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Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

(Mark One)

x QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 17, 2016

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission file number 001-35219

 

 

Marriott Vacations Worldwide Corporation

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Delaware   45-2598330

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

6649 Westwood Blvd.

Orlando, FL

  32821
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

(407) 206-6000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:

 

Large accelerated filer   x    Accelerated filer   ¨
Non-accelerated filer   ¨  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x

The number of shares outstanding of the issuer’s common stock, par value $0.01 per share, as of July 15, 2016 was 26,986,204.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

INDEX

 

         Page  

Part I.

 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION (UNAUDITED)

     1   

Item 1.

 

Financial Statements

     1   
 

Interim Consolidated Statements of Income

     1   
 

Interim Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income

     2   
 

Interim Consolidated Balance Sheets

     3   
 

Interim Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

     4   
 

Notes to Interim Consolidated Financial Statements

     5   

Item 2.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     27   

Item 3.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

     60   

Item 4.

 

Controls and Procedures

     60   

Part II.

 

OTHER INFORMATION

     60   

Item 1.

 

Legal Proceedings

     60   

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

     61   

Item 2.

 

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

     61   

Item 3.

 

Defaults Upon Senior Securities

     61   

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

     61   

Item 5.

 

Other Information

     61   

Item 6.

 

Exhibits

     61   
 

SIGNATURES

     62   


Table of Contents

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

MARRIOTT VACATIONS WORLDWIDE CORPORATION

INTERIM CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME

(In thousands, except per share amounts)

(Unaudited)

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended      Twenty-Four Weeks Ended  
           June 17, 2016                  June 19, 2015                  June 17, 2016                  June 19, 2015        

REVENUES

           

Sale of vacation ownership products

     $ 146,450             $ 155,370             $ 284,819             $ 339,276       

Resort management and other services

     80,930             74,063             150,559             138,480       

Financing

     28,654             28,294             57,878             57,346       

Rental

     75,069             72,642             155,357             148,841       

Cost reimbursements

     98,842             92,458             206,375             193,764       
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

TOTAL REVENUES

     429,945             422,827             854,988             877,707       
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

EXPENSES

           

Cost of vacation ownership products

     33,753             45,119             69,370             110,081       

Marketing and sales

     78,919             77,137             157,331             157,132       

Resort management and other services

     49,311             45,480             95,108             87,889       

Financing

     4,864             6,085             9,493             10,990       

Rental

     66,028             61,835             130,688             121,993       

General and administrative

     24,588             22,892             49,885             45,669       

Litigation reversal (settlement)

     —             26             (303)            (236)      

Organizational and separation related

     —             101             —             293       

Consumer financing interest

     5,117             5,248             10,479             11,269       

Royalty fee

     14,026             13,431             27,383             26,431       

Cost reimbursements

     98,842             92,458             206,375             193,764       
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

TOTAL EXPENSES

     375,448             369,812             755,809             765,275       
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Gains and other income

     10,668             8,625             10,675             9,512       

Interest expense

     (2,087)            (3,009)            (4,069)            (5,983)      

Other

     (1,911)            (1,187)            (4,453)            (1,174)      
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

INCOME BEFORE INCOME TAXES

     61,167             57,444             101,332             114,787       

Provision for income taxes

     (24,858)            (23,403)            (40,615)            (46,692)      
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

NET INCOME

     $ 36,309             $ 34,041             $ 60,717             $ 68,095       
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Basic earnings per share

     $ 1.28             $ 1.07             $ 2.11             $ 2.12       

Shares used in computing basic earnings per share

     28,345             31,858             28,734             32,078       

Diluted earnings per share

     $ 1.26             $ 1.05             $ 2.08             $ 2.08       

Shares used in computing diluted earnings per share

     28,834             32,517             29,244             32,760       

Dividends declared per share of common stock

     $ 0.30             $ 0.25             $ 0.60             $ 0.50       

See Notes to Interim Consolidated Financial Statements

 

1


Table of Contents

MARRIOTT VACATIONS WORLDWIDE CORPORATION

INTERIM CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

(In thousands)

(Unaudited)

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended      Twenty-Four Weeks Ended  
            June 17, 2016                    June 19, 2015                    June 17, 2016                    June 19, 2015         

Net income

     $ 36,309           $ 34,041           $ 60,717           $ 68,095     

Other comprehensive (loss) income, net of tax:

           

Foreign currency translation adjustments

     606           3,245           1,753           (2,357)    

Derivative instrument adjustment

     (808)          59           (399)          59     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total other comprehensive (loss) income, net of tax

     (202)          3,304           1,354           (2,298)    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

     $ 36,107           $ 37,345           $ 62,071           $ 65,797     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

See Notes to the Interim Consolidated Financial Statements

 

2


Table of Contents

MARRIOTT VACATIONS WORLDWIDE CORPORATION

INTERIM CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands, except share and per share data)

 

     (Unaudited)
        June 17, 2016        
           January 1, 2016        

ASSETS

     

Cash and cash equivalents

     $ 97,418              $ 177,061       

Restricted cash (including $39,395 and $26,884 from VIEs, respectively)

     68,340              71,451       

Accounts and contracts receivable, net (including $4,112 and $4,893 from VIEs, respectively)

     142,864              131,850       

Vacation ownership notes receivable, net (including $679,185 and $669,179 from VIEs, respectively)

     903,747              920,631       

Inventory

     702,377              669,243       

Property and equipment

     228,848              288,803       

Other

     109,960              140,679       
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total Assets

     $ 2,253,554              $ 2,399,718       
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

     

Accounts payable

     $ 74,484              $ 139,120       

Advance deposits

     80,876              69,064       

Accrued liabilities (including $1,401 and $669 from VIEs, respectively)

     132,733              164,791       

Deferred revenue

     30,600              35,276       

Payroll and benefits liability

     75,309              104,331       

Liability for Marriott Rewards customer loyalty program

     —              35       

Deferred compensation liability

     57,567              51,031       

Mandatorily redeemable preferred stock of consolidated subsidiary, net

     39,068              38,989       

Debt, net (including $691,845 and $684,604 from VIEs, respectively)

     733,828              678,793       

Other

     56,248              32,945       

Deferred taxes

     126,093              109,076       
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total Liabilities

     1,406,806              1,423,451       
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Contingencies and Commitments (Note 8)

     

Preferred stock — $0.01 par value; 2,000,000 shares authorized; none issued or outstanding

     —              —       

Common stock — $0.01 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized; 36,620,686 and 36,393,800 shares issued, respectively

     366              364       

Treasury stock — at cost; 9,640,473 and 6,844,256 shares, respectively

     (593,052)             (429,990)      

Additional paid-in capital

     1,139,366              1,150,731       

Accumulated other comprehensive income

     12,735              11,381       

Retained earnings

     287,333              243,781       
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total Equity

     846,748              976,267       
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total Liabilities and Equity

     $ 2,253,554              $ 2,399,718       
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The abbreviation VIEs above means Variable Interest Entities.

See Notes to Interim Consolidated Financial Statements

 

3


Table of Contents

MARRIOTT VACATIONS WORLDWIDE CORPORATION

INTERIM CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(In thousands)

(Unaudited)

 

     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended  
             June 17, 2016                      June 19, 2015          

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

     

Net income

     $ 60,717             $ 68,095        

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

     

Depreciation

     10,177             8,558        

Amortization of debt issuance costs

     2,559             2,506        

Provision for loan losses

     19,591             15,662        

Share-based compensation

     6,856             6,588        

Employee stock purchase plan

     307             —        

Deferred income taxes

     15,792             17,850        

Gain on disposal of property and equipment, net

     (10,675)            (9,512)       

Non-cash reversal of litigation expense

     (303)            (262)       

Net change in assets and liabilities:

     

Accounts and contracts receivable

     (11,084)            (6,068)       

Notes receivable originations

     (124,318)            (112,060)       

Notes receivable collections

     120,548             132,397        

Inventory

     (13,924)            68,629        

Purchase of operating properties for future conversion to inventory

     —             (46,614)       

Other assets

     26,111             8,154        

Accounts payable, advance deposits and accrued liabilities

     (78,190)            (66,223)       

Deferred revenue

     (4,805)            (5,955)       

Payroll and benefit liabilities

     (27,313)            (18,382)       

Liability for Marriott Rewards customer loyalty program

     (36)            (9,345)       

Deferred compensation liability

     6,536             4,858        

Other liabilities

     20,348             18,013        

Other, net

     2,184             1,776        
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

     21,078             78,665        
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

     

Capital expenditures for property and equipment (excluding inventory)

     (15,142)            (15,718)       

Decrease in restricted cash

     2,969             43,758        

Dispositions, net

     69,738             20,346        
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net cash provided by investing activities

     57,565             48,386        
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

     

Borrowings from securitization transactions

     91,281             —        

Repayment of debt related to securitization transactions

     (84,040)            (143,374)       

Borrowings from Revolving Corporate Credit Facility

     85,000             —        

Repayment of Revolving Corporate Credit Facility

     (40,000)            —        

Proceeds from vacation ownership inventory arrangement

     —             5,375        

Debt issuance costs

     (231)            (30)       

Repurchase of common stock

     (163,359)            (66,237)       

Accelerated stock repurchase forward contract

     (14,470)            —        

Payment of dividends

     (26,067)            (8,085)       

Payment of withholding taxes on vesting of restricted stock units

     (3,876)            (9,353)       

Other

     572             201        
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

     (155,190)            (221,503)       
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Effect of changes in exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents

     (3,096)            (1,157)       

DECREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

     (79,643)            (95,609)       

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, beginning of period

     177,061             346,515        
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, end of period

     $ 97,418             $ 250,906        
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURES OF NON-CASH INVESTING AND FINANCING ACTIVITIES

     

Non-cash issuance of note receivable

     $ —             $ (500)       

Non-cash impact on Additional paid-in capital for changes in Deferred tax liabilities distributed to Marriott Vacations Worldwide at Spin-Off

     —             (77)       

Dividends payable

     —             (7,914)       

Non-cash issuance of treasury stock for employee stock purchase plan

     307             —        

Disposition accruals not yet paid

     4,636             —        

Property acquired via capital lease

     7,221             —        

Non-cash transfer of excess inventory to Property and equipment for disposition

     9,741             —        

See Notes to Interim Consolidated Financial Statement

 

4


Table of Contents

MARRIOTT VACATIONS WORLDWIDE CORPORATION

NOTES TO INTERIM CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Our Business

Marriott Vacations Worldwide Corporation (“Marriott Vacations Worldwide,” “we” or “us,” which includes our consolidated subsidiaries except where the context of the reference is to a single corporate entity) is the exclusive worldwide developer, marketer, seller and manager of vacation ownership and related products under the Marriott Vacation Club and Grand Residences by Marriott brands. In 2016, we introduced Marriott Vacation Club PulseSM, an extension to the Marriott Vacation Club brand. We are also the exclusive worldwide developer, marketer and seller of vacation ownership and related products under The Ritz-Carlton Destination Club brand, and we have the non-exclusive right to develop, market and sell whole ownership residential products under The Ritz-Carlton Residences brand. The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C. (“The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company”), a subsidiary of Marriott International, Inc. (“Marriott International”), provides on-site management for Ritz-Carlton branded properties.

Our business is grouped into three reportable segments: North America, Europe and Asia Pacific. As of June 17, 2016, our portfolio consisted of over 60 properties in the United States and eight other countries and territories. We generate most of our revenues from four primary sources: selling vacation ownership products; managing our resorts; financing consumer purchases of vacation ownership products; and renting vacation ownership inventory.

Principles of Consolidation and Basis of Presentation

The interim consolidated financial statements presented herein and discussed below include 100 percent of the assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses and cash flows of Marriott Vacations Worldwide, all entities in which Marriott Vacations Worldwide has a controlling voting interest (“subsidiaries”), and those variable interest entities for which Marriott Vacations Worldwide is the primary beneficiary in accordance with consolidation accounting guidance. Intercompany accounts and transactions between consolidated companies have been eliminated in consolidation. The interim consolidated financial statements reflect our financial position, results of operations and cash flows as prepared in conformity with United States Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”).

In order to make this report easier to read, we refer throughout to (i) our Interim Consolidated Financial Statements as our “Financial Statements,” (ii) our Interim Consolidated Statements of Income as our “Statements of Income,” (iii) our Interim Consolidated Balance Sheets as our “Balance Sheets,” and (iv) our Interim Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows as our “Cash Flows.” In addition, references throughout to numbered “Footnotes” refer to the numbered Notes in these Notes to Interim Consolidated Financial Statements, unless otherwise noted.

Unless otherwise specified, each reference to a particular quarter in these Financial Statements means the twelve weeks ended on the date shown in the following table, rather than the corresponding calendar quarter:

 

Fiscal Year

 

Quarter-End Date

2016 Second Quarter   June 17, 2016
2016 First Quarter   March 25, 2016
2015 Second Quarter   June 19, 2015
2015 First Quarter   March 27, 2015

In our opinion, our Financial Statements reflect all normal and recurring adjustments necessary to present fairly our financial position and the results of our operations and cash flows for the periods presented. Interim results may not be indicative of fiscal year performance because of, among other reasons, seasonal and short-term variations.

These Financial Statements have not been audited. Amounts as of January 1, 2016 included in these Financial Statements have been derived from the audited consolidated financial statements as of that date. We have condensed or omitted certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements presented in accordance with GAAP. Although we believe our footnote disclosures are adequate to make the information presented not misleading, you should read these Financial Statements in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes to those consolidated financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 1, 2016.

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Such estimates include, but are not limited to, revenue recognition, cost of vacation ownership products, inventory valuation, property and equipment valuation, loan loss reserves, self-insured medical plan reserves, equity-based compensation, income taxes and loss contingencies. Accordingly, actual amounts may differ from these estimated amounts.

We have reclassified certain prior year amounts to conform to our current period presentation.

 

5


Table of Contents

Future Adoption of Accounting Standards

Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-13 – “Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326), Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments” (“ASU 2016-13”)

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, which replaces the incurred loss impairment methodology in current GAAP with a methodology that reflects expected credit losses. The update is intended to provide financial statement users with more decision-useful information about the expected credit losses on financial instruments and other commitments to extend credit held by a reporting entity at each reporting date. This update is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019, with early adoption permitted for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018. We are evaluating the impact that ASU 2016-13, including the timing of implementation, will have on our financial statements and disclosures.

Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-09 – “Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718)” (“ASU 2016-09”)

In March 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-09 which changes how entities account for certain aspects of share-based payment transactions, including the income tax consequences, classification of awards as either equity or liabilities and classification on the statement of cash flows. The update is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016 and interim periods within those annual periods. We are evaluating the impact that ASU 2016-09 will have on our financial statements and disclosures.

Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-02 – “Leases (Topic 842)” (“ASU 2016-02”)

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02 to increase transparency and comparability of information regarding an entity’s leasing activities by providing additional information to users of financial statements. ASU 2016-02 amends the existing accounting standards for lease accounting, including requiring lessees to recognize most leases on their balance sheets and making targeted changes to lessor accounting. The new standard requires a modified retrospective transition approach for all leases existing at, or entered into after, the date of initial application, with an option to use certain transition relief. This update is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, with early adoption permitted. We are evaluating the impact that ASU 2016-02, including the method and timing of implementation, will have on our financial statements and disclosures.

Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-01 – “Financial Instruments – Overall (Subtopic 825-10)” (“ASU 2016-01”)

In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-01, which updates certain aspects of recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of financial instruments. For public business entities, the amendments in ASU 2016-01 will be effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. We do not expect the adoption of ASU 2016-01 to have a material impact on our Financial Statements.

Accounting Standards Update No. 2014-09 – “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606)” (“ASU 2014-09”), Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-08 – “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), Principal versus Agent Considerations” (“ASU 2016-08”), Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-10 – “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), Identifying Performance Obligations and Licensing” (“ASU 2016-10”), and Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-12 – “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), Narrow-Scope Improvements and Practical Expedients” (“ASU 2016-12”)

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, which was later amended by ASU 2016-08, ASU 2016-10 and ASU 2016-12. ASU 2014-09, as amended, supersedes the revenue recognition requirements in Topic 605, Revenue Recognition, as well as most industry-specific guidance, and significantly enhances comparability of revenue recognition practices across entities and industries by providing a principles-based, comprehensive framework for addressing revenue recognition issues. In order for a provider of promised goods or services to recognize as revenue the consideration that it expects to receive in exchange for the promised goods or services, the provider should apply the following five steps: (1) identify the contract with a customer; (2) identify the performance obligations in the contract; (3) determine the transaction price; (4) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract; and (5) recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligation. ASU 2014-09, as amended, will be effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2017. The new standard may be applied retrospectively or on a modified retrospective basis with the cumulative effect recognized on the date of adoption. Although we expect to adopt ASU 2014-09, as amended, commencing in fiscal year 2018, we continue to evaluate the impact that adoption of this ASU, including the method of implementation, will have on our financial statements and disclosures.

 

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2. INCOME TAXES

We file income tax returns with U.S. federal and state and non-U.S. jurisdictions and are subject to audits in these jurisdictions. Although we do not anticipate that a significant impact to our unrecognized tax benefit balance will occur during the next fiscal year, the amount of our liability for unrecognized tax benefits could change as a result of audits in these jurisdictions. Our total unrecognized tax benefit balance that, if recognized, would impact our effective tax rate, was $2.0 million and $2.4 million at June 17, 2016 and January 1, 2016, respectively.

3. VACATION OWNERSHIP NOTES RECEIVABLE

The following table shows the composition of our vacation ownership notes receivable balances, net of reserves:

 

($ in thousands)          June 17, 2016                January 1, 2016       

Vacation ownership notes receivable — securitized

     $ 679,185            $ 669,179     

Vacation ownership notes receivable — non-securitized

    

Eligible for securitization (1)

     99,669            104,671     

Not eligible for securitization (1)

     124,893            146,781     
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Subtotal

     224,562            251,452     
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total vacation ownership notes receivable

     $ 903,747            $ 920,631     
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  (1)  Refer to Footnote No. 4, “Financial Instruments,” for discussion of eligibility of our vacation ownership notes receivable for securitization.  

