Attached files

file filename
EX-32 - EXHIBIT 32 - CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPcrs-ex32x2017930.htm
EX-31.B - EXHIBIT 31.B - CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPcrs-ex31bx2017930.htm
EX-31.A - EXHIBIT 31.A - CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPcrs-ex31ax2017930.htm
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C.  20549
 
 

FORM 10-Q
 
 

(Mark One)
 
x
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2017
 
or
 
o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from             to            
 
 
Commission File Number 1-5828
 
CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its Charter)
 

Delaware
 
23-0458500
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
 
 
1735 Market Street, 15th Floor
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
 
19103
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
610-208-2000
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes x  No o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files.  Yes x  No o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer:
x
 
Accelerated filer:
o
 
 
 
Non-accelerated filer:
o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company:
o
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Emerging growth company
o







If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes o  No x
 
The number of shares outstanding of the issuer’s common stock as of October 19, 2017 was 46,816,607.



CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
FORM 10-Q
INDEX
 
 
 
 
Page
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


2


PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1. Financial Statements
 
CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Unaudited)
(in millions, except share data)
 
September 30,
2017
 
June 30,
2017
ASSETS
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
24.9

 
$
66.3

Accounts receivable, net
294.6

 
290.4

Inventories
737.3

 
690.4

Other current assets
54.9

 
46.5

Total current assets
1,111.7

 
1,093.6

Property, plant and equipment, net
1,308.7

 
1,316.8

Goodwill
263.4

 
263.4

Other intangibles, net
63.2

 
64.9

Deferred income taxes
7.5

 
7.6

Other assets
138.0

 
131.8

Total assets
$
2,892.5

 
$
2,878.1

LIABILITIES
 
 
 
Current liabilities:
 

 
 

Credit agreement borrowings
$
3.3

 
$

Current portion of long-term debt
55.0

 
55.0

Accounts payable
212.5

 
201.1

Accrued liabilities
110.8

 
139.9

Total current liabilities
381.6

 
396.0

Long-term debt, net of current portion
549.8

 
550.0

Accrued pension liabilities
372.1

 
378.3

Accrued postretirement benefits
123.3

 
122.6

Deferred income taxes
191.4

 
184.8

Other liabilities
43.3

 
47.8

Total liabilities
1,661.5

 
1,679.5

Contingencies and commitments (see Note 8)

 

STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
 
 
 
Common stock — authorized 100,000,000 shares; issued 55,395,245 shares at September 30, 2017 and 55,349,658 shares at June 30, 2017; outstanding 46,803,324 shares at September 30, 2017 and 46,753,180 shares at June 30, 2017
277.0

 
276.7

Capital in excess of par value
289.9

 
284.8

Reinvested earnings
1,336.6

 
1,321.8

Common stock in treasury (8,591,921 shares and 8,596,478 shares at September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017, respectively), at cost
(341.4
)
 
(341.6
)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(331.1
)
 
(343.1
)
Total stockholders' equity
1,231.0

 
1,198.6

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity
$
2,892.5

 
$
2,878.1


See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

3


CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(Unaudited)
(in millions, except per share data)
 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
 
2017
 
2016
Net sales
$
479.8

 
$
389.0

Cost of sales
394.2

 
343.0

Gross profit
85.6

 
46.0

 
 
 
 
Selling, general and administrative expenses
43.9

 
44.6

Operating income
41.7

 
1.4

 
 
 
 
Interest expense
(7.2
)
 
(7.3
)
Other income, net
0.7

 
0.6

 
 
 
 
Income (loss) before income taxes
35.2

 
(5.3
)
Income tax expense
11.8

 
0.9

 
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
$
23.4

 
$
(6.2
)
 
 
 
 
EARNINGS (LOSS) PER COMMON SHARE:
 

 
 

Basic
$
0.49

 
$
(0.13
)
Diluted
$
0.49

 
$
(0.13
)
 
 
 
 
WEIGHTED AVERAGE COMMON SHARES OUTSTANDING:
 

 
 

Basic
47.1

 
46.9

Diluted
47.3

 
46.9

 
 
 
 
Cash dividends per common share
$
0.18

 
$
0.18

 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

4


CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(Unaudited)
($ in millions)
 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
 
2017
 
2016
Net income (loss)
$
23.4

 
$
(6.2
)
Other comprehensive income, net of tax
 

 
 

Pension and postretirement benefits, net of tax of $(1.3) and $(10.5), respectively
2.1

 
17.4

Net gain on derivative instruments, net of tax of $(4.9) and $(6.5), respectively
8.1

 
10.8

Foreign currency translation
1.8

 
(0.7
)
Other comprehensive income
12.0

 
27.5

Comprehensive income
$
35.4

 
$
21.3

 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

5


CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)
($ in millions)
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
 
2017
 
2016
OPERATING ACTIVITIES
 

 
 

Net income (loss)
$
23.4

 
$
(6.2
)
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash (used for) provided from operating activities:
 

 
 

Depreciation and amortization
28.7

 
28.9

Deferred income taxes
0.6

 
37.5

Net pension expense
3.6

 
16.8

Share-based compensation expense
4.2

 
3.0

Loss on disposals of property and equipment
0.1

 
0.1

Changes in working capital and other:
 

 
 

Accounts receivable
(1.2
)
 
13.2

Inventories
(46.3
)
 
(33.5
)
Other current assets
(9.0
)
 
(44.6
)
Accounts payable
15.9

 
(0.7
)
Accrued liabilities
(21.7
)
 
(10.5
)
Pension plan contributions
(4.2
)
 

Other postretirement plan contributions
(0.5
)
 
(1.4
)
Other, net
(1.0
)
 
1.5

Net cash (used for) provided from operating activities
(7.4
)
 
4.1

INVESTING ACTIVITIES
 

 
 

Purchases of property, equipment and software
(28.9
)
 
(26.6
)
Net cash used for investing activities
(28.9
)
 
(26.6
)
FINANCING ACTIVITIES
 

 
 

Credit agreement borrowings, net
3.3

 

Dividends paid
(8.6
)
 
(8.5
)
Proceeds from stock options exercised
1.4

 
0.3

Other
(0.2
)
 
(0.2
)
Net cash used for financing activities
(4.1
)
 
(8.4
)
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
(1.0
)
 
(0.2
)
DECREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
(41.4
)
 
(31.1
)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
66.3

 
82.0

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
$
24.9

 
$
50.9

SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW INFORMATION:
 

 
 

Non-cash investing activities:
 

 
 

Acquisition of property, equipment and software
$
9.0

 
$
9.6


See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

6


CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2017 AND 2016
(Unaudited)
($ in millions, except per share data)
 
 
Common Stock
 
Reinvested Earnings
 
Common Stock in Treasury
 
Accumulated Other Comprehensive (Loss) Income
 
Total Equity
 
Par Value Of $5
 
Capital in Excess of Par Value
 
 
 
 
Balances at June 30, 2017
$
276.7

 
$
284.8

 
$
1,321.8

 
$
(341.6
)
 
$
(343.1
)
 
$
1,198.6

Net income
 

 
 

 
23.4

 
 

 
 

 
23.4

Pension and postretirement benefits gain, net of tax
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
2.1

 
2.1

Net gain on derivative instruments, net of tax
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
8.1

 
8.1

Foreign currency translation
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
1.8

 
1.8

Cash Dividends:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
0

Common @ $0.18 per share
 

 
 

 
(8.6
)
 
 

 
 

 
(8.6
)
Share-based compensation plans
 

 
4.0

 
 

 
0.2

 
 

 
4.2

Stock options exercised
0.3

 
1.1

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
1.4

Balances at September 30, 2017
$
277.0

 
$
289.9

 
$
1,336.6

 
$
(341.4
)
 
$
(331.1
)
 
$
1,231.0

 
 
Common Stock
 
Reinvested Earnings
 
Common Stock in Treasury
 
Accumulated Other Comprehensive (Loss) Income
 
Total Equity
 
Par Value Of $5
 
Capital in Excess of Par Value
 
 
 
