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EX-32.1 - EX-32.1 - PS BUSINESS PARKS, INC./MDd864826dex321.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

 

þ ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014.

or

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                 to                

Commission File Number 1-10709

PS BUSINESS PARKS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

California   95-4300881

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

  (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

701 Western Avenue, Glendale, California 91201-2349

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

818-244-8080

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class

  

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share

   New York Stock Exchange

Depositary Shares Each Representing 1/1,000 of a Share of

6.875% Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series R, $0.01 par value per share

   New York Stock Exchange

Depositary Shares Each Representing 1/1,000 of a Share of

6.450% Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series S, $0.01 par value per share

   New York Stock Exchange

Depositary Shares Each Representing 1/1,000 of a Share of

6.000% Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series T, $0.01 par value per share

   New York Stock Exchange

Depositary Shares Each Representing 1/1,000 of a Share of

5.750% Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series U, $0.01 par value per share

   New York Stock Exchange

Depositary Shares Each Representing 1/1,000 of a Share of

5.700% Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series V, $0.01 par value per share

   New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

(Title of class)

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  þ    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.    Yes  ¨    No  þ

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  þ    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  þ    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§232.405) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  þ

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

        Large accelerated filer þ      Accelerated filer ¨  
        Non-accelerated filer ¨      Smaller reporting company ¨  
        (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)       

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  þ

As of June 30, 2014, the aggregate market value of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was $1,625,742,494 based on the closing price as reported on that date.

Number of shares of the registrant’s common stock, par value $0.01 per share, outstanding as of February 16, 2015 (the latest practicable date): 26,919,161.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the definitive proxy statement to be filed in connection with the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held in 2015 are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

 


PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

Forward-Looking Statements

Forward-looking statements, within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, are made throughout this Annual Report on Form 10-K. For this purpose, any statements contained herein that are not statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. Without limiting the foregoing, the words “may,” “believes,” “anticipates,” “plans,” “expects,” “seeks,” “estimates,” “intends,” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. There are a number of important factors that could cause the results of the Company to differ materially from those indicated by such forward-looking statements, including but not limited to: (a) changes in general economic and business conditions; (b) decreases in rental rates or increases in vacancy rates/failure to renew or replace expiring leases; (c) tenant defaults; (d) the effect of the recent credit and financial market conditions; (e) our failure to maintain our status as a real estate investment trust (“REIT”); (f) the economic health of our tenants; (g) increases in operating costs; (h) casualties to our properties not covered by insurance; (i) the availability and cost of capital; (j) increases in interest rates and its effect on our stock price; (k) other factors discussed under the heading Item 1A, “Risk Factors”. In light of the significant uncertainties inherent in the forward-looking statements included herein, the inclusion of such information should not be regarded as a representation by us or any other person that our objectives and plans will be achieved. Moreover, we assume no obligation to update these forward-looking statements to reflect actual results, changes in assumptions or changes in other factors affecting such forward-looking statements, except as required by law.

The Company

PS Business Parks, Inc. (“PSB”) is a fully-integrated, self-advised and self-managed REIT that owns, operates, acquires and develops commercial properties, primarily multi-tenant flex, office and industrial parks. PS Business Parks, L.P. (the “Operating Partnership”) is a California limited partnership, which owns directly or indirectly substantially all of our assets and through which we conduct substantially all of our business. Unless otherwise indicated or unless the context requires otherwise, all references to “the Company,” “we,” “us,” “our,” and similar references mean PS Business Parks, Inc. and its subsidiaries, including the Operating Partnership. PSB is the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership and, as of December 31, 2014, owned 77.8% of the common partnership units. The remaining common partnership units are owned by Public Storage (“PS”). Assuming issuance of PSB common stock upon redemption of the common partnership units held by PS, PS would own 42.3% (or 14.5 million shares) of the outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock. PSB, as the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership, has full, exclusive and complete responsibility and discretion in managing and controlling the Operating Partnership.

As of December 31, 2014, the Company owned and operated 28.6 million rentable square feet of commercial space, comprising 103 business parks, concentrated primarily in the following states: California, Florida, Maryland, Texas, Virginia and Washington. The Company focuses on owning concentrated business parks which provide the Company with the greatest flexibility to meet the needs of its customers. The Company also manages 1.1 million rentable square feet on behalf of PS.

History of the Company: The Company was formed in 1990 as a California corporation under the name Public Storage Properties XI, Inc. In a March 17, 1998 merger with American Office Park Properties, Inc. (“AOPP”) (the “Merger”), the Company acquired the commercial property business operated by AOPP and was renamed “PS Business Parks, Inc.” Prior to the Merger, in January, 1997, AOPP was reorganized to succeed to the commercial property business of PS, becoming a fully integrated, self-advised and self-managed REIT.

 

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From January, 2012 through December, 2014, the Company acquired 3.4 million square feet of multi-tenant flex, office and industrial parks, which comprise the Non-Same Park portfolio as defined on page 30, for an aggregate purchase price of $213.6 million. The table below reflects the assets acquired during this period (in thousands):

 

Property

   Date Acquired      Location      Purchase
Price
     Square
Feet
     Occupancy at
December 31, 2014
 

Charcot Business Park II

     December, 2014         San Jose, California       $ 16,000        119        96.7

McNeil 1

     November, 2014         Austin, Texas         10,550        246        53.3

Springlake Business Center II

     August, 2014         Dallas, Texas         5,148        145        39.6

Arapaho Business Park 9

     July, 2014         Dallas, Texas         1,134        19        100.0

MICC — Center 23

     July, 2014         Miami, Florida         12,725        149        100.0
        

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total 2014 Acquisitions

           45,557        678        69.5
        

 

 

    

 

 

    

Bayshore Corporate Center

     December, 2013         San Mateo, California         60,500        340        84.8

Valwood Business Park

     November, 2013         Dallas, Texas         12,425        245        88.3

Dallas Flex Portfolio

     October, 2013         Dallas, Texas         27,900        559        77.5

Arapaho Business Park

     July, 2013         Dallas, Texas         14,750        389        87.7
        

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total 2013 Acquisitions

           115,575        1,533        83.5
        

 

 

    

 

 

    

Austin Flex Buildings

     December, 2012         Austin, Texas         14,900        226        100.0

212th Business Park

     July, 2012         Kent Valley, Washington         37,550        958        91.6
        

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total 2012 Acquisitions

           52,450        1,184        93.2
        

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total

         $ 213,582        3,395        84.2
        

 

 

    

 

 

    

At the beginning of 2013, the Company reclassified a 125,000 square foot building located in Northern Virginia to land and building held for development as the Company intends to redevelop the property. In conjunction with the reclassification, the Company ceased depreciation of the asset. In July, 2013, the Company entered into a joint venture agreement, which it will maintain a 95.0% economic interest in, with a real estate development company to pursue a multi-family development on the property. During the entitlement phase, all costs related to the pre-development will be split evenly between the Company and its joint venture partner. Subsequent to December 31, 2014, the Company received entitlements which allow it to develop a multi-family building up to 450,000 square feet on the property. The property will be contributed to the joint venture upon commencement of construction, which will occur in 2015. The asset and capitalized development costs were $18.4 million and $16.2 million at December 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013, respectively, which includes the Company’s basis in the land. For the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, the Company capitalized costs of $2.2 million and $752,000, respectively, related to this development, of which $944,000 and $359,000, respectively, related to capitalized interest costs.

On November 21, 2014, the Company completed the sale of three business parks, consisting of 42 buildings aggregating 656,000 square feet, located in Phoenix, Arizona, for net proceeds of $52.2 million, resulting in a net gain of $29.6 million.

On October 1, 2014, the Company completed the sale of two business parks, Cornell Oaks Corporate Center and Creekside Corporate Park along with 11.5 acres of adjacent land, located in Beaverton, Oregon, for net proceeds of $159.9 million, resulting in a net gain of $62.8 million. The parks consist of 18 buildings aggregating 1.2 million square feet.

In October, 2012, the Company completed the sale of Quail Valley Business Park, a 66,000 square foot flex park in Houston, Texas, for a gross sales price of $2.3 million, resulting in a net gain of $935,000.

From 1998 through 2011, the Company acquired 23.7 million square feet of commercial space, developed an additional 575,000 square feet and sold 2.2 million square feet along with some parcels of land.

As of December 31, 2014, the Company has 125,000 square feet of assets held for sale which the Company expects to sell in 2015.

The Company has elected to be taxed as a REIT under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), commencing with its taxable year ended December 31, 1990. To the extent that the Company continues to qualify as a REIT, it will not be taxed, with certain limited exceptions, on the net income that is currently distributed to its shareholders.

 

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The Company’s principal executive offices are located at 701 Western Avenue, Glendale, California 91201-2349. The Company’s telephone number is (818) 244-8080. The Company maintains a website with the address www.psbusinessparks.com. The information contained on the Company’s website is not a part of, or incorporated by reference into, this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The Company makes available free of charge through its website its Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and Current Reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to these reports, as soon as reasonably practicable after the Company electronically files such material with, or furnishes such material to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”).