The following tables show future principal payments, net of reserves, as well as interest rates for our non-securitized and securitized vacation ownership notes receivable at June 17, 2016:

 

($ in thousands)    Non-Securitized
 Vacation Ownership 
Notes Receivable
    Securitized
 Vacation Ownership 
Notes Receivable
    Total  

2016

     $ 33,683         $ 52,842         $ 86,525    

2017

     43,979         87,725         131,704    

2018

     27,652         84,602         112,254    

2019

     19,927         78,765         98,692    

2020

     16,997         77,374         94,371    

Thereafter

     82,324         297,877         380,201    
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 17, 2016

     $ 224,562         $ 679,185         $ 903,747    
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted average stated interest rate

     11.9%         12.8%         12.5%    

Range of stated interest rates

     0.0% to 19.5%         4.9% to 19.5%         0.0% to 19.5%    

We reflect interest income associated with vacation ownership notes receivable in our Statements of Income in the Financing revenues caption. The following table summarizes interest income associated with vacation ownership notes receivable:

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended      Twenty-Four Weeks Ended  
($ in thousands)        June 17, 2016            June 19, 2015           June 17, 2016            June 19, 2015   

Interest income associated with vacation ownership notes receivable — securitized

     $ 21,201            $ 17,913          $ 42,392            $ 39,987    

Interest income associated with vacation ownership notes receivable — non-securitized

     6,052            9,014          12,635            14,507    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total interest income associated with vacation ownership notes receivable

     $ 27,253            $ 26,927          $ 55,027            $ 54,494    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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We record an estimate of expected uncollectibility on all notes receivable from vacation ownership purchasers as a reduction of revenues from the sale of vacation ownership products at the time we recognize profit on a vacation ownership product sale. We fully reserve for all defaulted vacation ownership notes receivable in addition to recording a reserve on the estimated uncollectible portion of the remaining vacation ownership notes receivable. For those vacation ownership notes receivable that are not in default, we assess collectibility based on pools of vacation ownership notes receivable because we hold large numbers of homogeneous vacation ownership notes receivable. We use the same criteria to estimate uncollectibility for non-securitized vacation ownership notes receivable and securitized vacation ownership notes receivable because they perform similarly. We estimate uncollectibility for each pool based on historical activity for similar vacation ownership notes receivable.

The following table summarizes the activity related to our vacation ownership notes receivable reserve for the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016:

 

($ in thousands)    Non-Securitized
 Vacation Ownership 
Notes Receivable
Reserve
    Securitized
 Vacation Ownership 
Notes Receivable
Reserve
                Total              

Balance at January 1, 2016

     $ 55,584           $ 47,655           $ 103,239      

Provision for loan losses

     13,018           6,622           19,640      

Securitizations

     (7,426)          7,426           —     

Write-offs

     (16,032)          —          (16,032)     

Defaulted vacation ownership notes receivable repurchase activity (1)

     12,866           (12,866)          —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 17, 2016

     $ 58,010           $ 48,837           $ 106,847      
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  (1)  Decrease in securitized vacation ownership notes receivable reserve and increase in non-securitized vacation ownership notes receivable reserve was attributable to the transfer of the reserve when we voluntarily repurchased the securitized vacation ownership notes receivable.  

Although we consider loans to owners to be past due if we do not receive payment within 30 days of the due date, we suspend accrual of interest only on those loans that are over 90 days past due. We consider loans over 150 days past due to be in default. We apply payments we receive for vacation ownership notes receivable on non-accrual status first to interest, then to principal and any remainder to fees. We resume accruing interest when vacation ownership notes receivable are less than 90 days past due. We do not accept payments for vacation ownership notes receivable during the foreclosure process unless the amount is sufficient to pay all past due principal, interest, fees and penalties owed and fully reinstate the note. We write off uncollectible vacation ownership notes receivable against the reserve once we receive title to the vacation ownership products through the foreclosure or deed-in-lieu process or, in Europe or Asia Pacific, when revocation is complete. For both non-securitized and securitized vacation ownership notes receivable, we estimated average remaining default rates of 6.97 percent and 6.92 percent as of June 17, 2016 and January 1, 2016, respectively. A 0.5 percentage point increase in the estimated default rate would have resulted in an increase in our allowance for loan losses of $4.7 million as of both June 17, 2016 and January 1, 2016.

 

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The following table shows our recorded investment in non-accrual vacation ownership notes receivable, which are vacation ownership notes receivable that are 90 days or more past due:

 

($ in thousands)    Non-Securitized
  Vacation Ownership 
Notes Receivable
    Securitized
  Vacation Ownership 

Notes Receivable
                Total              

Investment in vacation ownership notes receivable on non-accrual status at June 17, 2016

     $ 48,248          $ 10,681          $ 58,929     

Investment in vacation ownership notes receivable on non-accrual status at January 1, 2016

     $ 46,024          $ 8,717          $ 54,741     

Average investment in vacation ownership notes receivable on non-accrual status during the twelve weeks ended June 17, 2016

     $ 47,471          $ 10,407          $ 57,878     

Average investment in vacation ownership notes receivable on non-accrual status during the twelve weeks ended June 19, 2015

     $ 54,354          $ 9,352          $ 63,706     

Average investment in vacation ownership notes receivable on non-accrual status during the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016

     $ 47,136          $ 9,699          $ 56,835     

Average investment in vacation ownership notes receivable on non-accrual status during the twenty-four weeks ended June 19, 2015

     $ 57,656          $ 7,481          $ 65,137     

The following table shows the aging of the recorded investment in principal, before reserves, in vacation ownership notes receivable as of June 17, 2016:

 

($ in thousands)    Non-Securitized
  Vacation Ownership 
Notes Receivable
    Securitized
  Vacation Ownership 
Notes Receivable
                Total              

31 – 90 days past due

     $ 7,095         $ 17,197         $ 24,292    

91 – 150 days past due

     4,071         8,927         12,998     

Greater than 150 days past due

     44,177         1,754          45,931    
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total past due

     55,343         27,878         83,221    

Current

     227,229         700,144         927,373    
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total vacation ownership notes receivable

     $ 282,572         $ 728,022         $ 1,010,594    
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The following table shows the aging of the recorded investment in principal, before reserves, in vacation ownership notes receivable as of January 1, 2016:

 

($ in thousands)

   Non-Securitized
  Vacation Ownership 
Notes Receivable
    Securitized
  Vacation Ownership 
Notes Receivable
                Total              

31 – 90 days past due

     $ 9,981         $ 21,113         $ 31,094    

91 – 150 days past due

     4,731         8,590         13,321    

Greater than 150 days past due

     41,293         127         41,420    
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total past due

     56,005         29,830         85,835    

Current

     251,031         687,004         938,035    
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total vacation ownership notes receivable

     $ 307,036         $ 716,834         $ 1,023,870    
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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4. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

The following table shows the carrying values and the estimated fair values of financial assets and liabilities that qualify as financial instruments, determined in accordance with the authoritative guidance for disclosures regarding the fair value of financial instruments. Considerable judgment is required in interpreting market data to develop estimates of fair value. The use of different market assumptions and/or estimation methodologies could have a material effect on the estimated fair value amounts. The table excludes Cash and cash equivalents, Restricted cash, Accounts and contracts receivable, Accounts payable, Advance deposits, and Accrued liabilities, all of which had fair values approximating their carrying amounts due to the short maturities and liquidity of these instruments.

 

                         At June 17, 2016                                               At January 1,  2016                      
($ in thousands)    Carrying
Amount
     Fair
Value(1)
     Carrying
Amount
     Fair
Value(1)
 

Vacation ownership notes receivable

           

Securitized

     $ 679,185         $ 813,884         $ 669,179         $ 803,533   

Non-securitized

     224,562         245,475         251,452         274,799   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total financial assets

     $ 903,747         $ 1,059,359         $ 920,631         $ 1,078,332   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Non-recourse debt associated with vacation ownership notes receivable securitizations, gross

     $ (602,806)         $ (604,694)         $ (684,604)         $ (677,595)   

Warehouse credit facility, gross

     (89,039)         (87,584)         —         —   

Revolving corporate credit facility, gross

     (45,000)         (45,000)         —         —   

Other debt, gross

     (2,186)         (2,186)         (3,496)         (3,496)   

Mandatorily redeemable preferred stock of consolidated subsidiary, gross

     (40,000)         (41,557)         (40,000)         (42,258)   

Other liabilities

     (2,598)         (2,598)         (4,515)         (4,515)   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total financial liabilities

     $ (781,629)         $ (783,619)         $ (732,615)         $ (727,864)   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

  (1)  Fair value of financial instruments, with the exception of derivative instruments, has been determined using Level 3 inputs. Fair value of derivative instruments has been determined using Level 2 inputs.

Vacation Ownership Notes Receivable

We estimate the fair value of our securitized vacation ownership notes receivable using a discounted cash flow model. We believe this is comparable to the model that an independent third party would use in the current market. Our model uses default rates, prepayment rates, coupon rates and loan terms for our securitized vacation ownership notes receivable portfolio as key drivers of risk and relative value that, when applied in combination with pricing parameters, determine the fair value of the underlying vacation ownership notes receivable.

Due to factors that impact the general marketability of our non-securitized vacation ownership notes receivable, as well as current market conditions, we bifurcate our vacation ownership notes receivable at each balance sheet date into those eligible and not eligible for securitization using criteria applicable to current securitization transactions in the asset-backed securities (“ABS”) market. Generally, vacation ownership notes receivable are considered not eligible for securitization if any of the following attributes are present: (1) payments are greater than 30 days past due; (2) the first payment has not been received; or (3) the collateral is located in Europe or Asia. In some cases eligibility may also be determined based on the credit score of the borrower, the remaining term of the loans and other similar factors that may reflect investor demand in a securitization transaction or the cost to effectively securitize the vacation ownership notes receivable.

The following table shows the bifurcation of our non-securitized vacation ownership notes receivable into those eligible and not eligible for securitization based upon the aforementioned eligibility criteria:

 

     At June 17, 2016      At January 1, 2016  
($ in thousands)    Carrying
Amount
     Fair
Value
     Carrying
Amount
     Fair
Value
 

Vacation ownership notes receivable

           

  Eligible for securitization

   $ 99,669       $ 120,582       $ 104,671       $ 128,018   

  Not eligible for securitization

     124,893         124,893         146,781         146,781   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total non-securitized

   $         224,562       $         245,475       $         251,452       $         274,799   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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We estimate the fair value of the portion of our non-securitized vacation ownership notes receivable that we believe will ultimately be securitized in the same manner as securitized vacation ownership notes receivable. We value the remaining non-securitized vacation ownership notes receivable at their carrying value, rather than using our pricing model. We believe that the carrying value of these particular vacation ownership notes receivable approximates fair value because the stated interest rates of these loans are consistent with current market rates and the reserve for these vacation ownership notes receivable appropriately accounts for risks in default rates, prepayment rates and loan terms.

Non-Recourse Debt Associated with Securitized Vacation Ownership Notes Receivable and Warehouse Credit Facility

We generate cash flow estimates by modeling all bond tranches for our active vacation ownership notes receivable securitization transactions and our non-recourse warehouse credit facility (the “Warehouse Credit Facility”), with consideration for the collateral specific to each tranche. The key drivers in our analysis include default rates, prepayment rates, bond interest rates and other structural factors, which we use to estimate the projected cash flows. In order to estimate market credit spreads by rating, we obtain indicative credit spreads from investment banks that actively issue and facilitate the market for vacation ownership securities and determine an average credit spread by rating level of the different tranches. We then apply those estimated market spreads to swap rates in order to estimate an underlying discount rate for calculating the fair value of the active bonds payable.

Revolving Corporate Credit Facility

The carrying value of the outstanding balance on our $200 million revolving credit facility (the “Revolving Corporate Credit Facility”) approximates fair value, as the contractual interest rate floats at the Eurodollar rate plus an applicable margin based on our credit rating.

Mandatorily Redeemable Preferred Stock of Consolidated Subsidiary

We estimate the fair value of the mandatorily redeemable preferred stock of our consolidated subsidiary using a discounted cash flow model. We believe this is comparable to the model that an independent third party would use in the current market. Our model includes an assessment of our subsidiary’s credit risk and the instrument’s contractual dividend rate.

5. ACQUISITIONS AND DISPOSITIONS

Acquisitions

Miami Beach, Florida

During the first quarter of 2016, we completed the acquisition of an operating property located in the South Beach area of Miami Beach, Florida, for $23.5 million. The acquisition was treated as a business combination, accounted for using the acquisition method of accounting and included within Operating activities on our Cash Flows and presented as Inventory. As consideration for the acquisition, we paid $23.5 million in cash; the value of the acquired property was allocated to inventory. We rebranded this property as Marriott Vacation Club Pulse, South Beach and intend to convert this property, in its entirety, into vacation ownership interests for future use in our Marriott Vacation Club DestinationsTM (“MVCD”) program.

San Diego, California

During the first quarter of 2015, we completed the acquisition of an operating property located in San Diego, California, for $55.0 million. The acquisition was treated as a business combination and accounted for using the acquisition method of accounting. As consideration for the acquisition, we paid $55.0 million in cash, which was allocated based on the fair value at the date of acquisition as follows: $54.3 million to property and equipment and $0.7 million to other assets. Fair value was determined using an independent appraisal, which was primarily based on a discounted cash flow model, a Level 3 fair value input. We rebranded this property as Marriott Vacation Club Pulse, San Diego and intend to convert this property, in its entirety, into vacation ownership interests for future use in our MVCD program. In order to ensure consistency with the expected related future cash flow presentation, $46.6 million of the cash purchase price allocated to property and equipment was included as an operating activity in the Purchase of operating property for future conversion to inventory line on our Cash Flows for the twenty-four weeks ended June 19, 2015. The remaining $7.7 million was included as an investing activity in the Capital expenditures for property and equipment line on our Cash Flows for the twenty-four weeks ended June 19, 2015, as it was allocated to assets to be used prior to conversion of the property into vacation ownership interests, as well as ancillary and sales center assets to be retained after the conversion.

 

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Dispositions

Surfers Paradise, Australia

In the third quarter of 2015, we purchased an operating property located in Surfers Paradise, Australia. We are converting a portion of this hotel into vacation ownership inventory, the completed portion of which has been contributed to our new Marriott Vacation Club Destinations, Australia program. During the second quarter of 2016, we disposed of the portion of this operating property that we did not intend to convert to vacation ownership inventory for gross cash proceeds of AUD $70.5 million ($50.9 million). We accounted for the sale under the full accrual method in accordance with the authoritative guidance on accounting for sales of real estate. As part of the disposition, we guaranteed the net operating income of the hotel through 2021 up to a specified maximum of AUD $2.9 million ($2.1 million), which has been recorded as a deferred gain in the Other line within liabilities on the Balance Sheet. We recognized a loss, inclusive of the deferred gain, of AUD $2.1 million ($1.5 million) in connection with the sale, which was recorded in the Gains and other income line on the Statements of Income for the twelve and twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016.

San Francisco, California

During the second quarter of 2016, we disposed of 19 residential units, located at The Ritz-Carlton Club and Residences, San Francisco (the “RCC San Francisco”) for gross cash proceeds of $19.5 million. We accounted for the sale under the full accrual method in accordance with the authoritative guidance on accounting for sales of real estate and recorded a gain of $10.5 million in the Gains and other income line on our Statements of Income for the twelve and twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016.

Marco Island, Florida

During the first quarter of 2015, we sold real property located in Marco Island, Florida, consisting of $3.1 million of vacation ownership inventory, to a third-party developer. We received consideration consisting of $5.4 million of cash and a note receivable of $0.5 million. We did not recognize any gain or loss on this transaction.

In accordance with our agreement with the third-party developer, we are obligated to repurchase the completed property from the developer contingent upon the property meeting our brand standards, provided that the third-party developer has not sold the property to another party. In accordance with the authoritative guidance on accounting for sales of real estate, our conditional obligation to repurchase the property constitutes continuing involvement and thus we were unable to account for this transaction as a sale. The property was sold to a variable interest entity for which we are not the primary beneficiary as we do not control the variable interest entity’s development activities and cannot prevent the variable interest entity from selling the property at a higher price. Accordingly, we have not consolidated the variable interest entity.

As of June 17, 2016, our Balance Sheet reflects $8.5 million of Other liabilities that relate to the deferral of gain recognition for this transaction, which will reduce our basis in the asset if we repurchase the property. In addition, the note receivable of $0.5 million and other receivables of $0.2 million are included in the Accounts and contracts receivable line on the Balance Sheet as of June 17, 2016. The cash consideration received for the sale of the real property is included in Proceeds from vacation ownership inventory arrangements on our Cash Flows for the twenty-four weeks ended June 19, 2015. We believe that our maximum exposure to loss as a result of our involvement with this variable interest entity is our interest in the note receivable and the other receivables discussed above as of June 17, 2016.

 

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6. EARNINGS PER SHARE

Basic earnings per common share is calculated by dividing net income attributable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the reporting period. Treasury stock is excluded from the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding. Diluted earnings per common share is calculated to give effect to all potentially dilutive common shares that were outstanding during the reporting period. The dilutive effect of outstanding equity-based compensation awards is reflected in diluted earnings per common share by application of the treasury stock method using average market prices during the period.

The table below illustrates the reconciliation of the earnings and number of shares used in our calculation of basic and diluted earnings per share.

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended      Twenty-Four Weeks Ended  
(in thousands, except per share amounts)          June 17, 2016(1)                   June 19, 2015(2)                   June 17, 2016(1)                   June 19, 2015(2)         

Computation of Basic Earnings Per Share

           

Net income

     $ 36,309          $ 34,041          $ 60,717          $ 68,095    

Weighted average shares outstanding

     28,345          31,858          28,734          32,078    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Basic earnings per share

     $ 1.28          $ 1.07          $ 2.11          $ 2.12    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Computation of Diluted Earnings Per Share

           

Net income

     $ 36,309          $ 34,041          $ 60,717          $ 68,095    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Weighted average shares outstanding

     28,345          31,858          28,734          32,078    

Effect of dilutive shares outstanding

           

Employee stock options and SARs

     368          460          379          464    

Restricted stock units

     121          199          131          218    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Shares for diluted earnings per share

     28,834          32,517          29,244          32,760    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Diluted earnings per share

     $ 1.26          $ 1.05          $ 2.08          $ 2.08    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1)   The computations of diluted earnings per share exclude approximately 263,000 shares of common stock, the maximum number of shares issuable as of June 17, 2016 upon the vesting of certain performance-based awards, because the performance conditions required for the shares subject to such awards to vest were not achieved by the end of the reporting period.

