be unable to satisfy the asset coverage test, which could prohibit us from paying distributions and could prevent us from being subject to tax as a RIC. If we cannot satisfy the asset coverage test, we may be required to sell a portion of our investments and, depending on the nature of our debt financing, repay a portion of our indebtedness at a time when such sales may be disadvantageous.
Because we will continue to need capital to grow our investment portfolio, these limitations may prevent us from incurring debt and require us to raise additional equity at a time when it may be disadvantageous to do so. As a result of these requirements we need to periodically access the capital markets to raise cash to fund new investments at a more frequent pace than our privately owned competitors. We generally are not able to issue or sell our common stock at a price below net asset value per share, which may be a disadvantage as compared with other public companies or private investment funds. If our common stock trades at a discount to net asset value, this restriction could adversely affect our ability to raise capital. We may, however, sell our common stock, or warrants, options or rights to acquire our common stock, at a price below the current net asset value of the common stock if our Board of Directors and independent directors determine that such sale is in our best interests and the best interests of our stockholders, and our stockholders as well as those stockholders that are not affiliated with us approve such sale in accordance with the requirements of the 1940 Act. In any such case, the price at which our securities are to be issued and sold may not be less than a price that, in the determination of our Board of Directors, closely approximates the market value of such securities (less any underwriting commission or discount).
We also may make rights offerings to our stockholders at prices less than net asset value, subject to applicable requirements of the 1940 Act. If we raise additional funds by issuing more shares of our common stock or issuing senior securities convertible into, or exchangeable for, our common stock, the percentage ownership of our stockholders may decline at that time and such stockholders may experience dilution. Moreover, we can offer no assurance that we will be able to issue and sell additional equity securities in the future, on terms favorable to us or at all.
In addition, we may in the future seek to securitize our portfolio securities to generate cash for funding new investments. To securitize loans, we would likely create a wholly-owned subsidiary and contribute a pool of loans to the subsidiary. We would then sell interests in the subsidiary on a non-recourse basis to purchasers and we would retain all or a portion of the equity in the subsidiary. An inability to successfully securitize our loan portfolio could limit our ability to grow our business or fully execute our business strategy and may decrease our earnings, if any. The securitization market is subject to changing market conditions and we may not be able to access this market when we would otherwise deem appropriate. Moreover, the successful securitization of our portfolio might expose us to losses as the residual investments in which we do not sell interests will tend to be those that are riskier and more apt to generate losses. The 1940 Act also may impose restrictions on the structure of any securitization.

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We may experience fluctuations in our quarterly results.
We could experience fluctuations in our quarterly results due to a number of factors, including our ability or inability to make investments in companies that meet our investment criteria, the interest rate payable on the debt securities we acquire, changes in accrual status of our portfolio company investments, distributions, the level of our expenses, variations in and the timing of the recognition of realized and unrealized gains or losses, the degree to which we encounter competition in our market and general economic conditions. As a result of these factors, results for any period should not be relied upon as being indicative of performance in future periods.
Our Board of Directors may change our investment objective, operating policies and strategies without prior notice or stockholder approval, the effects of which may be adverse.
Our Board of Directors has the authority to modify or waive our current investment objective, operating policies and strategies without prior notice and without stockholder approval. We cannot predict the effect any changes to our current investment objective, operating policies and strategies would have on our business, net asset value, operating results and value of our stock. However, the effects might be adverse, which could negatively impact our ability to pay you distributions and cause you to lose part or all of your investment.
We may not be able to pay you distributions, our distributions may not grow over time and a portion of our distributions may be a return of capital.
We intend to pay distributions to our stockholders out of assets legally available for distribution. We cannot assure you that we will achieve investment results that will allow us to sustain a specified level of cash distributions or periodic increases in cash distributions. In addition, the inability to satisfy the asset coverage test applicable to us as a business development company can limit our ability to pay distributions. All distributions will be paid at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend on our earnings, our financial condition, maintenance of our ability to be subject to tax as a RIC, compliance with applicable business development company regulations and such other factors as our Board of Directors may deem relevant from time to time. We cannot assure you that we will continue to pay distributions to our stockholders at current levels, or at all.
When we make distributions, our distributions generally will be treated as dividends for U.S. federal income tax purposes to the extent such distributions are paid out of our current or accumulated earnings and profits. Distributions in excess of current and accumulated earnings and profits will be treated as a non-taxable return of capital to the extent of a stockholder's basis in our stock and, assuming that a stockholder holds our stock as a capital asset, thereafter as a capital gain. A return of capital generally is a return of a stockholder’s investment rather than a return of earnings or gains derived from our investment activities. Moreover, we may pay all or a substantial portion of our distributions from the proceeds of the sale of shares of our common stock or from borrowings in anticipation of future cash flow, which could constitute a return of stockholders’ capital and will lower such stockholders’ tax basis in our shares, which may result in increased tax liability to stockholders when they sell or otherwise dispose of such shares. The tax liability incurred by such stockholders upon the sale or other disposition of shares of our common stock may increase even if such shares are sold at a loss.
We will be subject to corporate-level U.S. federal income tax if we are unable to maintain our qualification as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code or do not satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement.
To maintain our tax status as a RIC and be relieved of U.S. federal taxes on income and gains distributed to our stockholders, we must meet the following annual distribution, income source and asset diversification requirements:
The Annual Distribution Requirement will be satisfied if we distribute dividends to our stockholders each taxable year of an amount generally at least equal to 90% of the sum of our net taxable income plus realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital losses, if any. Because we use debt financing, we are and may, in the future, be subject to certain financial covenants under our debt arrangements that could, under certain circumstances, restrict us from making distributions necessary to satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement. If we are unable to obtain cash from other sources, we could fail to qualify for RIC tax treatment and thus could become subject to corporate-level income tax.
The 90% Income Test will be satisfied if we earn at least 90% of our gross income for each taxable year from dividends, interest, gains from the sale of stock or securities or similar sources.
The Diversification Tests will be satisfied if, at the end of each quarter of our taxable year, at least 50% of the value of our assets consist of cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities, securities of other RICs, and other acceptable securities; and no more than 25% of the value of our assets can be invested in the securities, other than U.S. government securities or securities of other RICs, of one issuer, of two or more issuers that are controlled, as determined under applicable Code rules, by us and that are engaged in the same or similar or related trades or businesses or of certain “qualified publicly traded partnerships.” Failure to meet these requirements may result in our having to dispose of certain investments quickly in order to prevent the loss of RIC status. Because most of our investments will be in

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private companies, and therefore will be relatively illiquid, any such dispositions could be made at disadvantageous prices and could cause us to incur substantial losses.
If we fail to be subject to tax as a RIC and are subject to entity-level U.S. federal corporate income tax, the resulting corporate taxes could substantially reduce our net assets, the amount of income available for distribution and the amount of our distributions.
We may have difficulty paying our required distributions if we are required to recognize income for U.S. federal income tax purposes before or without receiving cash representing such income.
For U.S. federal income tax purposes, we generally are required to include in income certain amounts that we have not yet received in cash, such as OID or certain income accruals on contingent payment debt instruments, which may occur if we receive warrants in connection with the origination of a loan or possibly in other circumstances. Such OID is generally required to be included in income before we receive any corresponding cash payments. In addition, our loans typically contain PIK interest provisions. Any PIK interest, computed at the contractual rate specified in each loan agreement, is generally required to be added to the principal balance of the loan and recorded as interest income. We also may be required to include in income certain other amounts that we do not receive, and may never receive, in cash. To avoid the imposition of corporate-level tax on us, this non-cash source of income may need to be distributed to our stockholders in cash or, in the event that we determine to do so, in shares of our common stock, even though we may have not yet collected and may never collect the cash relating to such income.
Since, in certain cases, we may recognize income before or without receiving cash representing such income, we may have difficulty meeting the Annual Distribution Requirement necessary to be relieved of entity-level U.S. federal taxes on income and gains distributed to our stockholders. Accordingly, we may have to sell or otherwise dispose of some of our investments at times and/or at prices we would not consider advantageous, raise additional debt or equity capital or forgo new investment opportunities for this purpose. If we are not able to obtain cash from other sources, we may fail to satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement and thus become subject to corporate-level U.S. federal income tax.
We may in the future choose to pay distributions partly in our own stock, in which case you may be subject to tax in excess of the cash you receive.
We may distribute taxable distributions that are payable in part in our stock. In accordance with certain applicable Treasury regulations and other related administrative pronouncements issued by the Internal Revenue Service, or the IRS, a RIC may be eligible to treat a distribution of its own stock as fulfilling its RIC distribution requirements if each stockholder is permitted to elect to receive his or her entire distribution in either cash or stock of the RIC, subject to the satisfaction of certain guidelines. If too many stockholders elect to receive cash (which generally may not be less than 20% of the value of the overall distribution), each stockholder electing to receive cash must receive a pro rata amount of cash (with the balance of the distribution paid in stock). If these and certain other requirements are met, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the amount of the distribution paid in stock generally will be equal to the amount of cash that could have been received instead of stock. Taxable stockholders receiving such distributions will be required to include the full amount of the distribution as ordinary income (or as long-term capital gain to the extent such distribution is properly reported as a capital gain dividend) to the extent of their share of our current and accumulated earnings and profits for U.S. federal income tax purposes. As a result, a U.S. stockholder may be subject to tax with respect to such distributions in excess of any cash received. If a U.S. stockholder sells the stock it receives as a distribution in order to pay this tax, the sales proceeds may be less than the amount included in income with respect to the distribution, depending on the market price of our stock at the time of the sale. Furthermore, with respect to non-U.S. stockholders, we may be required to withhold U.S. tax with respect to such distribution, including in respect of all or a portion of such distribution that is payable in stock. In addition, if a significant number of our stockholders determine to sell shares of our stock in order to pay taxes owed on a distribution, such sales may put downward pressure on the trading price of our stock.

We may enter into reverse repurchase agreements, which are another form of leverage.

We may enter into reverse repurchase agreements as part of our management of our temporary investment portfolio. Our entry into any such reverse repurchase agreements would be subject to the 1940 Act limitations on leverage. In connection with entry into a reverse repurchase agreement, we would effectively pledge our assets as collateral to secure a short-term loan. Generally, the other party to the agreement would make a loan to us in an amount equal to a percentage of the fair value of the collateral we have pledged. At the maturity of the reverse repurchase agreement, we will be required to repay the loan and then receive back our collateral. While used as collateral, the assets continue to pay principal and interest which are for the benefit of us.


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Our use of reverse repurchase agreements, if any, involves many of the same risks involved in our use of leverage. For example, the market value of the securities acquired in the reverse repurchase agreement may decline below the price of the securities that we have sold but we would remain obligated to purchase those securities, meaning that we bear the risk of loss that the proceeds at settlement are less than the fair value of the securities pledged. In addition, the market value of the securities retained by us may decline. If a buyer of securities under a reverse repurchase agreement were to file for bankruptcy or experience insolvency, we would be adversely affected. In addition, due to the interest costs associated with reverse repurchase agreements, our net asset value would decline, and, in some cases, we may be worse off than if we had not used such agreements.

We are currently subject to an SEC investigation that could adversely affect our financial condition, business and results of operations.
We are the subject of an SEC investigation principally related to the activities of our Former Adviser, and we may possibly be subject to a variety of additional claims and lawsuits as well as additional SEC examinations or investigations. See “Business - Legal Proceedings.” The outcome of the SEC investigation may materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, and/or operating results and may continue without resolution for long periods of time. Litigation and responses to the SEC’s inquiries might consume substantial amounts of our management’s time and attention, and that time and the devotion of these resources may, at times, be disproportionate to the amounts at stake. The SEC investigation is subject to inherent uncertainties and management’s view of these matters may change in the future. A material adverse impact on our financial statements also could occur for the period in which the effect of an unfavorable final outcome becomes probable and reasonably estimable, particularly where the claims with respect to a particular period exceed both the amount of our insurance coverage relating to claims made with respect to the same period and the amount of any indemnification recoverable from Fifth Street Holdings L.P. In addition, we may incur expenses associated with defending ourselves against this litigation and other future claims and responding to the SEC’s inquiries, and these expenses may be material to our earnings in future periods that might exceed the amount of any indemnification recoverable from Fifth Street Holdings L.P. Under the New Investment Advisory Agreement, we are required to indemnify our Investment Adviser for its expenses incurred in any litigation arising from the rendering of our Investment Adviser’s services under the investment advisory agreement or otherwise as our Investment Adviser absent willful misfeasance, bad faith or gross negligence in the performance of its duties or by reason of the reckless disregard of its duties and obligations, and our Former Adviser may seek similar indemnification under the Former Investment Advisory Agreement.
We may be unable to invest a significant portion of the net proceeds from an offering of our securities on acceptable terms within an attractive timeframe.
Delays in investing the net proceeds raised in an offering of our securities may cause our performance to be worse than that of other fully invested business development companies or other lenders or investors pursuing comparable investment strategies. We cannot assure you that we will be able to identify any investments that meet our investment objective or that any investment that we make will produce a positive return. We may be unable to invest the net proceeds of any offering on acceptable terms within the time period that we anticipate or at all, which could harm our financial condition and operating results.
We anticipate that, depending on market conditions, it may take us a substantial period of time to invest substantially all of the net proceeds of any offering in securities meeting our investment objective. During this period, we will invest the net proceeds of an offering primarily in cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities, repurchase agreements and high-quality debt instruments maturing in one year or less from the time of investment, which may produce returns that are significantly lower than the returns which we expect to achieve when our portfolio is fully invested in securities meeting our investment objective. As a result, any distributions that we pay during this period may be substantially lower than the distributions that we may be able to pay when our portfolio is fully invested in securities meeting our investment objective. In addition, until such time as the net proceeds of an offering are invested in securities meeting our investment objective, the market price for our common stock may decline. Thus, the return on your investment may be lower than when, if ever, our portfolio is fully invested in securities meeting our investment objective.
We are an “emerging growth company” and we cannot be certain if the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to emerging growth companies will make our shares of common stock less attractive to investors.
We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act. As a result, we have taken advantage of the exemption for emerging growth companies allowing us to temporarily forgo the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We cannot predict if investors will find shares of our common stock less attractive because we rely on this exemption. If some investors find our shares of common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our shares and our share price may be more volatile. We did not take advantage of other disclosure or reporting exemptions for emerging growth companies under the JOBS Act. We will remain an emerging growth