Business of the Company: The Company is in the commercial property business, with 103 business parks consisting of multi-tenant flex, industrial and office space. The Company owns 15.1 million square feet of flex space. The Company defines “flex” space as buildings that are configured with a combination of warehouse and office space and can be designed to fit a wide variety of uses. The warehouse component of the flex space has a number of uses including light manufacturing and assembly, storage and warehousing, showroom, laboratory, distribution and research and development activities. The office component of flex space is complementary to the warehouse component by enabling businesses to accommodate management and production staff in the same facility. The Company owns 8.8 million square feet of industrial space that has characteristics similar to the warehouse component of the flex space as well as ample dock access. In addition, the Company owns 4.6 million square feet of low-rise office space, generally either in business parks that combine office and flex space or in submarkets where the market demand is more office focused.

The Company’s commercial properties typically consist of business parks with low-rise buildings, ranging from one to 49 buildings per park, located on parcels of various sizes which comprise from nearly 12,000 to 3.5 million aggregate square feet of rentable space. Facilities are managed through either on-site management or offices central to the facilities. Parking is generally open but in some instances is covered. The ratio of parking spaces to rentable square feet ranges from two to six per thousand square feet depending upon the use of the property and its location. Office space generally requires a greater parking ratio than most industrial uses. The Company may acquire properties that do not have these characteristics.

The tenant base for the Company’s facilities is diverse. The portfolio can be bifurcated into those facilities that service small to medium-sized businesses and those that service larger businesses. Approximately 35.6% of in-place rents from the portfolio are derived from facilities that serve small to medium-sized businesses. A property in this facility type is typically divided into units ranging in size from 500 to 4,999 square feet and leases generally range from one to three years. The remaining 64.4% of in-place rents from the portfolio are derived from facilities that serve larger businesses, with units greater than or equal to 5,000 square feet. The Company also has several tenants that lease space in multiple buildings and locations. The U.S. Government is the largest tenant with multiple leases encompassing approximately 845,000 square feet or 5.9% of the Company’s annualized rental income.

The Company currently owns operating properties concentrated primarily in six states and it may expand its operations to other states or reduce the number of states in which it operates. Properties are acquired for both income and potential capital appreciation; there is no limitation on the amount that can be invested in any specific property.

The Company owns land which may be used for the development of commercial properties. The Company owns approximately 14.0 acres of such land in Dallas, Texas and 6.4 acres in Northern Virginia as of December 31, 2014.

Operating Partnership

The properties in which the Company has an equity interest generally are owned by the Operating Partnership. Through this organizational structure, the Company has the ability to acquire interests in additional properties in transactions that could defer the contributors’ tax consequences by causing the Operating Partnership to issue equity interests in return for interests in properties.

The Company is the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership. As of December 31, 2014, the Company owned 77.8% of the common partnership units of the Operating Partnership, and the remainder of such common partnership units were owned by PS. The common units owned by PS may be redeemed by PS from

 

4


time to time, subject to the provisions of our charter, for cash or, at our option, shares of our common stock on a one-for-one basis. Also as of December 31, 2014, in connection with the Company’s issuance of publicly traded Cumulative Preferred Stock, the Company owned 39.8 million preferred units of the Operating Partnership of various series with an aggregate redemption value of $995.0 million with terms substantially identical to the terms of the publicly traded depositary shares each representing 1/1,000 of a share of 5.700% to 6.875% Cumulative Preferred Stock of the Company.

As the general partner of the Operating Partnership, the Company has the exclusive responsibility under the Operating Partnership Agreement to manage and conduct the business of the Operating Partnership. The Board of Directors directs the affairs of the Operating Partnership by managing the Company’s affairs. The Operating Partnership is responsible for, and pays when due, its share of all administrative and operating expenses of the properties it owns.

The Company’s interest in the Operating Partnership entitles it to share in cash distributions from, and the profits and losses of, the Operating Partnership in proportion to the Company’s economic interest in the Operating Partnership (apart from tax allocations of profits and losses to take into account pre-contribution property appreciation or depreciation). The Company, since 1998, has paid per share dividends on its common and preferred stock that track, on a one-for-one basis, the amount of per unit cash distributions the Company receives from the Operating Partnership in respect of the common and preferred partnership units in the Operating Partnership that are owned by the Company.

Common Officers and Directors with PS

Ronald L. Havner, Jr., Chairman of the Company, is also the Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and President of PS. Gary E. Pruitt, an independent director of the Company is also a trustee of PS. Other employees of PS render services to the Company pursuant to the cost sharing and administrative services agreement.

Property Management Services

The Company manages commercial properties owned by PS, which are generally adjacent to self-storage facilities, for a management fee of 5% of the gross revenues of such properties in addition to reimbursement of direct costs. The property management contract with PS is for a seven-year term with the agreement automatically extending for an additional one-year period upon each one-year anniversary of its commencement (unless cancelled by either party). Either party can give notice of its intent to cancel the agreement upon expiration of its current term. Management fee revenue derived from this management contract with PS totaled $660,000, $639,000 and $649,000 for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

PS also provides property management services for the self-storage component of two assets owned by the Company. These self-storage facilities, located in Palm Beach County, Florida, operate under the “Public Storage” name. Either the Company or PS can cancel the property management contract upon 60 days’ notice. Management fee expenses under the contract were $70,000, $59,000 and $55,000 for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

Management

Joseph D. Russell, Jr. leads the Company’s senior management team. Mr. Russell is President and Chief Executive Officer of the Company. The Company’s senior management includes: John W. Petersen, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer; Edward A. Stokx, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer; Maria R. Hawthorne, Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer; Christopher M. Auth, Vice President (Washington Metro Division); Trenton A. Groves, Vice President and Corporate Controller; Coby A. Holley, Vice President, Acquisitions and Dispositions; Robin E. Mather, Vice President (Southern California Division); Eddie F. Ruiz, Vice President and Director of Facilities; Viola I. Sanchez, Vice President (Southeast Division); Richard E. Scott, Vice President (Northern California Division); Eugene Uhlman, Vice President, Construction Management; and David A. Vicars, Vice President (Midwest Division).

 

5


REIT Structure

If certain detailed conditions imposed by the Code and the related Treasury Regulations are met, an entity, such as the Company, that invests principally in real estate and that otherwise would be taxed as a corporation may elect to be treated as a REIT. The most important consequence to the Company of being treated as a REIT for federal income tax purposes is that the Company can deduct dividend distributions (including distributions on preferred stock) to its shareholders, thus effectively eliminating the “double taxation” (at the corporate and shareholder levels) that typically results when a corporation earns income and distributes that income to shareholders in the form of dividends.

The Company believes that it has operated, and intends to continue to operate, in such a manner as to qualify as a REIT under the Code, but no assurance can be given that it will at all times so qualify. To the extent that the Company continues to qualify as a REIT, it will not be taxed, with certain limited exceptions, on the taxable income that is distributed to its shareholders.

Operating Strategy

The Company believes its operating, acquisition and finance strategies combined with its diversified portfolio produces a low risk, stable growth business model. The Company’s primary objective is to grow shareholder value. Key elements of the Company’s growth strategy include:

Maximize Net Cash Flow of Existing Properties: The Company seeks to maximize the net cash flow generated by its properties by (i) maximizing average occupancy rates, (ii) achieving the highest possible levels of realized rents per occupied square foot, (iii) controlling its operating cost structure by improving operating efficiencies and economies of scale and (iv) minimizing recurring capital expenditures required to maintain and improve occupancy. The Company believes that its experienced property management personnel and comprehensive systems combined with increasing economies of scale enhance the Company’s ability to meet these goals. The Company seeks to increase occupancy rates and realized rents per square foot by providing its field personnel with incentives to lease space to credit tenants and to maximize the return on investment in each lease transaction.

Focus on Targeted Markets: The Company intends to continue investing in markets that have characteristics which enable them to be competitive economically. The Company believes that markets with some combination of above average population growth, job growth, higher education levels and personal income will produce better overall economic returns. The Company targets parks in high barrier to entry markets that are close to critical infrastructure, middle to high income housing or universities and have easy access to major transportation arteries.

Reduce Capital Expenditures and Increase Occupancy Rates by Providing Flexible Properties and Attracting a Diversified Tenant Base: By focusing on properties with easily reconfigurable space, the Company believes it can offer facilities that appeal to a wide range of potential tenants, which aids in reducing the capital expenditures associated with re-leasing space. The Company believes this property flexibility also allows it to better serve existing tenants by accommodating expansion and contraction needs. In addition, the Company believes that a diversified tenant base combined with flexible parks helps it maintain occupancy rates by enabling it to attract a greater number of potential users to its space.