 

(2)

 

 

The computations of diluted earnings per share exclude approximately 180,000 shares of common stock, the maximum number of shares issuable as of June 19, 2015 upon the vesting of certain performance-based awards, because the performance conditions required for the shares subject to such awards to vest were not achieved by the end of the reporting period.

In accordance with the applicable accounting guidance for calculating earnings per share, for the twelve week period ending June 17, 2016, we excluded from our calculation of diluted earnings per share 62,018 shares underlying stock appreciation rights (“SARs”) that may be settled in shares of common stock, with an exercise price of $77.42, because this exercise price was greater than the average market price for the applicable period. For the twelve week period ending June 19, 2015, we have not excluded from our calculation of diluted earnings per share any shares underlying SARs that may be settled in shares of common stock, as no exercise prices were greater than the average market prices for the applicable period.

For the twenty-four week period ending June 17, 2016, we excluded from our calculation of diluted earnings per share 194,615 shares underlying SARs that may be settled in shares of common stock, with exercise prices ranging from $61.71 to $77.42, because these exercise prices were greater than the average market price for the applicable period. For the twenty-four week period ending June 19, 2015, we have not excluded from our calculation of diluted earnings per share any shares underlying SARs that may be settled in shares of common stock as no exercise prices were greater than the average market prices for the applicable period.

 

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7. INVENTORY

The following table shows the composition of our inventory balances:

 

($ in thousands)            At June 17, 2016                      At January 1, 2016          

Finished goods(1)

    $ 296,452         $ 332,888    

Work-in-progress

     76,628          —    

Land and infrastructure(2)

     324,793          331,042    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Real estate inventory

     697,873          663,930    

Operating supplies and retail inventory

     4,504          5,313    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
    $ 702,377         $ 669,243    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1)

  Represents completed inventory that is either registered for sale as vacation ownership interests, or unregistered and available for sale in its current form.

 

(2)

 

 

Includes $69.5 million of inventory related to estimated future foreclosures at June 17, 2016.

We value vacation ownership and residential products at the lower of cost or fair market value less costs to sell, in accordance with applicable accounting guidance, and we record operating supplies at the lower of cost (using the first-in, first-out method) or net realizable value. For the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 and June 19, 2015, product cost true-ups relating to vacation ownership products increased carrying values of inventory by $10.7 million and $3.2 million, respectively.

During the first half of 2016, $27.3 million was transferred from Property and equipment to Inventory as we commenced conversion of portions of the operating properties in Surfers Paradise, Australia and San Diego, California. The acquisition of these properties was previously included within Operating Activities on our Cash Flows and presented as Purchase of operating properties for future conversion to inventory within Operating Activities.

8. CONTINGENCIES AND COMMITMENTS

Guarantees

We have historically issued guarantees to certain lenders in connection with the provision of third-party financing for our sale of vacation ownership products for the North America and Asia Pacific segments. The terms of these guarantees generally require us to fund if the purchaser fails to pay under the term of its note payable. We are entitled to recover any payments we make to third-party lenders under these guarantees through reacquisition and resale of the financed vacation ownership product. Our commitments under these guarantees expire as the underlying notes mature or are repaid. The terms of the underlying notes extend to 2022. At June 17, 2016, the maximum potential amount of future fundings for financing guarantees where we are the primary obligor was $7.0 million and the carrying amount of the liability for expected future fundings, which is included in our Balance Sheet in the Other caption within Liabilities, was $0.2 million.

Commitments and Letters of Credit

In addition to the guarantees we describe in the preceding paragraphs, as of June 17, 2016, we had the following commitments outstanding:

 

    We have various contracts for the use of information technology hardware and software that we use in the normal course of business. Our aggregate commitments under these contracts were $24.3 million, of which we expect $6.9 million, $7.3 million, $3.7 million, $1.9 million, $1.7 million and $2.8 million will be paid in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 and thereafter, respectively.

 

    We have commitments of $2.0 million to subsidize vacation ownership associations, which we expect to pay in 2016.

 

    We have a commitment to purchase an operating property located in New York, New York for $158.5 million. We expect to acquire the units in the property, in their current form, over time, and we expect to make payments for these units of $96.8 million and $61.7 million in 2018 and 2019, respectively. We are currently managing this property, which we have rebranded as Marriott Vacation Club Pulse, New York City. In connection with this commitment, we entered into a capital lease arrangement for ancillary and operations space. See Footnote No. 13, “Variable Interest Entities,” for additional information on this transaction.

 

   

We have commitments to purchase vacation ownership units located in two resorts in Bali, Indonesia in two separate transactions, contingent upon completion of construction at agreed upon standards within specified

 

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timeframes, for use in our Asia Pacific segment. We expect to complete the acquisition of 51 vacation ownership units in 2017 pursuant to one of the commitments, and to make remaining payments with respect to these units, when specific construction milestones are completed, as follows: $2.3 million in 2016 and $19.0 million in 2017. We expect to complete the acquisition of 88 vacation ownership units in 2019 pursuant to the other commitment, and to make payments with respect to these units, when specific construction milestones are completed, as follows: $7.8 million in 2016, $5.9 million in 2018, and $25.4 million in 2019.

 

    We have a commitment of $137.1 million to purchase vacation ownership units located in Marco Island, Florida, of which we expect $33.3 million, $50.0 million and $53.8 million will be paid in 2017, 2018 and 2019, respectively. See Footnote No. 5, “Acquisitions and Dispositions,” for additional information on this transaction.

 

    We have a commitment of $91.1 million to purchase vacation ownership units located on the Big Island of Hawaii, contingent upon the completion of renovations to the vacation ownership units. We expect to acquire the completed vacation ownership units in 2017 and to pay the purchase price as follows: $27.5 million in 2017, $32.7 million in 2018 and $30.9 million in 2019.

 

    We have new commitments under operating leases that expire at various dates through 2027. Our aggregate minimum lease payments under these contracts were $23.0 million, of which we expect $0.2 million, $1.6 million, $1.9 million, $2.1 million, $2.4 million and $14.8 million will be paid in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 and thereafter, respectively.

Surety bonds issued as of June 17, 2016 totaled $56.2 million, the majority of which were requested by federal, state or local governments in connection with our operations.

Additionally, as of June 17, 2016, we had $3.3 million of letters of credit outstanding under our Revolving Corporate Credit Facility.

Loss Contingencies

In April 2013, Krishna and Sherrie Narayan and other owners of 12 residential units (owners of two of which subsequently agreed to release their claims) at the resort formerly known as The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Kapalua Bay (“Kapalua Bay”) filed an amended complaint related to a suit originally filed in Circuit Court for Maui County, Hawaii in June 2012 against us, certain of our subsidiaries, Marriott International, certain of its subsidiaries, and the joint venture in which we have an equity investment that developed and marketed vacation ownership and residential products at Kapalua Bay (the “Joint Venture”). In the original complaint, the plaintiffs alleged that defendants mismanaged funds of the residential owners association (the “Kapalua Bay Association”), created a conflict of interest by permitting their employees to serve on the Kapalua Bay Association’s board, and failed to disclose documents to which the plaintiffs were allegedly entitled. The amended complaint alleges breach of fiduciary duty, violations of the Hawaii Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practices Act and the Hawaii condominium statute, intentional misrepresentation and concealment, unjust enrichment and civil conspiracy. The relief sought in the amended complaint includes injunctive relief, repayment of all sums paid to us and our subsidiaries and Marriott International and its subsidiaries, compensatory and punitive damages, and treble damages under the Hawaii Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practices Act. We dispute the material allegations in the amended complaint and continue to defend against the action vigorously. We filed a motion in the Circuit Court to compel arbitration of plaintiffs’ claims. That motion was denied, but on appeal the Hawaii Intermediate Court of Appeals reversed. The Hawaii Supreme Court reversed the decision of the Intermediate Court of Appeals and reinstated the action in Circuit Court, which set the case for trial beginning September 6, 2016. We filed a petition with the United States Supreme Court seeking review of the Hawaii Supreme Court’s decision. On January 11, 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court issued an order vacating the Hawaii Supreme Court’s decision and remanding the case with instructions to reconsider its ruling in light of a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision reiterating the obligation of courts to enforce arbitration agreements. On January 27, 2016, we filed a motion to stay proceedings in the Circuit Court based on the order of the U.S. Supreme Court. Plaintiffs opposed the motion. The Circuit Court stayed proceedings until August 26, 2016, and set a hearing for that date. Given the inherent uncertainties of litigation, we cannot estimate a range of the potential liability, if any, at this time.

In June 2013, Earl C. and Patricia A. Charles, owners of a fractional interest at Kapalua Bay, together with owners of 38 other fractional interests (owners of two of which subsequently agreed to release their claims) at Kapalua Bay, filed an amended complaint in the Circuit Court of the Second Circuit for the State of Hawaii against us, certain of our subsidiaries, Marriott International, certain of its subsidiaries, the Joint Venture, and other entities that have equity investments in the Joint Venture. The plaintiffs allege that the defendants failed to disclose the financial condition of the Joint Venture and the commitment of the defendants to the Joint Venture, and that defendants’ actions constituted fraud and violated the Hawaii Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practices Act, the Hawaii Condominium Property Act and the Hawaii Time Sharing Plans statute. The relief sought includes compensatory and punitive damages, attorneys’ fees, pre-judgment interest, declaratory relief, rescission and treble damages under the Hawaii Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practices Act. The complaint was subsequently further amended to add owners of two additional fractional interests as plaintiffs. The Circuit Court granted our motion to compel arbitration of the claims asserted by the plaintiffs.

 

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Plaintiffs appealed that decision to the Hawaii Intermediate Court of Appeals and also initiated arbitration. On July 24, 2015, the Intermediate Court of Appeals reversed the decision of the Circuit Court and directed that the action be reinstated in the Circuit Court, based on the Hawaii Supreme Court’s decision in the Narayan case discussed above, which has since been vacated by the U.S. Supreme Court. We dispute the material allegations in the amended complaint and intend to defend against the action vigorously. Given the early stages of the action and the inherent uncertainties of litigation, we cannot estimate a range of the potential liability, if any, at this time.

In August 2014, Michael and Marla Flynn, owners of weeks-based Marriott Vacation Club vacation ownership products at two of our resorts in Hawaii, filed a claim with the American Arbitration Association on behalf of a putative class consisting of themselves and all others similarly situated. The claimants alleged that the introduction of our points-based MVCD program caused an actionable decrease in the value of their vacation ownership interests. The relief sought included compensatory and exemplary damages, restitution, injunctive relief, interest and attorneys’ fees pursuant to applicable timeshare and unfair trade practices acts, and common-law theories of breach of contract and breach of an implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing. On March 30, 2015, the arbitrator ruled that the Flynns’ claims are not subject to arbitration, and dismissed the Flynn proceeding. On October 2, 2015, Michael and Marla Flynn, joined by Patrick and Mary Flynn as Trustees of the Flynn Family Trust, filed a civil action in the United States District Court for the District of Hawaii, asserting similar claims and seeking similar relief on behalf of themselves and a putative class consisting of themselves and all others similarly situated. On December 24, 2015, we filed a motion to dismiss. On February 29, 2016, the Court granted the motion in part and denied it in part. On June 28, 2016, the parties executed a settlement agreement by which the plaintiffs agreed to release all claims in exchange for a nominal sum.

On May 26, 2015, we and certain of our subsidiaries were named as defendants in an action filed in the Superior Court of San Francisco County, California, by William and Sharon Petrick and certain other present and former owners of fractional interests at the RCC San Francisco. The case is not filed as a putative class action. The plaintiffs allege that the affiliation of the RCC San Francisco with our points-based MVCD program, certain alleged sales practices, and other acts we and the other defendants allegedly took caused an actionable decrease in the value of their fractional interests. The relief sought includes, among other things, compensatory and punitive damages, rescission, and pre- and post-judgment interest. Plaintiffs filed amended complaints on October 9, 2015 and April 25, 2016. We filed a motion to dismiss, and the Court has set a hearing on that motion for August 17, 2016. We dispute the material allegations in the amended complaint and intend to defend against the action vigorously. Given the early stages of the action and the inherent uncertainties of litigation, we cannot estimate a range of the potential liability, if any, at this time.

On July 18, 2016, RCHFU, L.L.C. and other owners of 50 fractional interests at The Ritz-Carlton Club, Aspen Highlands (“RCC-Aspen Highlands”) filed an amended complaint in the U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado against us and certain of our subsidiaries. The amended complaint alleges that the plaintiffs’ fractional interests were devalued by the affiliation of RCC-Aspen Highlands and other Ritz-Carlton Clubs with our points-based MVCD program. The relief sought includes, among other things, unspecified damages, pre- and post-judgment interest, and attorneys’ fees. The amended complaint also drops all class action allegations that were asserted in prior versions of the complaint. We dispute the material allegations in the amended complaint and intend to defend against the action vigorously. Given the early stages of the action and the inherent uncertainties of litigation, we cannot estimate a range of the potential liability, if any, at this time.

On May 20, 2016, we and certain of our subsidiaries were named as defendants in an action filed in the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida by Anthony and Beth Lennen. The case is filed as a putative class action; the plaintiffs seek to represent a class consisting of themselves and all other purchasers of MVCD points, from inception of the MVCD program in June 2010 to the present, as well as all individuals who own or have owned weeks in any resorts for which weeks have been added to the MVCD program. Plaintiffs challenge the characterization of the beneficial interests in the MVCD trust that are sold to customers as real estate interests under Florida law. They also challenge the structure of the trust and associated operational aspects of the trust product. The relief sought includes, among other things, declaratory relief, an unwinding of the MVCD product, and punitive damages. Our response to the complaint is due September 16, 2016. We dispute the material allegations in the complaint and intend to defend against the action vigorously. Given the early stages of the action and the inherent uncertainties of litigation, we cannot estimate a range of the potential liability, if any, at this time.

Other

We estimate the cash outflow associated with completing the phases of our existing portfolio of vacation ownership projects currently under development will be approximately $2.1 million, of which $1.7 million is included within liabilities on our Balance Sheet at June 17, 2016. This estimate is based on our current development plans, which remain subject to change, and we expect the phases currently under development will be completed by 2016.

 

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9. DEBT

The following table provides detail on our debt balances, net of unamortized debt issuance costs:

 

($ in thousands)       At June 17, 2016           At January 1, 2016    

Vacation ownership notes receivable securitizations, gross(1)

     $ 602,806           $ 684,604     

Unamortized debt issuance costs

     (7,486)          (9,043)    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     595,320           675,561     

Warehouse credit facility(2)

     89,039           —     

Unamortized debt issuance costs(3)

     (1,373)          —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     87,666           —     

Revolving corporate credit facility(4)

     45,000           —     

Unamortized debt issuance costs(5)

     (3,437)          —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     41,563           —     

Other debt, gross

     2,186           3,496     

Unamortized debt issuance costs

     (128)          (264)    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     2,058           3,232     

Capital leases

    

 

7,221   

 

 

 

    

 

—   

 

 

 

  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     $ 733,828           $ 678,793     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

  (1)  Interest rates as of June 17, 2016 range from 2.2% to 6.3% with a weighted average interest rate of 2.6%.
  (2)  The effective interest rate as of June 17, 2016 was 2.2%.
  (3)  As no borrowings were outstanding at January 1, 2016, unamortized debt issuance costs of $1.8 million were
included in the Other line within Assets on the Balance Sheet.
  (4)  The effective interest rate as of June 17, 2016 was 4.4%.
  (5)  As no borrowings were outstanding at January 1, 2016, unamortized debt issuance costs of $3.7 million were
included in the Other line within Assets on the Balance Sheet.

See Footnote No. 13, “Variable Interest Entities,” for a discussion of the collateral for the non-recourse debt associated with the securitized vacation ownership notes receivable and the Warehouse Credit Facility. The Warehouse Credit Facility currently terminates on November 22, 2017 and if not renewed, any amounts outstanding thereunder would become due and payable 13 months after termination, at which time all principal and interest collected with respect to the vacation ownership notes receivable held in the Warehouse Credit Facility would be redirected to the lenders to pay down the outstanding debt under the facility. We generally expect to securitize our vacation ownership notes receivable, including any vacation ownership notes receivable held in the Warehouse Credit Facility, in the ABS market once per year.

Any amounts that are borrowed under our Revolving Corporate Credit Facility, as well as obligations with respect to letters of credit issued pursuant to that facility, are secured by a perfected first priority security interest in substantially all of the assets of the borrower under, and guarantors of, that facility (which include Marriott Vacations Worldwide and each of our direct and indirect, existing and future, domestic subsidiaries, excluding certain bankruptcy remote special purpose subsidiaries), in each case including inventory, subject to certain exceptions.

 

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The following table shows scheduled future principal payments for our debt:

 

($ in thousands)    Vacation
Ownership
  Notes Receivable  
Securitizations  (1)
            Warehouse       
Credit
Facility
     Revolving
       Corporate       
Credit
Facility
            Other       
Debt
            Capital       
Leases
            Total       
    
 

Debt Principal Payments Year

                 

2016

   $ 52,052          $ 2,643           $ —           $ 60          $ —           $ 54,755      

2017

     85,036            5,012             —             664            7,221             97,933      

2018

     80,615            81,384             —             69            —             162,068      

2019

     72,365            —             45,000             74            —             117,439      

2020

     69,714            —             —             81            —             69,795      

Thereafter

     243,024            —             —             1,238            —             244,262      
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance at June 17, 2016

   $ 602,806          $ 89,039           $ 45,000           $ 2,186          $ 7,221           $ 746,252      
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1)   The debt associated with our vacation ownership notes receivable securitizations and the Warehouse Credit Facility is non-recourse to us.

As the contractual terms of the underlying securitized vacation ownership notes receivable determine the maturities of the non-recourse debt associated with them, actual maturities may occur earlier than shown above due to prepayments by the vacation ownership notes receivable obligors.

We paid cash for interest, net of amounts capitalized, of $8.9 million and $12.1 million in the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 and June 19, 2015, respectively.