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company until the earlier of (a) September 30, 2018 or (b) the date on which we have issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period.
Changes in laws or regulations governing our operations may adversely affect our business or cause us to alter our business strategy.
We and our portfolio companies are subject to regulation at the local, state and federal level. New legislation may be enacted or new interpretations, rulings or regulations could be adopted, including those governing the types of investments we are permitted to make or that impose limits on our ability to pledge a significant amount of our assets to secure loans or that restrict the operations of a portfolio company, any of which could harm us and our stockholders and the value of our investments, potentially with retroactive effect. For example, President Trump and certain members of Congress have indicated that they intend to seek to amend or repeal the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, which influences many aspects of the financial services industry, and to substantially amend and reform the Code. Any amendment or repeal of such legislation, or changes in regulations or regulatory interpretations thereof, could create uncertainty in the near term, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Additionally, any changes to the laws and regulations governing our operations relating to permitted investments may cause us to alter our investment strategy in order to avail ourselves of new or different opportunities. Such changes could result in material differences to the strategies and plans set forth herein and may result in our investment focus shifting from the areas of expertise of our Investment Adviser to other types of investments in which our Investment Adviser may have less expertise or little or no experience. Thus, any such changes, if they occur, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and the value of your investment.
We have identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting that, if not properly remediated, could result in material misstatements in our financial statements in future periods.
We identified a material weakness relating to our internal control over financial reporting under standards established by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or PCAOB, for the period ended September 30, 2017. The PCAOB defines a material weakness as a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. A deficiency in internal control exists when the design or operation of a control does not allow management or employees, in the normal course of performing their assigned functions, to prevent or detect misstatements on a timely basis.
We have taken and will take a number of actions to remediate this material weakness, but some of these measures will take time to be fully integrated and confirmed to be effective. We cannot assure you that the steps taken will remediate such weaknesses, nor can we be certain of whether additional actions will be required or the costs of any such actions. Until measures are fully implemented and tested, the identified material weakness may continue to exist.
We may need to take additional measures to fully mitigate these issues, and the measures we have taken, and expect to take, to improve our internal controls may not be sufficient to address the issues identified, to ensure that our internal controls are effective or to ensure that the identified material weaknesses or significant deficiencies or other material weaknesses or deficiencies will not result in a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements. In addition, other material weaknesses or deficiencies may be identified in the future. If we are unable to correct material weaknesses or deficiencies in internal controls in a timely manner, our ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information accurately and within the time periods specified in the rules and forms of the SEC will be adversely affected. This failure could negatively affect the market price and trading liquidity of our securities, cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, subject us to civil and criminal investigations and penalties, and generally materially and adversely impact our business and financial condition.

Future control deficiencies could prevent us from accurately and timely reporting our financial results.
We may identify deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting in the future, including significant deficiencies and material weaknesses. A “significant deficiency” is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting that is less severe than a material weakness, yet important enough to merit attention by those responsible for oversight of a company’s financial reporting.
Our failure to identify deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting in a timely manner or remediate any deficiencies, or the identification of material weaknesses or significant deficiencies in the future could prevent us from accurately and timely reporting our financial results.




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We are subject to risks associated with communications and information systems. 
We depend on the communications and information systems of our Investment Adviser and its affiliates as well as certain third-party service providers. As our reliance on these systems has increased, so have the risks posed to these communications and information systems.  Any failure or interruption in these systems could cause disruptions in our activities.  In addition, these systems are subject to potential attacks, including through adverse events that threaten the confidentiality, integrity or availability of our information resources.  These attacks, which may include cyber incidents, may involve a third party gaining unauthorized access to our communications or information systems for purposes of misappropriating assets, stealing confidential information, corrupting data or causing operational disruption.  Any such attack could result in disruption to our business, misstated or unreliable financial data, liability for stolen assets or information, increased cybersecurity protection and insurance costs, litigation and damage to our business relationships, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We incur significant costs as a result of being a publicly traded company.
As a publicly-traded company, we incur legal, accounting and other expenses, including costs associated with the periodic reporting requirements applicable to a company whose securities are registered under the Exchange Act, as well as additional corporate governance requirements, including requirements under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and other rules implemented by the SEC and the listing standards of the NASDAQ Global Select Market. Beginning with the fiscal year ending September 30, 2018, our independent registered public accounting firm will be required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which will increase costs associated with our periodic reporting requirements.
Risks Relating to Our Investments
Our investments in portfolio companies may be risky, and we could lose all or parts of our investments.
The companies in which we invest are typically highly leveraged, and, in most cases, our investments in such companies are not rated by any rating agency. If such investments were rated, we believe that they would likely receive a rating from a nationally recognized statistical rating organization of below investment grade (i.e., below BBB- or Baa), which is often referred to as "high yield" and “junk.” Exposure to below investment grade securities involves certain risks, and those securities are viewed as having predominately speculative characteristics with respect to the issuer's capacity to pay interest and repay principal. Investing in small and mid-sized companies involves a number of significant risks. As of September 30, 2017, 19.7% of our debt portfolio at fair value consisted of debt securities for which issuers were not required to make principal payments until the maturity of such debt securities, which could result in a substantial loss to us if such issuers are unable to refinance or repay their debt at maturity. Increases in interest rates may affect the ability of our portfolio companies to repay debt or pay interest, which may in turn affect the value of our portfolio investments, and our business, financial condition and results of operations. Among other things, our portfolio companies:
may have limited financial resources, may have limited or negative EBITDA and may be unable to meet their obligations under their debt instruments that we hold, which may be accompanied by a deterioration in the value of any collateral and a reduction in the likelihood of us realizing any guarantees from subsidiaries or affiliates of our portfolio companies that we may have obtained in connection with our investments, as well as a corresponding decrease in the value of the equity components of our investments;
may have shorter operating histories, narrower product lines, smaller market shares and/or significant customer concentrations than larger businesses, which tend to render them more vulnerable to competitors’ actions and market conditions, as well as general economic downturns;
may operate in regulated industries and/or provide services to federal, state or local governments, or operate in industries that provide services to regulated industries or federal, state or local governments, any of which could lead to delayed payments for services or subject the company to changing payment and reimbursement rates or other terms;
may not have collateral sufficient to pay any outstanding interest or principal due to us in the event of a default by these companies;
are more likely to depend on the management talents and efforts of a small group of people; therefore, the death, disability, resignation or termination of one or more of these persons could have a material adverse impact on our portfolio company and, in turn, on us;
may have difficulty accessing the capital markets to fund capital needs, which may limit their ability to grow or repay outstanding indebtedness at maturity;
generally have less predictable operating results, may from time to time be parties to litigation, may be engaged in rapidly changing businesses with products subject to a substantial risk of obsolescence, and may require substantial additional capital to support their operations, finance expansion or maintain their competitive position; and

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generally have less publicly available information about their businesses, operations and financial condition. If we are unable to uncover all material information about these companies, we may not make a fully informed investment decision, and as a result may lose part or all of our investment.
In addition, in the course of providing managerial assistance to certain of our portfolio companies, certain of our officers and directors may serve as directors on the boards of such companies. To the extent that litigation arises out of our investments in these companies, our officers and directors may be named as defendants in such litigation, which could result in an expenditure of funds (through our indemnification of such officers and directors) and the diversion of management time and resources.
We may be exposed to higher risks with respect to our investments that include OID or PIK interest.
Our investments may include OID and contractual PIK interest, which represents contractual interest added to a loan balance and due at the end of such loan’s term. To the extent OID or PIK interest constitute a portion of our income, we are exposed to typical risks associated with such income being required to be included in taxable and accounting income prior to receipt of cash, including the following:
OID and PIK instruments may have higher yields, which reflect the payment deferral and credit risk associated with these instruments;
OID and PIK accruals may create uncertainty about the source of our distributions to stockholders;
OID and PIK instruments may have unreliable valuations because their continuing accruals require continuing judgments about the collectability of the deferred payments and the value of the collateral; and
OID and PIK instruments may represent a higher credit risk than coupon loans.
An investment strategy focused primarily on privately held companies presents certain challenges, including the lack of available information about these companies.
We invest primarily in privately held companies. Generally, little public information exists about these companies, including typically a lack of audited financial statements and ratings by third parties. Furthermore, such an investment strategy involves a dependence on the management talents and efforts of a small group of people as well as a greater vulnerability to economic downturns. We must therefore rely on the ability of our Investment Adviser to obtain adequate information to evaluate the potential risks of investing in these companies. These companies and their financial information may not be subject to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and other rules that govern public companies. If we are unable to uncover all material information about these companies, we may not make a fully informed investment decision, and we may lose money on our investments. These factors could affect our investment returns.
If we acquire the securities and obligations of distressed or bankrupt companies, such investments may be subject to significant risks, including lack of income, extraordinary expenses, uncertainty with respect to satisfaction of debt, lower-than-expected investment values or income potentials and resale restrictions.
We may acquire the securities and other obligations of distressed or bankrupt companies. At times, distressed debt obligations may not produce income and may require us to bear certain extraordinary expenses (including legal, accounting, valuation and transaction expenses) in order to protect and recover our investment. Therefore, to the extent we invest in distressed debt, our ability to achieve current income for our stockholders may be diminished, particularly where the portfolio company has negative EBITDA.
We also will be subject to significant uncertainty as to when and in what manner and for what value the distressed debt we invest in will eventually be satisfied whether through a liquidation, an exchange offer or plan of reorganization involving the distressed debt securities or a payment of some amount in satisfaction of the obligation. In addition, even if an exchange offer is made or plan of reorganization is adopted with respect to distressed debt held by us, there can be no assurance that the securities or other assets received by us in connection with such exchange offer or plan of reorganization will not have a lower value or income potential than may have been anticipated when the investment was made.
Moreover, any securities received by us upon completion of an exchange offer or plan of reorganization may be restricted as to resale. As a result of our participation in negotiations with respect to any exchange offer or plan of reorganization with respect to an issuer of distressed debt, we may be restricted from disposing of such securities.

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The lack of liquidity in our investments may adversely affect our business.
We invest, and will continue to invest, in companies whose securities are not publicly traded, and whose securities are subject to legal and other restrictions on resale or are otherwise less liquid than publicly traded securities. In fact, all of our assets may be invested in illiquid securities. The illiquidity of these investments may make it difficult for us to sell these investments when desired. In addition, if we are required to liquidate all or a portion of our portfolio quickly, we may realize significantly less than the value at which we had previously recorded these investments. Our investments are usually subject to contractual or legal restrictions on resale or are otherwise illiquid because there is usually no established trading market for such investments. In addition, we may also face restrictions on our ability to liquidate our investments if our Investment Adviser or any of its affiliates have material nonpublic information regarding the portfolio company. The illiquidity of most of our investments may make it difficult for us to dispose of them at a favorable price, and, as a result, we may suffer losses.
We may not have the funds or ability to make additional investments in our portfolio companies.
After our initial investment in a portfolio company, we may be called upon from time to time to provide additional funds to such company or have the opportunity to increase our investment through a follow-on investment. There is no assurance that we will make, or will have sufficient funds to make, follow-on investments. Any decisions not to make a follow-on investment or any inability on our part to make such an investment may have a negative impact on a portfolio company in need of such an investment, may result in a missed opportunity for us to increase our participation in a successful operation, may reduce the expected yield on the investment or impair the value of our investment in any such portfolio company.
Our portfolio companies may incur debt that ranks equally with, or senior to, our investments in such companies.
We invest primarily in first lien loans issued by small and mid-sized companies. Our portfolio companies may have, or may be permitted to incur, other debt that ranks equally with, or senior to, the debt in which we invest. By their terms, such debt instruments may entitle the holders to receive payments of interest or principal on or before the dates on which we are entitled to receive payments with respect to the debt instruments in which we invest. Also, in the event of insolvency, liquidation, dissolution, reorganization or bankruptcy of a portfolio company, holders of debt instruments ranking senior to our investment in that portfolio company would typically be entitled to receive payment in full before we receive any distribution. After repaying such senior creditors, such portfolio company may not have any remaining assets to use for repaying its obligation to us. In the case of debt ranking equally with debt instruments in which we invest, we would have to share on an equal basis any distributions with other creditors holding such debt in the event of an insolvency, liquidation, dissolution, reorganization or bankruptcy of the relevant portfolio company.
The disposition of our investments may result in contingent liabilities.
In connection with the disposition of an investment in private securities, we may be required to make representations about the business and financial affairs of the portfolio company typical of those made in connection with the sale of a business. We may also be required to indemnify the purchasers of such investment to the extent that any such representations turn out to be inaccurate or with respect to certain potential liabilities. These arrangements may result in contingent liabilities that ultimately yield funding obligations that must be satisfied through our return of certain distributions previously made to us.
There may be circumstances where our debt investments could be subordinated to claims of other creditors or we could be subject to lender liability claims.
Even though we have structured some of our investments as senior loans, if one of our portfolio companies were to enter bankruptcy proceedings, a bankruptcy court might re-characterize our debt investment and subordinate all or a portion of our claim to that of other creditors, depending on the facts and circumstances, including the extent to which we actually provided managerial assistance to that portfolio company. We may also be subject to lender liability claims for actions taken by us with respect to a borrower’s business or instances where we exercise control over the borrower. It is possible that we could become subject to a lender’s liability claim, including as a result of actions taken in rendering significant managerial assistance.