 
Balances at June 30, 2016
$
276.3

 
$
273.5

 
$
1,308.9

 
$
(343.9
)
 
$
(409.9
)
 
$
1,104.9

Net loss
 

 
 

 
(6.2
)
 
 

 
 

 
(6.2
)
Pension and postretirement benefits gain, net of tax
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
17.4

 
17.4

Net gain on derivative instruments, net of tax
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
10.8

 
10.8

Foreign currency translation
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
(0.7
)
 
(0.7
)
Cash Dividends:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
0

Common @ $0.18 per share
 

 
 

 
(8.5
)
 
 

 
 

 
(8.5
)
Share-based compensation plans
 

 
2.6

 
 

 
0.3

 
 

 
2.9

Stock options exercised


 
0.3

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
0.3

Balances at September 30, 2016
$
276.3

 
$
276.4

 
$
1,294.2

 
$
(343.6
)
 
$
(382.4
)
 
$
1,120.9

 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

7

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


 
1.
Basis of Presentation
 
The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America for interim financial information and the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America for complete financial statements. In the opinion of management, all adjustments, consisting of normal and recurring adjustments, considered necessary for a fair statement of the results are reflected in the interim periods presented. The June 30, 2017 consolidated balance sheet data was derived from audited financial statements, but does not include all of the disclosures required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. These unaudited consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and footnotes thereto included in Carpenter’s annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2017 (the “2017 Form 10-K”). Operating results for the three months ended September 30, 2017 are not necessarily indicative of the operating results for any future period.

As used throughout this report, unless the context requires otherwise, the terms “Carpenter”, the “Company”, “Registrant”, “Issuer”, “we” and “our” refer to Carpenter Technology Corporation.
 
2.
Acquisition and Divestiture
 
On February 28, 2017, the Company acquired substantially all the assets of Puris LLC (“Puris”), for a cash purchase price of $35.3 million. The acquisition provides the Company with immediate entry into the rapidly growing titanium powder market, an expanded presence in additive manufacturing and strengthens the Company’s capabilities as a solutions provider for customers across its end-use markets.  The purchase price allocation resulted in the purchase price being allocated as follows: $1.7 million of working capital, $6.5 million of property and equipment, $8.5 million of identifiable intangible assets and $18.6 million to goodwill.

In the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2017, the Company divested the Specialty Steel Supply (“SSS”) business. The divestiture was completed in two separate transactions for total cash proceeds of $12.0 million. The operations of the SSS business were historically included in our Performance Engineered Products (“PEP”) segment. The Company does not have any significant continuing involvement in the operations of SSS after the divestiture.

3.
Earnings per Common Share
 
The Company calculates basic and diluted earnings per share using the two class method. Under the two class method, earnings are allocated to common stock and participating securities (non-vested restricted shares and units that receive non-forfeitable dividends) according to their participation rights in dividends and undistributed earnings. The earnings available to each class of stock are divided by the weighted average number of outstanding shares for the period in each class. Diluted earnings per share assumes the issuance of common stock for all potentially dilutive share equivalents outstanding. For the three months ended September 30, 2016, the Company incurred a net loss and, accordingly, excluded all potentially dilutive securities from the determination of diluted loss per share as their impact was anti-dilutive.


8

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


The calculations of basic and diluted earnings (loss) per common share for the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016 were as follows: 
 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
(in millions, except per share data)
 
2017
 
2016
Net income (loss)
 
$
23.4

 
$
(6.2
)
Less: earnings and dividends allocated to participating securities
 
(0.2
)
 

Earnings (loss) available for common stockholders used in calculation of basic earnings (loss) per common share
 
$
23.2

 
$
(6.2
)
 
 
 
 
 
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding, basic
 
47.1

 
46.9

 
 
 
 
 
Basic earnings (loss) per common share
 
$
0.49

 
$
(0.13
)
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
 
$
23.4

 
$
(6.2
)
Less: earnings and dividends allocated to participating securities
 
(0.2
)
 

Earnings (loss) available for common stockholders used in calculation of diluted earnings (loss) per common share
 
$
23.2

 
$
(6.2
)
 
 
 
 
 
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding, basic
 
47.1

 
46.9

Effect of shares issuable under share-based compensation plans
 
0.2

 

Weighted average number of common shares outstanding, diluted
 
47.3

 
46.9

 
 
 
 
 
Diluted earnings (loss) per common share
 
$
0.49

 
$
(0.13
)
 
The following awards issued under share-based compensation plans were excluded from the above calculations of diluted earnings (loss) per share because their effects were anti-dilutive:
 
 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
(in millions)
 
2017
 
2016
Stock options
 
1.8

 
1.8

Restricted stock awards
 

 
0.1

 
4.
Inventories
 
Inventories consisted of the following components as of September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017:
 
($ in millions)
 
September 30,
2017
 
June 30,
2017
Raw materials and supplies
 
$
172.0

 
$
152.8

Work in process
 
383.1

 
365.6

Finished and purchased products
 
182.2

 
172.0

Total inventory
 
$
737.3

 
$
690.4

 
Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or market. Cost for inventories is principally determined using the last-in, first-out (“LIFO”) inventory costing method. The Company also uses the first-in, first-out (“FIFO”) and average cost methods. As of September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017, $117.4 million and $107.3 million of inventory, respectively, was accounted for using a method other than the LIFO inventory costing method.

9

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


 
5.
Accrued Liabilities
 
Accrued liabilities consisted of the following as of September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017:
 
($ in millions)
 
September 30,
2017
 
June 30,
2017
Accrued compensation and benefits
 
$
43.3

 
$
59.1

Accrued postretirement benefits
 
15.5

 
15.5

Deferred revenue
 
10.2

 
9.8

Derivative financial instruments
 
5.8

 
13.1

Accrued interest expense
 
5.6

 
11.2

Accrued income taxes
 
4.8

 
5.1

Accrued pension liabilities
 
3.3

 
3.3

Other
 
22.3

 
22.8

Total accrued liabilities
 
$
110.8

 
$
139.9

 
6.
Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits
 
The components of the net periodic benefit cost related to the Company’s pension and other postretirement benefits for the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016 were as follows:
 
Three months ended September 30,
 
Pension Plans
 
Other Postretirement Plans
($ in millions)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Service cost
 
$
2.4

 
$
8.2

 
$
0.7

 
$
0.9

Interest cost
 
13.0

 
13.1

 
2.4

 
2.3

Expected return on plan assets
 
(16.5
)
 
(15.3
)
 
(1.7
)
 
(1.7
)
Amortization of net loss
 
3.4

 
9.4

 
0.7

 
0.8

Amortization of prior service cost (benefit)
 
0.5

 
0.2

 
(1.3
)
 
(1.6
)
Curtailment charge
 

 
0.5

 

 

    Net periodic benefit costs
 
$
2.8

 
$
16.1

 
$
0.8

 
$
0.7

In September 2016, the Company announced changes to retirement plans it offers to certain employees. Benefits accrued to eligible participants of its largest qualified defined benefit pension plan and certain non-qualified benefit plans were frozen effective December 31, 2016.  The Company recognized the plan freeze in the three months ended September 30, 2016 as a curtailment, since the plan changes eliminated the accrual of defined benefits for future services for a significant number of participants. The impact of the curtailment included a one-time accelerated recognition of outstanding unamortized prior service costs of $0.5 million, which was recognized in the three months ended September 30, 2016.
During the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company made $4.2 million and $0.0 million, respectively, of contributions to its qualified defined benefit pension plans. The Company currently expects to contribute $2.6 million to its qualified defined benefit pension plans during the remainder of fiscal year 2018.