Debt Associated with Vacation Ownership Notes Receivable Securitizations

Each of the transactions in which we have securitized vacation ownership notes receivable contains various triggers relating to the performance of the underlying vacation ownership notes receivable. If a pool of securitized vacation ownership notes receivable fails to perform within the pool’s established parameters (default or delinquency thresholds vary by transaction), transaction provisions effectively redirect the monthly excess spread we would otherwise receive from that pool (attributable to the interests we retained) to accelerate the principal payments to investors (taking into account the subordination of the different tranches to the extent there are multiple tranches) until the performance trigger is cured. During the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 and as of June 17, 2016, no securitized vacation ownership notes receivable pools were out of compliance with the established parameters. As of June 17, 2016, we had 6 securitized vacation ownership notes receivable pools outstanding.

Warehouse Credit Facility Borrowing

During the first half of 2016, we securitized vacation ownership notes receivable under our Warehouse Credit Facility. The total carrying amount of the vacation ownership notes receivable securitized was $107.7 million. The advance rate was 85 percent, which resulted in total gross proceeds of $91.3 million. The total net proceeds were $90.6 million due to the funding of reserve accounts in the amount of $0.7 million.

Amendment of the Revolving Corporate Credit Facility

During the second quarter of 2016, we entered into an amendment to the Revolving Corporate Credit Facility. Among other things, the amendment modifies certain of the financial covenants contained in the Revolving Corporate Credit Facility in a manner more favorable to us. The minimum consolidated tangible net worth covenant has been amended to require us to maintain a minimum consolidated tangible net worth (as defined in the Revolving Corporate Credit Facility) equal to the sum of (1) 70 percent, rather than 75 percent, of our relevant baseline net worth and (2) 70 percent, rather than 80 percent, of increases in such net worth resulting from certain equity offerings. In addition, we are required to maintain a ratio of our borrowing base amount (as defined in the Revolving Corporate Credit Facility) to the sum of (1) total extensions of credit under the Revolving Corporate Credit Facility and (2) the excess (if any) of all unrealized losses over all unrealized profits of certain swap agreements, of at least 1 to 1, rather than 1:25 to 1. The amendment also adds certain technical provisions with respect to the impact of European Union bail-in banking legislation on liabilities of certain non-U.S. financial institutions. The other terms of the Revolving Corporate Credit Facility are substantially similar to those in effect prior to the execution of the amendment.

Capital Leases

During the first quarter of 2016, we entered into a capital lease arrangement for ancillary and operations space in connection with the commitment to purchase an operating property located in New York, New York. See Footnote No. 8, “Contingencies and Commitments,” for additional information on this transaction.

 

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10. MANDATORILY REDEEMABLE PREFERRED STOCK OF CONSOLIDATED SUBSIDIARY

In October 2011, our subsidiary MVW US Holdings, Inc. (“MVW US Holdings”) issued $40.0 million of its mandatorily redeemable Series A (non-voting) preferred stock to Marriott International as part of Marriott International’s internal reorganization prior to our spin-off from Marriott International. Subsequently, Marriott International sold all of this preferred stock to third-party investors. Until October 2016, the Series A preferred stock will pay an annual cash dividend equal to the five-year U.S. Treasury Rate as of October 19, 2011, plus a spread of 10.958 percent, for a total annual cash dividend rate of 12 percent. In October 2016, if we do not elect to redeem the preferred stock, the annual cash dividend rate will be reset to the five-year U.S. Treasury Rate in effect on such date plus the same 10.958 percent spread. The Series A preferred stock is mandatorily redeemable by MVW US Holdings upon the tenth anniversary of the date of issuance but can be redeemed at our option after five years (i.e., beginning in October 2016) at par. The Series A preferred stock has an aggregate liquidation preference of $40.0 million plus any accrued and unpaid dividends and an additional premium if liquidation occurs during the first five years after the issuance of the preferred stock. As of June 17, 2016, 1,000 shares of Series A preferred stock were authorized, of which 40 shares were issued and outstanding. The dividends are recorded as a component of Interest expense as the Series A preferred stock is treated as a liability for accounting purposes.

The following table provides detail on our mandatorily redeemable preferred stock of consolidated subsidiary balance, net of unamortized debt issuance costs:

 

($ in thousands)        At June 17, 2016              At January 1, 2016      

Mandatorily redeemable preferred stock of consolidated subsidiary, gross

    $ 40,000          $ 40,000     

Unamortized debt issuance costs

     (932)          (1,011)    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
    $ 39,068          $ 38,989     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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11. SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

Marriott Vacations Worldwide has 100,000,000 authorized shares of common stock, par value of $0.01 per share. At June 17, 2016, there were 36,620,686 shares of Marriott Vacations Worldwide common stock issued, of which 26,980,213 shares were outstanding and 9,640,473 shares were held as treasury stock. At January 1, 2016, there were 36,393,800 shares of Marriott Vacations Worldwide common stock issued, of which 29,549,544 shares were outstanding and 6,844,256 shares were held as treasury stock. Marriott Vacations Worldwide has 2,000,000 authorized shares of preferred stock, par value of $0.01 per share, none of which were issued or outstanding as of June 17, 2016 or January 1, 2016.

The following table details changes in shareholders’ equity during the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016:

 

($ in thousands)        Common    
Stock
           Treasury      
Stock
           Additional      
Paid-In
Capital
     Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income
     Retained
      Earnings      
         Total Equity      

Balance at January 1, 2016

     $ 364          $ (429,990)         $ 1,150,731          $ 11,381          $ 243,781          $ 976,267    

Net income

     —          —          —          —          60,717          60,717    

Foreign currency translation adjustments

     —          —          —          1,753          —          1,753    

Derivative instruments adjustment

     —          —          —          (399)         —          (399)   

Amounts related to share-based compensation

     2          —          3,105          —          —          3,107    

Repurchase of common stock

     —          (163,359)         —          —          —          (163,359)   

Accelerated stock repurchase forward contract

     —          —          (14,470)         —          —          (14,470)   

Dividends

     —          —          —          —          (17,175)         (17,175)   

Employee stock plan issuance

     —          297          —          —          10          307    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance at June 17, 2016

     $ 366          $ (593,052)         $ 1,139,366          $ 12,735        $ 287,333          $ 846,748    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Share Repurchase Program

The following table summarizes share repurchase activity under our current share repurchase program:

 

($ in thousands, except per share amounts)    Number of
Shares
     Repurchased     
     Cost of
Shares
    Repurchased    
     Average
    Price Paid    
per Share
 

As of January 1, 2016

     6,854,083            $ 430,609         $ 62.83    

For the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016

     2,801,035             163,359          58.32    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

As of June 17, 2016

     9,655,118            $ 593,968         $ 61.52    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

On February 11, 2016, our Board of Directors approved the repurchase of up to an additional 2,000,000 shares of our common stock under our existing share repurchase program through March 24, 2017. Prior to that authorization, our Board of Directors had authorized the repurchase of an aggregate of up to 8,900,000 shares of our common stock under the share repurchase program since the initiation of the program in October 2013. Share repurchases may be made through open market purchases, privately negotiated transactions, block transactions, tender offers, accelerated share repurchase agreements or otherwise. The specific timing, amount and other terms of the repurchases will depend on market conditions, corporate and regulatory requirements and other factors. Acquired shares of our common stock are held as treasury shares carried at cost in our Financial Statements. In connection with the repurchase program, we are authorized to adopt one or more trading plans pursuant to the provisions of Rule 10b5-1 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.

 

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During the second quarter of 2016, pursuant to our existing share repurchase program, we entered into an accelerated share repurchase agreement (“ASR”) with a financial institution to repurchase shares of our common stock. Under the agreement, we paid $85.0 million to the financial institution and received an initial delivery of 1,168,917 shares of our common stock on June 16, 2016, which are included in treasury stock. We accounted for the ASR as two separate transactions: (i) a purchase of treasury stock and (ii) a forward contract indexed to our common stock.

We recorded $70.5 million as treasury stock and $14.5 million, the implied value of the forward contract, in Additional paid-in capital on the Balance Sheet as of June 17, 2016. The total number of shares that we ultimately receive under the ASR will be determined based on the average daily volume-weighted average share price of our common stock over the duration of the ASR, less an agreed discount, and may be subject to adjustments for certain events. The maximum number of additional shares that may be delivered to us under the ASR is 834,940. As the remainder of the shares are delivered to us, we will reclassify the implied value of the forward contract from additional paid-in capital to treasury stock. Final settlement will occur in the second half of 2016.

As of June 17, 2016, 1.2 million shares remained available for repurchase under the authorization approved by our Board of Directors. The authorization for the share repurchase program may be suspended, terminated, increased or decreased by our Board of Directors at any time without prior notice.

Dividends

We declared cash dividends to holders of common stock during the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 as follows:

 

          Declaration Date                       Shareholder Record Date                       Distribution Date                   Dividend per Share      
February 11, 2016   February 25, 2016   March 10, 2016   $ 0.30
May 12, 2016   May 26, 2016   June 9, 2016   $ 0.30

Any future dividend payments will be subject to Board approval, and there can be no assurance that we will pay dividends in the future.

12. SHARE-BASED COMPENSATION

A total of 6 million shares are authorized for issuance under the Marriott Vacations Worldwide Corporation Stock and Cash Incentive Plan (the “Stock Plan”). As of June 17, 2016, 1.5 million shares were available for grants under the Stock Plan.

For share-based awards with service-only vesting conditions, we measure compensation expense related to share-based payment transactions with our employees and non-employee directors at fair value on the grant date. With respect to our employees, we recognize this expense on our Statements of Income over the vesting period during which the employees provide service in exchange for the award; with respect to non-employee directors, we recognize this expense on the grant date. For share-based arrangements with performance vesting conditions, we recognize compensation expense once it is probable that the corresponding performance condition will be achieved.

We recorded share-based compensation expense related to award grants to our officers, directors and employees of $4.4 million and $4.0 million for the twelve weeks ended June 17, 2016 and June 19, 2015, respectively, and $6.9 million and $6.6 million for the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 and June 19, 2015, respectively. Our deferred compensation liability related to unvested awards held by our employees totaled $22.5 million and $13.3 million at June 17, 2016 and January 1, 2016, respectively.

Restricted Stock Units (“RSUs”)

We granted 168,228 RSUs, exclusive of RSUs with performance vesting conditions, to our employees and non-employee directors during the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016. RSUs granted in the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 had a weighted average grant-date fair value of $58.77. RSUs issued to our employees generally vest over four years in annual installments commencing one year after the date of grant. RSUs issued to our non-employee directors vest in full on the date of grant.

During the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 and June 19, 2015, we granted RSUs with performance vesting conditions to members of management. The number of RSUs earned, if any, is determined following the end of a three-year performance period based upon our cumulative achievement over that period of specific quantitative operating financial measures. The maximum number of RSUs that may be earned under the RSUs with performance-based vesting criteria granted during the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 and June 19, 2015 was approximately 144,000 and 74,000, respectively.

Stock Appreciation Rights

We granted 132,597 SARs to members of management during the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016. These SARs had a weighted average grant-date fair value of $16.12 and a weighted average exercise price of $61.71. SARs generally expire ten years after the date of grant and both vest and become exercisable in cumulative installments of one quarter of the grant at the end of each of the first four years following the date of grant.

 

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We use the Black-Scholes model to estimate the fair value of the SARs granted. For SARs granted under the Stock Plan in the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016, the expected stock price volatility was calculated based on the historical volatility from the stock prices of a group of identified peer companies. The average expected life was calculated using the simplified method. The risk-free interest rate was calculated based on U.S. Treasury zero-coupon issues with a remaining term equal to the expected life assumed at the date of grant. The dividend yield assumption listed below is based on the expectation of future payouts.

The following table outlines the assumptions used to estimate the fair value of grants during the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016:

 

Expected volatility

     31.60

Dividend yield

     1.96

Risk-free rate

     1.41

Expected term (in years)

     6.25   

13. VARIABLE INTEREST ENTITIES

In accordance with the applicable accounting guidance for the consolidation of variable interest entities, we analyze our variable interests, including loans, guarantees and equity investments, to determine if an entity in which we have a variable interest is a variable interest entity. Our analysis includes both quantitative and qualitative reviews. We base our quantitative analysis on the forecasted cash flows of the entity, and our qualitative analysis on our review of the design of the entity, its organizational structure including decision-making ability, and relevant financial agreements. We also use our qualitative analyses to determine if we must consolidate a variable interest entity because we are its primary beneficiary.

Variable Interest Entities Related to Our Vacation Ownership Notes Receivable Securitizations

We periodically securitize, without recourse, through bankruptcy remote special purpose entities, notes receivable originated in connection with the sale of vacation ownership products. These vacation ownership notes receivable securitizations provide funding for us and transfer the economic risks and substantially all the benefits of the consumer loans we originate to third parties. In a vacation ownership notes receivable securitization, various classes of debt securities issued by a special purpose entity are generally collateralized by a single tranche of transferred assets, which consist of vacation ownership notes receivable. We service the vacation ownership notes receivable. With each vacation ownership notes receivable securitization, we may retain a portion of the securities, subordinated tranches, interest-only strips, subordinated interests in accrued interest and fees on the securitized vacation ownership notes receivable or, in some cases, overcollateralization and cash reserve accounts.

We created these entities to serve as a mechanism for holding assets and related liabilities, and the entities have no equity investment at risk, making them variable interest entities. We continue to service the vacation ownership notes receivable, transfer all proceeds collected to these special purpose entities, and retain rights to receive benefits that are potentially significant to the entities. Accordingly, we concluded that we are the entities’ primary beneficiary and, therefore, consolidate them.

The following table shows consolidated assets, which are collateral for the obligations of these variable interest entities, and consolidated liabilities included on our Balance Sheet at June 17, 2016:

 

($ in thousands)        Vacation Ownership    
Notes Receivable
Securitizations
           Warehouse Credit      
Facility
                     Total                   

Consolidated Assets:

        

Vacation ownership notes receivable, net of reserves

     $ 582,274          $ 96,911          $ 679,185    

Interest receivable

     3,504          608          4,112    

Restricted cash

     35,402          3,993          39,395    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     $ 621,180          $ 101,512          $ 722,692    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Consolidated Liabilities:

        

Interest payable

     $ 1,214          $ 187          $ 1,401    

Debt

     602,806          89,039          691,845    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     $ 604,020          $ 89,226          $ 693,246    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The noncontrolling interest balance was zero. The creditors of these entities do not have general recourse to us.

 

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The following table shows the interest income and expense recognized as a result of our involvement with these variable interest entities during the twelve weeks ended June 17, 2016:

 

($ in thousands)        Vacation Ownership    
Notes Receivable
Securitizations
           Warehouse Credit      
Facility
                     Total                   

Interest income

     $ 18,632          $ 2,569          $ 21,201    

Interest expense to investors

     $ 3,654          $ 489          $ 4,143    

Debt issuance cost amortization

     $ 752          $ 222          $ 974    

Administrative expenses

     $ 51          $ 25          $ 76    

The following table shows the interest income and expense recognized as a result of our involvement with these variable interest entities during the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016:

 

($ in thousands)        Vacation Ownership    
Notes Receivable

Securitizations
           Warehouse Credit      
Facility
                     Total                   

Interest income

     $ 38,818          $ 3,574          $ 42,392    

Interest expense to investors

     $ 7,624          $ 853          $ 8,477    

Debt issuance cost amortization

     $ 1,557          $ 445          $ 2,002    

Administrative expenses

     $ 155          $ 67          $ 222    

The following table shows cash flows between us and the vacation ownership notes receivable securitization variable interest entities during the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 and June 19, 2015:

 

     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended  
($ in thousands)          June 17, 2016                  June 19, 2015        

Cash inflows:

     

Principal receipts

     $ 78,698           $ 86,675     

Interest receipts

     40,197           41,549     

Reserve release

     265           2,345     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     119,160           130,569     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Cash outflows:

     

Principal to investors

     (69,074)          (78,361)    

Voluntary repurchases of defaulted vacation ownership notes receivable

     (12,724)          (10,993)    

Voluntary clean-up call

     —           (54,020)    

Interest to investors

     (7,030)          (8,233)    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     (88,828)          (151,607)    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net Cash Flows

     $ 30,332           $ (21,038)    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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The following table shows cash flows between us and the Warehouse Credit Facility variable interest entity during the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 and June 19, 2015:

 

     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended  
($ in thousands)          June 17, 2016                  June 19, 2015        

Cash inflows:

     

Proceeds from vacation ownership notes receivable securitizations

     $ 91,281           $ —     

Principal receipts

     3,621           —     

Interest receipts

     2,965           —     

Reserve release

     28           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     97,895           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Cash outflows:

     

Principal to investors

     (2,100)          —     

Voluntary repurchases of defaulted vacation ownership notes receivable

     (142)          —     

Interest to investors

     (715)          (569)    

Funding of restricted cash

     (678)          (138)    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     (3,635)          (707)    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net Cash Flows

     $ 94,260           $ (707)    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Under the terms of our vacation ownership notes receivable securitizations, we have the right at our option to repurchase defaulted vacation ownership notes receivable at the outstanding principal balance. The transaction documents typically limit such repurchases to 15 to 20 percent of the transaction’s initial vacation ownership notes receivable principal balance. Our maximum exposure to loss relating to the special purpose entities that purchase, sell and own these vacation ownership notes receivable is the overcollateralization amount (the difference between the loan collateral balance and the balance on the outstanding vacation ownership notes receivable), plus cash reserves and any residual interest in future cash flows from collateral. In addition, we could be required to fund up to an aggregate of $5.0 million upon presentation of demand notes related to certain vacation ownership notes receivable securitization transactions outstanding at June 17, 2016.

Other Variable Interest Entities

We have an equity investment in the Joint Venture, a variable interest entity that previously developed and marketed vacation ownership and residential products in Hawaii. We concluded that the Joint Venture is a variable interest entity because the equity investment at risk is not sufficient to permit it to finance its activities without additional support from other venture parties. We determined that we are not the primary beneficiary of the Joint Venture, as power to direct the activities that most significantly impact its economic performance is shared among the variable interest holders and, therefore, we do not consolidate the Joint Venture. In 2009, we fully impaired our investments in the Joint Venture to zero. At June 17, 2016, we had an accrual of $2.1 million for potential future funding obligations, representing our remaining expected exposure to loss related to our involvement with the Joint Venture exclusive of any future costs that may be incurred pursuant to outstanding litigation matters, including those discussed in Footnote No. 8, “Contingencies and Commitments.”