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Second priority liens on collateral securing loans that we make to our portfolio companies may be subject to control by senior creditors with first priority liens. If there is a default, the value of the collateral may not be sufficient to repay in full both the first priority creditors and us.
Certain loans that we make to portfolio companies will be secured on a second priority basis by the same collateral securing senior secured debt of such companies. The first priority liens on the collateral will secure the portfolio company’s obligations under any outstanding senior debt and may secure certain other future debt that may be permitted to be incurred by the company under the agreements governing the loans. The holders of obligations secured by the first priority liens on the collateral will generally control the liquidation of and be entitled to receive proceeds from any realization of the collateral to repay their obligations in full before us. In addition, the value of the collateral in the event of liquidation will depend on market and economic conditions, the availability of buyers and other factors. There can be no assurance that the proceeds, if any, from the sale or sales of all of the collateral would be sufficient to satisfy the loan obligations secured by the second priority liens after payment in full of all obligations secured by the first priority liens on the collateral. If such proceeds are not sufficient to repay amounts outstanding under the loan obligations secured by the second priority liens, then we, to the extent not repaid from the proceeds of the sale of the collateral, will only have an unsecured claim against the company’s remaining assets, if any.
The rights we may have with respect to the collateral securing the loans we make to our portfolio companies with senior debt outstanding may also be limited pursuant to the terms of one or more inter-creditor agreements that we enter into with the holders of senior debt. Under such an inter-creditor agreement, at any time that obligations that have the benefit of the first priority liens are outstanding, any of the following actions may be taken with respect to the collateral and will be at the direction of the holders of the obligations secured by the first priority liens: the ability to cause the commencement of enforcement proceedings against the collateral; the ability to control the conduct of such proceedings; the approval of amendments to collateral documents; releases of liens on the collateral; and waivers of past defaults under collateral documents. We may not have the ability to control or direct such actions, even if our rights are adversely affected.
If we make unsecured debt investments, we may lack adequate protection in the event our portfolio companies become distressed or insolvent and will likely experience a lower recovery than more senior debtholders in the event such portfolio companies default on their indebtedness.
We have made, and may in the future make, unsecured debt investments in portfolio companies. Unsecured debt investments are unsecured and junior to other indebtedness of the portfolio company. As a consequence, the holder of an unsecured debt investment may lack adequate protection in the event the portfolio company becomes distressed or insolvent and will likely experience a lower recovery than more senior debtholders in the event the portfolio company defaults on its indebtedness. In addition, unsecured debt investments of small and mid-sized companies are often highly illiquid and in adverse market conditions may experience steep declines in valuation even if they are fully performing.
We may incur greater risk with respect to investments we acquire through assignments or participations of interests.
Although we originate a substantial portion of our loans, we may acquire loans through assignments or participations of interests in such loans. The purchaser of an assignment typically succeeds to all the rights and obligations of the assigning institution and becomes a lender under the credit agreement with respect to such debt obligation. However, the purchaser’s rights can be more restricted than those of the assigning institution, and we may not be able to unilaterally enforce all rights and remedies under an assigned debt obligation and with regard to any associated collateral. A participation typically results in a contractual relationship only with the institution participating out the interest and not directly with the borrower. Sellers of participations typically include banks, broker-dealers, other financial institutions and lending institutions. In purchasing participations, we generally will have no right to enforce compliance by the borrower with the terms of the loan agreement against the borrower, and we may not directly benefit from the collateral supporting the debt obligation in which we have purchased the participation. As a result, we will be exposed to the credit risk of both the borrower and the institution selling the participation. Further, in purchasing participations in lending syndicates, we will not be able to conduct the same level of due diligence on a borrower or the quality of the loan with respect to which we are buying a participation as we would conduct if we were investing directly in the loan. This difference may result in us being exposed to greater credit or fraud risk with respect to such loans than we expected when initially purchasing the participation.

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Our investments in Internet and software companies are subject to many risks, including regulatory concerns, litigation risks and intense competition.
As of September 30, 2017, our investments in Internet and software companies represented 21.72% of our total portfolio, at fair value. Our investments in Internet and software companies are subject to substantial risks. For example, our portfolio companies face intense competition since their businesses are rapidly evolving and intensely competitive, and are subject to changing technology, shifting user needs, and frequent introductions of new products and services. Internet and software companies have many competitors in different industries, including general purpose search engines, vertical search engines and e-commerce sites, social networking sites, traditional media companies, and providers of online products and services. Potential competitors to our portfolio companies in the Internet and software industries range from large and established companies to emerging start-ups. Further, such companies are subject to laws that were adopted prior to the advent of the Internet and related technologies and, as a result, do not contemplate or address the unique issues of the Internet and related technologies. The laws that do reference the Internet are being interpreted by the courts, but their applicability and scope remain uncertain. For example, the laws relating to the liability of providers of online services are currently unsettled both within the United States and abroad. Claims have been threatened and filed under both U.S. and foreign laws for defamation, invasion of privacy and other tort claims, unlawful activity, copyright and trademark infringement, or other theories based on the nature and content of the materials searched and the ads posted by a company’s users, a company’s products and services, or content generated by a company’s users. Further, the growth of Internet and software companies into a variety of new fields implicate a variety of new regulatory issues and may subject such companies to increased regulatory scrutiny, particularly in the United States and Europe. As a result, these portfolio company investments face considerable risk. This could, in turn, materially adversely affect the value of the Internet and software companies in our portfolio.
We generally do not, and do not expect to, control our portfolio companies.
We do not, and do not expect to, control most of our portfolio companies. As a result, we are subject to the risk that a portfolio company in which we invest may make business decisions with which we disagree and the management of such company, as representatives of the holders of their common equity, may take risks or otherwise act in ways that do not serve our interests as a debt investor, including actions that could decrease the value of our investment. Due to the lack of liquidity for our investments in non-traded companies, we may not be able to dispose of our interests in our portfolio companies as readily as we would like or at an appropriate valuation.
Defaults by our portfolio companies would harm our operating results.
A portfolio company’s failure to satisfy financial or operating covenants imposed by us or other lenders could lead to defaults and, potentially, termination of its loans and foreclosure on its secured assets, which could trigger cross-defaults under other agreements and jeopardize a portfolio company’s ability to meet its obligations under the debt or equity securities that we hold. We may incur expenses to the extent necessary to seek recovery upon default or to negotiate new terms, which may include the waiver of certain financial covenants, with a defaulting portfolio company. In addition, we may write-down the value of a portfolio company investment upon the worsening of the financial condition of the portfolio company or in anticipation of a default, which could also have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our portfolio companies may experience financial distress and our investments in such companies may be restructured.
Our portfolio companies may experience financial distress from time to time. Debt investments in such companies may cease to be income-producing, may require us to bear certain expenses to protect our investment and may subject us to uncertainty as to when, in what manner and for what value such distressed debt will eventually be satisfied, including through liquidation, reorganization or bankruptcy. Any restructuring can fundamentally alter the nature of the related investment, and restructurings may not be subject to the same underwriting standards that our Investment Adviser employs in connection with the origination of an investment. In addition, we may write-down the value of our investment in any such company to reflect the status of financial distress and future prospects of the business. Any restructuring could alter, reduce or delay the payment of interest or principal on any investment, which could delay the timing and reduce the amount of payments made to us. For example, if an exchange offer is made or plan of reorganization is adopted with respect to the debt securities we currently hold, there can be no assurance that the securities or other assets received by us in connection with such exchange offer or plan of reorganization will have a value or income potential similar to what we anticipated when our original investment was made or even at the time of restructuring. Restructurings of investments might also result in extensions of the term thereof, which could delay the timing of payments made to us, or we may receive equity securities, which may require significantly more of our management’s time and attention or carry restrictions on their disposition. We cannot assure you that any particular restructuring strategy pursued by our Investment Adviser will maximize the value of or recovery on any investment.

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We may not realize gains from our equity investments.
Certain investments that we have made in the past and may make in the future include warrants or other equity securities. In addition, we have made in the past and may make in the future direct equity investments in companies. Our goal is ultimately to realize gains upon our disposition of such equity interests. However, the equity interests we receive may not appreciate in value and, in fact, may decline in value. Accordingly, we may not be able to realize gains from our equity interests, and any gains that we do realize on the disposition of any equity interests may not be sufficient to offset any other losses we experience. We also may be unable to realize any value if a portfolio company does not have a liquidity event, such as a sale of the business, recapitalization or public offering, which would allow us to sell the underlying equity interests. We may seek puts or similar rights to give us the right to sell our equity securities back to the portfolio company issuer. We may be unable to exercise these put rights for the consideration provided in our investment documents if the issuer is in financial distress.
We are subject to certain risks associated with foreign investments.
We have made in the past and may make in the future investments in foreign companies. Investing in foreign companies may expose us to additional risks not typically associated with investing in U.S. companies. These risks include changes in foreign exchange rates, exchange control regulations, political and social instability, expropriation, imposition of foreign taxes, less liquid markets and less available information than is generally the case in the U.S., higher transaction costs, less government supervision of exchanges, brokers and issuers, less developed bankruptcy laws, difficulty in enforcing contractual obligations, lack of uniform accounting and auditing standards and greater price volatility. In addition, our foreign investments generally do not constitute "qualifying assets" under the 1940 Act, under which qualifying assets must represent at least 70% of our total assets. See “Business Development Company Regulations — Qualifying Assets.”
Our success will depend, in part, on our ability to anticipate and effectively manage these and other risks. We cannot assure you that these and other factors will not have a material adverse effect on our business as a whole.
We may expose ourselves to risks if we engage in hedging transactions.
Subject to applicable provisions of the 1940 Act and applicable regulations promulgated by the Commodities Futures Trading Commission, we have in the past and may in the future enter into hedging transactions, which may expose us to risks associated with such transactions. Such hedging may utilize instruments such as forward contracts, currency options and interest rate swaps, caps, collars and floors to seek to hedge against fluctuations in the relative values of our portfolio positions and amounts due under our credit facilities from changes in currency exchange rates and market interest rates. Use of these hedging instruments may include counterparty credit risk. Hedging against a decline in the values of our portfolio positions does not eliminate the possibility of fluctuations in the values of such positions and amounts due under our credit facilities or prevent losses if the values of such positions decline. However, such hedging can establish other positions designed to gain from those same developments, thereby offsetting the decline in the value of such portfolio positions. Such hedging transactions may also limit the opportunity for gain if the values of the underlying portfolio positions should increase. Moreover, it may not be possible to hedge against an exchange rate or interest rate fluctuation that is so generally anticipated that we are not able to enter into a hedging transaction at an acceptable price.
The success of any hedging transactions will depend on our ability to correctly predict movements in currencies and interest rates. Therefore, while we may enter into such transactions to seek to reduce currency exchange rate and interest rate risks, unanticipated changes in currency exchange rate or interest rates may result in poorer overall investment performance than if we had not engaged in any such hedging transactions. In addition, the degree of correlation between price movements of the instruments used in a hedging strategy and price movements in the portfolio positions being hedged may vary. Moreover, for a variety of reasons, we may not seek to (or be able to) establish a perfect correlation between such hedging instruments and the portfolio holdings or credit facilities being hedged. Any such imperfect correlation may prevent us from achieving the intended hedge and expose us to risk of loss. In addition, it may not be possible to hedge fully or perfectly against currency fluctuations affecting the value of securities denominated in non-U.S. currencies because the value of those securities is likely to fluctuate as a result of factors not related to currency fluctuations. See also “Risks Relating to Our Business and Structure- Changes in interest rates, changes in the method for determining LIBOR and the potential replacement of LIBOR may affect our cost of capital and net investment income.”