Provide Superior Property Management: The Company seeks to provide a superior level of service to its tenants in order to maintain occupancy and increase rental rates, as well as minimize customer turnover. The Company’s property management offices are located either on-site or regionally, providing tenants with convenient access to management and helping the Company maintain its properties and while conveying a sense of quality, order and security. The Company has significant experience in acquiring properties managed by others and thereafter improving tenant satisfaction, occupancy levels, retention rates and rental income by implementing established tenant service programs.

 

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Financing Strategy

The Company’s primary objective in its financing strategy is to maintain financial flexibility and a low risk capital structure. Key elements of this strategy are:

Retain Operating Cash Flow: The Company seeks to retain significant funds (after funding its distributions and capital improvements) for additional investments. During the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, the Company distributed 42.3% and 34.3%, respectively, of its funds from operations (“FFO”) to common shareholders/unit holders. FFO is computed in accordance with the White Paper on FFO approved by the Board of Governors of the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts (“NAREIT”). The White Paper defines FFO as net income, computed in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”), before depreciation, amortization, gains or losses on asset dispositions, net income allocable to noncontrolling interests — common units, net income allocable to restricted stock unit holders, impairment charges and nonrecurring items. FFO is a non-GAAP financial measure and should be analyzed in conjunction with net income. However, FFO should not be viewed as a substitute for net income as a measure of operating performance as it does not reflect depreciation and amortization costs or the level of capital expenditure and leasing costs necessary to maintain the operating performance of the Company’s properties, which are significant economic costs and could materially impact the Company’s results of operations. Other REITs may use different methods for calculating FFO and, accordingly, the Company’s FFO may not be comparable to other real estate companies’ funds from operations. See Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Liquidity and Capital Resources — Non-GAAP Supplemental Disclosure Measure: Funds from Operations,” for a reconciliation of FFO and net income allocable to common shareholders and for additional information on why the Company presents FFO.

Perpetual Preferred Stock/Units: The primary source of leverage in the Company’s capital structure is perpetual preferred stock or equivalent preferred units in the Operating Partnership. This method of financing eliminates interest rate and refinancing risks as the dividend rate is fixed and the stated value or capital contribution is not required to be repaid. In addition, the consequences of defaulting on required preferred distributions are less severe than with debt. The preferred shareholders may elect two additional directors if six quarterly distributions go unpaid, whether or not consecutive.

Throughout this Form 10-K, we use the term “preferred equity” to mean both the preferred stock issued by the Company (including the depositary shares representing interests in that preferred stock) and the preferred partnership units issued by the Operating Partnership and the term “preferred distributions” to mean dividends and distributions on the preferred stock and preferred partnership units.

Debt Financing: The Company, from time to time, has used debt financing to facilitate real estate acquisitions and other capital allocations. The primary source of debt the Company has historically relied upon to provide short-term capital is its $250.0 million unsecured line of credit (the “Credit Facility”). In addition, during 2011, in connection with its $520.0 million portfolio acquisition in Northern California, the Company obtained a $250.0 million unsecured three-year term loan and assumed a $250.0 million mortgage note. During 2013, the Company repaid the remaining balance of $200.0 million on the unsecured three-year term loan. The $250.0 million mortgage note is an interest only mortgage that matures December, 2016.

Access to Capital: The Company targets a minimum ratio of FFO to combined fixed charges and preferred distributions paid of 3.0 to 1.0. Fixed charges include interest expense and capitalized interest while preferred distributions include amounts paid to preferred shareholders and preferred Operating Partnership unit holders. For the year ended December 31, 2014, the FFO to combined fixed charges and preferred distributions paid ratio was 3.2 to 1.0. The Company believes that its financial position enables it to access capital to finance future growth. Subject to market conditions, the Company may add leverage to its capital structure.

Competition

Competition in the market areas in which many of the Company’s properties are located is significant and has from time to time reduced the occupancy levels and rental rates of, and increased the operating expenses of, certain of these properties. Competition may be accelerated by any increase in availability of funds for investment in real estate. Barriers to entry are relatively low for those with the necessary capital and the

 

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Company competes for property acquisitions and tenants with entities that have greater financial resources than the Company. Sublease space and unleased developments are expected to continue to provide competition among operators in certain markets in which the Company operates. While the Company will have to respond to market demands, management believes that the combination of its ability to offer a variety of options within its business parks and the Company’s financial stability provide it with an opportunity to compete favorably in its markets.

The Company’s properties compete for tenants with similar properties located in its markets primarily on the basis of location, rent charged, services provided and the design and condition of improvements. The Company believes it possesses several distinguishing characteristics that enable it to compete effectively in the flex, office and industrial space markets. The Company believes its personnel are among the most experienced in these real estate markets. The Company’s facilities are part of a comprehensive system encompassing standardized procedures and integrated reporting and information networks. The Company believes that the significant operating and financial experience of its executive officers and directors combined with the Company’s capital structure, national investment scope, geographic diversity and economies of scale should enable the Company to compete effectively.

Investments in Real Estate Facilities

As of December 31, 2014, the Company owned and operated 28.6 million rentable square feet comprised of 103 business parks concentrated primarily in six states compared to 29.7 million rentable square feet at December 31, 2013.

Summary of Business Model

The Company has a diversified portfolio. It is diversified geographically primarily in six states across the country and has a diversified customer mix by size and industry concentration. The Company believes that this diversification combined with a conservative financing strategy, focus on markets with strong demographics for growth and our operating strategy gives the Company a business model that mitigates risk and provides strong long-term growth opportunities.

Restrictions on Transactions with Affiliates

The Company’s Bylaws provide that the Company may engage in transactions with affiliates provided that a purchase or sale transaction with an affiliate is (i) approved by a majority of the Company’s independent directors and (ii) fair to the Company based on an independent appraisal or fairness opinion.

Borrowings

The Company had an outstanding mortgage note payable of $250.0 million at December 31, 2014 and 2013. See Notes 5 and 6 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Form 10-K for a summary of the Company’s outstanding borrowings as of December 31, 2014.

On April 28, 2014, the Company modified and extended the terms of its line of credit (the “Credit Facility”) with Wells Fargo Bank, National Association (“Wells Fargo”). The expiration of the Credit Facility was extended from August 1, 2015 to May 1, 2019. The Credit Facility has a borrowing limit of $250.0 million. The rate of interest charged on borrowings was modified to a rate ranging from the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) plus 0.875% to LIBOR plus 1.70% depending on the Company’s credit ratings. Currently, the Company’s rate under the Credit Facility is LIBOR plus 0.925%. In addition, the Company is required to pay an annual facility fee ranging from 0.125% to 0.30% of the borrowing limit depending on the Company’s credit ratings (currently 0.15%). The Company had no balance outstanding on the Credit Facility at December 31, 2014 and 2013. The Company had $1.0 million and $485,000 of unamortized commitment fees as of December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The Credit Facility requires the Company to meet certain covenants, with all of which the Company was in compliance at December 31, 2014 and 2013. Interest on outstanding borrowings is payable monthly.

The Company had a term loan with Wells Fargo (the “Term Loan”) in the amount of $250.0 million that was scheduled to mature on December 31, 2014. The Term Loan was repaid in full in November, 2013. Interest

 

8


on the amounts borrowed under the Term Loan was accrued based on an applicable rate ranging from LIBOR plus 1.15% to LIBOR plus 2.25% depending on the Company’s credit ratings. During 2013, the Company’s rate under the Term Loan was LIBOR plus 1.20%.

The Company has broad powers to borrow in furtherance of the Company’s objectives. The Company has incurred in the past, and may incur in the future, both short-term and long-term indebtedness to facilitate real estate acquisitions and other capital allocations.

Employees

As of December 31, 2014, the Company employed 168 individuals, primarily personnel engaged in property operations.

Insurance

The Company believes that its properties are adequately insured. Facilities operated by the Company have historically been covered by comprehensive insurance, including fire, earthquake and liability coverage from nationally recognized carriers.

Environmental Matters

Compliance with laws and regulations relating to the protection of the environment, including those regarding the discharge of material into the environment, has not had any material effect upon the capital expenditures, earnings or competitive position of the Company.

Substantially all of the Company’s properties have been subjected to Phase I environmental reviews. Such reviews have not revealed, nor is management aware of, any probable or reasonably possible environmental costs that management believes would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, assets or results of operations, nor is the Company aware of any potentially material environmental liability. See Item 1A, “Risk Factors” for additional information.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

In addition to the other information in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, you should consider the risks described below that we believe may be material to investors in evaluating the Company. This section contains forward-looking statements, and in considering these statements, you should refer to the qualifications and limitations on our forward-looking statements that are described in Item 1, “Business — Forward-Looking Statements.”

Since our business consists primarily of acquiring and operating real estate, we are subject to the risks related to the ownership and operation of real estate that can adversely impact our business and financial condition.