We have a commitment to purchase an operating property located in New York, New York, that we currently manage as Marriott Vacation Club Pulse, New York City. Refer to Footnote No. 8, “Contingencies and Commitments” for additional information on the commitment. We are required to purchase the completed property from the third party developer unless the developer has sold the property to another party. The property is held by a variable interest entity for which we are not the primary beneficiary as we cannot prevent the variable interest entity from selling the property at a higher price. Accordingly, we have not consolidated the variable interest entity. As of June 17, 2016, our Balance Sheet reflects a $7.1 million capital lease asset and a $7.2 million capital lease liability for ancillary and operations space we lease from the variable interest entity. In addition, our Balance Sheet reflects a note receivable of $0.5 million from this variable interest entity, which we believe is our maximum exposure to loss as a result of our involvement with this variable interest entity as of June 17, 2016.

 

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14. BUSINESS SEGMENTS

We define our reportable segments based on the way in which the chief operating decision maker, currently our chief executive officer, manages the operations of the company for purposes of allocating resources and assessing performance. We operate in three reportable business segments:

 

    In our North America segment, we develop, market, sell and manage vacation ownership and related products under the Marriott Vacation Club and Grand Residences by Marriott brands. In 2016, we introduced Marriott Vacation Club PulseSM, an extension to the Marriott Vacation Club brand. We also develop, market and sell vacation ownership and related products under The Ritz-Carlton Destination Club brand, as well as whole ownership residential products under The Ritz-Carlton Residences brand.

 

    In our Europe segment, we are focusing on selling our existing projects and managing existing resorts. We do not have any current plans for new development in this segment.

 

    In our Asia Pacific segment, we develop, market, sell and manage two points-based programs that we specifically designed to appeal to the vacation preferences of the market, Marriott Vacation Club, Asia Pacific and Marriott Vacation Club Destinations, Australia, as well as a weeks-based right-to-use product.

We evaluate the performance of our segments based primarily on the results of the segment without allocating corporate expenses or income taxes. We do not allocate corporate interest expense, consumer financing interest expense, other financing expenses or general and administrative expenses to our segments. We include interest income specific to segment activities within the appropriate segment. We allocate other gains and losses and equity in earnings or losses from our joint ventures to each of our segments as appropriate. Corporate and other represents that portion of our revenues, equity in earnings or losses, and other gains or losses that are not allocable to our segments.

Revenues

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended      Twenty-Four Weeks Ended  
($ in thousands)        June 17, 2016              June 19, 2015              June 17, 2016              June 19, 2015      

North America

    $ 384,486         $ 384,489         $ 769,933         $ 776,417    

Europe

     26,256          26,621          46,355          48,208    

Asia Pacific

     19,203          11,717          38,700          53,082    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total segment revenues

     429,945          422,827          854,988          877,707    

Corporate and other

     —            —            —            —      
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
    $ 429,945         $ 422,827         $ 854,988         $ 877,707    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net Income (Loss)

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended      Twenty-Four Weeks Ended  
($ in thousands)        June 17, 2016              June 19, 2015              June 17, 2016              June 19, 2015      

North America

    $ 111,721        $ 104,603        $ 201,245        $ 202,339   

Europe

     2,157         3,006         2,543         3,020   

Asia Pacific

     (2,464)         (55)         (1,454)         9,388   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total segment financial results

     111,414         107,554         202,334         214,747   

Corporate and other

     (50,247)         (50,110)         (101,002)         (99,960)   

Provision for income taxes

     (24,858)         (23,403)         (40,615)         (46,692)   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
    $ 36,309        $ 34,041        $ 60,717        $ 68,095   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Assets

 

($ in thousands)          At June 17, 2016                  At January 1, 2016        

North America

     $ 1,926,351            $ 1,900,178      

Europe

     70,355            80,839      

Asia Pacific

     99,448            134,661      
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total segment assets

     2,096,154            2,115,678      

Corporate and other

     157,400            284,040      
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     $ 2,253,554            $ 2,399,718      
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

15. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

Warehouse Credit Facility Borrowing

Subsequent to the end of the second quarter of 2016, we securitized vacation ownership notes receivable under our Warehouse Credit Facility. The carrying amount of the vacation ownership notes receivable securitized was $41.8 million. The advance rate was 85 percent, which resulted in gross proceeds of $35.3 million. Net proceeds were $35.1 million due to the funding of reserve accounts in the amount of $0.2 million.

Payments on Revolving Corporate Credit Facility

Subsequent to the end of the second quarter of 2016, we made repayments of $45.0 million on our Revolving Corporate Credit Facility.

 

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Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Forward-Looking Statements

We make forward-looking statements in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q based on our management’s beliefs and assumptions and on information currently available to our management. Forward-looking statements include, among other things, the information concerning our possible or assumed future results of operations, business strategies, financing plans, competitive position, potential growth opportunities, potential operating performance improvements, and the effects of competition. Forward-looking statements include all statements that are not historical facts and can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as the words “believe,” “expect,” “plan,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “predict,” “potential,” “continue,” “may,” “might,” “should,” “could” or the negative of these terms or similar expressions.

Forward-looking statements involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Actual results may differ materially from those expressed in these forward-looking statements. You should not put undue reliance on any forward-looking statements in this Quarterly Report. We do not have any intention or obligation to update forward-looking statements after the date of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, except as required by law.

The risk factors discussed in “Risk Factors” in our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K, and which may be discussed in subsequent Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, could cause our results to differ materially from those expressed in forward-looking statements. There may be other risks and uncertainties that we cannot predict at this time or that we currently do not expect will have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows. Any such risks could cause our results to differ materially from those we express in forward-looking statements.

Our Financial Statements (as defined below), which we discuss below, reflect our historical financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. The financial information discussed below and included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q may not necessarily reflect what our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows may be in the future. In order to make this report easier to read, we refer to (i) our Interim Consolidated Financial Statements as our “Financial Statements,” (ii) our Interim Consolidated Statements of Income as our “Statements of Income,” (iii) our Interim Consolidated Balance Sheets as our “Balance Sheets,” and (iv) our Interim Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows as our “Cash Flows.” In addition, references throughout to numbered “Footnotes” refer to the numbered Notes to our Financial Statements that we include in the Financial Statements section of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

Business Overview

We are one of the world’s largest companies whose business is focused almost entirely on vacation ownership, based on number of owners, number of resorts and revenues. We are the exclusive worldwide developer, marketer, seller and manager of vacation ownership and related products under the Marriott Vacation Club and Grand Residences by Marriott brands. We are also the exclusive worldwide developer, marketer and seller of vacation ownership and related products under The Ritz-Carlton Destination Club brand, and we have the non-exclusive right to develop, market and sell whole ownership residential products under The Ritz-Carlton Residences brand.

In 2016, we introduced Marriott Vacation Club PulseSM, an extension to the Marriott Vacation Club brand, which features unique properties that embrace the spirit and culture of their urban locations, creating an authentic sense of place while delivering easy access to local interests, attractions and transportation.

Our business is grouped into three reportable segments: North America, Europe and Asia Pacific. As of June 17, 2016, our portfolio consisted of over 60 properties in the United States and eight other countries and territories. We generate most of our revenues from four primary sources: selling vacation ownership products; managing our resorts; financing consumer purchases of vacation ownership products; and renting vacation ownership inventory.

Below is a summary of significant accounting policies used in our business that will be used in describing our results of operations.

Sale of Vacation Ownership Products

We recognize revenues from the sale of vacation ownership products when all of the following conditions exist: a binding sales contract has been executed; the statutory rescission period has expired; the receivable is deemed collectible; and the remainder of our obligations are substantially completed.

Sales of vacation ownership products may be made for cash or we may provide financing. For sales where we provide financing, we defer revenue recognition until we receive a minimum down payment equal to ten percent of the purchase price plus the fair value of certain sales incentives provided to the purchaser. These sales incentives typically include Marriott Rewards Points or an alternative sales incentive that we refer to as “plus points.” These plus points are redeemable for stays at our resorts or for use in the Explorer Collection, generally up to two years from the date of issuance. Sales incentives are only awarded if the sale is closed.

 

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As a result of the down payment requirements with respect to financed sales and the statutory rescission periods, we often defer revenues associated with the sale of vacation ownership products from the date of the purchase agreement to a future period. When comparing results year-over-year, this deferral frequently generates significant variances, which we refer to as the impact of revenue reportability.

Finally, as more fully described in the “Financing” section below, we record an estimate of expected uncollectibility on all vacation ownership notes receivable (also known as a vacation ownership notes receivable reserve or a sales reserve) as a reduction of revenues from the sale of vacation ownership products at the time we recognize revenues from a sale.

We report, on a supplemental basis, contract sales for each of our three segments. Contract sales represent the total amount of vacation ownership product sales under purchase agreements signed during the period where we have received a down payment of at least ten percent of the contract price, reduced by actual rescissions during the period. Contract sales differ from revenues from the sale of vacation ownership products that we report on our Statements of Income due to the requirements for revenue recognition described above. We consider contract sales to be an important operating measure because it reflects the pace of sales in our business.

Cost of vacation ownership products includes costs to develop and construct our projects (also known as real estate inventory costs) as well as other non-capitalizable costs associated with the overall project development process. For each project, we expense real estate inventory costs in the same proportion as the revenue recognized. Consistent with the applicable accounting guidance, to the extent there is a change in the estimated sales revenues or real estate inventory costs for the project in a period, a non-cash adjustment is recorded on our Statements of Income to true-up costs in that period to those that would have been recorded historically if the revised estimates had been used. These true-ups, which we refer to as product cost true-ups, will have a positive or negative impact on our Statements of Income.

We refer to revenues from the sale of vacation ownership products less the cost of vacation ownership products and marketing and sales costs as development margin. Development margin percentage is calculated by dividing development margin by revenues from the sale of vacation ownership products.

Resort Management and Other Services

Our resort management and other services revenues include revenues generated from fees we earn for managing each of our resorts. In addition, we earn revenue for providing ancillary offerings, including food and beverage, retail, and golf and spa offerings at our resorts. We also receive annual fees, club dues, settlement fees from the sale of vacation ownership products and certain transaction-based fees from owners and other third parties, including external exchange service providers with which we are associated.

We provide day-to-day management services, including housekeeping services, operation of reservation systems, maintenance, and certain accounting and administrative services for property owners’ associations. We receive compensation for these management services; this compensation is generally based on either a percentage of budgeted costs to operate the resorts or a fixed fee arrangement. We earn these fees regardless of usage or occupancy.

Resort management and other services expenses include costs to operate the food and beverage and other ancillary operations and overall customer support services, including reservations, certain transaction-based expenses relating to external exchange service providers and settlement expenses from the sale of vacation ownership products.

Financing

We offer financing to qualified customers for the purchase of most types of our vacation ownership products. The average FICO score of customers who were U.S. citizens or residents who financed a vacation ownership purchase was as follows:

 

     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended
                         June 17, 2016                                             June 19, 2015                     

Average FICO score

   743    734

The typical financing agreement provides for monthly payments of principal and interest with the principal balance of the loan fully amortizing over the term of the related vacation ownership note receivable, which is generally ten years. The interest income earned from the financing arrangements is earned on an accrual basis on the principal balance outstanding over the life of the arrangement and is recorded as Financing revenues on our Statements of Income.

Financing revenues include interest income earned on vacation ownership notes receivable as well as fees earned from servicing the existing vacation ownership notes receivable portfolio. Financing expenses include costs in support of the financing, servicing and securitization processes. The amount of interest income earned in a period depends on the amount of outstanding vacation ownership notes receivable, which is impacted positively by the origination of new vacation ownership notes receivable and negatively by principal collections. In the first half of 2015, we implemented new programs to help increase financing propensity

 

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above the 40 to 45 percent rate that the company has averaged in recent years. We expect that interest income will continue to increase as new originations of vacation ownership notes receivable from growth in the business as well as the impact of higher financing propensity levels outpace the decline in principal of our existing vacation ownership notes receivable portfolio.

In the event of a default, we generally have the right to foreclose on or revoke the mortgaged vacation ownership interest. We return vacation ownership interests that we reacquire through foreclosure or revocation back to real estate inventory. As discussed above, we record a vacation ownership notes receivable reserve at the time of sale and classify the reserve as a reduction to revenues from the sale of vacation ownership products on our Statements of Income. Historical default rates, which represent defaults as a percentage of each year’s beginning gross vacation ownership notes receivable balance, were as follows:

 

     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended
                         June 17, 2016                                        June 19, 2015                     

Historical default rates

   2.0%   1.8%

Rental

We operate a rental business to provide owner flexibility and to help mitigate carrying costs associated with our inventory. We obtain rental inventory from unsold inventory and inventory we control because owners have elected alternative usage options offered through our vacation ownership programs.

Rental revenues are primarily the revenues we earn from renting this inventory. We also recognize rental revenue from the utilization of plus points under the Marriott Vacation Club DestinationsTM (“MVCD”) program when those points are redeemed for rental stays at one of our resorts or upon expiration of the points.

Rental expenses include:

 

    Maintenance fees on unsold inventory;

 

    Costs to provide alternative usage options, including Marriott Rewards Points and offerings available as part of the Explorer Collection, for owners who elect to exchange their inventory;

 

    Marketing costs and direct operating and related expenses in connection with the rental business (such as housekeeping, credit card expenses and reservation services); and

 

    Costs associated with the banking and borrowing usage option that is available under the MVCD program.

Rental metrics, including the average daily transient rate or the number of transient keys rented, may not be comparable between periods given fluctuation in available occupancy by location, unit size (such as two bedroom, one bedroom or studio unit), and owner use and exchange behavior. Further, as our ability to rent certain luxury inventory and inventory in our Asia Pacific segment is often limited on a site-by-site basis, rental operations may not generate adequate rental revenues to cover associated costs. Our vacation units are either “full villas” or “lock-off” villas. Lock-off villas are units that can be separated into a master unit and a guest room. Full villas are “non-lock-off” villas because they cannot be separated. A “key” is the lowest increment for reporting occupancy statistics based upon the mix of non-lock-off and lock-off villas. Lock-off villas represent two keys and non-lock-off villas represent one key. The “transient keys” metric represents the blended mix of inventory available for rent and includes all of the combined inventory configurations available in our resort system.

Cost Reimbursements

Cost reimbursements include direct and indirect costs that property owners’ associations reimburse to us. In accordance with the accounting guidance for “gross versus net” presentation, we record these revenues and expenses on a gross basis. We recognize cost reimbursements when we incur the related reimbursable costs. These costs primarily consist of payroll and payroll related expenses for management of the property owners’ associations and other services we provide where we are the employer. Cost reimbursements consist of actual expenses with no added margin.

Consumer Financing Interest Expense

Consumer financing interest expense represents interest expense associated with the debt from our non-recourse warehouse credit facility (the “Warehouse Credit Facility”) and from the securitization of our vacation ownership notes receivable. We distinguish consumer financing interest expense from all other interest expense because the debt associated with the consumer financing interest expense is secured by vacation ownership notes receivable that have been sold to bankruptcy remote special purpose entities and that is generally non-recourse to us.

Interest Expense

Interest expense consists of all interest expense other than consumer financing interest expense.

 

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Other Items

We measure operating performance using the following key metrics:

 

    Contract sales from the sale of vacation ownership products;

 

    Development margin percentage; and

 

    Volume per guest (“VPG”), which we calculate by dividing contract sales, excluding fractional and residential sales, telesales and other sales that are not attributed to a tour at a sales location, by the number of tours at sales locations in a given period. We believe that this operating metric is valuable in evaluating the effectiveness of the sales process as it combines the impact of average contract price with the number of touring guests who make a purchase.

Rounding

Percentage changes presented in our public filings are calculated using whole dollars.

Consolidated Results

The following discussion presents an analysis of our results of operations for the twelve and twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016, compared to the twelve and twenty-four weeks ended June 19, 2015.

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended      Twenty-Four Weeks Ended  
($ in thousands)          June 17, 2016                  June 19, 2015                  June 17, 2016                  June 19, 2015        

Revenues

           

Sale of vacation ownership products

   $ 146,450      $ 155,370      $ 284,819      $ 339,276  

Resort management and other services

     80,930        74,063        150,559        138,480  

Financing

     28,654        28,294        57,878        57,346  

Rental

     75,069        72,642        155,357        148,841  

Cost reimbursements

     98,842        92,458        206,375        193,764  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total revenues

     429,945        422,827        854,988        877,707  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Expenses

           

Cost of vacation ownership products

     33,753        45,119        69,370        110,081  

Marketing and sales

     78,919        77,137        157,331        157,132  

Resort management and other services

     49,311        45,480        95,108        87,889  

Financing

     4,864        6,085        9,493        10,990  

Rental

     66,028        61,835        130,688        121,993  

General and administrative

     24,588        22,892        49,885        45,669  

Litigation settlement

     —          26        (303      (236

Organizational and separation related

     —          101        —          293  

Consumer financing interest

     5,117        5,248        10,479        11,269  

Royalty fee

     14,026        13,431        27,383        26,431  

Cost reimbursements

     98,842        92,458        206,375        193,764  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total expenses

     375,448        369,812        755,809        765,275  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Gains and other income

     10,668        8,625        10,675        9,512  

Interest expense

     (2,087      (3,009      (4,069      (5,983

Other

     (1,911      (1,187      (4,453      (1,174
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

     61,167        57,444        101,332        114,787  

Provision for income taxes

     (24,858      (23,403      (40,615      (46,692
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 36,309      $ 34,041      $ 60,717      $ 68,095  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Contract Sales

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended                  Change                    % Change    
($ in thousands)            June 17, 2016                        June 19, 2015                  

Contract Sales

           

Vacation ownership

           

North America

     $ 145,600          $ 150,605          $ (5,005)        (3%)

Europe

     9,938          7,341          2,597         35%

Asia Pacific

     10,454          7,992          2,462         31%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total contract sales

     $ 165,992          $ 165,938          $ 54         NM
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

NM = not meaningful

The changes in contract sales are described within the discussions of our segment results below.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended                  Change                    % Change    
($ in thousands)            June 17, 2016                        June 19, 2015                  

Contract Sales

           

Vacation ownership

           

North America

     $ 285,250          $ 306,598          $ (21,348)        (7%)

Europe

     14,356          12,639          1,717         14%

Asia Pacific

     19,880          16,651          3,229         19%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    
     319,486          335,888          (16,402)        (5%)

Residential Products

           

Asia Pacific

     —          28,420          (28,420)        (100%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total contract sales

     $ 319,486          $ 364,308          $ (44,822)        (12%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

The changes in contract sales are described within the discussions of our segment results below.