10

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


7.
Debt
 
On March 31, 2017, the Company entered into a $400.0 million unsecured revolving credit facility (“Credit Agreement”) that extends to March 2022. Interest on the borrowings under the Credit Agreement accrue at variable rates, based upon LIBOR or a defined “Base Rate,” both are determined based upon the rating of the Company’s senior unsecured long-term debt (the “Debt Rating”). The applicable margin to be added to LIBOR ranges from 1.00% to 1.75% (1.50% as of September 30, 2017), and for Base Rate-determined loans, from 0.00% to 0.75% (0.50% as of September 30, 2017). The Company also pays a quarterly commitment fee ranging from 0.125% to 0.400% (0.275% as of September 30, 2017), determined based upon the Debt Rating, of the unused portion of the $400.0 million commitment under the Credit Agreement. In addition, the Company must pay certain letter of credit fees, ranging from 1.00% to 1.75% (1.50% as of September 30, 2017), with respect to letters of credit issued under the Credit Agreement. The Company has the right to voluntarily prepay and re-borrow loans and to terminate or reduce the commitments under the facility. As of September 30, 2017, the Company had $6.1 million of issued letters of credit and $3.3 million of borrowings under the Credit Agreement with the balance of $390.6 million available to the Company.

The Company is subject to certain financial and restrictive covenants under the Credit Agreement, which, among other things, require the maintenance of a minimum interest coverage ratio of 3.50 to 1.00. The interest coverage ratio is defined in the Credit Agreement as, for any period, the ratio of consolidated earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization and non-cash net pension expense (“EBITDA”) to consolidated interest expense for such period. The Credit Agreement also requires the Company to maintain a debt to capital ratio of less than 55 percent. The debt to capital ratio is defined in the Credit Agreement as the ratio of consolidated indebtedness, as defined therein, to consolidated capitalization, as defined therein. As of September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017, the Company was in compliance with all of the covenants of the Credit Agreement.
 
Long-term debt outstanding as of September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017 consisted of the following:
 
($ in millions)
 
September 30,
2017
 
June 30,
2017
Medium-term notes, Series B at 6.97% to 7.10% due from April 2018 to May 2018 (face value of $55.0 million at September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017)
 
$
55.0

 
$
55.0

Senior unsecured notes, 5.20% due July 2021 (face value of $250.0 million at September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017)
 
250.9

 
251.2

Senior unsecured notes, 4.45% due March 2023 (face value of $300.0 million at September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017)
 
298.9

 
298.8

Total
 
604.8

 
605.0

Less: amounts due within one year
 
55.0

 
55.0

Long-term debt, net of current portion
 
$
549.8

 
$
550.0

 
For the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, interest costs totaled $7.7 million and $7.5 million, respectively, of which $0.5 million and $0.2 million, respectively, were capitalized as part of the cost of property, equipment and software.


11

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


8.
Contingencies and Commitments

Environmental
 
The Company is subject to various federal, state, local and international environmental laws and regulations relating to pollution, protection of public health and the environment, natural resource damages and occupational safety and health. Although compliance with these laws and regulations may affect the costs of the Company’s operations, compliance costs to date have not been material. The Company has environmental remediation liabilities at some of its owned operating facilities and has been designated as a potentially responsible party (“PRP”) with respect to certain third party Superfund waste-disposal sites and other third party-owned sites. The Company accrues amounts for environmental remediation costs that represent management’s best estimate of the probable and reasonably estimable future costs related to environmental remediation. During the three months ended September 30, 2017, no additional accruals were recorded. The liabilities recorded for environmental remediation costs at Superfund sites, other third party-owned sites and Carpenter-owned current or former operating facilities remaining at September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017 were $16.1 million and $16.1 million, respectively. Additionally, the Company has been notified that it may be a PRP with respect to other Superfund sites as to which no proceedings have been instituted against the Company. Neither the exact amount of remediation costs nor the final method of their allocation among all designated PRPs at these Superfund sites have been determined. Accordingly, at this time, the Company cannot reasonably estimate expected costs for such matters. The liability for future environmental remediation costs that can be reasonably estimated is evaluated by management on a quarterly basis.

Other
 
The Company is defending various routine claims and legal actions that are incidental to its business and common to its operations, including those pertaining to product claims, commercial disputes, patent infringement, employment actions, employee benefits, compliance with domestic and foreign laws, personal injury claims and tax issues. Like many other manufacturing companies in recent years, the Company, from time to time, has been named as a defendant in lawsuits alleging personal injury as a result of exposure to chemicals and substances in the workplace such as asbestos. The Company provides for costs relating to these matters when a loss is probable and the amount of the loss is reasonably estimable. The effect of the outcome of these matters on the Company’s future results of operations and liquidity cannot be predicted because any such effect depends on future results of operations and the amount and timing (both as to recording future charges to operations and cash expenditures) of the resolution of such matters. While it is not feasible to determine the outcome of these matters, management believes that the total liability from these matters will not have a material effect on the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows over the long-term. However, there can be no assurance that an increase in the scope of pending matters or that any future lawsuits, claims, proceedings or investigations will not be material to the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows in a particular future quarter or year.

9.
Fair Value Measurements
 
The fair value hierarchy has three levels based on the inputs used to determine fair value. Level 1 refers to quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 2 refers to observable inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data. Level 3 refers to unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities. This includes certain pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies and similar techniques that use significant unobservable inputs. Currently, the Company does not use Level 1 and 3 inputs.
 

12

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


The following tables present the Company’s assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis and are categorized using the fair value hierarchy:
 
September 30, 2017
 
Fair Value
Measurements Using
Input Type
($ in millions)
 
Level 2
Assets:
 
 

Marketable securities:
 
 

Municipal auction rate securities
 
$
3.4

Derivative financial instruments
 
14.4

Total assets
 
$
17.8

 
 
 

Liabilities:
 
 

Derivative financial instruments
 
$
5.9

 
June 30, 2017
 
Fair Value
Measurements Using
Input Type
($ in millions)
 
Level 2
Assets:
 
 

Marketable securities:
 
 

Municipal auction rate securities
 
$
3.4

Derivative financial instruments
 
14.5

Total assets
 
$
17.9

 
 
 

Liabilities:
 
 

Derivative financial instruments
 
$
19.1

 
The Company’s derivative financial instruments consist of commodity forward contracts, foreign currency forward contracts and interest rate swaps. These instruments are measured at fair value using the market method valuation technique. The inputs to this technique utilize information related to foreign exchange rates, commodity prices and interest rates published by third party leading financial news and data providers. This is observable data; however, the valuation of these instruments is not based on actual transactions for the same instruments and, as such, they are classified as Level 2. The Company’s use of derivatives and hedging policies are more fully discussed in Note 10.
 
The Company has currently chosen not to elect the fair value option for any items that are not already required to be measured at fair value in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
 
The carrying amounts of other financial instruments not listed in the table below approximate fair value due to the short-term nature of these items. The carrying amounts and estimated fair values of the Company’s financial instruments not recorded at fair value in the financial statements were as follows:
 
 
 
September 30, 2017
 
June 30, 2017
($ in millions)
 
Carrying
Value
 
Fair
Value
 
Carrying
Value
 
Fair
Value
Long-term debt, including current portion
 
$
604.8

 
$
622.6

 
$
605.0

 
$
622.5

Company-owned life insurance
 
$
15.7

 
$
15.7

 
$
15.9

 
$
15.9

 

13

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


The carrying amount of company-owned life insurance reflects cash surrender values based upon the market values of underlying securities, using Level 2 inputs, net of any outstanding policy loans. The carrying value associated with the cash surrender value of these policies is recorded in other assets in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets.
 
The fair values of long-term debt as of September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017 were determined by using current interest rates for debt with terms and maturities similar to the Company’s existing debt arrangements and accordingly would be classified as Level 2 inputs in the fair value hierarchy.
 
10.
Derivatives and Hedging Activities
 
The Company uses commodity forwards, interest rate swaps, forward interest rate swaps and foreign currency forwards to manage risks generally associated with commodity price, interest rate and foreign currency rate fluctuations. The following explains the various types of derivatives and includes a recap about the impact the derivative instruments had on the Company’s financial position, results of operations and cash flows.
 