The value of our investments may be reduced by general risks of real estate ownership: Since we derive substantially all of our income from real estate operations, we are subject to the general risks of acquiring and owning real estate-related assets, including:

 

   

changes in the national, state and local economic climate and real estate conditions, such as oversupply of or reduced demand for commercial real estate space and changes in market rental rates;

 

   

how prospective tenants perceive the attractiveness, convenience and safety of our properties;

 

   

difficulties in consummating and financing acquisitions and developments on advantageous terms and the failure of acquisitions and developments to perform as expected;

 

   

our ability to provide adequate management, maintenance and insurance;

 

   

natural disasters, such as earthquakes, hurricanes and floods, which could exceed the aggregate limits of our insurance coverage;

 

   

the expense of periodically renovating, repairing and re-letting spaces;

 

   

the impact of environmental protection laws;

 

9


   

compliance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations;

 

   

increasing operating and maintenance costs, including property taxes, insurance and utilities, if these increased costs cannot be passed through to tenants;

 

   

adverse changes in tax, real estate and zoning laws and regulations;

 

   

increasing competition from other commercial properties in our market;

 

   

tenant defaults and bankruptcies;

 

   

tenants’ right to sublease space; and

 

   

concentration of properties leased to non-rated private companies with uncertain financial strength.

Certain significant costs, such as mortgage payments, real estate taxes, insurance and maintenance, generally are not reduced even when a property’s rental income is reduced. In addition, environmental and tax laws, interest rate levels, the availability of financing and other factors may affect real estate values and property income. Furthermore, the supply of commercial space fluctuates with market conditions.

If our properties do not generate sufficient income to meet operating expenses, including any debt service, tenant improvements, lease commissions and other capital expenditures, we may have to borrow additional amounts to cover fixed costs, and we may have to reduce our distributions to shareholders.

There is significant competition among commercial properties: Other commercial properties compete with our properties for tenants. Some of the competing properties may be newer and better located than our properties. Competition in the market areas in which many of our properties are located is significant and has affected our occupancy levels, rental rates and operating expenses. We also expect that new properties will be built in our markets. In addition, we compete with other buyers, some of which are larger than us, for attractive commercial properties. Therefore, we may not be able to grow as rapidly as we would like.

We may encounter significant delays and expense in re-letting vacant space, or we may not be able to re-let space at existing rates, in each case resulting in losses of income: When leases expire, we may incur expenses in retrofitting space and we may not be able to re-lease the space on the same terms. Certain leases provide tenants with the right to terminate early if they pay a fee. As of December 31, 2014, 2,318 leases representing 27.4% of the leased square footage of our total portfolio or 25.7% of annualized rental income are scheduled to expire in 2015. While we have estimated our cost of renewing leases that expire in 2015, our estimates could be wrong. If we are unable to re-lease space promptly, if the terms are significantly less favorable than anticipated or if the costs are higher, we may have to reduce our distributions to shareholders.

Tenant defaults and bankruptcies may reduce our cash flow and distributions: We may have difficulty collecting from tenants in default, particularly if they declare bankruptcy. This could affect our cash flow and our ability to fund distributions to shareholders. Since many of our tenants are non-rated private companies, this risk may be enhanced. There is inherent uncertainty in a tenant’s ability to continue paying rent if they are in bankruptcy.

We may be adversely affected if casualties to our properties are not covered by insurance: We could suffer uninsured losses or losses in excess of our insurance policy limits for occurrences such as earthquakes or hurricanes that adversely affect us or even result in loss of the property. Approximately 40.6% of our properties are located in California and are generally in areas that are subject to risks of earthquake-related damage. In the event of an earthquake, hurricane or other natural disaster, we might still remain liable on any mortgage debt or other unsatisfied obligations related to that property.

The illiquidity of our real estate investments may prevent us from adjusting our portfolio to respond to market changes: There may be delays and difficulties in selling real estate. Therefore, we cannot easily change our portfolio when economic conditions change. Also, REIT tax laws may impose negative consequences if we sell properties held for less than four years.

We may be adversely affected by changes in laws: Increases in income and service taxes may reduce our cash flow and ability to make expected distributions to our shareholders. Our properties are also subject to various federal, state and local regulatory requirements, such as state and local fire and safety codes. If we fail to

 

10


comply with these requirements, governmental authorities could fine us or courts could award damages against us. We believe our properties comply with all significant legal requirements. However, these requirements could change in a way that would reduce our cash flow and ability to make distributions to shareholders.

We may incur significant environmental remediation costs: As an owner and operator of real properties, under various federal, state and local environmental laws, we are required to clean up spills or other releases of hazardous or toxic substances on or from our properties. Certain environmental laws impose liability whether or not the owner or buyer knew of, or was responsible for, the presence of the hazardous or toxic substances. In some cases, liability may not be limited to the value of the property. The presence of these substances, or the failure to properly remediate any resulting contamination, whether from environmental or microbial issues, also may adversely affect our ability to sell, lease, operate, or encumber our facilities for purposes of borrowing.

We have conducted preliminary environmental assessments of most of our properties (and conduct these assessments in connection with property acquisitions) to evaluate the environmental condition of, and potential environmental liabilities associated with, our properties. These assessments generally consist of an investigation of environmental conditions at the property (including soil or groundwater sampling or analysis if appropriate), as well as a review of available information regarding the site and publicly available data regarding conditions at other sites in the vicinity. In connection with these property assessments, our operations and recent property acquisitions, we have become aware that prior operations or activities at some properties or from nearby locations have or may have resulted in contamination to the soil or groundwater at these properties. In circumstances where our environmental assessments disclose potential or actual contamination, we may attempt to obtain indemnifications and, in appropriate circumstances, we obtain limited environmental insurance in connection with the properties acquired, but we cannot assure you that such protections will be sufficient to cover actual future liabilities nor that our assessments have identified all such risks. Although we cannot provide any assurance, based on the preliminary environmental assessments, we are not aware of any environmental contamination of our facilities material to our overall business, financial condition or results of operations.

There has been an increasing number of claims and litigation against owners and managers of rental properties relating to moisture infiltration, which can result in mold or other property damage. When we receive a complaint concerning moisture infiltration, condensation or mold problems and/or become aware that an air quality concern exists, we implement corrective measures in accordance with guidelines and protocols we have developed with the assistance of outside experts. We seek to work proactively with our tenants to resolve moisture infiltration and mold-related issues, subject to our contractual limitations on liability for such claims. However, we can give no assurance that material legal claims relating to moisture infiltration and the presence of, or exposure to, mold will not arise in the future.

Property taxes can increase and cause a decline in yields on investments: Each of our properties is subject to real property taxes, which could increase in the future as property tax rates change and as our properties are assessed or reassessed by tax authorities. Recent local government shortfalls in tax revenue may cause pressure to increase tax rates or assessment levels or impose new taxes. Such increases could adversely impact our profitability.

We must comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act and fire and safety regulations, which can require significant expenditures: All our properties must comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act and with related regulations (the “ADA”). The ADA has separate compliance requirements for “public accommodations” and “commercial facilities,” but generally requires that buildings be made accessible to persons with disabilities. Various state laws impose similar requirements. A failure to comply with the ADA or similar state laws could lead to government imposed fines on us and/or litigation, which could also involve an award of damages to individuals affected by the non-compliance. In addition, we must operate our properties in compliance with numerous local fire and safety regulations, building codes, and other land use regulations. Compliance with these requirements can require us to spend substantial amounts of money, which would reduce cash otherwise available for distribution to shareholders. Failure to comply with these requirements could also affect the marketability of our real estate facilities.

We incur liability from tenant and employment-related claims: From time to time we have to make monetary settlements or defend actions or arbitration to resolve tenant or employment-related claims and disputes.

 

11


Global economic conditions adversely affect our business, financial condition, growth and access to capital.

There continues to be global economic uncertainty, elevated levels of unemployment and reduced levels of economic activity, and it is uncertain as to when economic conditions will improve. These negative economic conditions in the markets where we operate facilities, and other events or factors that adversely affect demand for commercial real estate, could continue to adversely affect our business. To the extent that turmoil in the financial markets returns or intensifies, it has the potential to materially affect the value of our properties, the availability or the terms of financing and may impact the ability of our customers to enter into new leasing transactions or satisfy rental payments under existing leases. The uncertainty and pace of an economic recovery could also affect our operating results and financial condition as follows:

Debt and Equity Markets: Our results of operations and share price are sensitive to volatility in the credit markets. From time to time, the commercial real estate debt markets experience volatility as a result of various factors, including changing underwriting standards by lenders and credit rating agencies. This may result in lenders increasing the cost for debt financing. Should the overall cost of borrowings increase, either by increases in the index rates or by increases in lender spreads, we will need to factor such increases into the economics of our acquisitions. In addition, the state of the debt markets could have an effect on the overall amount of capital being invested in real estate, which may result in price or value decreases of real estate assets and affect our ability to raise capital.