Sale of Vacation Ownership Products

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended                Change                    % Change    
($ in thousands)            June 17, 2016                      June 19, 2015                 

Contract sales

     $ 165,992           $ 165,938           $ 54         NM

Revenue recognition adjustments:

           

Reportability

     1,179           1,440           (261)       

Sales reserve

     (11,352)          (7,179)          (4,173)       

Other(1)

     (9,369)          (4,829)          (4,540)       
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Sale of vacation ownership products

     $ 146,450           $ 155,370           $ (8,920)         (6%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

  (1) Adjustment for sales incentives that will not be recognized as Sale of vacation ownership products revenue.

Revenue reportability had a $1.2 million positive impact in the current period, compared to a $1.4 million positive impact in the prior year comparable period. The higher sales reserve reflects an increase in our North America segment due to the increase in financing propensity and Latin American default activity and higher reserves required in our Asia Pacific and Europe segments due to an unfavorable adjustment to correct an immaterial error in the current period with respect to historical static pool data.

The increase in other adjustments is primarily driven by an increase in the utilization of plus points as a sales incentive in our North America segment in the second quarter of 2016. These revenues are deferred and recognized as rental revenue when those points are redeemed or upon expiration of the points.

 

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Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended                Change                    % Change    
($ in thousands)            June 17, 2016                      June 19, 2015                

Contract sales

     $ 319,486         $ 364,308         $ (44,822)        (12%)

Revenue recognition adjustments:

           

Reportability

     1,965           (73)          2,038        

Sales reserve

     (19,575)          (15,546)          (4,029)       

Other(1)

     (17,057)          (9,413)          (7,644)       
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Sale of vacation ownership products

     $ 284,819         $ 339,276         $ (54,457)        (16%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

  (1)  Adjustment for sales incentives that will not be recognized as Sale of vacation ownership products revenue.

Revenue reportability had a $2.0 million positive impact in the current period, compared to a $0.1 million negative impact in the prior year comparable period. The favorable change versus the prior year comparable period was due to an increase in the amount of sales meeting the down payment requirement for revenue reportability prior to the end of the current period, partially offset by an increase in the amount of sales that remained in the rescission period as of the end of the current period as compared to the prior year comparable period. The increase in the amount of sales meeting the down payment requirement for revenue reportability was due to an increase in down payment amounts in our North America segment compared to the prior year comparable period. The increase in down payment requirements occurred while achieving a 13.3 percentage point increase in the North America financing propensity in the first half of 2016 compared to the prior year comparable period.

The higher sales reserve reflects an increase in our North America segment due to the increase in financing propensity and Latin American default activity and higher reserves required in our Asia Pacific segment due to an unfavorable adjustment to correct an immaterial error in the current period with respect to historical static pool data.

The increase in other adjustments is primarily driven by an increase in the utilization of plus points as a sales incentive in our North America segment in the first half of 2016. These revenues are deferred and recognized as rental revenue when those points are redeemed or upon expiration of the points.

Development Margin

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016 

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended                  Change                        % Change    
($ in thousands)              June 17, 2016                         June 19, 2015                 

Sale of vacation ownership products

     $ 146,450           $ 155,370           $ (8,920)        (6%)

Cost of vacation ownership products

     (33,753)          (45,119)          11,366         25%

Marketing and sales

     (78,919)          (77,137)          (1,782)        (2%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Development margin

     $ 33,778           $ 33,114           $ 664         2%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Development margin percentage

     23.1%           21.3%           1.8 pts        

The increase in development margin reflected the following increases:

 

    $6.9 million of higher favorable product cost true-ups ($7.5 million in the twelve weeks ended June 17, 2016 compared to $0.6 million in the prior year comparable period) of which $3.7 million was attributed to projected increases in development revenue primarily from a reduction in our estimate of future sales incentives and $3.2 million resulted from lower development spending for completion of common elements at multiple projects;

 

    $2.2 million from a favorable mix of lower cost real estate inventory being sold; and

 

    $0.6 million of higher vacation ownership contract sales volume net of lower direct variable expenses (i.e., cost of vacation ownership products and marketing and sales).

These increases were partially offset by the following:

 

    $3.2 million of additional deferred revenue in the current period due to higher usage of plus points as a sales incentive in our North America segment; this revenue will be recognized as rental revenue when the plus points are redeemed or upon expiration of the plus points;

 

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    $3.0 million of higher sales reserve activity in the current period due to the increase in financing propensity in our North America segment and higher reserves required in our Asia Pacific and Europe segments due to an unfavorable adjustment to correct an immaterial error in the current period with respect to historical static pool data;

 

    $2.2 million of pre-opening and startup expenses in the current period to support new sales locations in our North America and Asia Pacific segments; and

 

    $0.5 million of higher development expenses in the current period due to fewer costs being capitalized.

The 1.8 percentage point increase in the development margin percentage reflected a 4.5 percentage point increase due to the higher favorable product cost true-up activity year-over-year and a 1.4 percentage point increase due to a favorable mix of lower cost vacation ownership real estate inventory being sold in the twelve weeks ended June 17, 2016. These increases were partially offset by a 1.5 percentage point decline due to the higher usage of plus points as a sales incentive, a 1.3 percentage point decline due to the pre-opening and startup expenses, and a 1.3 percentage point decline due to the higher sales reserve activity primarily due to the increase in financing propensity.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016 

 

     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended                  Change                         % Change    
($ in thousands)              June 17, 2016                         June 19, 2015                 

Sale of vacation ownership products

     $ 284,819           $ 339,276           $ (54,457)        (16%)

Cost of vacation ownership products

     (69,370)          (110,081)          40,711         37%

Marketing and sales

     (157,331)          (157,132)          (199)        NM
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Development margin

     $ 58,118           $ 72,063           $ (13,945)        (19%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Development margin percentage

     20.4%           21.2%           (0.8 pts)        

The decrease in development margin reflected the following:

 

    $6.6 million of lower vacation ownership contract sales volume net of direct variable expenses (i.e., cost of vacation ownership products and marketing and sales);

 

    $5.9 million of lower residential contract sales (there were no residential sales in the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016, compared to $5.9 million from the sale of residential inventory in our Asia Pacific segment in the prior year comparable period);

 

    $5.5 million of additional deferred revenue in the current period due to higher usage of plus points as a sales incentive in our North America segment; this revenue will be recognized as rental revenue when the plus points are redeemed or upon expiration of the plus points;

 

    $3.3 million of pre-opening and startup expenses in the current period in support of new sales locations in our North America and Asia Pacific segments;

 

    $3.3 million of higher sales reserve activity in the current period due to the increase in financing propensity in our North America segment and higher reserves required in our Asia Pacific segment due to an unfavorable adjustment to correct an immaterial error in the current period with respect to historical static pool data;

 

    $2.1 million of higher marketing and sales costs in the current period due to investment in new programs to help generate future incremental tour volumes; and

 

    $0.4 million of higher development expenses in the current period due to fewer costs being capitalized in the current period.

These decreases were partially offset by the following:

 

    $7.5 million of higher favorable product cost true-ups ($10.7 million in the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 compared to $3.2 million in the prior year comparable period) of which $5.1 million was attributed to projected increases in development revenue primarily from a reduction in our estimate of future sales incentives and $2.5 million resulted from lower development spending for completion of common elements at multiple projects;

 

    $4.4 million from a favorable mix of lower cost real estate inventory being sold; and

 

    $1.3 million of higher revenue reportability compared to the prior year comparable period.

 

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The 0.8 percentage point decline in the development margin percentage reflected a 1.6 percentage point decline due to higher marketing and sales spending (including a 1.0 percentage point impact from the pre-opening and startup expenses), a 1.2 percentage point decline due to the higher usage of plus points as a sales incentive, a 1.0 percentage point decline due to an inability to leverage fixed marketing and sales costs on lower vacation ownership contract sales, and a 0.7 percentage point decline due to the higher sales reserve activity primarily due to the increase in financing propensity. These declines were partially offset by a 2.1 percentage point increase due to the higher favorable product cost true-up activity year-over-year, a 1.3 percentage point increase due to a favorable mix of lower cost vacation ownership real estate inventory being sold in the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016, and a 0.3 percentage point increase due to the favorable revenue reportability year-over-year.

Resort Management and Other Services Revenues, Expenses and Margin

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended                  Change                       % Change    
($ in thousands)            June 17, 2016                    June 19, 2015              

Management fee revenues

     $ 19,411           $ 17,956           $ 1,455         8%

Other services revenues

     61,519           56,107           5,412         10%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Resort management and other services revenues

     80,930           74,063           6,867         9%

Resort management and other services expenses

     (49,311)          (45,480)          (3,831)        (8%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Resort management and other services margin

     $ 31,619           $ 28,583           $ 3,036         11%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Resort management and other services margin percentage

     39.1%           38.6%           0.5 pts        

The increase in resort management and other services revenues reflected $4.1 million of higher ancillary revenues, $1.7 million of additional annual club dues earned in connection with the MVCD program due to the cumulative increase in owners enrolled in the program, $1.5 million of higher management fees, $0.6 million of higher customer service fees and $0.1 million of higher resales commission and other revenues compared to the second quarter of 2015. These increases were partially offset by $1.1 million of lower settlement and lien fees due to a decrease in the number of contracts closed and fewer lien fees assessed compared to the second quarter of 2015. The increase in ancillary revenues included $3.6 million of ancillary revenues at our operating property in Australia and $0.8 million of ancillary revenues at the property we manage in New York, partially offset by a $0.3 million decrease in ancillary revenues from food and beverage and golf offerings at our other resorts.

The improvement in the resort management and other services margin reflected the changes in revenue, partially offset by $3.8 million of higher expenses, including $3.1 million from the operation of the ancillary businesses at the operating property in Australia and $0.8 million from the operation of the ancillary businesses at the property we manage in New York, partially offset by a $0.1 million decrease in other expenses in the current period. The ancillary revenue producing portions of the operating property in Australia were included in the sale of the operating property. Therefore, we do not anticipate future ancillary revenues or expenses at our property in Australia.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended                  Change                       % Change    
($ in thousands)            June 17, 2016                    June 19, 2015              

Management fee revenues

     $ 37,851           $ 35,536           $ 2,315         7%

Other services revenues

     112,708           102,944           9,764         9%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Resort management and other services revenues

     150,559           138,480           12,079         9%

Resort management and other services expenses

     (95,108)          (87,889)          (7,219)        (8%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Resort management and other services margin

     $ 55,451           $ 50,591           $ 4,860         10%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Resort management and other services margin percentage

     36.8%           36.5%           0.3 pts        

 

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The increase in resort management and other services revenues reflected $7.6 million of higher ancillary revenues, $2.7 million of additional annual club dues earned in connection with the MVCD program due to the cumulative increase in owners enrolled in the program, $2.4 million of higher management fees (net of $0.1 million negative foreign exchange impact in our Europe segment), $0.9 million of higher customer service fees and $0.2 million of higher resales commission and other revenues, compared to the prior year comparable period. These increases were partially offset by $1.3 million of lower settlement and lien fees due to a decrease in the number of contracts closed and fewer lien fees assessed and $0.4 million of lower brand fees due to fewer closings, in each case, compared to the prior year comparable period. The increase in ancillary revenues included $6.3 million of ancillary revenues at our operating property in Australia, $1.2 million of ancillary revenues at the property we manage in New York and a $0.1 million increase in ancillary revenues from food and beverage and golf offerings at our other resorts.

The improvement in the resort management and other services margin reflected the changes in revenue, partially offset by $7.2 million of higher expenses, including $5.4 million from the operation of the ancillary businesses at the operating property in Australia, $1.5 million from the operation of the ancillary businesses at the property we manage in New York and a $0.3 million increase in other expenses in the current period. The ancillary revenue producing portions of the operating property in Australia were included in the sale of the operating property. Therefore, we do not anticipate future ancillary revenues or expenses at our property in Australia.

Financing Revenues, Expenses and Margin

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended                  Change                      % Change    
($ in thousands)            June 17, 2016                      June 19, 2015              

Interest income

     $ 27,253           $ 26,927           $ 326         1%

Other financing revenues

     1,401           1,367           34         2%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Financing revenues

     28,654           28,294           360         1%

Financing expenses

     (4,864)          (6,085)          1,221         20%

Consumer financing interest expense

     (5,117)          (5,248)          131         2%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Financing margin

     $ 18,673           $ 16,961           $ 1,712         10%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Financing propensity

     54.4%           41.9%           

The increase in financing revenues was due to a $14.6 million increase in the average gross vacation ownership notes receivable balance, partially offset by a slight decrease in the weighted average coupon rate of our vacation ownership notes receivable.

The increase in financing margin reflects the higher financing revenues, as well as lower financing expenses and lower consumer financing interest expense. The lower consumer financing interest expense was due to a lower average interest rate on the outstanding debt balances, partially offset by a higher average outstanding debt balance. The lower average interest rate reflected the continued pay-down of older securitization transactions that carried higher overall interest rates and the benefit of lower interest rates applicable to our more recently completed securitizations of vacation ownership notes receivable.

The increase in financing propensity resulted from new programs implemented in the first half of 2015 to help increase financing propensity above the 40 to 45 percent rate that the company has averaged in recent years. As a result of these programs, we expect that interest income will continue to increase as new originations of vacation ownership notes receivable outpace the decline in principal of existing vacation ownership notes receivables. We are targeting higher financing propensity for fiscal year 2016.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

     Twenty Weeks Ended                  Change                      % Change    
($ in thousands)            June 17, 2016                      June 19, 2015              

Interest income

     $ 55,027           $ 54,494           $ 533         1%

Other financing revenues

     2,851           2,852           (1)        NM
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Financing revenues

     57,878           57,346           532         1%

Financing expenses

     (9,493)          (10,990)          1,497         14%

Consumer financing interest expense

     (10,479)          (11,269)          790         7%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Financing margin

     $ 37,906           $ 35,087           $ 2,819         8%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Financing propensity

     56.2%           42.7%           

 

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The increase in financing revenues was due to a $5.8 million increase in the average gross vacation ownership notes receivable balance, partially offset by a slight decrease in the weighted average coupon rate of our vacation ownership notes receivable.

The increase in financing margin reflects the higher financing revenues, as well as lower financing expenses and lower consumer financing interest expense. The lower consumer financing interest expense was due to a lower average interest rate on the outstanding debt balances, partially offset by a higher average outstanding debt balance. The lower average interest rate reflected the continued pay-down of older securitization transactions that carried higher overall interest rates and the benefit of lower interest rates applicable to our more recently completed securitizations of vacation ownership notes receivable.

The increase in financing propensity resulted from new programs implemented in the first half of 2015 to help increase financing propensity above the 40 to 45 percent rate that the company has averaged in recent years. As a result of these programs, we expect that interest income will continue to increase as new originations of vacation ownership notes receivable outpace the decline in principal of existing vacation ownership notes receivables. We are targeting higher financing propensity for fiscal year 2016.

Rental Revenues, Expenses and Margin

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended                  Change                       % Change
($ in thousands)              June 17, 2016                          June 19, 2015                

Rental revenues

     $ 75,069           $ 72,642           $ 2,427         3%

Unsold maintenance fees — upscale

     (15,313)          (13,425)          (1,888)        (14%)

Unsold maintenance fees — luxury

     (530)          (2,006)          1,476         74%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Unsold maintenance fees

     (15,843)          (15,431)          (412)        (3%)

Other rental expenses

     (50,185)          (46,404)          (3,781)        (8%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Rental margin

     $ 9,041           $ 10,807           $ (1,766)        (16%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Rental margin percentage

     12.0%           14.9%           (2.9 pts)       
     Twelve Weeks Ended      Change      % Change
     June 17, 2016      June 19, 2015        

Transient keys rented (1)

     284,385           275,587           8,798         3%

Average transient key rate

     $ 212.69           $ 218.83           $ (6.14)        (3%)

Resort occupancy

     87.4%           88.3%           (0.9 pts)       

 

 

(1)  Transient keys rented exclude those obtained through the use of plus points, preview stays and those associated with our operating properties in San Diego, California and Surfers Paradise, Australia.

The increase in rental revenues was due to $2.9 million of revenue from our operating property in Australia acquired during the third quarter of 2015, a company-wide 3 percent increase in transient keys rented ($1.8 million) primarily due to a 7 percent increase in available keys, and $0.1 million of higher plus points revenue (which is recognized upon utilization of plus points or upon expiration of the points), partially offset by a company-wide 3 percent decrease in average transient rate ($1.6 million) and $0.8 million of lower revenue from our operating property in San Diego due to the conversion of some of the inventory to vacation ownership inventory.

The decrease in rental margin reflected a $1.1 million loss from our operating property in Australia, $0.9 million of lower rental revenues net of direct variable expenses (such as housekeeping), expenses incurred due to owners choosing alternative usage options, and unsold maintenance fees, partially offset by a $0.3 million improvement in the operation of the property in San Diego compared to the prior year comparable period and the $0.1 million increase in plus points revenue.

 

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Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended              
($ in thousands)              June 17, 2016                          June 19, 2015                          Change                      % Change

Rental revenues

     $ 155,357           $ 148,841           $ 6,516         4%

Unsold maintenance fees — upscale

     (29,295)          (25,468)          (3,827)        (15%)

Unsold maintenance fees — luxury

     (1,041)          (4,416)          3,375         76%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Unsold maintenance fees

     (30,336)          (29,884)          (452)        (2%)

Other rental expenses

     (100,352)          (92,109)          (8,243)        (9%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Rental margin

     $ 24,669           $ 26,848           $ (2,179)        (8%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Rental margin percentage

     15.9%           18.0%           (2.1 pts)       
     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended              
     June 17, 2016      June 19, 2015      Change      % Change

Transient keys rented (1)

     577,034           572,297           4,737         1%

Average transient key rate

     $ 220.86           $ 222.62           $ (1.76)        (1%)

Resort occupancy

     88.1%           88.0%           0.1 pts        

 

 

(1)  Transient keys rented exclude those obtained through the use of plus points, preview stays and those associated with our operating properties in San Diego, California and Surfers Paradise, Australia.