Cash Flow Hedging — Commodity forward contracts: The Company enters into commodity forward contracts to fix the price of a portion of anticipated future purchases of certain critical raw materials and energy to manage the risk of cash flow variability associated with volatile commodity prices. The commodity forward contracts have been designated as cash flow hedges. The qualifying hedge contracts are marked-to-market at each reporting date and any unrealized gains or losses are included in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (“AOCI”) to the extent effective, and reclassified to cost of sales in the period during which the hedged transaction affects earnings or it becomes probable that the forecasted transaction will not occur. As of September 30, 2017, the Company had forward contracts to purchase 22.2 million pounds of certain raw materials with settlement dates through December 2023.
 
Cash Flow Hedging — Forward interest rate swaps: Historically, the Company has entered into forward interest rate swap contracts to manage the risk of cash flow variability associated with fixed interest debt expected to be issued. The forward interest rate swaps were designated as cash flow hedges. The qualifying hedge contracts were marked-to-market at each reporting date and any unrealized gains or losses were included in AOCI to the extent effective, and reclassified to interest expense in the period during which the hedged transaction affected earnings or it became probable that the forecasted transaction would not occur.  Upon the issuance of the fixed rate debt, the forward interest rate swap contracts were terminated. The realized gains at the time the interest rate swap contracts were terminated are being amortized over the term of the underlying debt. For the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, net gains of $0.1 million and $0.1 million, respectively, related to the previously terminated contracts were recorded as a reduction to interest expense.
 
Cash Flow Hedging — Foreign currency forward contracts: The Company uses foreign currency forward contracts to hedge a portion of anticipated future sales denominated in foreign currencies, principally the Euro and Pound Sterling, in order to offset the effect of changes in exchange rates. The qualifying hedge contracts are marked-to-market at each reporting date and any unrealized gains or losses are included in AOCI to the extent effective, and reclassified to net sales in the period during which the transaction affects earnings or it becomes probable that the forecasted transaction will not occur.
 
The Company also uses foreign currency forward contracts to protect certain short-term asset positions denominated in foreign currencies against the effect of changes in exchange rates. These positions do not qualify for hedge accounting and accordingly are marked-to-market at each reporting date through charges to other income and expense. As of September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017, the fair value of the outstanding foreign currency forwards not designated as hedging instruments and the charges to income for changes in fair value for these contracts were not material.
 
Fair Value Hedging - Interest rate swaps: The Company uses interest rate swaps to achieve a level of floating rate debt relative to fixed rate debt where appropriate. The Company has designated fixed to floating interest rate swaps as fair value hedges. Accordingly, the changes in the fair value of these instruments are immediately recorded in earnings. The mark-to-market values of both the fair value hedging instruments and the underlying debt obligations are recorded as equal and offsetting gains and losses in interest expense in the consolidated statements of operations. As of September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017, the total notional amount of floating interest rate contracts was $150.0 million. For the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, net gains of $0.2 million and $0.4 million, respectively, were recorded as a reduction to interest expense.
 

14

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


The fair value and location of outstanding derivative contracts recorded in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets were as follows as of September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017:
 
September 30, 2017
 
Interest
Rate Swaps
 
Foreign
Currency
Contracts
 
Commodity
Contracts
 
Total
Derivatives
($ in millions)
 
 
 
 
Asset Derivatives:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Derivatives designated as hedging instruments:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Other current assets
 
$
0.2

 
$
0.6

 
$
6.8

 
$
7.6

Other assets
 
1.3

 

 
5.5

 
6.8

Total asset derivatives
 
$
1.5

 
$
0.6

 
$
12.3

 
$
14.4

Liability Derivatives:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Derivatives designated as hedging instruments:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Accrued liabilities
 
$

 
$
1.0

 
$
4.8

 
$
5.8

Other liabilities
 

 
0.1

 

 
0.1

Total liability derivatives
 
$

 
$
1.1

 
$
4.8

 
$
5.9

 
June 30, 2017
 
Interest
Rate Swaps
 
Foreign
Currency
Contracts
 
Commodity
Contracts
 
Total
Derivatives
($ in millions)
 
 
 
 
Asset Derivatives:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Derivatives designated as hedging instruments:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Other current assets
 
$
0.6

 
$
0.2

 
$
6.4

 
$
7.2

Other assets
 
1.6

 

 
5.7

 
7.3

Total asset derivatives
 
$
2.2

 
$
0.2

 
$
12.1

 
$
14.5

Liability Derivatives:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Derivatives designated as hedging instruments:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Accrued liabilities
 
$

 
$
1.0

 
$
12.1

 
$
13.1

Other liabilities
 

 

 
6.0

 
6.0

Total liability derivatives
 
$

 
$
1.0

 
$
18.1

 
$
19.1


Substantially all of the derivative contracts are subject to master netting arrangements, or similar agreements with each counterparty, which provide for the option to settle contracts on a net basis when they settle on the same day and in the same currency. In addition, these arrangements provide for a net settlement of all contracts with a given counterparty in the event that the arrangement is terminated due to the occurrence of default or a termination event. The Company presents the outstanding derivative contracts on a net basis by counterparty in the consolidated balance sheets. If the Company had chosen to present the derivative contracts on a gross basis, the total asset derivatives would have been $19.5 million and total liability derivatives would have been $11.0 million as of September 30, 2017.

According to the provisions of the Company’s derivative arrangements, in the event that the fair value of outstanding derivative positions with certain counterparties exceeds certain thresholds, the Company may be required to issue cash collateral to the counterparties. As of September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017, the Company had no cash collateral held by counterparties.
 
The Company is exposed to credit loss in the event of nonperformance by counterparties on its derivative instruments as well as credit or performance risk with respect to its customer commitments to perform. Although nonperformance is possible, the Company does not anticipate nonperformance by any of the parties. In addition, various master netting arrangements are in place with counterparties to facilitate settlements of gains and losses on these contracts.
 

15

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


Cash Flow Hedges
 
For derivative instruments that are designated and qualify as cash flow hedges, the effective portion of the gain or loss on the derivative is reported as a component of AOCI and reclassified into earnings in the same period or periods during which the hedged transactions affect earnings or it becomes probable the forecasted transactions will not occur. The following is a summary of the gains (losses) related to cash flow hedges recognized during the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016:
 
 
 
Amount of Gain (Loss)
Recognized in AOCI on
Derivatives
(Effective Portion)
 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
($ in millions)
 
2017
 
2016
Derivatives in Cash Flow Hedging Relationship:
 
 

 
 

  Commodity contracts
 
$
9.6

 
$
7.0

  Foreign exchange contracts
 
(0.4
)
 

Total
 
$
9.2

 
$
7.0

 
($ in millions)
 
Location of (Loss) Gain
Reclassified from AOCI into
Income
 
Amount of (Loss) Gain
Reclassified from AOCI
into Income
(Effective Portion)
 
Amount of (Loss) Gain 
Reclassified from AOCI
into Income
(Ineffective Portion)
 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
 
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Derivatives in Cash Flow Hedging Relationship:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Commodity contracts
 
Cost of sales
 
$
(2.6
)
 
$
(10.1
)
 
$
(0.8
)
 
$
0.5

  Foreign exchange contracts
 
Net sales
 
(0.4
)
 
0.1

 

 

  Forward interest rate swaps
 
Interest expense
 
0.1

 
0.1

 

 

Total
 
 
 
$
(2.9
)
 
$
(9.9
)
 
$
(0.8
)
 
$
0.5

 
The Company estimates that $2.7 million of net derivative losses included in AOCI as of September 30, 2017 will be reclassified into income within the next 12 months. No significant cash flow hedges were discontinued during the three months ended September 30, 2017.
   
11.
Other Income, Net
 
Other income, net consisted of the following:
 
 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
($ in millions)
 
2017
 
2016
Foreign exchange gain
 
$
0.1

 
$

Unrealized gains on company-owned life insurance contracts and investments held in rabbi trusts
 
0.6

 
0.5

Interest income
 

 
0.1

Total other income, net
 
$
0.7

 
$
0.6

 

16

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


12.
Income Taxes
 
The effective tax rate used for interim periods is the estimated annual effective consolidated tax rate, based on the current estimate of full year results, except that taxes related to specific events, if any, are recorded in the interim period in which they occur.
 