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We are a non-diversified investment company within the meaning of the 1940 Act, and therefore have few restrictions with respect to the proportion of our assets that may be invested in securities of a single industry or issuer.
We are classified as a non-diversified investment company within the meaning of the 1940 Act, which means that we are not limited by the 1940 Act with respect to the proportion of our assets that we may invest in securities of a single industry or issuer, excluding limitations on investments in other investment companies. We cannot predict the industries or sectors in which our investment strategy may cause us to concentrate and cannot predict the level of our diversification among industries or issuers. To the extent that we assume large positions in a certain type of security or the securities of a small number of industries or issuers, our net asset value may fluctuate to a greater extent than that of a diversified investment company as a result of changes in the financial condition or the market’s assessment of the security, industry or issuer. We may also be more susceptible to any single economic or regulatory occurrence than a diversified investment company. Beyond RIC diversification requirements, we do not have fixed guidelines for diversification, and our investments could be concentrated in relatively few industries or issuers.

Our portfolio may be concentrated in a limited number of portfolio companies and industries, which will subject us to a risk of significant loss if any of these companies defaults on its obligations under any of its debt instruments or if there is a downturn in a particular industry.
Our portfolio may be concentrated in a limited number of portfolio companies and industries. As a result, the aggregate returns we realize may be significantly and adversely affected if a small number of investments perform poorly or if we need to write down the value of any one investment. Additionally, while we are not targeting any specific industries, our investments may be concentrated in relatively few industries, including the Internet and software industry. As a result, a downturn in any particular industry in which we are invested could also significantly impact the aggregate returns we realize.
We may allocate the net proceeds from an offering in ways with which you may not agree.
We have significant flexibility in investing the net proceeds of an offering, and may do so in a way with which you may not agree. Additionally, our Investment Adviser will select our investments subsequent to the closing of an offering, and our stockholders will have no input with respect to such investment decisions. Further, other than general limitations that may be included in a future credit facility, the holders of our debt securities will generally not have veto power or a vote in approving any changes to our investment or operational policies. These factors increase the uncertainty, and thus the risk, of investing in our securities. In addition, pending such investments, we will invest the net proceeds from an offering primarily in high quality, short-term debt securities, consistent with our business development company election and our election to be taxed as a RIC, at yields significantly below the returns which we expect to achieve when our portfolio is fully invested in securities meeting our investment objective. If we are not able to identify or gain access to suitable investments, our income may be limited.

Risks Relating to Our Common Stock
Shares of closed-end investment companies, including business development companies, may trade at a discount to their net asset value.
Shares of closed-end investment companies, including business development companies, may trade at a discount from net asset value. This characteristic of closed-end investment companies and business development companies is separate and distinct from the risk that our net asset value per share may decline. During the last two years, shares of our common stock have regularly traded below our net asset value. We cannot predict whether our common stock will trade at, above or below net asset value.
Investing in our common stock may involve an above average degree of risk.
The investments we make in accordance with our investment objective may result in a higher amount of risk than alternative investment options and a higher risk of volatility or loss of principal. Our investments in portfolio companies involve higher levels of risk, and therefore, an investment in our shares may not be suitable for someone with lower risk tolerance.
The market price of our common stock may fluctuate significantly.
The market price and liquidity of the market for shares of our common stock may be significantly affected by numerous factors, some of which are beyond our control and may not be directly related to our operating performance. These factors include:
significant volatility in the market price and trading volume of securities of business development companies or other companies in our sector, which are not necessarily related to the operating performance of these companies;
inability to obtain any exemptive relief that may be required by us from the SEC;

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changes in regulatory policies, accounting pronouncements or tax guidelines, particularly with respect to RICs and business development companies;
loss of our business development company or RIC status;
changes in earnings or variations in operating results;
increases in expenses associated with defense of litigation and responding to SEC inquiries;
changes in the value of our portfolio of investments;
any shortfall in revenue or net income or any increase in losses from levels expected by investors or securities analysts;
departure of our Investment Adviser’s key personnel; and
general economic trends and other external factors.
Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market may have an adverse effect on the market price of our common stock.
Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock, or the availability of such common stock for sale, could adversely affect the prevailing market prices for our common stock. If this occurs and continues for a sustained period of time, it could impair our ability to raise additional capital through the sale of securities should we desire to do so.
Certain provisions of our restated certificate of incorporation and our bylaws as well as the Delaware General Corporation Law could deter takeover attempts and have an adverse impact on the price of our common stock.
Our restated certificate of incorporation and our bylaws as well as the Delaware General Corporation Law contain provisions that may have the effect of discouraging a third party from making an acquisition proposal for us. These anti-takeover provisions may inhibit a change in control in circumstances that could give the holders of our common stock the opportunity to realize a premium over the market price for our common stock.
Stockholders may incur dilution if we issue securities to subscribe to, convert to or purchase shares of our common stock.
The 1940 Act prohibits us from selling shares of our common stock at a price below the current net asset value per share of such stock with certain exceptions. One such exception is prior stockholder approval of issuances of securities to subscribe to, convert to or purchase shares of our common stock even if the subscription, conversion or purchase price per share of our common stock is below the net asset value per share of our common stock at the time of any such subscription, conversion or purchase. Any decision to sell securities to subscribe to, convert to, or purchase shares of our common stock will be subject to the determination by our board of directors that such issuance is in our and our stockholders’ best interests. If we issue securities to subscribe to, convert to or purchase shares of common stock, the exercise or conversion of such securities would increase the number of outstanding shares of our common stock. Any such exercise or conversion would be dilutive on the voting power of existing stockholders, and could be dilutive with regard to distributions and our net asset value, and other economic aspects of the common stock.
Because the number of shares of common stock that could be so issued and the timing of any issuance is not currently known, the actual dilutive effect cannot be predicted; however, the table below illustrates the impact on the net asset value per common share of a business development company that would be experienced upon the exercise of a subscription right to acquire shares of common stock of the business development company.
Example of Impact of Exercise of Subscription Right to Acquire Common Stock on Net Asset Value Per Share
The example assumes that the business development company has 1,000,000 shares of common stock outstanding, $15,000,000 in total assets and $5,000,000 in total liabilities at the time of the exercise of the subscription right. As a result, the net asset value and net asset value per common share of the business development company are $10,000,000 and $10.00, respectively.
Further, the example assumes that the subscription right permits the holder thereof to acquire 250,000 common shares under the following three different scenarios: (i) with an exercise price equal to a 10% premium to the business development company’s net asset value per share at the time of exercise, or $11.00 per share, (ii) with an exercise price equal to the business development company’s net asset value per share at the time of exercise, or $10.00 per share, and (iii) with an exercise price equal to a 10% discount to the business development company’s net asset value per share at the time of exercise, or $9.00 per

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share.
Subscription Rights Exercise Price
 
Net Asset Value Per Share
Prior To Exercise
 
Net Asset Value Per Share
After Exercise
10% premium to net asset value per common share
 
$
10.00

 
$
10.20

Net asset value per common share
 
$
10.00

 
$
10.00

10% discount to net asset value per common share
 
$
10.00

 
$
9.80

Although have we chosen to demonstrate the impact on the net asset value per common share of a business development company that would be experienced by existing stockholders of the business development company upon the exercise of a subscription right to acquire shares of common stock of the business development company, the results noted above would be similar in connection with the exercise or conversion of other securities exercisable or convertible into shares of the business development company’s common stock. In addition, the example does not take into account the impact of other securities that may be issued in connection with the issuance of exercisable or convertible securities (e.g., the issuance of shares of common stock in conjunction with the issuance of subscription rights to acquire shares of common stock).
Risks Related to Our Debt Securitization
We are subject to risks associated with the 2015 Debt Securitization.
As a result of the 2015 Debt Securitization, we are subject to a variety of risks, including those set forth below. We use the term “debt securitization” to describe a form of secured borrowing under which an operating company (sometimes referred to as an “originator” or “sponsor”) acquires or originates mortgages, receivables, loans or other assets that earn income, whether on a one-time or recurring basis (collectively, “income producing assets”), and borrows money on a non-recourse basis against a legally separate pool of loans or other income producing assets. In a typical debt securitization, the originator transfers the loans or income producing assets to a single-purpose, bankruptcy-remote subsidiary (also referred to as a “special purpose entity”), which is established solely for the purpose of holding loans and income producing assets and issuing debt secured by these income producing assets. The special purpose entity completes the borrowing through the issuance of notes secured by the loans or other assets. The special purpose entity may issue the notes in the capital markets to a variety of investors, including banks, non-bank financial institutions and other investors. In the 2015 Debt Securitization, institutional investors purchased $222.6 million long-term secured notes, or the 2015 Notes, issued by FS Senior Funding Ltd., our wholly-owned subsidiary, or the 2015 Issuer, in a private placement.
We are subject to certain risks as a result of our interests in the junior notes and membership interests of the 2015 Issuer.
Under the terms of the master transfer agreement governing the 2015 Debt Securitization, we sold to the 2015 Issuer all of our ownership interest in certain of our portfolio loans and participations for the purchase price and other consideration set forth in such master transfer agreement. Following this transfer, the 2015 Issuer held all of the ownership interest in such portfolio loans and participations. As a result of the 2015 Debt Securitization and as of September 30, 2015, we held the Class C Senior Secured Notes, or the Class C Notes, as well as all of the subordinated notes, or the Subordinated 2015 Notes, of the 2015 Issuer. As a result, we consolidate the financial statements of the 2015 Issuer, as well as our other subsidiaries, in our Consolidated Financial Statements. Because the 2015 Issuer is disregarded as an entity separate from its owner for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the sale or contribution by us to the 2015 Issuer did not constitute a taxable event for U.S. federal income tax purposes. If the U.S. Internal Revenue Service were to take a contrary position, there could be a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
The Class C Notes are subordinated obligations of the 2015 Issuer.
The Class C Notes are the most junior class of rated notes issued by the 2015 Issuer, are subordinated in priority of payment to the Class A-T Senior Secured Floating Rate Notes, Class A-R Senior Secured Revolving Floating Rate Notes, Class A-S Senior Secured Floating Rate Notes, or collectively, the Class A Notes, and the Class B Senior Secured Floating Rate Notes, or the Class B Notes, and, together with the Class A Notes, the Senior 2015 Notes, and are subject to certain payment restrictions set forth in the indenture governing the 2015 Debt Securitization. Therefore, we only receive cash distributions on the Class C Notes if the 2015 Issuer has made all cash interest payments on all the Senior 2015 Notes it has issued. Consequently, to the extent that the value of the 2015 Issuer’s portfolio of loan investments has been reduced as a result of conditions in the credit markets, or as a result of defaulted loans or individual fund assets, the value of the Class C Notes at their redemption will be reduced because the Class C Notes are junior to the Senior 2015 Notes and will bear losses of the 2015 Issuer’s portfolio of loan investments prior to the Senior 2015 Notes.