The increase in rental revenues was due to $6.1 million of revenue from our operating property in Australia acquired during the third quarter of 2015, a company-wide 1 percent increase in transient keys rented ($0.8 million) primarily due to a 2 percent increase in available keys, $0.5 million of higher plus points revenue (which is recognized upon utilization of plus points or upon expiration of the points) and a $0.3 million increase in preview keys and other revenue, partially offset by a company-wide 1 percent decrease in average transient rate ($0.8 million) and $0.4 million of lower revenue from our operating property in San Diego due to the conversion of some of the inventory to vacation ownership inventory.

The decrease in rental margin reflected a $1.8 million of lower rental revenues net of direct variable expenses (such as housekeeping), expenses incurred due to owners choosing alternative usage options, and unsold maintenance fees, and a $1.1 million loss from our operating property in Australia, partially offset by the $0.5 million increase in plus points revenue and a $0.3 million improvement in the operation of the property in San Diego compared to the prior year comparable period.

Cost Reimbursements

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

Cost reimbursements increased $6.4 million, or 7 percent, over the prior year comparable period, reflecting an increase of $4.8 million due to higher costs, $1.4 million due to additional managed unit weeks in the twelve weeks ended June 17, 2016, and a $0.2 million impact from foreign exchange rates in our Europe segment.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

Cost reimbursements increased $12.6 million, or 6.5 percent, over the prior year comparable period, reflecting an increase of $10.4 million due to higher costs and $2.6 million due to additional managed unit weeks in the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016, partially offset by a $0.4 million impact from foreign exchange rates in our Europe segment.

General and Administrative

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

General and administrative expenses increased $1.7 million (from $22.9 million to $24.6 million) and were driven by higher information technology project costs and inflationary cost increases.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

General and administrative expenses increased $4.2 million (from $45.7 million to $49.9 million) and were driven by higher information technology project costs and inflationary cost increases.

 

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Royalty Fee

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

Royalty fee expense increased $0.6 million in the twelve weeks ended June 17, 2016 (from $13.4 million to $14.0 million), and included $0.9 million of higher costs due to an increase in initial sales of our real estate inventory, which carry a higher royalty fee as compared to sales of pre-owned inventory (two percent versus one percent), partially offset by $0.3 million of lower costs due to lower closings in the current period.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

Royalty fee expense increased $1.0 million in the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 (from $26.4 million to $27.4 million), and included $1.4 million of higher costs due to an increase in initial sales of our real estate inventory, which carry a higher royalty fee as compared to sales of pre-owned inventory (two percent versus one percent), partially offset by $0.4 million of lower costs due to lower closings in the current period.

Gains and Other Income

Twelve and Twenty-four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

In the twelve and twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016, we recorded a $10.5 million gain on the disposition of excess inventory at our Ritz-Carlton project in San Francisco, California, the reversal of the remaining $1.7 million accrual associated with the disposition of a golf course and related assets in Kauai, Hawaii because we no longer expect to incur additional costs in connection with this sale and a $1.5 million loss on the sale of the portion of the operating property in Australia that we did not intend to convert to vacation ownership inventory.

During the second quarter of 2015, we recorded an $8.7 million gain on the disposition of undeveloped land in Kauai, Hawaii. During the first quarter of 2015, we recorded a $0.9 million gain from the disposition of a golf course and adjacent undeveloped land in Orlando, Florida. We disposed of the golf course and undeveloped land in Orlando, Florida in the first quarter of 2014 and, as a condition of the sale, we continued to operate the golf course through the end of the first quarter of 2015 at our own risk. We utilized the performance of services method to record a gain of $3.1 million over the period during which we operated the golf course following the sale.

Interest Expense

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

Interest expense decreased $0.9 million (from $3.0 million to $2.1 million) due to a $0.8 million decline in expense associated with our liability for the Marriott Rewards customer loyalty program under our Marriott Rewards Affiliation Agreement with Marriott International, Inc. (“Marriott International”) and $0.1 million of lower other interest expense. Due to the payoff of the liability associated with the Marriott Rewards customer loyalty program at the end of 2015, we will not incur further interest expense associated with this liability in the future.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

Interest expense decreased $1.9 million (from $6.0 million to $4.1 million) due to a $1.7 million decline in expense associated with our liability for the Marriott Rewards customer loyalty program under our Marriott Rewards Affiliation Agreement with Marriott International and $0.2 million of lower other interest expense. Due to the payoff of the liability associated with the Marriott Rewards customer loyalty program at the end of 2015, we will not incur further interest expense associated with this liability in the future.

Other

Twelve and Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

During the first quarter of 2016, we incurred $2.3 million of costs associated with the acquisition of an operating property in the South Beach area of Miami Beach and the anticipated future acquisition of the operating property in New York we are currently managing, and $0.2 million of transaction related costs associated with the then anticipated sale of the portion of the operating property located in Surfers Paradise, Australia that we did not intend to convert to vacation ownership inventory. See Footnote No. 5, “Acquisitions and Dispositions” and Footnote No. 8, “Contingencies and Commitments,” to our Financial Statements for further information related to these transactions.

During the second quarter of 2016, we incurred $1.9 million of costs associated with the anticipated future acquisition of vacation ownership units located on the Big Island of Hawaii and the anticipated future acquisition of the operating property in New York we are currently managing.

 

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During the second quarter of 2015, we incurred $1.2 million of transaction related costs associated with the purchase of the operating property located in Surfers Paradise, Australia that occurred in the third quarter of 2015. We did not incur any transaction related costs in the first quarter of 2015.

Income Tax

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

Our provision for income taxes increased $1.5 million (from $23.4 million to $24.9 million) from the prior year comparable period. The increase was primarily due to an increase in U.S. income, partially offset by a decline in non-U.S. income for the twelve weeks ended June 17, 2016.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

Our provision for income taxes decreased $6.1 million (from $46.7 million to $40.6 million) from the prior year comparable period. The decrease was primarily due to a decline in non-U.S. income for the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016.

Earnings Before Interest Expense, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization (“EBITDA”) and Adjusted EBITDA

EBITDA, a financial measure that is not prescribed or authorized by GAAP, is defined as earnings, or net income, before interest expense (excluding consumer financing interest expense), provision for income taxes, depreciation and amortization. For purposes of our EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA calculations, we do not adjust for consumer financing interest expense because the associated debt is secured by vacation ownership notes receivable that have been sold to bankruptcy remote special purpose entities and is generally non-recourse to us. Further, we consider consumer financing interest expense to be an operating expense of our business. We consider EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA to be indicators of operating performance, which we use to measure our ability to service debt, fund capital expenditures and expand our business. We also use EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA, as do analysts, lenders, investors and others, because these measures exclude certain items that can vary widely across different industries or among companies within the same industry. For example, interest expense can be dependent on a company’s capital structure, debt levels and credit ratings. Accordingly, the impact of interest expense on earnings can vary significantly among companies. The tax positions of companies can also vary because of their differing abilities to take advantage of tax benefits and because of the tax policies of the jurisdictions in which they operate. As a result, effective tax rates and provision for income taxes can vary considerably among companies. EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA also exclude depreciation and amortization because companies utilize productive assets of different ages and use different methods of both acquiring and depreciating productive assets. These differences can result in considerable variability in the relative costs of productive assets and the depreciation and amortization expense among companies. Adjusted EBITDA reflects additional adjustments for certain items described below, and excludes non-cash share-based compensation expense to address considerable variability among companies in recording compensation expense because companies use share-based payment awards differently, both in the type and quantity of awards granted. We evaluate Adjusted EBITDA as an indicator of operating performance because it allows for period-over-period comparisons of our on-going core operations before the impact of the excluded items. Together, EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA facilitate our comparison of results from our on-going core operations before the impact of these items with results from other vacation ownership companies.

EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA have limitations and should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for performance measures calculated in accordance with GAAP. In addition, other companies in our industry may calculate EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA differently than we do or may not calculate them at all, limiting their usefulness as comparative measures. The table below shows our EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA calculation and reconciles these measures with Net income, which is the most directly comparable GAAP financial measure.

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended      Twenty-Four Weeks Ended  
($ in thousands)          June 17, 2016                  June 19, 2015                  June 17, 2016                  June 19, 2015        

Net income

    $ 36,309          $ 34,041          $ 60,717          $ 68,095     

Interest expense

     2,087           3,009           4,069           5,983     

Tax provision

     24,858           23,403           40,615           46,692     

Depreciation and amortization

     5,052           4,493           10,177           8,558     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

EBITDA

     68,306           64,946           115,578           129,328     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Non-cash share-based compensation

     4,332           3,945           6,856           6,588      

Certain items

     (8,473)           (7,226)           (6,678)           (14,098)     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

    $ 64,165          $ 61,665          $ 115,756          $ 121,818      
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

The certain items for the twelve weeks ended June 17, 2016 consisted of $10.7 million of gains and other income, $2.0 million of transaction costs associated with acquisitions, and $0.2 million of losses from the operations of the property we acquired in Australia in 2015 that we sold in the second quarter of 2016. These exclusions decreased EBITDA by $8.5 million.

The certain items for the twelve weeks ended June 19, 2015 consisted of $8.6 million of gains and other income, $1.3 million of transaction costs associated with acquisitions, $0.1 million of organizational and separation related costs and less than $0.1 million of litigation expense. These exclusions decreased EBITDA by $7.2 million.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

The certain items for the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 consisted of $10.7 million of gains and other income, $4.6 million of transaction costs associated with acquisitions, $0.3 million of profit from the operations of the property we acquired in Australia in 2015 that we sold in the second quarter of 2016, and a $0.3 million reversal of litigation expense. These exclusions decreased EBITDA by $6.7 million.

The certain items for the twenty-four weeks ended June 19, 2015 consisted of $9.5 million of gains and other income, $5.9 million of development profit from the disposition of units in Macau as whole ownership residential units rather than through our Marriott Vacation Club, Asia Pacific points program, $1.3 million of transaction costs associated with acquisitions, $0.3 million of organizational and separation related costs and a $0.2 million reversal of litigation expense. These exclusions decreased EBITDA by $14.1 million.

Business Segments

Our business is grouped into three reportable business segments: North America, Europe and Asia Pacific. See Footnote No. 14, “Business Segments,” to our Financial Statements for further information on our segments.

North America

The following discussion presents an analysis of our results of operations for the North America segment for the twelve and twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016, compared to the twelve and twenty-four weeks ended June 19, 2015.

 

    Twelve Weeks Ended     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended  
($ in thousands)   June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015     June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015  

Revenues

       

Sale of vacation ownership products

   $             132,473        $                 142,148        $             257,157        $                 283,876    

Resort management and other services

    69,357         66,194         131,022         124,769    

Financing

    26,853         26,354         54,261         53,410    

Rental

    65,629         65,756         138,137         137,471    

Cost reimbursements

    90,174         84,037         189,356         176,891    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

    384,486         384,489         769,933         776,417    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Expenses

       

Cost of vacation ownership products

    29,080         40,834         59,742         81,335    

Marketing and sales

    66,911         67,837         135,226         136,854    

Resort management and other services

    39,337         39,101         77,489         76,069    

Rental

    55,593         55,128         111,549         109,739    

Litigation settlement

    —         (108)        (303)         (370)    

Organizational and separation related

    —         115         0         254    

Royalty fee

    2,254         1,686         3,940         2,946    

Cost reimbursements

    90,174         84,037         189,356         176,891    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total expenses

    283,349         288,630         576,999         583,718    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gains and other income

    12,317         8,658         12,324         9,538    

Other

    (1,733)        86         (4,013)        102    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Segment financial results

   $ 111,721        $ 104,603        $ 201,245        $ 202,339    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Contract Sales

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

    Twelve Weeks Ended     Change         % Change    
($ in thousands)   June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015      

Contract Sales

       

Vacation ownership

    $ 145,600         $ 150,605         $ (5,005)         (3%)
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total contract sales

    $                 145,600         $                     150,605         $         (5,005)         (3%)
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

The decrease in North America vacation ownership contract sales reflected a $3.8 million decrease in sales at off-site (non tour-based) sales locations, a $0.7 million decrease in fractional sales as we continue to sell through remaining luxury inventory and a $0.5 million decrease in sales at on-site sales locations.

The decrease in sales at North America on-site locations is primarily driven by an increase in sales in the prior year comparable period as a result of enhancements during that period to our owner recognition levels that created a near-term incentive for existing owners to purchase additional points at that time. The decrease in sales at on-site sales locations reflected a 0.6 percent decrease in VPG to $3,384 in the twelve weeks ended June 17, 2016 from $3,404 in the prior year comparable period, partially offset by a 0.3 percent increase in the number of tours. The slight decrease in VPG resulted from a 1.4 percentage point decrease in closing efficiency, partially offset by an increase in the number of points sold per contract due to a shift in the mix of sales towards more first time buyers who, on average, purchase more points per contract than existing owners, and higher pricing. The increase in the number of tours was driven by an increase in first time buyer tours, partially offset by fewer existing owner tours due to prior year enhancements to our owner recognition levels that created a near-term incentive for existing owners to take a tour in the prior year comparable period. The sales at North America off-site locations were negatively impacted by the strength of the U.S. dollar, primarily in Latin America, a trend that has been impacting our results since the third quarter of 2015, as well as lower sales to existing owners due to the enhancements in the owner recognition levels that drove higher sales in the prior year comparable period.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

    Twenty-Four Weeks Ended     Change         % Change    
($ in thousands)   June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015      

Contract Sales

       

Vacation ownership

    $ 285,250         $ 306,598         $ (21,348)         (7%)
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total contract sales

    $                 285,250         $                     306,598         $         (21,348)         (7%)
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

The decrease in North America vacation ownership contract sales reflected a $12.5 million decrease in sales at on-site sales locations, a $6.7 million decrease in sales at off-site (non tour-based) sales locations and a $2.1 million decrease in fractional sales as we continue to sell through remaining luxury inventory.

The decrease in sales at North America on-site locations is primarily driven by an increase in sales in the prior year comparable period as a result of enhancements during that period to our owner recognition levels that created a near-term incentive for existing owners to purchase additional points at that time. The decrease in sales at on-site sales locations reflected a 1.8 percent decrease in the number of tours and a 2.3 percent decrease in VPG to $3,438 in the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 from $3,519 in the prior year comparable period. The decrease in VPG resulted from a 1.7 percentage point decrease in closing efficiency, partially offset by an increase in the number of points sold per contract due to a shift in the mix of sales towards more first time buyers who, on average, purchase more points per contract than existing owners, and higher pricing. The decrease in the number of tours was driven by fewer existing owner tours, which was also due to prior year enhancements to our owner recognition levels that created a near-term incentive for existing owners to take a tour in the prior year comparable period, partially offset by an increase in first time buyer tours. The sales at North America off-site locations were negatively impacted by the strength of the U.S. dollar, primarily in Latin America, a trend that has been impacting our results since the third quarter of 2015, as well as lower sales to existing owners due to the enhancements in the owner recognition levels that drove higher sales in the prior year comparable period.

 

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Sale of Vacation Ownership Products

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

    Twelve Weeks Ended     Change         % Change    
($ in thousands)   June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015      

Contract sales

    $ 145,600          $ 150,605          $ (5,005)       (3%)

Revenue recognition adjustments:

       

Reportability

    3,783          1,942          1,841       

Sales reserve

    (7,631)         (5,651)         (1,980)      

Other(1)

    (9,279)         (4,748)         (4,531)      
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Sale of vacation ownership products

    $                     132,473          $                     142,148          $         (9,675)       (7%)
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

(1)  Adjustment for sales incentives that will not be recognized as Sale of vacation ownership products revenue.

Revenue reportability improved due to an increase in the amount of sales meeting the down payment requirement for revenue reportability prior to the end of the current period, partially offset by an increase in the amount of sales that remained in the rescission period as of the end of the current period as compared to the prior year comparable period. The increase in the amount of sales meeting the down payment requirement for revenue reportability was due to an increase in down payment amounts compared to the prior year comparable period. The increase in down payment requirements occurred while achieving a 12.1 percentage point increase in financing propensity in the second quarter of 2016 compared to the prior year comparable period.

The higher sales reserve reflects an increase in the rate due to the increase in financing propensity and Latin American default activity, partially offset by the lower vacation ownership contract sales volume.

The increase in other adjustments is primarily driven by an increase in the utilization of plus points as a sales incentive in our North America segment in the second quarter of 2016. These revenues are deferred and recognized as rental revenue when those points are redeemed or upon expiration of the points.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

    Twenty-Four Weeks Ended     Change         % Change    
($ in thousands)   June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015      

Contract sales

    $ 285,250          $ 306,598          $ (21,348)       (7%)

Revenue recognition adjustments:

       

Reportability

    3,871          (1,502)         5,373       

Sales reserve

    (15,037)         (11,985)         (3,052)      

Other(1)

    (16,927)         (9,235)         (7,692)      
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Sale of vacation ownership products

    $                     257,157          $                     283,876          $         (26,719)       (9%)
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

(1)  Adjustment for sales incentives that will not be recognized as Sale of vacation ownership products revenue.

Revenue reportability improved due to an increase in the amount of sales meeting the down payment requirement for revenue reportability prior to the end of the current period, partially offset by an increase in the amount of sales that remained in the rescission period as of the end of the current period as compared to the prior year comparable period. The increase in the amount of sales meeting the down payment requirement for revenue reportability was due to an increase in down payment amounts compared to the prior year comparable period. The increase in down payment requirements occurred while achieving a 13.3 percentage point increase in financing propensity in the first half of 2016 compared to the prior year comparable period.

The higher sales reserve reflects an increase in the rate due to the increase in financing propensity and Latin American default activity, partially offset by the lower vacation ownership contract sales volume.

The increase in other adjustments is primarily driven by an increase in the utilization of plus points as a sales incentive in our North America segment in the first half of 2016. These revenues are deferred and recognized as rental revenue when those points are redeemed or upon expiration of the points.

 

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Development Margin

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

    Twelve Weeks Ended     Change         % Change    
($ in thousands)   June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015      

Sale of vacation ownership products

    $                     132,473          $                     142,148          $         (9,675)       (7%)

Cost of vacation ownership products

    (29,080)         (40,834)         11,754        29%

Marketing and sales

    (66,911)         (67,837)         926        1%
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Development margin

    $ 36,482          $ 33,477          $ 3,005        9%
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Development margin percentage

    27.5%          23.6%          3.9 pts       

The increase in development margin reflected the following:

 

    $6.5 million from higher favorable product cost true-ups ($7.0 million in the twelve weeks ended June 17, 2016 compared to $0.5 million in the prior year comparable period) of which $3.5 million was attributed to projected increases in development revenue primarily from a reduction in our estimate of future sales incentives and $3.0 million resulted from lower development spending for completion of common elements at multiple projects;

 

    $2.5 million from a favorable mix of lower cost real estate inventory being sold; and

 

    $1.2 million of higher revenue reportability compared to the prior year comparable period.