Income tax expense for the three months ended September 30, 2017 was $11.8 million, or 33.5 percent of pre-tax income as compared with $0.9 million, or 17.0 percent of pre-tax loss for the three months ended September 30, 2016. In October 2016, the Company made a voluntary pension contribution of $100.0 million that was announced in connection with the plan freeze.  As a result of the pension contribution, income tax expense in the three months ended September 30, 2016 included a discrete tax charge of $2.1 million due to reduced tax benefits for domestic manufacturing claimed in prior periods.

As of June 30, 2017, the Company had $99.1 million of indefinitely reinvested foreign earnings for which deferred income taxes have not been provided. 

13.
Business Segments
 
The Company has two reportable segments, Specialty Alloys Operations (“SAO”) and Performance Engineered Products (“PEP”).
 
The SAO segment is comprised of the Company’s major premium alloy and stainless steel manufacturing operations. This includes operations performed at mills primarily in Reading and Latrobe, Pennsylvania and surrounding areas as well as South Carolina and Alabama. The combined assets of the SAO operations are being managed in an integrated manner to optimize efficiency and profitability across the total system.
 
The PEP segment is comprised of the Company’s differentiated operations. This segment includes the Dynamet titanium business, the Carpenter Powder Products business, the Amega West business, and the Latrobe and Mexico distribution businesses. The businesses in the PEP segment are managed with an entrepreneurial structure to promote flexibility and agility to quickly respond to market dynamics. 
 
The Company’s executive management evaluates the performance of these operating segments based on sales, operating income and cash flow generation. Segment operating profit excludes general corporate costs, which include executive and director compensation, and other corporate facilities and administrative expenses not allocated to the segments.
 
The service cost component of the Company’s net pension expense, which represents the estimated cost of future pension liabilities earned associated with active employees, is included in the operating income of the business segments. The residual net pension expense, which is comprised of the expected return on plan assets, interest costs on the projected benefit obligations of the plans and amortization of actuarial gains and losses and prior service costs, is included under the heading “Pension earnings, interest and deferrals”.
 
On a consolidated basis, one customer, Arconic, Inc., accounted for approximately 11 percent of the net sales for the three months ended September 30, 2017. On a consolidated basis, one customer, Alcoa Inc., accounted for approximately 12 percent of the net sales for three months ended September 30, 2016. Approximately 10 percent of the accounts receivable outstanding at September 30, 2017 is due from one customer, Arconic, Inc. No single customer accounted for 10 percent or more of the accounts receivable outstanding at June 30, 2017.
Segment Data
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
($ in millions)
 
2017
 
2016
Net Sales:
 
 

 
 

Specialty Alloys Operations
 
$
396.8

 
$
315.1

Performance Engineered Products
 
100.7

 
78.5

Intersegment
 
(17.7
)
 
(4.6
)
Consolidated net sales
 
$
479.8

 
$
389.0


17

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


Segment Data
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
($ in millions)
 
2017
 
2016
Operating Income:
 
 

 
 

Specialty Alloys Operations
 
$
50.5

 
$
25.0

Performance Engineered Products
 
5.3

 
(2.8
)
Corporate costs
 
(12.9
)
 
(13.8
)
     Pension earnings, interest and deferrals
 
(0.5
)
 
(7.1
)
Intersegment
 
(0.7
)
 
0.1

Consolidated operating income
 
$
41.7

 
$
1.4

Segment Data
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
($ in millions)
 
2017
 
2016
Depreciation and Amortization:
 
 

 
 

Specialty Alloys Operations
 
$
23.1

 
$
23.4

Performance Engineered Products
 
5.0

 
5.1

Corporate
 
0.9

 
0.8

Intersegment
 
(0.3
)
 
(0.4
)
Consolidated depreciation and amortization
 
$
28.7

 
$
28.9

Segment Data
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
($ in millions)
 
2017
 
2016
Capital Expenditures:
 
 

 
 

Specialty Alloys Operations
 
$
17.2

 
$
14.7

Performance Engineered Products
 
4.9

 
4.5

Corporate
 
7.1

 
7.5

Intersegment
 
(0.3
)
 
(0.1
)
Consolidated capital expenditures
 
$
28.9

 
$
26.6

Segment Data
 
September 30,
2017
 
June 30,
2017
($ in millions)
 
 
Total Assets:
 
 

 
 

Specialty Alloys Operations
 
$
2,310.2

 
$
2,292.1

Performance Engineered Products
 
459.2

 
434.3

Corporate
 
139.0

 
167.2

Intersegment
 
(15.9
)
 
(15.5
)
Consolidated total assets
 
$
2,892.5

 
$
2,878.1



18

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)



14.    Recent Accounting Pronouncements
 
Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements - Adopted in current period

In March 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-09, Compensation — Stock Compensation (Topic 718) - Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting, which outlines new provisions intended to simplify various aspects related to accounting for share-based payments and their presentation in the financial statements. The update revises requirements in the following areas: income tax consequences, forfeitures and classification on the statement of cash flows. The Company adopted this standard in the first quarter of fiscal year 2018. The standard did not have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements of the Company. The amendments requiring recognition of excess tax benefits and tax deficiencies in the income statement will be applied prospectively. The inclusion of excess tax benefits and deficiencies as a component of income tax expense will increase volatility of the provision for income taxes as the amount of excess tax benefits or deficiencies from share-based compensation awards are dependent on the stock price at the date the awards are exercised or vested. The Company does not expect the impact to be material to the Company’s consolidated results of operations; however, such determination is subject to change based on facts and circumstances at the time when awards vest or settle. The Company accounts for forfeitures of share-based awards when they occur. The Company applied the amendments related to the presentation of excess tax benefits on the consolidated statement of cash flows using a prospective transition method, and as a result, excess tax benefits related to share-based awards will be reported as cash flows from operating activities. The Company applied the amendments related to the presentation of statutory tax withholding on the consolidated statement of cash flows using a retrospective transition method as required, and as a result, statutory tax withholding related to share-based awards which had been previously classified as cash flows from operating activities has been be reclassified as cash flows from financing activities.

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230) - Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments, which outlines new provisions intended to reduce the existing diversity in practice related to accounting for the cash flow and its presentation in the financial statements. ASU 2016-15 is effective for public business entities for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted. The Company adopted the provisions of ASU 2016-15 in the first quarter of fiscal year 2018. The adoption of ASU 2016-15 did not materially impact the Company’s consolidated statement of cash flows.

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230) - Restricted Cash, which outlines that a statement of cash flows explains the change during the period in total cash, cash equivalents, and amounts generally described as restricted cash or restricted cash equivalents. ASU 2016-18 is effective for public business entities for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted. The Company adopted the provisions of ASU 2016-18 in the first quarter of fiscal year 2018. The adoption of ASU 2016-18 did not materially impact the Company’s consolidated statement of cash flows.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, Intangibles - Goodwill and Other (Topic 350) - Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment, which outlines updates to simplify the subsequent measurement of goodwill by eliminating Step 2 from the goodwill impairment test. ASU 2017-04 is effective for public business entities for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2019, with early adoption permitted. The Company adopted ASU 2017-04 in the first quarter of fiscal year 2018. The adoption of ASU 2017-04 did not have an impact on the Company’s financial statements.

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements - Pending Adoption

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606). The guidance in ASU 2014-09 requires that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The guidance in ASU 2014-09 permits two methods of adoption: full retrospective in which the standard is applied to all of the periods presented or modified retrospective where an entity would recognize the cumulative effect of initially applying the standard as an adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings.


19

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-08 Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) - Principal versus Agent Considerations (Reporting Revenue Gross versus Net). ASU 2016-08 requires an entity to determine whether the nature of its promise to provide goods or services to a customer is performed in a principal or agent capacity and to recognize revenue in a gross or net manner based on its principal/agent designation.