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The 2015 Issuer, as holder of the Subordinated 2015 Notes, is the residual claimant on funds, if any, remaining after holders of all classes of 2015 Notes have been paid in full on each payment date or upon maturity of such notes under the 2015 Debt Securitization documents. The Subordinated 2015 Notes in the 2015 Issuer represent all of the residual interest in the 2015 Issuer, and, as the holder of the Subordinated 2015 Notes, we may receive distributions, if any, only to the extent that the 2015 Issuer makes distributions out of funds remaining after holders of all classes of 2015 Notes have been paid in full on each payment date any amounts due and owing on such payment date or upon maturity of such 2015 Notes.
The interests of holders of the senior classes of securities issued by the 2015 Issuer may not be aligned with our interests.
The Class A Notes are the debt obligations ranking senior in right of payment to other securities issued by the 2015 Issuer in the 2015 Debt Securitization. As such, there are circumstances in which the interests of holders of the Class A Notes may not be aligned with the interests of holders of the other classes of notes issued by the 2015 Issuer. For example, under the terms of the Class A Notes, holders of the Class A Notes have the right to receive payments of principal and interest prior to holders of the Class B Notes, the Class C Notes and the 2015 Issuer and the holders of the Class B Notes have the right to receive payments of the principal and interest prior to the holders of the Class C Notes.
For as long as the Class A Notes remain outstanding, holders of the Class A Notes comprise the most senior class of notes outstanding of the 2015 Issuer, or the Controlling Class, under the 2015 Debt Securitization. If the Class A Notes are paid in full, the Class B Notes would comprise the Controlling Class under the 2015 Debt Securitization. Holders of the Controlling Class under the 2015 Debt Securitization have the right to act in certain circumstances with respect to the portfolio loans in ways that may benefit their interests but not the interests of holders of more junior classes of notes and Subordinated 2015 Notes, including by exercising remedies under the indenture in the 2015 Debt Securitization.
If an event of default has occurred and acceleration occurs in accordance with the terms of the indenture governing the 2015 Debt Securitization, the Controlling Class, as the most senior class of notes then outstanding in the 2015 Debt Securitization will be paid in full before any further payment or distribution on the more junior classes of notes and Subordinated 2015 Notes. In addition, if an event of default under the 2015 Debt Securitization occurs, holders of a majority of the Controlling Class of the 2015 Debt Securitization may be entitled to determine the remedies to be exercised under the indenture, subject to the terms of such indenture. For example, upon the occurrence of an event of default with respect to the notes issued by the 2015 Issuer, the trustee or holders of a majority of the Controlling Class may declare the principal, together with any accrued interest, of all the notes of such class and any junior classes to be immediately due and payable. This would have the effect of accelerating the principal on such notes, triggering a repayment obligation on the part of the 2015 Issuer. If at such time the portfolio loans were not performing well, the 2015 Issuer may not have sufficient proceeds available to enable the trustee under the indenture to repay the obligations of holders of the 2015 Notes or the Subordinated 2015 Notes.
Remedies pursued by the Controlling Class could be adverse to the interests of the holders of the 2015 Notes that are subordinated to the Controlling Class, and the Controlling Class will have no obligation to consider any possible adverse effect on such other interests. Thus, we cannot assure you that any remedies pursued by the Controlling Class will be in the best interests of the 2015 Issuer or us or that the 2015 Issuer or we will receive any payments or distributions upon an acceleration of the notes. In a liquidation under the 2015 Debt Securitization, the Class C Notes will be subordinated to payment of the Class A Notes and Class B Notes and may not be paid in full to the extent funds remaining after payment of the Class A Notes and Class B Notes are insufficient. In addition, under the 2015 Debt Securitization, after the Class A Notes and Class B Notes are paid in full, the holder of the Class C Notes will be the only remaining noteholder and may amend the applicable indenture to, among other things, direct the assignment of any remaining assets to other wholly-owned subsidiaries for a price less than the fair market value of such assets with the difference in price to be considered an equity contribution to such subsidiaries. Any failure of the 2015 Issuer to make distributions on the notes we indirectly or directly hold, whether as a result of an event of default, liquidation or otherwise, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows and may result in an inability of us to make distributions sufficient to maintain our status as a RIC.

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The 2015 Issuer may fail to meet certain asset coverage tests.
Under the documents governing the 2015 Debt Securitization, there are two asset coverage tests applicable to the 2015 Notes. The first such test compares the amount of interest received on the portfolio loans held by the 2015 Issuer to the amount of interest payable in respect of the Class A Notes, the Class B Notes and the Class C Notes, with respect to the 2015 Issuer. To meet this first test, interest received on the portfolio loans must equal at least 200.0% of the interest payable in respect of the Class A Notes and Class B Notes, taken together, and at least 175.0% of the interest payable in respect of the Class C Notes. The second such test compares the principal amount of the portfolio loans of the applicable debt securitization to the aggregate outstanding principal amount of the Class A Notes, the Class B Notes and the Class C Notes. To meet this second test at any time, the aggregate principal amount of the portfolio loans must equal at least 144.95% of the Class A Notes and the Class B Notes, taken together, and 131.63% of the Class C Notes. If any asset coverage test with respect to the Class A Notes, the Class B Notes or Class C Notes is not met, proceeds from the portfolio of loan investments that otherwise would have been distributed to the holders of the Class C Notes and the 2015 Issuer will instead be used to redeem first the Class A Notes and then the Class B Notes, to the extent necessary to satisfy the applicable asset coverage tests on a pro forma basis after giving effect to all payments made in respect of the notes, which we refer to as a mandatory redemption, or to obtain the necessary ratings confirmation.
The value of the Class B Notes or the Class C Notes could be adversely affected by a mandatory redemption because such redemption could result in the applicable notes being redeemed at par at a time when they are trading in the secondary market at a premium to their stated principal amount and when other investments bearing the same rate of interest may be difficult or expensive to acquire. A mandatory redemption could also result in a shorter investment duration than a holder of such notes may have wanted or anticipated, which could, in turn, result in such a holder incurring breakage costs on related hedging transactions. In addition, the reinvestment period under the 2015 Debt Securitization may extend through as late as May 28, 2019, which could affect the value of the collateral securing the Class C Notes.
We may not receive cash from the 2015 Issuer.
We receive cash from the 2015 Issuer only to the extent of payments on the Class C Notes and distributions, if any, with respect to the membership interests of the 2015 Issuer as permitted under the 2015 Debt Securitization. The 2015 Issuer may only make payments on such securities to the extent permitted by the payment priority provisions of the indenture governing the 2015 Debt Securitization, which generally provide that principal payments on the Class C Notes may not be made on any payment date unless all amounts owing under the Class A Notes and Class B Notes are paid in full. If the 2015 Issuer does not meet the asset coverage tests or the interest coverage test set forth in the documents governing the 2015 Debt Securitization, cash would be diverted from the Class C Notes to first pay the Class A Notes and Class B Notes in amounts sufficient to cause such tests to be satisfied. In the event that we fail to receive cash indirectly from the 2015 Issuer, we could be unable to make such distributions in amounts sufficient to maintain our status as a RIC, or at all.
We may be required to assume liabilities of the 2015 Issuer and are indirectly liable for certain representations and warranties in connection with the 2015 Debt Securitization.
The structure of the 2015 Debt Securitization is intended to prevent, in the event of our bankruptcy, the consolidation of the 2015 Issuer with our operations. If the true sale of the assets in the 2015 Debt Securitization was not respected in the event of our insolvency, a trustee or debtor-in-possession might reclaim the assets of the 2015 Issuer for our estate. However, in doing so, we would become directly liable for all of the indebtedness then outstanding under the 2015 Debt Securitization, which would equal the full amount of debt of the 2015 Issuer reflected on our consolidated balance sheet. In addition, we cannot assure you that the recovery in the event we were consolidated with the 2015 Issuer for purposes of any bankruptcy proceeding would exceed the amount to which we would otherwise be entitled as the holder of the Class C Notes had we not been consolidated with the 2015 Issuer.
In addition, in connection with the 2015 Debt Securitization, we gave the lenders certain customary representations with respect to the legal structure of the 2015 Issuer, and the quality of the assets transferred to each entity. We remain liable for any breach of such representations for the life of the 2015 Debt Securitization.

46


The 2015 Issuer may issue additional 2015 Notes.
Under the terms of the 2015 Debt Securitization documents, the 2015 Issuer could issue additional 2015 Notes in any class at any time during the reinvestment period on a pro rata basis for each class of notes (but not for each sub-class) and use the net proceeds of such issuance to purchase additional portfolio loans or for another permitted use as provided in the 2015 Debt Securitization documents. Any such additional issuance, however, would require the consent of the collateral manager to the 2015 Debt Securitization and the holders of a majority of the Subordinated 2015 Notes. Among the other conditions that must be satisfied in connection with an additional issuance of 2015 Notes, the aggregate principal amount of all additional issuances of any class of 2015 Notes may not exceed 100% of the outstanding principal amount of such class of 2015 Notes; the 2015 Issuer must notify each rating agency of such issuance prior to the issuance date and such rating agency, if it then rates any class of 2015 Notes, must confirm in writing that no immediate withdrawal or reduction with respect to its then-current rating of any such class of 2015 Notes will occur as a result of such issuance; and the terms of the 2015 Notes to be issued must be identical to the terms of previously issued 2015 Notes of the same class (except that all monies due on such additional 2015 Notes will accrue from the issue date of such notes and that the prices of such 2015 Notes do not have to be identical to those of the initial 2015 Notes). We do not expect to cause the 2015 Issuer to issue any additional 2015 Notes at this time. The total purchase price for any additional 2015 Notes that may be issued may not always equal 100% of the par value of such 2015 Notes, depending on several factors, including fees and closing expenses.
Restructurings of investments of our 2015 Debt Securitization may decrease their value and reduce amounts payable on the 2015 Notes.
We and FS Senior Funding Ltd. have entered into a collateral management agreement, an agreement entered into between a manager and a debt securitization vehicle or similar issuer, which sets forth the terms and conditions pursuant to which the manager provides advisory and/or management services with respect to the client’s securities portfolio. Under the collateral management agreement, we serve as collateral manager of the 2015 Debt Securitization. We have retained a sub-collateral manager, which, as of October 17, 2017, was the Investment Adviser and, prior to October 17, 2017, was the Former Adviser, to furnish collateral management sub-advisory services to us pursuant to a sub-collateral management agreement with our investment adviser.
In our capacity as the collateral manager, we have broad authority to direct and supervise the investment and reinvestment of the investments held by the 2015 Debt Securitization, which may include exercising or enforcing, or refraining from exercising or enforcing, any or all of the 2015 Debt Securitization’s rights in connection with the execution of amendments, waivers, modifications and other changes to the investment documentation in accordance with the collateral management agreement. During periods of economic uncertainty and recession, the incidence of amendments, waivers, modifications and restructurings of investments may increase. Such amendments, waivers, modifications and other restructurings will change the terms of the investments and in some cases may result in the 2015 Debt Securitization holding assets not meeting its criteria for investments. This could adversely impact the coverage tests under the indenture governing the 2015 Notes. Any amendment, waiver, modification or other restructuring that reduces the 2015 Debt Securitization’s compliance with certain financial tests will make it more likely that the 2015 Debt Securitization will need to utilize cash to pay down the unpaid principal amount of the 2015 Notes to cure any breach in such test instead of making payments on the 2015 Notes. Any such use of cash would reduce distributions available and delay the timing of payments to us.
We cannot assure you that any particular restructuring strategy pursued by us or any successor collateral manager will maximize the value of or recovery on any investment. Any restructuring can fundamentally alter the nature of the related investment, and restructurings are not subject to the same underwriting standards that are employed in connection with the origination or acquisition of investments. Any restructuring could alter, reduce or delay the payment of interest or principal on any investment, which could delay the timing and reduce the amount of payments made to us. Restructurings of investments might also result in extensions of the term thereof, which could delay the timing of payments made to us.
The 2015 Debt Securitization depends on the managerial expertise and key personnel available to the collateral manager.
The 2015 Debt Securitization’s activities are directed by us (or any successor collateral manager). As of October 17, 2017, we retained the Investment Adviser to furnish collateral management sub-advisory services. In our capacity as holder of the 2015 Notes, we are generally not able to make decisions with respect to the management, disposition or other realization of any investment, or other decisions regarding the business and affairs of the 2015 Debt Securitization. Consequently, the success of the 2015 Debt Securitization will depend, in large part, on the financial and managerial expertise of the investment professionals available to the sub-collateral manager, which, as of October 17, 2017, was the Investment Adviser. There can be no assurance that such investment professionals will continue to serve in their current positions or continue to be authorized persons of the Investment Adviser. Although such investment professionals will devote such time as they determine in their discretion is reasonably necessary to fulfill the obligations under the collateral management sub-advisory services agreement to the 2015 Debt Securitization effectively, they will not devote all of their professional time to the affairs of the 2015 Debt Securitization.

47


Our ability to transfer the 2015 Notes is limited.
The notes issued pursuant to the 2015 Debt Securitization are illiquid investments and subject to extensive transfer restrictions, and no party is under any obligation to make a market for the notes. There is no market for the notes, and we may not be able to sell or otherwise transfer the 2015 Notes at their fair value, or at all, in the event that we determine to sell them. During economic downturns, notes issued in securitization transactions may experience high volatility and significant fluctuations in market value. Additionally, some potential buyers of such notes now view securitization products as an inappropriate investment, thereby reducing the number of potential buyers and/or potentially affecting liquidity in the secondary market.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
None.

Item 2. Properties
We do not own any real estate or other physical properties material to our operations. Our administrative and principal executive offices are located at 333 South Grand Avenue, 28th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90071. We believe that our office facilities are suitable and adequate for our business as it is presently conducted.


Item 3.     Legal Proceedings
Although we may, from time to time, be involved in litigation arising out of our operations in the normal course of business or otherwise, we are currently not a party to any pending material legal proceedings except as described below.
SEC Examination and Investigation
On March 23, 2016, the Division of Enforcement of the SEC sent document subpoenas and document preservation notices to us, FSAM, FSCO GP LLC - General Partner of Fifth Street Opportunities Fund, L.P., or FSOF, and OCSL. The subpoenas sought production of documents relating to a variety of issues principally related to the activities of our Former Adviser, including those raised in an ordinary-course examination of the Former Adviser by the SEC’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations that began in October 2015, and in the previously disclosed OCSL and FSAM securities class actions and other previously disclosed litigation. The subpoenas were issued pursuant to a formal order of private investigation captioned In the Matter of the Fifth Street Group of Companies, No. HO-12925, dated March 23, 2016, which addresses (among other things) (i) the valuation of our portfolio companies and investments, (ii) the expenses allocated or charged to us and OCSL, (iii) FSOF’s trading in the securities of publicly traded business development companies, (iv) statements to our board of directors, other representatives of pooled investment vehicles, investors, or prospective investors concerning the fair value of our portfolio companies or investments as well as expenses allocated or charged to us and OCSL, (v) various issues relating to adoption and implementation of policies and procedures under the Advisers Act, (vi) statements and/or potential omissions in the entities’ SEC filings, (vii) the entities’ books, records, and accounts and whether they fairly and accurately reflected the entities’ transactions and dispositions of assets, and (viii) several other issues relating to corporate books and records. The formal order cites various provisions of the Securities Act, the Exchange Act, and the Advisers Act, as well as rules promulgated under those Acts, as the bases of the investigation. We are cooperating with the Division of Enforcement investigation, have produced requested documents, and have been communicating with Division of Enforcement personnel. Our Investment Adviser is not subject to these subpoenas.
Item 4.     Mine Safety Disclosures
Not applicable.