Our ability to issue preferred shares or obtain other sources of capital, such as borrowing, has been in the past, and may in the future, be adversely affected by challenging credit market conditions. The issuance of perpetual preferred securities historically has been a significant source of capital to grow our business. We believe that we have sufficient working capital and capacity under our credit facilities and our retained cash flow from operations to continue to operate our business as usual and meet our current obligations. However, if we were unable to issue preferred shares or borrow at reasonable rates, that could limit the earnings growth that might otherwise result from the acquisition and development of real estate facilities.

Valuations: Market volatility makes the valuation of our properties difficult. There may be significant uncertainty in the valuation, or in the stability of the value, of our properties, which could result in a substantial decrease in the value of our properties. As a result, we may not be able to recover the carrying amount of our properties, which may require us to recognize an impairment charge in earnings.

The acquisition of existing properties is a significant component of our long-term growth strategy, and acquisitions of existing properties are subject to risks that may adversely affect our growth and financial results.

We acquire existing properties, either in individual transactions or portfolios offered by other commercial real estate owners. In addition to the general risks related to real estate described above, we are also subject to the following risks which may jeopardize our realization of benefits from acquisitions.

Any failure to manage acquisitions and other significant transactions to achieve anticipated results and to successfully integrate acquired operations into our existing business could negatively impact our financial results: To fully realize anticipated earnings from an acquisition, we must successfully integrate the property into our operating platform. Failures or unexpected circumstances in the integration process, such as a failure to maintain existing relationships with tenants and employees due to changes in processes, standards, or compensation arrangements, or circumstances we did not detect during due diligence, could jeopardize realization of the anticipated earnings.

During 2014, we acquired 678,000 square feet for an aggregate purchase price of $45.6 million and average occupancy of 69.5% at the time of acquisitions, and we will continue to seek to acquire additional multi-tenant flex, industrial and office properties where they meet our criteria. Our acquisitions and developments may not perform as expected, we may be unable to quickly integrate new acquisitions and developments into our existing operations, and any costs to develop projects or redevelop acquired properties may exceed estimates. As of December 31, 2014, the aggregate occupancy of the assets acquired in 2014 was 69.5%. If we are unable to lease the vacant square footage of these properties in a reasonable period of time, we may not be able to achieve our objective of enhancing value. Further, we face significant competition for suitable acquisition properties from other real estate investors,

 

12


including other publicly traded real estate investment trusts and private institutional investors. As a result, we may be unable to acquire additional properties we desire or the purchase price for desirable properties may be significantly increased.

In addition, some of these properties may have unknown characteristics or deficiencies or may not complement our portfolio of existing properties. We may also finance future acquisitions and developments through a combination of borrowings, proceeds from equity or debt offerings by us or the Operating Partnership, and proceeds from property divestitures. These financing options may not be available when desired or required or may be more costly than anticipated, which could adversely affect our cash flow. Real property development is subject to a number of risks, including construction delays, complications in obtaining necessary zoning, occupancy and other governmental permits, cost overruns, financing risks, and the possible inability to meet expected occupancy and rent levels. If any of these problems occur, development costs for a project may increase, and there may be costs incurred for projects that are not completed. As a result of the foregoing, some properties may be worth less or may generate less revenue than, or simply not perform as well as, we believed at the time of acquisition or development, negatively affecting our operating results. Any of the foregoing risks could adversely affect our financial condition, operating results and cash flow, and our ability to pay dividends on, and the market price of, our stock. In addition, we may be unable to successfully integrate and effectively manage the properties we do acquire and develop, which could adversely affect our results of operations.

Acquired properties are subject to property tax reappraisals which may increase our property tax expense: Facilities that we acquire are subject to property tax reappraisal which can result in substantial increases to the ongoing property taxes paid by the seller. The reappraisal process is subject to judgment of governmental agencies regarding estimated real estate values and other factors, and as a result there is a significant degree of uncertainty in estimating the property tax expense of an acquired property. In connection with future or recent acquisitions of properties, if our estimates of property taxes following reappraisal are too low, we may not realize anticipated earnings from an acquisition.

We would incur adverse tax consequences if we fail to qualify as a REIT.

Our cash flow would be reduced if we fail to qualify as a REIT: While we believe that we have qualified since 1990 to be taxed as a REIT, and will continue to be so qualified, we cannot be certain. To continue to qualify as a REIT, we need to satisfy certain requirements under the federal income tax laws relating to our income, assets, distributions to shareholders and shareholder base. In this regard, the share ownership limits in our articles of incorporation do not necessarily ensure that our shareholder base is sufficiently diverse for us to qualify as a REIT. For any year we fail to qualify as a REIT, we would be taxed at regular corporate tax rates on our taxable income unless certain relief provisions apply. Taxes would reduce our cash available for distributions to shareholders or for reinvestment, which could adversely affect us and our shareholders. Also we would not be allowed to elect REIT status for five years after we fail to qualify unless certain relief provisions apply.

We may need to borrow funds to meet our REIT distribution requirements: To qualify as a REIT, we must generally distribute to our shareholders 90% of our taxable income. Our income consists primarily of our share of our Operating Partnership’s income. We intend to make sufficient distributions to qualify as a REIT and otherwise avoid corporate tax. However, differences in timing between income and expenses and the need to make nondeductible expenditures such as capital improvements and principal payments on debt could force us to borrow funds to make necessary shareholder distributions.

During 2014, the Company sold a combined total of 1.9 million square feet along with some parcels of land in Beaverton, Oregon and Phoenix, Arizona. Absent a special distribution in excess of our normal, recurring quarterly dividend, the Company would have had taxable income in excess of distributions resulting in federal income tax at the corporate level. To qualify for the dividends paid deduction for tax purposes and minimize this potential tax, on December 30, 2014, the Company paid a one-time special cash dividend of $2.75 per common share along with the fourth quarter 2014 regular dividend of $0.50 per common share. Holders of common partnership units of the Operating Partnership also received the same distribution on December 30, 2014. The Board of Directors will continue to evaluate our dividend rate in light of our actual and projected taxable income, liquidity requirements and other circumstances, and there can be no assurance that the future dividends declared by our Board of Directors will not differ materially.

 

13


PS has significant influence over us.

Assuming issuance of the Company’s common stock upon redemption of its partnership units, PS would own 42.3% (or 14.5 million shares) of the outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock at December 31, 2014. As of December 31, 2014, PS owned 7.2 million shares of the Company’s common stock and 7.3 million common units of the Operating Partnership (100.0% of the common units not owned by the Company). In addition, the PS Business Parks name and logo are owned by PS and licensed to the Company under a non-exclusive, royalty-free license agreement. The license can be terminated by either party for any reason with six months written notice. Ronald L. Havner, Jr., the Company’s chairman, is also Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and President of PS. Gary E. Pruitt, an independent director of the Company is also a trustee of PS. Consequently, PS has the ability to significantly influence all matters submitted to a vote of our shareholders, including electing directors, changing our articles of incorporation, dissolving and approving other extraordinary transactions such as mergers, and all matters requiring the consent of the limited partners of the Operating Partnership. PS’s interest in such matters may differ from other shareholders. In addition, PS’s ownership may make it more difficult for another party to take over our Company without PS’s approval.

Provisions in our organizational documents may prevent changes in control.

Our articles generally prohibit any person from owning more than 7% of our shares: Our articles of incorporation restrict the number of shares that may be owned by any other person, and the partnership agreement of our Operating Partnership contains an anti-takeover provision. No shareholder (other than PS and certain other specified shareholders) may own more than 7% of the outstanding shares of our common stock, unless our board of directors waives this limitation. We imposed this limitation to avoid, to the extent possible, a concentration of ownership that might jeopardize our ability to qualify as a REIT. This limitation, however, also makes a change of control much more difficult (if not impossible) even if it may be favorable to our public shareholders. These provisions will prevent future takeover attempts not supported by PS even if a majority of our public shareholders consider it to be in their best interests as they would receive a premium for their shares over market value or for other reasons.

Our board can set the terms of certain securities without shareholder approval: Our board of directors is authorized, without shareholder approval, to issue up to 50.0 million shares of preferred stock and up to 100.0 million shares of equity stock, in each case in one or more series. Our board has the right to set the terms of each of these series of stock. Consequently, the board could set the terms of a series of stock that could make it difficult (if not impossible) for another party to take over our Company even if it might be favorable to our public shareholders. Our articles of incorporation also contain other provisions that could have the same effect. We can also cause our Operating Partnership to issue additional interests for cash or in exchange for property.

The partnership agreement of our Operating Partnership restricts mergers: The partnership agreement of our Operating Partnership generally provides that we may not merge or engage in a similar transaction unless the limited partners of our Operating Partnership are entitled to receive the same proportionate payments as our shareholders. In addition, we have agreed not to merge unless the merger would have been approved had the limited partners been able to vote together with our shareholders, which has the effect of increasing PS’s influence over us due to PS’s ownership of operating partnership units. These provisions may make it more difficult for us to merge with another entity.