The Company is in the process of evaluating the effect that ASU 2014-09 and ASU 2016-08 will have on its Consolidated Financial Statements and related disclosures, as well as the expected method of adoption. Currently, the Company is in the process of completing the assessment phase of its evaluation.   The assessment phase includes conducting and evaluating the results of internal surveys of its businesses, holding revenue recognition workshops with commercial and business unit finance leadership, and reviewing revenue arrangements across all businesses to initially identify a set of applicable qualitative revenue recognition changes related to the standards update.   The Company’s method of adoption for ASU 2014-09 and 2016-08 has not yet been determined and is not expected to be finalized until the assessment phase of the evaluation has been completed.  The Company’s effective date for the adoption of the guidance in ASU 2014-09 and 2016-08 is July 1, 2018.
        
In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02 Leases (Topic 842). ASU 2016-02 improves transparency and comparability among companies by recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet and by disclosing key information about leasing arrangements. ASU 2016-02 is effective for public business entities for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2018, with early adoption permitted. The Company is evaluating the impact of the adoption of ASU 2016-02 on the consolidated financial statements.
                
In October 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-16, Income Taxes (Topic 740) - Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory, which outlines updates to improve the accounting for the income tax consequences of intra-entity transfers of assets other than inventory. ASU 2016-16 is effective for public business entities for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted. The Company is evaluating the impact of the adoption of ASU 2016-16 on the consolidated financial statements.
        
In March 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-07, Compensation - Retirement Benefits (Topic 715) - Improving the Presentation of Net Periodic Pension Cost and Net Periodic Postretirement Benefit Cost, which outlines updates to improve the presentation of net periodic pension cost and net periodic postretirement benefit cost. ASU 2017-07 is effective for public business entities for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2017, with early application permitted. The Company is evaluating the impact of the adoption of ASU 2017-07 on the consolidated financial statements.

In August 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-12, Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): Targeted Improvements to Accounting for Hedging Activities, which expands and refines hedge accounting for both financial and non-financial risk components, aligns the recognition and presentation of the effects of hedging instruments and hedge items in the financial statements, and includes certain targeted improvements to ease the application of current guidance related to the assessment of hedge effectiveness. ASU 2017-12 is effective for public business entities for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2018, with early adoption permitted. The Company is evaluating the impact of the adoption of ASU 2017-12 on the consolidated financial statements.


20

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


15.
Reclassifications from Accumulated Other Comprehensive (Loss) Income
 
The changes in AOCI by component, net of tax, for the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016 were as follows:
 

Three Months Ended September 30, 2017
($ in millions) (a)
 
Cash flow
hedging items
 
Pension and
other
postretirement
benefit plan
items
 
Unrealized
losses on
available-for-
sale securities
 
Foreign currency items
 
Total
Balance at June 30, 2017
 
$
(2.3
)
 
$
(299.0
)
 
$
(0.3
)
 
$
(41.5
)
 
$
(343.1
)
Other comprehensive income before reclassifications
 
6.3

 

 

 
1.8

 
8.1

Amounts reclassified from AOCI (b)
 
1.8

 
2.1

 

 

 
3.9

Net other comprehensive income
 
8.1

 
2.1

 

 
1.8

 
12.0

Balance at September 30, 2017
 
$
5.8

 
$
(296.9
)
 
$
(0.3
)
 
$
(39.7
)
 
$
(331.1
)
 

Three Months Ended September 30, 2016
($ in millions) (a)
 
Cash flow
hedging items
 
Pension and
other
postretirement
benefit plan
items
 
Unrealized
losses on
available-for-
sale securities
 
Foreign currency items
 
Total
Balance at June 30, 2016
 
$
(21.8
)
 
$
(344.3
)
 
$
(0.3
)
 
$
(43.5
)
 
$
(409.9
)
Other comprehensive income (loss) before reclassifications
 
4.4

 
11.4

 

 
(0.7
)
 
15.1

Amounts reclassified from AOCI (b)
 
6.4

 
6.0

 

 

 
12.4

Net other comprehensive income (loss)
 
10.8

 
17.4

 

 
(0.7
)
 
27.5

Balance at September 30, 2016
 
$
(11.0
)
 
$
(326.9
)
 
$
(0.3
)
 
$
(44.2
)
 
$
(382.4
)
 
(a)
All amounts are net of tax. Amounts in parentheses indicate debits.
(b)
See separate table below for further details.

        


21

CARPENTER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


The following is a summary of amounts reclassified from AOCI for the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016:
 
($ in millions) (a)
 
Location of
(loss) gain
 
Amount Reclassified from AOCI
Three Months Ended September 30,
Details about AOCI Components
 
 
2017
 
2016
Cash flow hedging items:
 
 
 
 

 
 

Commodity contracts
 
Cost of sales
 
$
(2.6
)
 
$
(10.1
)
Foreign exchange contracts
 
Net sales
 
(0.4
)
 
0.1

Forward interest rate swaps
 
Interest expense
 
0.1

 
0.1

 
 
Total before tax
 
(2.9
)
 
(9.9
)
 
 
Tax benefit
 
1.1

 
3.5

 
 
Net of tax
 
$
(1.8
)
 
$
(6.4
)
 

($ in millions) (a)
 
Location of
(loss) gain
 
Amount Reclassified from AOCI
Three Months Ended September 30,
Details about AOCI Components
 
 
2017
 
2016
Amortization of pension and other postretirement benefit plan items:
 
 
 
 

 
 

Net actuarial loss
 
(b)
 
$
(4.1
)
 
$
(10.2
)
Prior service benefit
 
(b)
 
0.8

 
1.4

Curtailment charge
 
(b)
 

 
(0.5
)
 
 
Total before tax
 
(3.3
)
 
(9.3
)
 
 
Tax benefit
 
1.2

 
3.3

 
 
Net of tax
 
$
(2.1
)
 
$
(6.0
)

(a)
Amounts in parentheses indicate debits to income/loss.
(b)
These AOCI components are included in the computation of net periodic benefit cost (see Note 6. Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits for additional details).


Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
 
Background and General
 
We are engaged in the manufacturing, fabrication and distribution of specialty metals. We primarily process basic raw materials such as nickel, cobalt, titanium, manganese, chromium, molybdenum, iron scrap and other metal alloying elements through various melting, hot forming and cold working facilities to produce finished products in the form of billet, bar, rod, wire and narrow strip in many sizes and finishes. We also produce certain metal powders. Our sales are distributed directly from our production plants and distribution network as well as through independent distributors. Unlike many other specialty steel producers, we operate our own worldwide network of service and distribution centers. These service centers, located in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Europe and Asia, allow us to work more closely with customers and to offer various just-in-time stocking programs. We also manufacture and rent down-hole drilling tools and components used in the oil and gas industry.

As part of our overall business strategy, we have sought out and considered opportunities related to strategic acquisitions, divestitures and joint collaborations as well as possible business unit dispositions aimed at broadening our offering to the marketplace. We have participated with other companies to explore potential terms and structures of such opportunities and expect that we will continue to evaluate these opportunities.
 

22


Our discussions below in this Item 2 are based upon the more detailed discussions about our business, operations and financial condition included in Item 7 of our 2017 Form 10-K. Our discussions here focus on our results during or as of the three-month period ended September 30, 2017 and the comparable periods of fiscal year 2017, and to the extent applicable, on material changes from information discussed in the 2017 Form 10-K and other important intervening developments or information that we have reported on Form 8-K. These discussions should be read in conjunction with the 2017 Form 10-K for detailed background information and with any such intervening Form 8-K.
 
Impact of Raw Material Prices and Product Mix
 
We value most of our inventory utilizing the last-in, first-out (“LIFO”) inventory costing method. Under the LIFO inventory costing method, changes in the cost of raw materials and production activities are recognized in cost of sales in the current period even though these materials may potentially have been acquired at significantly different values due to the length of time from the acquisition of the raw materials to the sale of the processed finished goods to the customers. In a period of rising raw material costs, the LIFO inventory valuation normally results in higher cost of sales. Conversely, in a period of decreasing raw material costs, the LIFO inventory valuation normally results in lower cost of sales.
 