48



PART II

Item 5.     Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Price Range of Common Stock
Our common stock currently trades on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “OCSI.” Through October 17, 2017, our common stock traded under the symbol “FSFR.” The following table sets forth, for each fiscal quarter during the two most recently completed fiscal years, the range of high and low sales prices of our common stock as reported on the NASDAQ Global Select Market:
 
 
High
 
Low
Fiscal year ended September 30, 2017
 
 
 
 
  First quarter
 
$
9.53

 
$
8.30

  Second quarter
 
$
10.37

 
$
8.50

  Third quarter
 
$
8.88

 
$
7.30

  Fourth quarter
 
$
9.09

 
$
7.89

Fiscal year ended September 30, 2016
 
 
 
 
  First quarter
 
$
9.10

 
$
7.34

  Second quarter
 
$
8.68

 
$
6.53

  Third quarter
 
$
8.35

 
$
7.25

  Fourth quarter
 
$
8.99

 
$
7.94

The last reported price for our common stock on December 7, 2017 was $8.32 per share. As of December 7, 2017, we had five stockholders of record, which did not include stockholders for whom shares are held in nominee or “street” name.
Sales of Unregistered Securities
We did not engage in any sales of unregistered securities during the fiscal year ended September 30, 2017.
Distributions
Our distributions, if any, are determined by our Board of Directors.
In addition, we have elected to be treated for U.S. federal income tax purposes as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. As long as we continue to qualify as a RIC, we will not be subject to tax on our investment company taxable income or realized net capital gains, to the extent that such taxable income or gains are distributed as dividends for U.S. federal income tax purposes, or deemed to be distributed, to our stockholders on a timely basis.
To maintain RIC tax treatment, we must, among other things, distribute dividends to our stockholders each taxable year of an amount generally, with respect to each taxable year, at least equal to 90% of our investment company net taxable income (i.e., the sum of our net ordinary income plus our realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital losses determined without regard to any deduction for dividends paid). Depending on the level of taxable income earned in a taxable year, we may choose to carry forward taxable income in excess of current year distributions into the next taxable year and incur a 4% U.S. federal excise tax on such income. Any such carryover taxable income must be distributed through a dividend declared prior to filing the final tax return related to the taxable year in which such taxable income was generated. We may, in the future, make actual distributions to our stockholders of our net capital gains. We can offer no assurance that we will achieve results that will permit the payment of any cash distributions and we may be prohibited from making distributions if doing so causes us to fail to maintain the asset coverage ratios stipulated by the 1940 Act or if distributions are limited by the terms of any of our borrowings. See “Business - Taxation as a Regulated Investment Company” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations-Regulated Investment Company Status and Distributions.”
We have adopted an “opt out” dividend reinvestment plan, or DRIP, for our common stockholders. As a result, if we make a cash distribution, then stockholders’ cash distributions will be automatically reinvested in additional shares of our common stock, unless they specifically “opt out” of the DRIP so as to receive cash distributions.
In accordance with certain applicable Treasury regulations and related administrative authorities issued by the IRS, a RIC may treat a distribution of its own stock as fulfilling its RIC distribution requirements if each stockholder may elect to receive

49


his or her entire distribution in either cash or stock of the RIC, subject to certain requirements, including those relating to the amount of cash to be distributed to all stockholders in connection with such distributions. If too many stockholders elect to receive cash (which generally may not be less than 20% of the value of the overall distribution), each stockholder electing to receive cash must receive a pro rata amount of cash (with the balance of the distribution paid in stock). If these and certain other requirements are met, for U.S federal income tax purposes, the amount of the dividend paid in stock will be equal to the amount of cash that could have been received instead of stock. We have no current intention of paying dividends in shares of our stock in accordance with these Treasury regulations or administrative authorities.
The following table reflects the distributions per share, including any return of capital, that our Board of Directors has declared, including shares issued under our DRIP on our common stock since October 1, 2015:
Frequency
 
Date Declared
 
Record Date
 
Payment Date
 
Amount
per Share
 
Total Distribution
 
DRIP Shares Issued (1)
 
DRIP Shares Value
Monthly
 
July 10, 2015
 
October 6, 2015
 
October 15, 2015
 
0.075
 
2,210,008
 
12,080
 
108,563
Monthly
 
July 10, 2015
 
November 5, 2015
 
November 16, 2015
 
0.075
 
2,210,008
 
13,269
 
116,730
Monthly
 
November 30, 2015
 
December 11, 2015
 
December 22, 2015
 
0.075
 
2,210,007
 
11,103
 
94,563
Monthly
 
November 30, 2015
 
January 4, 2016
 
January 15, 2016
 
0.075
 
2,210,007
 
8,627
 
61,079
Monthly
 
November 30, 2015
 
February 5, 2016
 
February 16, 2016
 
0.075
 
2,210,008
 
4,542
 
32,923
Monthly
 
February 8, 2016
 
March 15, 2016
 
March 31, 2016
 
0.075
 
2,210,008
 
4,383
 
34,578
Monthly
 
February 8, 2016
 
April 15, 2016
 
April 29, 2016
 
0.075
 
2,210,008
 
4,452
 
35,033
Monthly
 
February 8, 2016
 
May 13, 2016
 
May 31, 2016
 
0.075
 
2,210,007
 
4,256
 
33,494
Monthly
 
May 6, 2016
 
June 15, 2016
 
June 30, 2016
 
0.075
 
2,210,007
 
5,822
 
46,881
Monthly
 
May 6, 2016
 
July 15, 2016
 
July 29, 2016
 
0.075
 
2,210,008
 
3,627
 
30,745
Monthly
 
May 6, 2016
 
August 15, 2016
 
August 31, 2016
 
0.075
 
2,210,008
 
3,260
 
29,002
Monthly
 
August 4, 2016
 
September 15, 2016
 
September 30, 2016
 
0.075
 
2,210,008
 
3,078
 
26,811
Monthly
 
August 4, 2016
 
October 14, 2016
 
October 31, 2016
 
0.075
 
2,210,008
 
3,146
 
26,985
Monthly
 
August 4, 2016
 
November 15, 2016
 
November 30, 2016
 
0.075
 
2,210,008
 
2,986
 
26,909
Monthly
 
October 19, 2016
 
December 15, 2016
 
December 30, 2016
 
0.075
 
2,210,008
 
3,438
 
30,586
Monthly
 
October 19, 2016
 
January 31, 2017
 
January 31, 2017
 
0.075
 
2,210,008
 
2,905
 
29,363
Monthly
 
October 19, 2016
 
February 15, 2017
 
February 28, 2017
 
0.075
 
2,210,008
 
2,969
 
26,427
Monthly
 
February 6, 2017
 
March 15, 2017
 
March 31, 2017
 
0.040
 
1,178,671
 
1,508
 
13,253
Quarterly
 
February 6, 2017
 
June 15, 2017
 
June 30, 2017
 
0.190
 
5,598,686
 
6,840
 
55,221
Quarterly
 
August 7, 2017
 
September 15, 2017
 
September 29, 2017
 
0.190
 
5,598,686
 
6,991
 
61,887
Quarterly
 
August 7, 2017
 
December 15, 2017
 
December 29, 2017
 
0.190
 
 
 
 
 
 
_______________________
(1) Shares were purchased on the open market and distributed.



50


Stock Performance Graph
The following graph compares the cumulative total return provided to shareholders on Oaktree Strategic Income Corporation’s common stock relative to the cumulative total returns of the NYSE Composite index, the NASDAQ Financial index and a customized peer group of our two direct competitors, Solar Senior Capital Ltd. and PennantPark Floating Rate Capital Ltd. An investment of $100 (with reinvestment of all dividends) is assumed to have been made in our common stock on July 12, 2013, the date our common stock was listed, and in each index and in the peer group at June 30, 2013, and its relative performance is tracked through September 30, 2017. The stock performance graph shows returns during management by the Former Adviser.
ocsi10kstockgraph.jpg
 
7/12/13
9/13
12/13
3/14
6/14
9/14
12/14
3/15
6/15
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Oaktree Strategic Income Corporation
100.00

95.69

95.04

104.85

104.23

90.00

80.14

85.71

76.59

NYSE Composite
100.00

105.64

114.82

116.93

122.75

120.34

122.57

123.97

123.72

NASDAQ Financial
100.00

104.75

117.25

118.72

117.66

114.96

124.17

126.50

131.77

Peer Group
100.00

96.46

98.55

97.72

100.79

96.61

97.25

103.96

104.49

 
9/15
12/15
3/16
6/16
9/16
12/16
3/17
6/17
9/17
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Oaktree Strategic Income Corporation
73.94

75.19

70.94

73.29

80.95

84.47

87.36

82.74

91.28

NYSE Composite
112.91

117.55

119.12

123.31

126.85

131.59

137.62

141.83

148.09

NASDAQ Financial
122.67

128.11

124.96

127.04

137.93

161.48

160.89

169.33

180.84

Peer Group
94.94

95.11

99.33

109.35

116.81

124.87

131.45

131.22

137.57



51


Selected unaudited quarterly financial data for Oaktree Strategic Income Corporation for the years ended September 30, 2017, 2016, and 2015, are below:
 
For the three months ended
(dollars in thousands,
except per share
amounts)
September  30, 2017
June 30,
2017
March 31,
2017
December 
31, 2016
September  30, 2016
June 30,
2016
March 31,
2016
December 
31, 2015
September  30, 2015
June 30,
2015
March 31,
2015
December 
31, 2014
Total investment income
$
11,820

$
12,171

$
11,020

$
11,561

$
13,203

$
13,114

$
13,195

$
13,914

$
14,068

$
14,140

$
11,341

$
11,923

Net investment income
5,521

5,930

5,086

5,884

6,342

6,164

5,785

7,002

7,402

7,086

6,294

7,496

Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)
(19,984
)
(5,791
)
(254
)
(5,159
)
2,251

(5,248
)
(6,445
)
(20,308
)
(7,115
)
(4,632
)
393

(1,012
)
Net increase (decrease) in net assets resulting from operations
(14,463
)
139

4,832

725

8,593

916

(660
)
(13,306
)
287

2,454

6,687

6,484

Net assets
293,636

313,698

319,158

319,924

325,829

323,866

329,580

334,661

356,807

361,782

368,168

370,322

Total investment income per common share
$
0.40

$
0.41

$
0.37

$
0.39

$
0.45

$
0.45

$
0.45

$
0.47

$
0.48

$
0.48

$
0.38

$
0.40

Net investment income per common share
0.19

0.20

0.17

0.20

0.22

0.21

0.20

0.24

0.25

0.24

0.21

0.25

Earnings (loss) per common share
(0.49
)

0.16

0.02

0.29

0.03

(0.02
)
(0.45
)
0.01

0.08

0.23

0.22

Net asset value per common share at period end
9.97

10.65

10.83

10.86

11.06

10.99

11.18

11.36

12.11

12.28

12.49

12.57



52


Item 6.     Selected Financial Data
The following selected financial data should be read together with our Consolidated Financial Statements and the related notes and the discussion under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” which is included elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K. The financial information as of and for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2017, 2016, 2015 and 2014 and as of September 30, 2013 and for the period from the commencement of operations, June 29, 2013, through September 30, 2013 set forth below was derived from our audited financial statements and related notes for Oaktree Strategic Income Corporation.
 