The interests of limited partners of our Operating Partnership may conflict with the interests of our common stockholders.

Limited partners of our Operating Partnership, including PS, have the right to vote on certain changes to the partnership agreement. They may vote in a way that is against the interests of our shareholders. Also, as general partner of our Operating Partnership, we are required to protect the interests of the limited partners of the Operating Partnership. The interests of the limited partners and of our shareholders may differ.

 

14


We depend on external sources of capital to grow our Company.

We are generally required under the Code to distribute at least 90% of our taxable income. Because of this distribution requirement, we may not be able to fund future capital needs, including any necessary building and tenant improvements, from operating cash flow. Consequently, we may need to rely on third-party sources of capital to fund our capital needs. We may not be able to obtain the financing on favorable terms or at all. Access to third-party sources of capital depends, in part, on general market conditions, the market’s perception of our growth potential, our current and expected future earnings, our cash flow, and the market price per share of our common stock. If we cannot obtain capital from third-party sources, we may not be able to acquire properties when strategic opportunities exist, satisfy any debt service obligations, or make cash distributions to shareholders.

We are subject to laws and governmental regulations and actions that affect our operating results and financial condition.

Our business is subject to regulation under a wide variety of U.S. federal, state and local laws, regulations and policies including those imposed by the SEC, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and the New York Stock Exchange, as well as applicable labor laws. Although we have policies and procedures designed to comply with applicable laws and regulations, failure to comply with the various laws and regulations may result in civil and criminal liability, fines and penalties, increased costs of compliance and restatement of our financial statements.

There can also be no assurance that, in response to current economic conditions or the current political environment or otherwise, laws and regulations will not be implemented or changed in ways that adversely affect our operating results and financial condition, such as recently adopted legislation that expands health care coverage costs or facilitates union activity or federal legislative proposals to otherwise increase operating costs.

Terrorist attacks and the possibility of wider armed conflict may have an adverse impact on our business and operating results and could decrease the value of our assets.

Terrorist attacks and other acts of violence or war could have a material adverse impact on our business and operating results. There can be no assurance that there will not be further terrorist attacks against the U.S. Attacks or armed conflicts that directly impact one or more of our properties could significantly affect our ability to operate those properties and thereby impair our operating results. Further, we may not have insurance coverage for losses caused by a terrorist attack. Such insurance may not be available, or if it is available and we decide to obtain such terrorist coverage, the cost for the insurance may be significant in relationship to the risk overall. In addition, the adverse effects that such violent acts and threats of future attacks could have on the U.S. economy could similarly have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. Finally, further terrorist acts could cause the U.S. to enter into a wider armed conflict, which could further impact our business and operating results.

Developments in California may have an adverse impact on our business and financial results.

We are headquartered in, and approximately 40.6% of our properties are located in California, which has from time to time faced budgetary problems and deficits. Actions have been and may continue to be taken in response to these problems, such as increases in property taxes, changes to sales taxes or other governmental efforts to raise revenues, which could adversely impact our business and results of operations.

Holders of depositary shares, each representing 1/1,000 of a share of our outstanding preferred stock, have dividend, liquidation and other rights that are senior to the rights of the holders of shares of our common stock.

Our shares of preferred stock are entitled to cumulative dividends before any dividends may be declared or set aside on our common stock. Upon our voluntary or involuntary liquidation, dissolution or winding up, before any payment is made to holders of our common stock, shares of our preferred stock are entitled to receive a liquidation preference of $25,000 per share (or $25.00 per depositary share) plus any accrued and unpaid

 

15


distributions. This will reduce the remaining amount of our assets, if any, available to distribute to holders of our common stock. In addition, our preferred stockholders have the right to elect two additional directors to our board of directors whenever dividends are in arrears in an aggregate amount equivalent to six or more quarterly dividends, whether or not consecutive.

Future issuances by us of shares of our common stock may be dilutive to existing stockholders, and future sales of shares of our common stock may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

Sales of substantial amounts of shares of our common stock in the public market (either by us or by PS), or issuances of shares of common stock in connection with redemptions of common units of our Operating Partnership, could adversely affect the market price of our common stock. During the year ended December 31, 2013, the Company completed a public offering of its common stock and may seek to engage in such offerings in the future. Offerings of common stock, including by us in connection with portfolio or other property acquisitions or by PS in secondary offerings, and the issuance of common units of the Operating Partnership in exchange for shares of common stock, could have an adverse effect on the market price of the shares of our common stock.

We rely on technology in our operations and failures, inadequacies or interruptions to our service could harm our business.

The execution of our business strategy is heavily dependent on the use of technologies and systems, including the Internet, to access, store, transmit, deliver and manage information and processes. Although we believe we have taken commercially reasonable steps to protect the security of our systems, there can be no assurance that such security measures will prevent failures, inadequacies or interruptions in system services, or that system security will not be breached. Disruptions in service, system shutdowns and security breaches could have a material adverse effect on our business.

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

 

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ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

As of December 31, 2014, the Company owned 103 business parks consisting of a geographically diverse portfolio of 28.6 million rentable square feet of commercial real estate which consists of 15.1 million square feet of flex space, 8.8 million square feet of industrial space and 4.6 million square feet of office space concentrated primarily in six states consisting of California, Texas, Virginia, Florida, Maryland and Washington. The weighted average occupancy rate throughout 2014 was 91.3% and the realized rent per square foot was $14.00.

The following table reflects the geographical diversification of the 103 business parks owned by the Company as of December 31, 2014, the type of the rentable square footage and the weighted average occupancy rates throughout 2014 (except as set forth below, all of the properties are held in fee simple interest) (in thousands, except number of business parks):

 

     Number  of
Business
Parks
            Weighted
Average
Occupancy
Rate
 
        Rentable Square Footage     

State

      Flex      Industrial      Office      Total     

California (1)

     49        5,906        4,618        1,076        11,600        93.4

Texas (2)

     23        4,611        477                5,088        87.7

Virginia

     17        1,947                2,093        4,040        90.3

Florida

     3        1,074        2,780        12        3,866        94.6

Maryland

     6        970                1,382        2,352        87.8

Washington

     3        493        958        28        1,479        86.3
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     101        15,001        8,833        4,591        28,425        91.3
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Assets held for sale

     2        125                        125        97.3
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     103        15,126        8,833        4,591        28,550        91.3
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) The Company has 4.8 million square feet in California that serves as collateral to a mortgage note payable. For more information, see Note 6 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Form 10-K.

 

(2) The Company owns two properties comprising of 232,000 square feet that are subject to ground leases in Las Colinas, Texas, expiring in 2019 and 2020, each with one 10 year extension option.

We currently anticipate that each of the properties listed above will continue to be used for its current purpose. Competition exists in each of the market areas in which these properties are located.

The Company renovates its properties in connection with the re-leasing of space to tenants and expects that it will pay the costs of such renovations from rental income. From time to time the Company may identify higher and better use of its assets. The Company has risks that tenants will default on leases and declare bankruptcy. Management believes these risks are mitigated through the Company’s geographic diversity and diverse tenant base.

The Company evaluates the performance of its business parks primarily based on net operating income (“NOI”). NOI is defined by the Company as rental income as defined by GAAP less cost of operations as defined by GAAP, excluding depreciation and amortization. The Company uses NOI and its components as a measurement of the performance of its commercial real estate. Management believes that these financial measures provide them, as well as the investor, the most consistent measurement on a comparative basis of the performance of the commercial real estate and its contribution to the value of the Company. Depreciation and amortization have been excluded from NOI as they are generally not used in determining the value of commercial real estate by management or the investment community. Depreciation and amortization are generally not used in determining value as they consider the historical costs of an asset compared to its current value; therefore, to understand the effect of the assets’ historical cost on the Company’s results, investors should look at GAAP financial measures, such as total operating costs including depreciation and amortization. The Company’s calculation of NOI may not be comparable to those of other companies and should not be used as an alternative to measures of performance calculated in accordance with GAAP. Following the table below, we have reconciled total NOI to income from continuing operations, which we consider the most directly comparable financial measure calculated in accordance with GAAP. The following information illustrates rental income, cost of operations and NOI generated by the Company’s total portfolio in 2014, 2013 and 2012 by state and by property classifications. As a result of acquisitions and dispositions, certain properties were not held for the full year and are reflected as assets held for sale or sold.