The volatility of the costs of raw materials has impacted our operations over the past several years. We, and others in our industry, generally have been able to pass cost increases on major raw materials through to our customers using surcharges that are structured to recover increases in raw material costs. Generally, the formula used to calculate a surcharge is based on published prices of the respective raw materials for the previous month which correlates to the prices we pay for our raw material purchases. However, a portion of our surcharges to customers may be calculated using a different surcharge formula or may be based on the raw material prices at the time of order, which creates a lag between surcharge revenue and corresponding raw material costs recognized in cost of sales. The surcharge mechanism protects our net income on such sales except for the lag effect discussed above. However, surcharges have had a dilutive effect on our gross margin and operating margin percentages as described later in this report.

Approximately 30 percent of our net sales are sales to customers under firm price sales arrangements. Firm price sales arrangements involve a risk of profit margin fluctuations, particularly when raw material prices are volatile. In order to reduce the risk of fluctuating profit margins on these sales, we enter into commodity forward contracts to purchase certain critical raw materials necessary to produce the related products sold. Firm price sales arrangements generally include certain annual purchasing commitments and consumption schedules agreed to by the customers at selling prices based on raw material prices at the time the arrangements are established. If a customer fails to meet the volume commitments (or the consumption schedule deviates from the agreed-upon terms of the firm price sales arrangements), the Company may need to absorb the gains or losses associated with the commodity forward contracts on a temporary basis. Gains or losses associated with commodity forward contracts are reclassified to earnings/loss when earnings are impacted by the hedged transaction. Because we value most of our inventory under the LIFO costing methodology, changes in the cost of raw materials and production activities are recognized in cost of sales in the current period attempting to match the most recently incurred costs with revenues. Gains or losses on the commodity forward contracts are reclassified from other comprehensive income (loss) together with the actual purchase price of the underlying commodities when the underlying commodities are purchased and recorded in inventory. To the extent that the total purchase price of the commodities, inclusive of the gains or losses on the commodity forward contracts, are higher or lower relative to the beginning of year costs, our cost of goods sold reflects such amounts. Accordingly, the gains and/or losses associated with commodity forward contracts may not impact the same period that the firm price sales arrangements revenue is recognized, and comparisons of gross profit from period to period may be impacted. These firm price sales arrangements are expected to continue as we look to strengthen our long-term customer relationships by expanding, renewing and in certain cases extending to a longer-term, our customer long-term arrangements.
 
We produce hundreds of grades of materials with a wide range of pricing and profit levels depending on the grade. In addition, our product mix within a period is subject to the fluctuating order patterns of our customers as well as decisions we may make on participation in certain products based on available capacity, including the impacts of capacity commitments we may have under existing customer agreements. While we expect to see positive contribution from a more favorable product mix in our margin performance over time, the impact by period may fluctuate and period-to-period comparisons may vary.
 

23


Net Pension Expense
 
Net pension expense, as we define it below, includes the net periodic benefit costs related to both our pension and other postretirement plans. The net periodic benefit costs are determined annually based on beginning of year balances and are recorded ratably throughout the fiscal year, unless a significant re-measurement event occurs. We currently expect that the total net periodic benefit costs for fiscal year 2018 will be $14.0 million as compared with $48.2 million in fiscal year 2017.  The following is the pension expense for the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016:
 
 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
($ in millions)
 
2017
 
2016
Pension plans
 
$
2.8

 
$
16.1

Other postretirement plans
 
0.8

 
0.7

Net periodic benefit costs
 
$
3.6

 
$
16.8

 
In September 2016, we announced changes to retirement plans we offer to certain employees. The decision was consistent with addressing costs and actively managing the business. Benefits accrued to eligible participants of our largest qualified defined benefit pension plan and certain non-qualified pension plans were frozen effective December 31, 2016. Approximately 1,900 affected employees were transitioned to the Company’s 401(k) plan that has been in effect for eligible employees since 2012, when the pension plan was closed to new entrants. We recognized the plan freeze in the three months ended September 30, 2016 as a curtailment, since it eliminated the accrual for a significant number of participants for all of their future services. We also made a voluntary pension contribution of $100.0 million to the affected plan in October 2016.  

The service cost component of net pension expense represents the estimated cost of future pension liabilities earned associated with active employees. The pension earnings, interest and deferrals (“pension EID”) is comprised of the expected return on plan assets, interest costs on the projected benefit obligations of the plans and amortization of actuarial gains and losses and prior service costs.

Net pension expense is recorded in accounts that are included in both the cost of sales and selling, general and administrative expenses based on the function of the associated employees. The following is a summary of the classification of net pension expense for the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016:
 
 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
($ in millions)
 
2017
 
2016
Cost of sales:
 
 

 
 

Service cost
 
$
2.7

 
$
7.6

Pension earnings, interest and deferrals
 

 
5.1

 
 
2.7

 
12.7

Selling, general and administrative expenses:
 
 

 
 

Service cost
 
0.4

 
1.5

Pension earnings, interest and deferrals
 
0.5

 
2.1

Curtailment charge
 

 
0.5

 
 
0.9

 
4.1

Net pension expense
 
$
3.6

 
$
16.8

 
As of September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017, amounts related to the net pension expense capitalized in gross inventory were $1.7 million and $3.4 million, respectively.
 

24


Operating Performance Overview
 
The first quarter of fiscal year 2018 was our best first quarter in four years as continued execution of our commercial and manufacturing strategies and improving market conditions drove solid operational performance. Our solutions-focused approach is helping drive a stronger product mix. We are continuing to generate cost savings driven by the organization-wide implementation of the Carpenter Operating Model. In addition, the conditions across most of our end-use markets are continuing to improve, including in the Aerospace and Defense end-use market where engine demand remains strong as the new platform ramp continues and we are also benefiting from our broad participation in other attractive Aerospace sub-markets.

Results of Operations — Three Months Ended September 30, 2017 vs. Three Months Ended September 30, 2016
 
For the three months ended September 30, 2017, we reported net income of $23.4 million, or $0.49 earnings per diluted share. This compares with net loss for the same period a year earlier of $6.2 million, or $0.13 loss per diluted share. Excluding special items, earnings per share would have been $0.08 loss per diluted share for the three months ended September 30, 2016. The current period results reflect the impact of higher sales and improved product mix across most of our end-use markets and lower operating costs through the ongoing implementation of the Carpenter Operating Model. 

Net Sales
 
Net sales for the three months ended September 30, 2017 were $479.8 million, which was a 23 percent increase over the same period a year ago. Excluding surcharge revenue, sales increased 21 percent on a 17 percent increase in shipment volume from the same period a year ago. The results primarily reflect the impact of stronger demand for materials primarily used in the Aerospace and Defense, Industrial and Consumer and Medical end-use markets.
 