 
 
As of and for the Year Ended September 30, 2017
 
As of and for the Year Ended September 30, 2016
 
As of and for the Year Ended September 30, 2015
 
As of and for the Year Ended September 30, 2014
 
As of September 30 and for the period from June 29, 2013 through September 30, 2013
Statement of Operations data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total investment income
 
$
46,571,856

 
$
53,426,234

 
$
51,472,531

 
$
12,516,674

 
$
456,417

Base management fee, net
 
5,648,467

 
6,128,072

 
5,931,155

 
1,602,617

 
61,379

Part I incentive fee
 
3,236,320

 
5,211,729

 
5,689,371

 
708,235

 

Part II incentive fee
 

 

 
(766,552
)
 
774,841

 
137,609

All other expenses
 
15,265,376

 
16,793,749

 
12,340,527

 
3,667,100

 
241,723

Net investment income
 
22,421,693

 
25,292,684

 
28,278,030

 
5,763,881

 
15,706

Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments
 
(31,188,572
)
 
(29,750,301
)
 
(12,365,948
)
 
3,600,076

 
688,043

Net increase (decrease) in net assets resulting from operations
 
(8,766,879
)
 
(4,457,617
)
 
15,912,082

 
9,363,957

 
703,749

Per share data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net asset value per common share at period end
 
$
9.97

 
$
11.06

 
$
12.11

 
$
12.65

 
$
15.11

Market price at period end
 
8.80

 
8.56

 
8.73

 
11.82

 
13.54

Net investment income (2)
 
0.76

 
0.86

 
0.96

 
0.62

 

Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments (2)
 
(1.06
)
 
(1.01
)
 
(0.42
)
 
0.39

 
0.13

Net increase (decrease) in net assets resulting from operations (2)
 
(0.30
)
 
(0.15
)
 
0.54

 
1.01

 
0.13

Distributions per common share
 
0.80

 
0.90

 
1.07

 
1.01

 

Balance Sheet data at period end:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total investments at fair value
 
$
560,436,660

 
$
573,604,381

 
$
623,647,474

 
$
300,001,397

 
$
48,653,617

Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash
 
43,012,387

 
28,815,679

 
52,692,097

 
109,557,165

 
52,346,831

Other assets
 
5,213,604

 
19,997,081

 
21,370,913

 
2,946,782

 
449,596

Total assets
 
608,662,651

 
622,417,141

 
697,710,484

 
412,505,344

 
101,450,044

Total liabilities
 
315,026,217

 
296,587,747

 
340,903,381

 
39,827,666

 
744,775

Total net assets
 
293,636,434

 
325,829,394

 
356,807,103

 
372,677,678

 
100,705,269

Other data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Weighted average yield on debt investments(1)
 
7.52
%
 
8.58
%
 
8.22
%
 
7.27
%
 
6.81
%
Number of portfolio companies at period end
 
67

 
63

 
64

 
48

 
8

 
(1)
Weighted average yield is calculated based upon our debt investments at the end of the period.
(2)
Calculated based on weighted average shares outstanding for the period.


53


Item 7.     Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K.
Some of the statements in this annual report on Form 10-K constitute forward-looking statements because they relate to future events or our future performance or financial condition. The forward-looking statements contained in this annual report on Form 10-K may include statements as to:

our future operating results and distribution projections;
the ability of our Investment Adviser to reposition our portfolio and to implement our Investment Adviser’s future plans with respect to our business;
our business prospects and the prospects of our portfolio companies;
the impact of the investments that we expect to make;
the ability of our portfolio companies to achieve their objectives;
our expected financings and investments;
the adequacy of our cash resources and working capital;
the timing of cash flows, if any, from the operations of our portfolio companies; and
the cost or potential outcome of any litigation to which we may be a party.
In addition, words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “expect,” “seek,” “plan,” “should,” “estimate,” “project” and “intend” indicate forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements include these words. The forward-looking statements contained in this annual report on Form 10-K involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results could differ materially from those implied or expressed in the forward-looking statements for any reason, including the factors set forth in “Item 1A. Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K.
Other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially include:
 
changes in the economy, financial markets and political environment;
risks associated with possible disruption in our operations or the economy generally due to terrorism or natural disasters;
future changes in laws or regulations (including the interpretation of these laws and regulations by regulatory authorities) and conditions in our operating areas, particularly with respect to business development companies or RICs; and
other considerations that may be disclosed from time to time in our publicly disseminated documents and filings.
We have based the forward-looking statements included in this annual report on Form 10-K on information available to us on the date of this annual report, and we assume no obligation to update any such forward-looking statements. Although we undertake no obligation to revise or update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, you are advised to consult any additional disclosures that we may make directly to you or through reports that we in the future may file with the SEC, including annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and current reports on Form 8-K.
Except as otherwise specified, references to the “Company,” “we,” “us,” and “our,” refer to Oaktree Strategic Income Corporation and its consolidated subsidiaries.
Business Overview
We are a specialty finance company dedicated to providing customized capital solutions for middle-market companies in both the syndicated and private placement markets. We are a closed-end, externally managed, non-diversified management investment company that has elected to be regulated as a business development company under the 1940 Act. In addition, we have qualified and elected to be treated as a RIC under the Code for tax purposes.
As of October 17, 2017, we are externally managed by Oaktree, a subsidiary of OCG, a global investment manager specializing in alternative investments, pursuant the New Investment Advisory Agreement. OFA, a subsidiary of our Investment Adviser, also provides certain administrative and other services necessary for us to operate. Prior to October 17, 2017, we were externally managed and advised by our Former Adviser, and we were named Fifth Street Senior Floating Rate Corp.
We seek to generate a stable source of current income while minimizing the risk of principal loss and, to a lesser extent, capital appreciation by providing middle-market companies with primarily first lien secured debt financings that pay us interest at rates which are determined periodically on the basis of a floating base lending rate. We invest in companies across a variety of industries that typically possess resilient business models with strong underlying fundamentals. We deploy capital across credit and economic cycles with a focus on long-term results, which enables us to build lasting partnerships with financial sponsors and management teams. Under normal market conditions, through January 18, 2018, at least 80% of the value of our net assets plus borrowings for investment purposes will be invested

54


in floating rate senior loans, which include both first and second lien secured debt financings. We may also invest in unsecured loans, including subordinated loans, issued by private middle-market companies and, to a lesser extent, senior and subordinated loans issued by public companies and equity investments.
Following entry into the New Investment Advisory Agreement, our Investment Adviser intends to reposition our portfolio in the near-term in order to (1) rotate out of a small number of investments that it views as challenged, (2) focus on increasing the size of our core private investments and (3) supplement the portfolio with broadly syndicated and select privately placed loans. We expect that our Investment Adviser will focus on middle-market companies, which we define as companies with enterprise values of between $100 and $750 million. Going forward, we expect our portfolio to include primarily first lien floating rate senior secured financings. We generally invest in securities that are rated below investment grade by rating agencies or that would be rated below investment grade if they were rated. Below investment grade securities, which are often referred to as “high yield” and “junk,” have predominantly speculative characteristics with respect to the issuer’s capacity to pay interest and repay principal.

Business Environment and Developments
The opportunity set in credit is still dominated by the search for yield as central banks in Japan and Europe continue their accommodative monetary policies. This glut of capital is resulting in significant inflows into sub-investment grade credit from investors seeking higher spreads as investment grade and highly rated sub-investment grade credit trade at close-to-historically tight levels.
During the fiscal year 2017, the spread on the BAML High Yield Single B Index ranged between 3.43% and 5.34% and was 3.57% as of September 30, 2017. In addition, during fiscal year 2017 the Credit Suisse Leveraged Loan Index spread ranged between 3.64% and 4.57% and was 3.87% as of September 30, 2017. The weighted average annual yield on the OCSI portfolio of 7.5% compares favorably in the current environment.
In this environment, we believe attractive risk-adjusted returns can be achieved by investing in companies that cannot efficiently access traditional debt capital markets. We believe that the Company has the resources and experience to source, diligence and structure investments in these companies and is well placed to generate attractive returns for investors.

New Investment Advisory Agreement with Oaktree
Upon the closing of the Transaction on October 17, 2017, Oaktree became the investment adviser to each of OCSL and us, and Oaktree paid gross cash consideration of $320 million to our Former Adviser. The closing of the Transaction resulted in an assignment for purposes of the 1940 Act of the Former Investment Advisory Agreement and, as a result, its immediate termination. The material terms of the services to be provided under the New Investment Advisory Agreement, other than the fee structure, are substantially the same as the Former Investment Advisory Agreement, except that services are provided by Oaktree. See “Business-The Investment Adviser” and “-New Investment Advisory Agreement.”
Critical Accounting Policies
Basis of Presentation
Our Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, or GAAP, and pursuant to the requirements for reporting on Form 10-K and Regulation S-X. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated. We are an investment company following the accounting and reporting guidance in Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, Accounting Standards Codification, or ASC, Topic 946, Financial Services-Investment Companies, or ASC 946.
Investment Valuation
We report our investments for which current market values are not readily available at fair value. We value our investments in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, or ASC 820, which defines fair value as the amount that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. A liability's fair value is defined as the amount that would be paid to transfer the liability to a new obligor, not the amount that would be paid to settle the liability with the creditor. ASC 820 prioritizes the use of observable market prices derived from such prices over entity-specific inputs. Where observable prices or inputs are not available or reliable, valuation techniques are applied. These valuation techniques involve some level of management estimation and judgment, the degree of which is dependent on the price transparency for the investments or market and the investments' complexity.

Hierarchical levels, defined by ASC 820 and directly related to the amount of subjectivity associated with the inputs to fair valuation of these assets and liabilities, are as follow:

Level 1 - Unadjusted, quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities at the measurement date.

55



Level 2 - Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data at the measurement date for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities.

Level 3 - Unobservable inputs that reflect management's best estimate of what market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability at the measurement date. Consideration is given to the risk inherent in the valuation technique and the risk inherent in the inputs to the model.
If inputs used to measure fair value fall into different levels of the fair value hierarchy, an investment's level is based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. Our assessment of the significance of a particular input to the fair value measurement in its entirety requires judgment and considers factors specific to the investment. This includes investment securities that are valued using "bid" and "ask" prices obtained from independent third party pricing services or directly from brokers. These investments may be classified as Level 3 because the quoted prices may be indicative in nature for securities that are in an inactive market, may be for similar securities or may require adjustments for investment-specific factors or restrictions.
Financial instruments with readily available quoted prices generally will have a higher degree of market price observability and a lesser degree of judgment inherent in measuring fair value. As such, our Investment Adviser obtains and analyzes readily available market quotations provided by independent pricing services for all of our senior secured debt investments for which quotations are available. In determining the fair value of a particular investment, pricing services use observable market information, including both binding and non-binding indicative quotations.
Our Investment Adviser evaluates the prices obtained from independent pricing services and company specific data that could affect the credit quality and/or fair value of the investment. Investments for which market quotations are readily available may be valued at such market quotations. In order to validate market quotations, our Investment Adviser looks at a number of factors to determine if the quotations are representative of fair value, including the source and nature of the quotations. Our Investment Adviser does not adjust the prices unless it has a reason to believe market quotations are not reflective of the fair value of an investment. Examples of events that would cause market quotations to not reflect fair value could include cases when a security trades infrequently causing a quoted purchase or sale price to become stale or in the event of a "fire sale" by a distressed seller. In these instances, we value such investments by using the valuation procedure that we use with respect to assets for which market quotations are not readily available (as discussed below).
If the quotation provided by the pricing service is based on only one or two market sources, we perform additional procedures to corroborate such information, which may include the market yield technique discussed below and a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the credit quality and market trends affecting the portfolio company.
We perform detailed valuations of our debt and equity investments for which market quotations are not readily available or are deemed not to represent fair value of the investments. We typically use three different valuation techniques. The first valuation technique is the transaction precedent technique, which utilizes recent or expected future transactions of the investment to determine fair value, to the extent applicable. The second valuation technique is an analysis of the enterprise value, or EV, of the portfolio company. EV means the entire value of the portfolio company to a market participant, including the sum of the values of debt and equity securities used to capitalize the enterprise at a point in time. The EV analysis is typically performed to determine the value of equity investments, to determine if there is credit impairment for debt investments and to determine the value for debt investments that we are deemed to control under the 1940 Act. To estimate the EV of a portfolio company, the Investment Adviser analyzes various factors, including the portfolio company’s historical and projected financial results, macroeconomic impacts on the company, and competitive dynamics in the company’s industry. The Investment Adviser also utilizes some or all of the following information based on the individual circumstances of the portfolio company, including: (i) valuations of comparable public companies, (ii) recent sales of private and public comparable companies in similar industries or having similar business or earnings characteristics, (iii) purchase price multiples as a multiple of their earnings or cash flow, (iv) the portfolio company’s ability to meet its forecasts and its business prospects, (v) a discounted cash flow analysis, (vi) estimated liquidation or collateral value of the portfolio company's assets and (vii) offers from third parties to buy the portfolio company. We may probability weight potential sale outcomes with respect to a portfolio company due to the uncertainty that exists as of the valuation date. The third valuation technique is a market yield technique, which is typically performed for non-credit impaired debt investments. To determine fair value using a market yield technique, a current price is imputed for the investment based upon an assessment of the expected market yield for a similarly structured investment with a similar level of risk. In the market yield technique, we consider the current contractual interest rate, the capital structure and other terms of the investment relative to risk of the company and the specific investment. A key determinant of risk, among other things, is the leverage through the investment relative to the EV of the portfolio company. As debt investments held by us are substantially illiquid with no active transaction market, we depend on primary market data, including newly funded transactions and industry specific market movements, as well as secondary market data with respect to high yield debt instruments and syndicated loans, as inputs in determining the appropriate market yield, as applicable.
In accordance with ASC 820-10, certain investments that qualify as investment companies in accordance with ASC 946 may be valued using net asset value as a practical expedient for fair value. Consistent with FASB guidance under ASC 820, these investments are excluded from the hierarchical levels.