These increases were partially offset by the following:

 

    $3.3 million of additional deferred revenue in the current period due to higher usage of plus points as a sales incentive; this revenue will be recognized as rental revenue when the plus points are redeemed or upon expiration of the plus points

 

    $1.6 million of higher sales reserve activity in the current period due to the increase in financing propensity;

 

    $1.3 million of pre-opening and startup expenses in support of new sales locations; and

 

    $1.0 million of lower vacation ownership contract sales volume net of direct variable expenses (i.e., cost of vacation ownership products and marketing and sales).

The 3.9 percentage point decline in the development margin percentage reflected a 4.7 percentage point increase due to the higher favorable product cost true-up activity year-over-year, a 1.8 percentage point increase due to a favorable mix of lower cost vacation ownership real estate inventory being sold in the twelve weeks ended June 17, 2016, and a 0.5 percentage point increase due to the favorable revenue reportability year-over-year. These increases were partially offset by a 1.6 percentage point decline due to the higher usage of plus points as a sales incentive, a 0.8 percentage point decline due to the higher marketing and sales spending (including a 0.9 percentage point impact from the pre-opening and startup expenses), and a 0.7 percentage point decline due to the higher sales reserve rate.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

    Twenty-Four Weeks Ended     Change         % Change    
($ in thousands)   June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015      

Sale of vacation ownership products

    $                     257,157          $                     283,876          $         (26,719)       (9%)

Cost of vacation ownership products

    (59,742)         (81,335)         21,593        27%

Marketing and sales

    (135,226)         (136,854)         1,628        1%
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Development margin

    $ 62,189          $ 65,687          $ (3,498)       (5%)
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Development margin percentage

    24.2%          23.1%          1.1 pts       

The decrease in development margin reflected the following:

 

    $8.4 million from lower vacation ownership contract sales volume net of direct variable expenses (i.e., cost of vacation ownership products and marketing and sales);

 

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    $5.5 million of additional deferred revenue in the current period due to higher usage of plus points as a sales incentive; this revenue will be recognized as rental revenue when the plus points are redeemed or upon expiration of the plus points;

 

    $2.8 million of higher sales reserve activity in the current period due to the increase in financing propensity;

 

    $2.5 million of higher marketing and sales costs due to investment in new programs to help generate future incremental tour volumes; and

 

    $1.6 million of pre-opening and startup expenses in support of new sales locations.

These decreases were partially offset by the following:

 

    $8.9 million from higher favorable product cost true-ups ($10.4 million in the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016 compared to $1.5 million in the prior year comparable period) of which $5.0 million was attributed to projected increases in development revenue primarily from a reduction in our estimate of future sales incentives and $3.9 million resulted from lower development spending for completion of common elements at multiple projects;

 

    $4.8 million from a favorable mix of lower cost real estate inventory being sold;

 

    $3.4 million of higher revenue reportability compared to the prior year comparable period; and

 

    $0.2 million of lower other development expenses.

The 1.1 percentage point increase in the development margin percentage reflected a 3.2 percentage point increase due to the higher favorable product cost true-up activity year-over-year, a 1.7 percentage point increase due to a favorable mix of lower cost vacation ownership real estate inventory being sold in the twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016, a 0.8 percentage point increase due to the favorable revenue reportability year-over-year and a 0.1 percentage point increase due to lower other development expenses. These increases were partially offset by a 1.4 percentage point decline due to the higher marketing and sales spending (including a 0.6 percentage point impact from the pre-opening and startup expenses), a 1.3 percentage point decline due to an inability to leverage fixed marketing and sales costs on lower vacation ownership contract sales, a 1.3 percentage point decline due to the higher usage of plus points as a sales incentive and a 0.7 percentage point decline due to the higher sales reserve rate.

Resort Management and Other Services Revenues, Expenses and Margin

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

    Twelve Weeks Ended     Change         % Change    
($ in thousands)
  June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015      

Management fee revenues

   $ 17,229         $ 15,909         $ 1,320        8%

Other services revenues

    52,128          50,285          1,843        4%
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Resort management and other services revenues

    69,357          66,194          3,163        5%

Resort management and other services expenses

    (39,337)         (39,101)         (236)       (1%)
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Resort management and other services margin

   $                     30,020         $                 27,093         $         2,927        11%
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Resort management and other services margin
percentage

    43.3%          40.9%          2.4 pts       

The increase in resort management and other services revenues reflected $1.6 million of additional annual club dues earned in connection with the MVCD program due to the cumulative increase in owners enrolled in the program, $1.3 million of higher management fees, $0.6 million of higher ancillary revenues, $0.6 million of higher customer service fees and $0.1 million of higher resales commission and other revenues compared to the second quarter of 2015. These increases were partially offset by $1.1 million of lower settlement and lien fees due to a decrease in the number of contracts closed and fewer lien fees assessed compared to the second quarter of 2015. The increase in ancillary revenues included $0.8 million of ancillary revenues at the property we manage in New York, partially offset by a $0.2 million decrease in ancillary revenues from food and beverage and golf offerings at our other resorts.

The improvement in the resort management and other services margin reflected the changes in revenue, partially offset by $0.2 million of higher expenses, including $0.8 million from the operation of the ancillary businesses at the property we manage in New York, partially offset by a $0.6 million decrease in other expenses in the current period.

 

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Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

    Twenty-Four Weeks Ended     Change         % Change    
($ in thousands)   June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015      

Management fee revenues

   $ 33,692         $ 31,477         $ 2,215        7%

Other services revenues

    97,330          93,292          4,038        4%
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Resort management and other services revenues

    131,022          124,769          6,253        5%

Resort management and other services expenses

    (77,489)         (76,069)         (1,420)       (2%)
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Resort management and other services margin

   $                     53,533         $                 48,700         $         4,833        10%
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Resort management and other services margin
percentage

    40.9%          39.0%          1.9 pts       

The increase in resort management and other services revenues reflected $2.6 million of additional annual club dues earned in connection with the MVCD program due to the cumulative increase in owners enrolled in the program, $2.2 million of higher management fees, $1.8 million of higher ancillary revenues, $0.9 million of higher customer service fees and $0.4 million of higher resales commission and other revenues, in each case, compared to the prior year comparable period. These increases were partially offset by $1.3 million of lower settlement and lien fees due to a decrease in the number of contracts closed and fewer lien fees assessed and $0.4 million of lower brand fees due to fewer closings, in each case, compared to the prior year comparable period. The increase in ancillary revenues included $1.2 million of ancillary revenues at the property we manage in New York and a $0.6 million increase in ancillary revenues from food and beverage and golf offerings at our other resorts.

The improvement in the resort management and other services margin reflected the changes in revenue, partially offset by $1.4 million of higher expenses, including $1.5 million from the operation of the ancillary businesses at the property we manage in New York, and a $0.1 million decrease in other expenses in the current period.

Financing Revenues, Expenses and Margin

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

    Twelve Weeks Ended     Change         % Change    
($ in thousands)   June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015      

Interest income

   $ 25,482         $ 25,027         $ 455        2%

Other financing revenues

    1,371          1,327          44        3%
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Financing revenues

   $                     26,853         $                     26,354         $         499        2%
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Financing propensity

    51.9%          39.8%         

The increase in financing revenues was due to an increase in the average gross vacation ownership notes receivable balance, partially offset by a slight decrease in the weighted average coupon rate of our vacation ownership notes receivable. The increase in financing propensity resulted from new programs implemented in the first half of 2015 to help increase financing propensity above the 40 to 45 percent rate that the company has averaged in recent years. As a result of these programs, we expect that interest income will continue to increase as new originations of vacation ownership notes receivable outpace the decline in principal of existing vacation ownership notes receivables. We are targeting higher financing propensity for fiscal year 2016.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

    Twenty-Four Weeks Ended     Change         % Change    
($ in thousands)   June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015      

Interest income

   $ 51,475         $ 50,636         $ 839        2%

Other financing revenues

    2,786          2,774          12        NM
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Financing revenues

   $                     54,261         $                     53,410         $         851        2%
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Financing propensity

    54.1%          40.8%         

The increase in financing revenues was due to an increase in the average gross vacation ownership notes receivable balance, partially offset by a slight decrease in the weighted average coupon rate of our vacation ownership notes receivable. The increase in financing propensity resulted from new programs implemented in the first half of 2015 to help increase financing propensity above the 40 to 45 percent rate that the company has averaged in recent years. As a result of these programs, we expect that interest income will continue to increase as new originations of vacation ownership notes receivable outpace the decline in principal of existing vacation ownership notes receivables. We are targeting higher financing propensity for fiscal year 2016.

 

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Rental Revenues, Expenses and Margin

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended                  Change                         % Change      
($ in thousands)            June 17, 2016                      June 19, 2015              

Rental revenues

     $ 65,629           $ 65,756           $ (127)        NM

Unsold maintenance fees — upscale

     (13,914)          (12,408)          (1,506)        (12%)

Unsold maintenance fees — luxury

     (530)          (2,006)          1,476         74%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Unsold maintenance fees

     (14,444)          (14,414)          (30)        NM

Other rental expenses

     (41,149)          (40,714)          (435)        (1%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Rental margin

     $ 10,036           $ 10,628           $ (592)        (6%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Rental margin percentage

     15.3%           16.2%           (0.9 pts)       

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended                  Change                         % Change      
             June 17, 2016                      June 19, 2015              

Transient keys rented (1)

     261,320            252,199           9,121         4%

Average transient key rate

     $ 209.08           $ 214.51           $ (5.43)        (3%)

Resort occupancy

     87.9%           89.5%           (1.6 pts)       

 

 

(1)  Transient keys rented exclude those obtained through the use of plus points, preview stays and those associated with our operating property in San Diego, California.

The decrease in rental revenues was due to a 3 percent decrease in average transient rate ($1.4 million) and $0.8 million of lower revenue from our operating property in San Diego due to the conversion of some of the inventory to vacation ownership inventory, partially offset by a 4 percent increase in transient keys rented ($2.0 million) primarily due to a 10 percent increase in available keys and $0.1 million of higher plus points revenue (which is recognized upon utilization of plus points or upon expiration of the points).

The decrease in rental margin reflected $0.9 million of lower rental revenues net of direct variable expenses (such as housekeeping), expenses incurred due to owners choosing alternative usage options, and unsold maintenance fees, partially offset by a $0.3 million improvement in the operation of the property in San Diego compared to the prior year comparable period and the $0.1 million increase in plus points revenue.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended                  Change                         % Change      
($ in thousands)            June 17, 2016                      June 19, 2015              

Rental revenues

     $ 138,137           $ 137,471           $ 666         NM

Unsold maintenance fees — upscale

     (26,930)          (23,344)          (3,586)        (15%)

Unsold maintenance fees — luxury

     (1,041)          (4,416)          3,375         76%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Unsold maintenance fees

     (27,971)          (27,760)          (211)        (1%)

Other rental expenses

     (83,578)          (81,979)          (1,599)        (2%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Rental margin

     $ 26,588           $ 27,732           $ (1,144)        (4%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Rental margin percentage

     19.2%           20.2%           (1.0 pts)       

 

     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended                  Change                         % Change      
             June 17, 2016                      June 19, 2015              

Transient keys rented (1)

     535,691           531,960           3,731         1%

Average transient key rate

     $ 219.71           $ 220.57           $ (0.86)        NM

Resort occupancy

     89.1%           89.6%           (0.5 pts)       

 

 

(1)  Transient keys rented exclude those obtained through the use of plus points, preview stays and those associated with our operating property in San Diego, California.

 

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The increase in rental revenues was due to a 1 percent increase in transient keys rented ($0.8 million) primarily due to a 4 percent increase in available keys, $0.5 million of higher plus points revenue (which is recognized upon utilization of plus points or upon expiration of the points) and a $0.2 million increase in preview keys and other revenue, partially offset by a less than 1 percent decrease in average transient rate ($0.4 million) and $0.4 million of lower revenue from the operation of our operating property in San Diego due to the conversion of some of the inventory to vacation ownership inventory.

The decrease in rental margin reflected $1.8 million of lower rental revenues net of direct variable expenses (such as housekeeping), expenses incurred due to owners choosing alternative usage options, and unsold maintenance fees, partially offset by the $0.5 million increase in plus points revenue and a $0.3 million improvement in the operation of the property in San Diego compared to the prior year comparable period.

Europe

The following discussion presents an analysis of our results of operations for the Europe segment for the twelve and twenty-four weeks ended June 17, 2016, compared to the twelve and twenty-four weeks ended June 19, 2015.

 

    Twelve Weeks Ended     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended  
($ in thousands)   June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015     June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015  

Revenues

       

Sale of vacation ownership products

   $               5,867        $               5,647        $             11,027        $             11,547    

Resort management and other services

    7,000         6,905         11,467         11,884    

Financing

    794         897         1,629         1,887    

Rental

    4,612         5,383         6,771         7,515    

Cost reimbursements

    7,983         7,789         15,461         15,375    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

    26,256         26,621         46,355         48,208    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Expenses

       

Cost of vacation ownership products

    1,268         1,233         2,559         2,085    

Marketing and sales

    5,313         4,868         9,199         10,289    

Resort management and other services

    5,748         5,724         9,841         10,315    

Rental

    3,669         3,913         6,585         6,964    

Royalty fee

    118         88         167         164    

Cost reimbursements

    7,983         7,789         15,461         15,375    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total expenses

    24,099         23,615         43,812         45,192    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gains and other income

    —         —         —         4    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Segment financial results

   $ 2,157        $ 3,006        $ 2,543        $ 3,020    
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Overview

In our Europe segment, we are focused on selling our existing projects and managing existing resorts. We do not have any current plans for new development in this segment.

Contract Sales

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

    Twelve Weeks Ended     Change             % Change        
($ in thousands)   June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015      

Contract Sales

       

Vacation ownership

    $ 9,938         $ 7,341         $ 2,597         35%
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total contract sales

    $                     9,938         $                         7,341         $                     2,597         35%
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

The increase in Europe vacation ownership contract sales was due to $3.8 million of higher sales, primarily from several large multi-week purchases in the current period, partially offset by $1.2 million of lower fractional sales due to the near sell-out of developer inventory in 2015.

 

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Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

    Twenty-Four Weeks Ended     Change             % Change        
($ in thousands)   June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015      

Contract Sales

       

Vacation ownership

    $ 14,356         $ 12,639         $ 1,717         14%
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total contract sales

    $                   14,356         $                       12,639         $                     1,717         14%
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

The increase in Europe vacation ownership contract sales was due to $4.3 million of higher sales, primarily from several large multi-week purchases in the current period, partially offset by $2.6 million of lower fractional sales due to the near sell-out of developer inventory in 2015.

Sale of Vacation Ownership Products

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

     Twelve Weeks Ended                  Change                         % Change      
($ in thousands)            June 17, 2016                      June 19, 2015                

Contract sales

     $ 9,938           $ 7,341           $ 2,597         35%

Revenue recognition adjustments:

           

Reportability

     (2,308)          (581)          (1,727)       

Sales reserve

     (1,704)          (1,035)          (669)       

Other(1)

     (59)          (78)          19        
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Sale of vacation ownership products

     $ 5,867           $ 5,647           $ 220         4%
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

(1)  Adjustment for sales incentives that will not be recognized as Sale of vacation ownership products revenue.

Revenue reportability had a larger unfavorable impact in the current period compared to the prior year comparable period because fewer sales met the down payment requirement for revenue recognition purposes prior to the end of the current period compared to the prior year comparable period. This was driven by a large multi-week sale that was not reportable at the end of the current period. The increase in the sales reserve was due to an unfavorable adjustment to correct an immaterial error of $0.5 million in the current period with respect to historical static pool data.

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

     Twenty-Four Weeks Ended                  Change                         % Change      
($ in thousands)            June 17, 2016                      June 19, 2015                

Contract sales

     $ 14,356           $ 12,639           $ 1,717         14%

Revenue recognition adjustments:

           

Reportability

     (1,343)          1,187           (2,530)       

Sales reserve

     (1,902)          (2,115)          213        

Other(1)

     (84)          (164)          80        
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Sale of vacation ownership products

     $ 11,027           $ 11,547           $ (520)        (5%)
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

(1)  Adjustment for sales incentives that will not be recognized as Sale of vacation ownership products revenue.

Revenue reportability had an unfavorable impact in the current period compared to a favorable impact in the prior year comparable period because fewer sales met the down payment requirement for revenue recognition purposes prior to the end of the current period compared to the prior year comparable period. This was driven by a large multi-week sale that was not reportable at the end of the current period. The decrease in the sales reserve was due to an unfavorable adjustment to the reserve in the prior year comparable period, partially offset by the higher contract sales volume in the current period, and due to an unfavorable adjustment in the current year to correct an immaterial error of $0.5 million in the current period with respect to historical static pool data.

 

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Table of Contents

Development Margin

Twelve Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

    Twelve Weeks Ended     Change         % Change    
($ in thousands)   June 17, 2016     June 19, 2015      

Sale of vacation ownership products

    $                     5,867         $ 5,647         $                 220       4%

Cost of vacation ownership products

    (1,268)        (1,233)        (35)      (3%)

Marketing and sales

    (5,313)        (4,868)        (445)      (9%)
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Development margin

    $ (714)        $                     (454)        $ (260)      (57%)
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Development margin percentage

    (12.2%)        (8.0%)        (4.2 pts)     

The decrease in development margin reflected $1.1 million of lower revenue reportability year-over-year and the $0.3 million increase in the sales reserve, partially offset by $1.0 million of higher vacation ownership contract sales volume net of direct variable expenses (i.e., cost of vacation ownership products and marketing and sales) and $0.1 million of higher product cost true-ups ($0.2 million favorable true-up in the twelve weeks ended June 17, 2016 compared to $0.1 million favorable true-up in the prior year comparable period) .

Twenty-Four Weeks Ended June 17, 2016

 

    Twenty-Four Weeks Ended     Change         % Change    
($ in thousands)