 

17


The Company’s calculation of NOI may not be comparable to those of other companies and should not be used as an alternative to measures of performance in accordance with GAAP. In order to provide a meaningful period-to-period comparison, the tables below exclude certain lease buyout payments noted below and amortization of the Senior Management Long-Term Equity Incentive Plan (“LTEIP”) related to field leadership. The tables below also include a reconciliation of NOI to the most comparable amounts based on GAAP (in thousands):

 

     For the Year Ended December 31, 2014      For the Year Ended December 31, 2013      For the Year Ended December 31, 2012  
     Flex      Office      Industrial      Total      Flex      Office      Industrial      Total      Flex      Office      Industrial      Total  

Rental Income:

                                   

California

   $ 73,922       $ 19,890       $ 37,291       $ 131,103       $ 70,642       $ 13,184       $ 34,896       $ 118,722       $ 68,397       $ 12,773       $ 33,210       $ 114,380   

Texas

     45,881                 1,564         47,445         37,783                 1,391         39,174         32,878                 1,297         34,175   

Virginia

     32,108         49,204                 81,312         33,373         48,942                 82,315         34,341         48,096                 82,437   

Florida

     12,180         285         21,538         34,003         11,414         210         20,672         32,296         10,686         206         20,649         31,541   

Maryland

     15,667         33,585                 49,252         15,299         32,954                 48,253         15,470         33,495                 48,965   

Washington

     8,128         568         5,052         13,748         7,808         493         3,433         11,734         7,628         521         1,338         9,487   

Assets held for sale or sold

     16,654         2,738                 19,392         20,908         3,592                 24,500         20,381         3,399                 23,780   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     204,540         106,270         65,445         376,255         197,227         99,375         60,392         356,994         189,781         98,490         56,494         344,765   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Cost of Operations:

                                   

California

     23,540         9,094         9,118         41,752         23,304         5,763         9,115         38,182         22,243         5,400         9,479         37,122   

Texas

     16,977                 431         17,408         13,034                 287         13,321         11,103                 406         11,509   

Virginia

     9,483         16,164                 25,647         9,191         15,947                 25,138         8,651         17,208                 25,859   

Florida

     3,895         120         6,491         10,506         3,810         141         6,070         10,021         3,868         171         5,991         10,030   

Maryland

     5,709         11,765                 17,474         4,916         10,899                 15,815         4,689         10,938                 15,627   

Washington

     2,349         202         1,652         4,203         2,380         189         1,606         4,175         2,355         193         667         3,215   

Assets held for sale or sold

     6,618         1,140                 7,758         7,926         1,494                 9,420         8,109         1,396                 9,505   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     68,571         38,485         17,692         124,748         64,561         34,433         17,078         116,072         61,018         35,306         16,543         112,867   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

NOI:

                                   

California

     50,382         10,796         28,173         89,351         47,338         7,421         25,781         80,540         46,154         7,373         23,731         77,258   

Texas

     28,904                 1,133         30,037         24,749                 1,104         25,853         21,775                 891         22,666   

Virginia

     22,625         33,040                 55,665         24,182         32,995                 57,177         25,690         30,888                 56,578   

Florida

     8,285         165         15,047         23,497         7,604         69         14,602         22,275         6,818         35         14,658         21,511   

Maryland

     9,958         21,820                 31,778         10,383         22,055                 32,438         10,781         22,557                 33,338   

Washington

     5,779         366         3,400         9,545         5,428         304         1,827         7,559         5,273         328         671         6,272   

Assets held for sale or sold

     10,036         1,598                 11,634         12,982         2,098                 15,080         12,272         2,003                 14,275   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 135,969       $ 67,785       $ 47,753       $ 251,507       $ 132,666       $ 64,942       $ 43,314       $ 240,922       $ 128,763       $ 63,184       $ 39,951       $ 231,898   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

18


The following table is provided to reconcile NOI to consolidated income from continuing operations as determined by GAAP (in thousands):

 

     For The Years Ended December 31,  
     2014     2013     2012  

Total NOI

   $ 251,507     $ 240,922     $ 231,898  

Other income and (expenses):

      

Lease buyout payments

            2,252       1,783  

LTEIP amortization:

      

Cost of operations

     (2,623     1,241       (1,241

General and administrative

     (4,802     2,652       (2,652

Facility management fees

     660       639       649  

Other income and expenses

     (13,221     (14,681     (20,377

Depreciation and amortization

     (110,357     (108,917     (109,398

General and administrative

     (8,487     (7,110     (5,917

Acquisition transaction costs

     (350     (854     (350

Gain on sale of real estate facilities

     92,373                
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations

   $ 204,700     $ 116,144     $ 94,395  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Portfolio Information

The table below sets forth information with respect to occupancy and rental rates of the Company’s total portfolio for each of the last five years, including discontinued operations:

 

     2014     2013(1)     2012(1)     2011(1)     2010  

Weighted average occupancy rate

     91.3     89.9     89.4     89.8     90.9

Realized rent per square foot

   $ 14.00      $ 13.91      $ 14.05      $ 15.11     $ 15.01   

 

(1) Excludes lease buyout payments of $2.3 million, $1.8 million and $2.9 million for the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

The following table sets forth the lease expirations for all operating assets as of December 31, 2014 (in thousands):

Lease Expirations as of December 31, 2014

 

Year of Lease Expiration

   Number of
Tenants
     Rentable Square
Footage Subject to
Expiring Leases
     Annualized Rental
Income Under
Expiring Leases
     Percent of
Annualized Rental
Income Represented
by Expiring Leases
 

2015

     2,318        7,231      $ 99,082        25.7

2016

     1,332        6,031        87,787        22.8

2017

     703        4,340        61,317        15.9

2018

     271        2,586        41,878        10.8

2019

     246        2,796        37,988        9.8

2020

     84        1,572        23,754        6.2

2021

     28        710        9,856        2.6

2022

     20        380        9,156        2.4

2023

     11        188        2,888        0.7

2024

     10        306        5,339        1.4

Thereafter

     11        257        6,707        1.7
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     5,034        26,397      $ 385,752        100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

19


ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

We are not presently subject to material litigation nor, to our knowledge, is any material litigation threatened against us, other than routine actions for negligence and other claims and administrative proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business, some of which are expected to be covered by liability insurance or third party indemnifications and all of which collectively are not expected to have a materially adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, or liquidity.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Price of the Registrant’s Common Equity:

The common stock of the Company trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol PSB. The following table sets forth the high and low sales prices of the common stock on the New York Stock Exchange for the applicable periods:

 

     Range      Dividends
Declared
 

Three Months Ended

   High      Low     

March 31, 2013

   $ 79.34       $ 64.70       $ 0.44  

June 30, 2013

   $ 86.94       $ 65.50       $ 0.44  

September 30, 2013

   $ 77.97       $ 70.33       $ 0.44  

December 31, 2013

   $ 82.58       $ 73.45       $ 0.44  

March 31, 2014

   $ 87.54       $ 74.85       $ 0.50  

June 30, 2014

   $ 87.15       $ 80.78       $ 0.50  

September 30, 2014

   $ 85.01       $ 74.97       $ 0.50  

December 31, 2014

   $ 84.76       $ 75.02       $ 3.25 (1) 

 

(1) Amount includes a $2.75 per common share special cash dividend.

Holders:

As of February 16, 2015, there were 348 holders of record of the common stock.

Dividends:

Holders of common stock are entitled to receive distributions when, as and if declared by the Company’s Board of Directors out of any funds legally available for that purpose. The Company is required to distribute at least 90% of its taxable income prior to the filing of the Company’s tax return to maintain its REIT status for federal income tax purposes. It is management’s intention to pay distributions of not less than these required amounts.

Effective March, 2014, the Company increased its quarterly dividend from $0.44 per common share to $0.50 per common share.

Dividends declared for the three months ended December 31, 2014 included a one-time special cash dividend of $2.75 per share (the “Special Cash Dividend”) along with the fourth quarter regular dividend of $0.50 per share. See discussion in Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”. The Special Cash Dividend was declared to distribute a portion of the excess income attributable to gains on sales from asset dispositions during 2014, as discussed in Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Form 10-K.

 

20


The Board of Directors has established a distribution policy intended to maximize the retention of operating cash flow and distribute the amount required for the Company to maintain its tax status as a REIT.

Issuer Repurchases of Equity Securities:

The Company’s Board of Directors previously authorized the repurchase, from time to time, of up to 6.5 million shares of the Company’s common stock on the open market or in privately negotiated transactions. During the three months ended December 31, 2014, there were no shares of the Company’s common stock repurchased. As of December 31, 2014, the Company has 1,614,721 shares available for purchase under the program. The program does not expire. Purchases will be made subject to market conditions and other investment opportunities available to the Company.

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans:

The equity compensation plan information is provided in Item 12, “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters”.

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following sets forth selected consolidated financial and operating information on a historical basis of the Company. The following information should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto of the Company included in this Form 10-K. Note that historical results from 2013 through 2010 were reclassified to conform to 2014 presentation for discontinued operations. See Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Form 10-K for a discussion of income from discontinued operations.