Geographically, sales outside the United States increased 32 percent from the same period a year ago to $159.9 million for the three months ended September 30, 2017. The increase is primarily due to net sales to Europe in the Aerospace and Defense and Medical end-use markets, Asia Pacific in the Aerospace and Defense end-use market and Canada in the Energy end-use market. A portion of our sales outside the United States are denominated in foreign currencies. The impact of fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates resulted in a $1.1 million increase in sales during the three months ended September 30, 2017 compared to the three months ended September 30, 2016. International sales represented 33 percent and 31 percent of total net sales for the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

Sales by End-Use Markets
 
We sell to customers across diversified end-use markets. The following table includes comparative information for our net sales, which includes surcharge revenue by principal end-use markets.  We believe this is helpful supplemental information in analyzing the performance of the business from period to period:
 
 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
 
$
Increase
 
%
Increase
($ in millions)
 
2017
 
2016
 
 
Aerospace and Defense
 
$
258.6

 
$
206.4

 
$
52.2

 
25
%
Energy
 
32.0

 
28.4

 
3.6

 
13
%
Transportation
 
36.7

 
35.2

 
1.5

 
4
%
Medical
 
38.3

 
24.5

 
13.8

 
56
%
Industrial and Consumer
 
84.4

 
66.4

 
18.0

 
27
%
Distribution
 
29.8

 
28.1

 
1.7

 
6
%
Total net sales
 
$
479.8

 
$
389.0

 
$
90.8

 
23
%
 

25


The following table includes comparative information for our net sales by the same principal end-use markets, but excluding surcharge revenue:
 
 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
 
$
Increase
 
%
Increase
($ in millions)
 
2017
 
2016
 
 
Aerospace and Defense
 
$
215.6

 
$
173.3

 
$
42.3

 
24
%
Energy
 
28.8

 
25.7

 
3.1

 
12
%
Transportation
 
30.6

 
30.6

 

 
%
Medical
 
33.4

 
23.0

 
10.4

 
45
%
Industrial and Consumer
 
71.7

 
59.3

 
12.4

 
21
%
Distribution
 
29.7

 
27.9

 
1.8

 
6
%
Total net sales excluding surcharge
 
$
409.8

 
$
339.8

 
$
70.0

 
21
%

Sales to the Aerospace and Defense end-use market increased 25 percent from the first quarter a year ago to $258.6 million. Excluding surcharge revenue, sales increased 24 percent from the first quarter a year ago on a 25 percent increase in shipment volume. The results reflect the impact of stronger demand for materials used in aerospace engines and an increase in sales of structural and defense applications driven by specific programs.
 
Sales to the Energy end-use market of $32.0 million reflect a 13 percent increase from the first quarter a year ago. Excluding surcharge revenue, sales increased 12 percent from a year ago on 43 percent higher shipment volume. The results reflect increased rental activity demand keeping pace with slow oil and gas market expansion partially offset by weaker demand for materials used in power generation applications.
 
Transportation end-use market sales increased 4 percent from the first quarter a year ago to $36.7 million. Excluding surcharge revenue, sales were flat on 6 percent lower shipment volume from the first quarter a year ago. The results reflect the impact of improved demand as a result of heavy duty truck production offset by continued softness in North American passenger car production.
 
Medical end-use market sales increased 56 percent from the first quarter a year ago to $38.3 million. Excluding surcharge revenue, sales increased 45 percent on 22 percent higher shipment volume from the first quarter a year ago. The results reflect improved market positioning and the positive impact of supply chain inventory rebuilding within orthopedic and cardiology sub-markets.

Industrial and Consumer end-use market sales increased 27 percent from the first quarter a year ago to $84.4 million. Excluding surcharge revenue, sales increased 21 percent on an 11 percent increase in shipment volume. The results reflect the impact of stronger demand for consumer electronic applications and an increase in industrial components due in part to a moderate increase in recovery of oil and gas activity partially offset by weaker demand for sporting goods applications.

Gross Profit
 
Our gross profit in the first quarter increased 86 percent to $85.6 million, or 17.8 percent of net sales as compared with $46.0 million, or 11.8 percent of net sales in the same quarter a year ago. Excluding the impact of surcharge revenue, our gross margin in the first quarter was 20.9 percent as compared to 13.5 percent in the same period a year ago. The current quarter results reflect higher sales and improved product mix across most end-use markets and operating cost efficiencies compared to the same period a year ago.

 Our surcharge mechanism is structured to recover increases in raw material costs, although in certain cases with a lag effect as discussed above. While the surcharge generally protects the absolute gross profit dollars, it does have a dilutive effect on gross margin as a percent of sales. The following represents a summary of the dilutive impact of the surcharge on gross margin for the comparative three month period. See the section “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” below for further discussion of these financial measures.

26



 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
($ in millions)
 
2017
 
2016
Net sales
 
$
479.8

 
$
389.0

Less: surcharge revenue
 
70.0

 
49.2

Net sales excluding surcharge revenue
 
$
409.8

 
$
339.8

 
 
 
 
 
Gross profit
 
$
85.6

 
$
46.0

 
 
 
 
 
Gross margin
 
17.8
%
 
11.8
%
 
 
 
 
 
Gross margin excluding surcharge revenue
 
20.9
%
 
13.5
%
 
Selling, General and Administrative Expenses
 
Selling, general and administrative expenses of $43.9 million were 9.1 percent of net sales (10.7 percent of net sales excluding surcharge) as compared with $44.6 million and 11.5 percent of net sales (13.1 percent of net sales excluding surcharge) in the same quarter a year ago.

Operating Income
 
Our operating income in the recent first quarter was $41.7 million or 8.7 percent of net sales as compared with $1.4 million or 0.4 percent of net sales in the same quarter a year ago. Excluding surcharge revenue, pension EID and special items, operating margin was 10.3 percent for the most recent quarter as compared with 2.6 percent a year ago. The increase in our operating margin for the first quarter of fiscal year 2018 reflects the impacts of higher sales and improved product mix across most end-use markets combined with operating cost efficiencies compared to the same period a year ago.

Operating income has been significantly impacted by our pension EID, which may be volatile based on conditions in the financial markets, as well as special items. The following presents our operating income and operating margin, in each case excluding the impact of surcharge revenue on net sales and other special items. We present and discuss these financial measures because management believes removing these items provides a more consistent and meaningful basis for comparing ongoing results of operations from period to period. See the section “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” below for further discussion of these financial measures.

 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
($ in millions)
 
2017
 
2016
Net sales
 
$
479.8

 
$
389.0

Less: surcharge revenue
 
70.0

 
49.2

Net sales excluding surcharge revenue
 
$
409.8

 
$
339.8

 
 
 
 
 
Operating income
 
$
41.7

 
$
1.4

Pension EID
 
0.5

 
7.1

Operating income excluding pension EID
 
42.2

 
8.5

Special items:
 
 
 
 
Pension curtailment charge
 

 
0.5

Operating income excluding pension EID and other special items
 
$
42.2

 
$
9.0

 
 
 
 
 
Operating margin
 
8.7
%
 
0.4
%
 
 
 
 
 
Operating margin excluding surcharge, pension EID and other special items
 
10.3
%
 
2.6
%

27



Interest Expense
 
Interest expense for the three months ended September 30, 2017 was $7.2 million compared with $7.3 million in the same period a year ago. We have used interest rate swaps to achieve a level of floating rate debt to fixed rate debt where appropriate. Interest expense for the three months ended September 30, 2017 includes net gains from interest rate swaps of $0.2 million compared with $0.4 million of net gains from interest rate swaps for the three months ended September 30, 2016. Capitalized interest reduced interest expense by $0.5 million for the three months ended September 30, 2017 and $0.2 million for the three months ended September 30, 2016.

Other Income, Net

Other income for the three months ended September 30, 2017 was $0.7 million as compared with other income of $0.6 million for the three months ended September 30, 2016.
 
Income Taxes
 
Income tax expense in the recent first quarter was $11.8 million, or 33.5 percent of pre-tax income compared with $0.9 million, or 17.0 percent of pre-tax loss in the same quarter a year ago.

In October 2016, the Company made a voluntary pension contribution of $100.0 million that was announced in connection with the plan freeze.  As a result of the planned pension contribution, income tax expense in the three months ended September 30, 2016 included a discrete tax charge of $2.1 million due to reduced tax benefits for domestic manufacturing claimed in prior periods.
 
Business Segment Results
 
We have two reportable business segments: SAO and PEP.

The following table includes comparative information for volumes by business segment:
 
 
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
 

Increase
(Decrease)
 
%
Increase
(Decrease)
(Pounds sold, in thousands) 
 
2017
 
2016
 
 
Specialty Alloys Operations
 
61,190

 
52,360

 
8,830

 
17
 %
Performance Engineered Products *
 
3,526

 
2,414

 
1,112

 
46
 %
Intersegment
 
(1,370
)
 
(594
)
 
(776
)
 
(131
)%
Consolidated pounds sold