56


We estimate the fair value of privately held warrants using a Black Scholes pricing model, which includes an analysis of various factors and subjective assumptions including, the current stock price (by using an EV analysis as described above), the expected period until exercise, expected volatility of the underlying stock price, expected dividends and the risk-free rate. Changes in the subjective input assumptions can materially affect the fair value estimates.
Our Board of Directors undertakes a multi-step valuation process each quarter in connection with determining the fair value of our investments:
The quarterly valuation process begins with each portfolio company or investment being initially valued by our Investment Adviser’s valuation team in conjunction with the Investment Adviser’s portfolio management team and investment professionals responsible for each portfolio investment;
Preliminary valuations are then reviewed and discussed with management of our Investment Adviser;
Separately, independent valuation firms engaged by our Board of Directors prepare valuations of our investments, on a selected basis, for which market quotations are not readily available or are readily available but deemed not reflective of the fair value of the investment, and submit the reports to us and provide such reports to our Investment Adviser and the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors;
The Investment Adviser compares and contrasts its preliminary valuations to the valuations of the independent valuation firms and prepares a valuation report for the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors;
The Audit Committee of our Board of Directors reviews the preliminary valuations with our Investment Adviser, and our Investment Adviser responds and supplements the preliminary valuations to reflect any discussions between our Investment Adviser and the Audit Committee;
The Audit Committee of our Board of Directors makes a recommendation to our Board of Directors regarding the fair value of the investments in our portfolio; and
Our Board of Directors discusses valuations and determines the fair value of each investment in our portfolio.
The fair value of our investments at September 30, 2017 and September 30, 2016 was determined in good faith by our Board of Directors. Our Board of Directors has authorized the engagement of independent valuation firms to provide valuation assistance. We will continue to engage independent valuation firms to provide assistance regarding the determination of the fair value of a portion of our portfolio securities for which market quotations are not readily available or are readily available but deemed not reflective of the fair value of the investment each quarter, and the Board of Directors may reasonably rely on that assistance. The percentage of our portfolio valued by independent valuation firms may vary from period to period based on the availability of market quotations for our portfolio investments during the respective periods. Typically, a higher percentage of our portfolio is valued by independent valuation firms in our fiscal fourth quarter due to additional year-end procedures. However, our Board of Directors is responsible for the ultimate valuation of the portfolio investments at fair value as determined in good faith pursuant to our valuation policy and a consistently applied valuation process.
The percentages of our portfolio, at fair value, valued by independent valuation firms as of the end of each period during the current and two preceding fiscal years were as follows:
As of December 31, 2014
54.1
%
As of March 31, 2015 (1)
32.1
%
As of June 30, 2015
23.8
%
As of September 30, 2015 (2)
76.5
%
As of December 31, 2015
29.3
%
As of March 31, 2016
25.0
%
As of June 30, 2016
32.0
%
As of September 30, 2016 (2)
73.5
%
As of December 31, 2016
29.6
%
As of March 31, 2017
30.1
%
As of June 30, 2017
29.4
%
As of September 30, 2017 (2)
63.8
%
__________
(1) The decrease from prior quarters is primarily related to the increased use of market quotations to value certain of our portfolio investments beginning in the quarter ended March 31, 2015.
(2) Valuations performed by independent valuation firms as of September 30, 2017, 2016 and 2015 were higher primarily due to additional year-end procedures related to portfolio investments that were valued using market quotations based on only one source.

57


As of September 30, 2017 and September 30, 2016, approximately 92.1% and 92.2%, respectively, of our total assets represented investments in portfolio companies valued at prices equal to fair value.
Revenue Recognition
Interest and Dividend Income
Interest income, adjusted for accretion of OID, is recorded on the accrual basis to the extent that such amounts are expected to be collected. We stop accruing interest on investments when it is determined that interest is no longer collectible. Investments that are expected to pay regularly scheduled interest in cash are generally placed on non-accrual status when there is reasonable doubt that principal or interest cash payments will be collected. Cash interest payments received on investments may be recognized as income or a return of capital depending upon management’s judgment. Such non-accrual investments are restored to accrual status if past due principal and interest are paid in cash, and the portfolio companies, in management’s judgment, are likely to continue timely payment of their remaining interest. As of September 30, 2017, there were three investments on which we had stopped accruing cash and/or PIK interest or OID income.
In connection with our investment in a portfolio company, we sometimes receive nominal cost equity that is valued as part of the negotiation process with the portfolio company. When we receive nominal cost equity, we allocate our cost basis in the investment between debt securities and the nominal cost equity at the time of origination. Any resulting discount from recording the loan, or otherwise purchasing a security at a discount, is accreted into interest income over the life of the loan.
We generally recognize dividend income on the ex-dividend date. Distributions received from equity investments are evaluated to determine if the distribution should be recorded as dividend income or a return of capital. Generally, we will not record distributions from such equity investments as dividend income unless there are sufficient earnings at the portfolio company prior to the distribution. Distributions that are classified as a return of capital are recorded as a reduction in the cost basis of the investment.
Fee Income
We receive a variety of fees in the ordinary course of business, including servicing, advisory, amendment, structuring and prepayment fees, which are classified as fee income and recognized as they are earned.
PIK Interest
Our loans may contain contractual PIK interest provisions. The PIK interest, which represents contractually deferred interest added to the loan balance that is generally due at the end of the loan term, is generally recorded on the accrual basis to the extent such amounts are expected to be collected. We generally cease accruing PIK interest if there is insufficient value to support the accrual or if we do not expect the portfolio company to be able to pay all principal and interest due. Our decision to cease accruing PIK interest involves subjective judgments and determinations based on available information about a particular portfolio company, including whether the portfolio company is current with respect to its payment of principal and interest on its loans and debt securities; financial statements and financial projections for the portfolio company; our assessment of the portfolio company's business development success; information obtained by us in connection with periodic formal update interviews with the portfolio company's management and, if appropriate, the private equity sponsor; and information about the general economic and market conditions in which the portfolio company operates. Based on this and other information, we determine whether to cease accruing PIK interest on a loan or debt security when it is determined that PIK interest is no longer collectible. Our determination to cease accruing PIK interest on a loan or debt security is generally made well before our full write-down of such loan or debt security. In addition, if it is subsequently determined that we will not be able to collect any previously accrued PIK interest, the fair value of our loans or debt securities would be reduced by the amount of such previously accrued, but uncollectible, PIK interest. The accrual of PIK interest on our debt investments increases the recorded cost bases of these investments in our Consolidated Financial Statements and, as a result, increases the cost bases of these investments for purposes of computing the capital gains incentive fee payable by us to our Investment Adviser.
For a discussion of risks we are subject to as a result of our use of PIK interest in connection with our investments, see "Risk Factors - Risks Relating to Our Business and Structure - We may have difficulty paying our required distributions if we are required to recognize income for U.S. federal income tax purposes before or without receiving cash representing such income," "- We may in the future choose to pay distributions partly in our own stock, in which case you may be subject to tax in excess of the cash you receive" and "- Our incentive fee may induce our Investment Adviser to make speculative investments" elsewhere in this annual report. To maintain our status as a RIC, income from PIK interest must be paid out to our stockholders as distributions even though we have not yet collected the cash and may never collect the cash relating to the PIK interest. Accumulated PIK interest was $0.5 million and $0.1 million as of September 30, 2017 and September 30, 2016, respectively. The net increases in loan balances as a result of contractual PIK arrangements are separately identified in our Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows.

58


Portfolio Composition
Our investments principally consist of senior loans in private middle-market companies and investments in FSFR Glick JV. As of September 30, 2017, our senior loans were typically secured by a first or second lien on the assets of the portfolio company and generally have terms of up to ten years (but an expected average life of between three and four years). We believe the environment for direct lending remains active, and, as a result, a number of our portfolio companies were able to refinance and repay their loans during the fiscal year ended September 30, 2017.
During the year ended September 30, 2017, we originated $290.8 million of investment commitments in 36 new and 12 existing portfolio companies and funded $290.6 million of investments.
During the year ended September 30, 2017, we received $215.3 million in connection with the full repayments and exits of 27 of our investments and an additional $61.7 million in connection with other paydowns and sales of investments.
A summary of the composition of our investment portfolio at cost and fair value as a percentage of total investments is shown in the following tables:
 
 
September 30, 2017
 
September 30, 2016
Cost:
 
 
 
 
Senior secured debt
 
86.50
%
 
86.40
%
Subordinated notes of FSFR Glick JV
 
10.61

 
10.66

LLC equity interests of FSFR Glick JV
 
1.18

 
1.18

Purchased equity
 
1.71

 
1.76

Equity grants
 

 

Total
 
100.00
%
 
100.00
%
 
 
September 30, 2017
 
September 30, 2016
Fair value:
 
 
 
 
Senior secured debt
 
89.53
%
 
87.58
%
Subordinated notes of FSFR Glick JV
 
10.28

 
9.92

LLC equity interests of FSFR Glick JV
 

 
1.12

Purchased equity
 
0.19

 
1.36

Equity grants
 

 
0.02

Total
 
100.00
%
 
100.00
%


59


The industry composition of our portfolio at cost and fair value as a percentage of total investments was as follows:
 
 
September 30, 2017
 
September 30, 2016
Cost:
 
 
 
 
 Internet software & services
 
21.46
%
 
22.07
%
 Multi-sector holdings (1)
 
11.79

 
11.84

 Healthcare services
 
8.41

 
14.80

 Advertising
 
7.19

 
8.06

 Application software
 
5.59

 
5.35

 Diversified support services
 
4.00

 
3.28

 IT consulting & other services
 
3.39

 
1.47

 Human resources & employment services
 
3.33

 

 Specialized finance
 
2.54

 

 Environmental & facilities services
 
2.34

 
1.06

 Oil & gas equipment & services
 
2.32

 
0.70

 Distributors
 
2.14

 

 Industrial machinery
 
2.06

 
0.64

 Real estate services
 
2.02

 

 Commercial printing
 
1.96

 
0.98

 Integrated telecommunication services
 
1.87

 
4.06

 Food retail
 
1.66

 
1.15

 Data processing & outsourced services
 
1.62

 
1.64

 Pharmaceuticals
 
1.50

 
1.53

 Specialty Stores
 
1.38

 

 Security & alarm services
 
1.33

 
2.97

 Computer & Electronics Retail
 
1.22

 

 Research & consulting services
 
1.14

 
2.85

 Personal products
 
1.08

 
0.21

 Aerospace & defense
 
1.07

 

 Auto parts & equipment
 
0.97

 

 Healthcare distributors
 
0.82

 

 Casinos & gaming
 
0.82

 

 Housewares & specialties
 
0.79

 

 Trucking
 
0.67

 

 Fertilizers & agricultural chemicals
 
0.54

 
0.59

 Hypermarkets & super centers
 
0.50

 

 Specialized consumer services
 
0.27

 
3.76

 Computer hardware
 
0.21

 
0.66

 Education services
 

 
2.54

 Electronic equipment & instruments
 

 
1.82

 Diversified capital markets
 

 
1.45

 Construction and engineering
 

 
0.98

 Wireless telecommunication services
 

 
0.95

 Food distributors
 

 
0.95

 Restaurants
 

 
0.83

 Healthcare technology
 

 
0.81

 
 
100.00
%
 
100.00
%


60


 
 
September 30, 2017
 
September 30, 2016
Fair value:

 
 
 
 
 Internet software & services
 
21.72
%
 
20.82
%
 Multi-sector holdings (1)
 
10.28

 
11.04

 Advertising
 
7.34

 
8.49

 Application software
 
6.06

 
5.65

 Healthcare services
 
5.27

 
14.64

 Diversified support services
 
4.40

 
3.42

 IT consulting & other services
 
3.66

 
1.55

 Human resources & employment services
 
3.59

 

 Specialized finance
 
2.79

 

 Environmental & facilities services
 
2.55

 
1.14

 Oil & gas equipment & services
 
2.51

 
0.71

 Distributors
 
2.31

 

 Industrial machinery
 
2.22

 
0.66

 Real estate services
 
2.19

 

 Commercial printing
 
2.13

 
1.03

 Integrated telecommunication services
 
2.03

 
4.30

 Food retail
 
1.82

 
1.22

 Data processing & outsourced services
 
1.76

 
1.71

 Pharmaceuticals
 
1.61

 
1.57

 Specialty Stores
 
1.46

 

 Security & alarm services
 
1.42

 
3.11

 Computer & Electronics Retail
 
1.34

 

 Research & consulting services
 
1.25

 
2.99

 Personal products
 
1.18

 
0.22

 Aerospace & defense
 
1.17

 

 Auto parts & equipment
 
1.03

 

 Casinos & gaming
 
0.90

 

 Healthcare distributors
 
0.88

 

 Housewares & specialties
 
0.85

 

 Trucking
 
0.73

 

 Hypermarkets & super centers
 
0.51

 

 Fertilizers & agricultural chemicals
 
0.50

 
0.59

 Specialized consumer services
 
0.30

 
3.93

 Computer hardware
 
0.24

 
0.68

 Education services
 

 
2.67

 Electronic equipment & instruments
 

 
1.90

 Diversified capital markets
 

 
1.53

 Construction and engineering
 

 
1.01

 Food distributors
 

 
0.98

 Restaurants
 

 
0.87

&