 

     For The Years Ended December 31,  
     2014     2013     2012     2011     2010  
     (In thousands, except per share data)  

Revenues:

          

Rental income

   $ 376,255     $ 359,246     $ 346,548     $ 297,457     $ 276,276  

Facility management fees

     660       639       649       684       672  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating revenues

     376,915       359,885       347,197       298,141       276,948  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Expenses:

          

Cost of operations

     127,371       114,831       114,108       99,917       89,348  

Depreciation and amortization

     110,357       108,917       109,398       84,391       78,354  

General and administrative

     13,639       5,312       8,919       9,036       9,651  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

     251,367       229,060       232,425       193,344       177,353  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other income and (expenses):

          

Interest and other income

     372       1,485       241       221       333  

Interest and other expenses

     (13,593     (16,166     (20,618     (5,455     (3,534
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other income and (expenses)

     (13,221     (14,681     (20,377     (5,234     (3,201
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gain on sale of real estate facilities

     92,373                              
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations

     204,700       116,144       94,395       99,563       96,394  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Discontinued operations:

          

Income from discontinued operations (1)

                   42       360       475  

Gain on sale of real estate facilities

                   935       2,717       5,153  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total discontinued operations

                   977       3,077       5,628  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 204,700     $ 116,144     $ 95,372     $ 102,640     $ 102,022  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

21


    For The Years Ended December 31,  
    2014     2013     2012     2011     2010  
    (In thousands, except per share data)  

Net income allocation:

         

Net income allocable to noncontrolling interests:

         

Noncontrolling interests — common units

  $ 30,729     $ 12,952     $ 5,970     $ 15,543     $ 11,594  

Noncontrolling interests — preferred units

                  323       (6,991     5,103  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total net income allocable to noncontrolling interests

    30,729       12,952       6,293       8,552       16,697  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income allocable to PS Business
Parks, Inc.:

         

Preferred shareholders

    60,488       59,216       69,136       41,799       46,214  

Restricted stock unit holders

    329       125       138       127       152  

Common shareholders

    113,154       43,851       19,805       52,162       38,959  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total net income allocable to PS Business Parks, Inc.

    173,971       103,192       89,079       94,088       85,325  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

  $ 204,700     $ 116,144     $ 95,372     $ 102,640     $ 102,022  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Per Common Share:

         

Cash Distributions (2)

  $ 4.75     $ 1.76     $ 1.76     $ 1.76     $ 1.76  

Net income — basic

  $ 4.21     $ 1.77     $ 0.82     $ 2.13     $ 1.59  

Net income — diluted

  $ 4.19     $ 1.77     $ 0.81     $ 2.12     $ 1.58  

Weighted average common shares — basic

    26,899       24,732       24,234       24,516       24,546  

Weighted average common shares — diluted

    27,000       24,833       24,323       24,599       24,687  

Balance Sheet Data:

         

Total assets

  $ 2,227,114     $ 2,238,559     $ 2,151,817     $ 2,138,619     $ 1,621,057  

Total debt

  $ 250,000     $ 250,000     $ 468,102     $ 717,084     $ 144,511  

Equity:

         

PS Business Parks, Inc.’s shareholders’ equity:

         

Preferred stock

  $ 995,000     $ 995,000     $ 885,000     $ 598,546     $ 598,546  

Common stock

  $ 718,281     $ 722,941     $ 560,689     $ 580,659     $ 594,982  

Noncontrolling interests:

         

Preferred units

  $      $      $      $ 5,583     $ 53,418  

Common units

  $ 194,928     $ 196,699     $ 168,572     $ 175,807     $ 176,179  

Other Data:

         

Net cash provided by operating activities

  $ 227,771     $ 222,294     $ 209,127     $ 180,620     $ 177,116  

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

  $ 113,188     $ (172,872   $ (105,729   $ (337,106   $ (326,623

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

  $ (219,973   $ (30,824   $ (95,495   $ 156,400     $ (53,656

Square footage owned at the end of period

    28,550       29,740       28,208       27,090       21,666  

 

(1) Prior to the current year adoption of the guidance for reporting discontinued operations and disposal of components of an entity, the operating results from assets classified as properties held for disposition prior to December 31, 2013 are included in discontinued operations for the years ended December 31, 2010 through 2013. Subsequent to the adoption, the operating results from assets classified as properties held for disposition as of January 1, 2014 are included in income from continuing operations.

 

(2) Amount includes a $2.75 per common share special cash dividend.

 

22


ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion and analysis of the results of operations and financial condition should be read in conjunction with the selected financial data and the Company’s consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in this Form 10-K.

Overview

As of December 31, 2014, the Company owned and operated 28.6 million rentable square feet of multi-tenant flex, industrial and office properties concentrated primarily in six states. All operating metrics discussed in this section as of and for years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 excludes assets held for sale or sold. Management believes excluding the results of such assets provides the most relevant perspective on the ongoing operations of the Company. Please refer to “Item 15, “Exhibits and Financial Statements Schedules” for financial metrics that include results from assets held for sale or sold.

The Company focuses on increasing profitability and cash flow aimed at maximizing shareholder value. The Company strives to maintain high occupancy levels while increasing rental rates and minimizing capital expenditures when market conditions allow, although the Company may decrease rental rates in markets where conditions require. The Company also acquires properties it believes will create long-term value, and from time to time disposes of properties which no longer fit within the Company’s strategic objectives. Operating results are driven primarily by income from rental operations and are therefore substantially influenced by demand for rental space within our properties and our markets, which impacts occupancy, rental rates and capital requirements.

During 2014, the Company executed leases comprising 8.6 million square feet of space including 5.2 million square feet of renewals of existing leases and 3.4 million square feet of new leases. Overall, the change in rental rates for the Company continued to improve. See further discussion of operating results below.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates:

Our accounting policies are described in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Form 10-K. We believe our most critical accounting policies relate to revenue recognition, property acquisitions, allowance for doubtful accounts, impairment of long-lived assets, depreciation, accruals of operating expenses and accruals for contingencies, each of which we discuss below.

Revenue Recognition: The Company must meet four basic criteria before revenue can be recognized: persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists; the delivery has occurred or services have been rendered; the fee is fixed or determinable; and collectability is reasonably assured. All leases are classified as operating leases. Rental income is recognized on a straight-line basis over the terms of the leases. Straight-line rent is recognized for all tenants with contractual fixed increases in rent that are not included on the Company’s credit watch list. Deferred rent receivable represents rental revenue recognized on a straight-line basis in excess of billed rents. Reimbursements from tenants for real estate taxes and other recoverable operating expenses are recognized as rental income in the period the applicable costs are incurred. Property management fees are recognized in the period earned.

Property Acquisitions: The purchase price of acquired properties is recorded to land, buildings and improvements (including tenant improvements, unamortized lease commissions, acquired in-place lease values, and tenant relationships, if any) and intangible assets and liabilities associated with the value of above-market and below-market leases based on their respective estimated fair values. Acquisition related costs are expensed as incurred.

In determining the fair value of the tangible assets of the acquired properties, management considers the value of the properties as if vacant as of the acquisition date. Management must make significant assumptions in determining the value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed. Using different assumptions in the recording of the purchase cost of the acquired properties would affect the timing of recognition of the

 

23


related revenue and expenses. Amounts recorded to land are derived from comparable sales of land within the same region. Amounts recorded to buildings and improvements, tenant improvements and unamortized lease commissions are based on current market replacement costs and other market information.

The value recorded to the above-market or below-market in-place lease values of acquired properties is determined based upon the present value (using a discount rate which reflects the risks associated with the acquired leases) of the difference between (i) the contractual rents to be paid pursuant to the in-place leases, and (ii) management’s estimate of fair market lease rates for the corresponding in-place leases, measured over a period equal to the remaining non-cancelable term of the lease. The amounts recorded to above-market or below-market leases are included in other assets or other liabilities in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and are amortized on a straight-line basis as an increase or reduction of rental income over the remaining non-cancelable term of the respective leases.

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts: Rental revenue from our tenants is our principal source of revenue. Tenant receivables consist primarily of amounts due for contractual lease payments, reimbursements of common area maintenance expenses, property taxes and other expenses recoverable from tenants. Deferred rent receivable represents the amount that the cumulative straight-line rental income recorded to date exceeds cash rents billed to date under the lease agreement. We monitor the collectability of our receivable balances including the deferred rent receivable on an ongoing basis. Based on these reviews, we maintain an allowance for doubtful accounts for estimated losses resulting from the possible inability of our tenants to make required rent payments to us. Tenant receivables and deferred rent receivable are carried net of the allowances for uncollectible tenant receivables and deferred rent. Determination of the adequacy of these allowances requires significant judgments and estimates, and our evaluation of the adequacy of the allowance for uncollectible current tenant receivables and deferred rent receivable are performed using a methodology that incorporates specific identification, aging analysis, an overall evaluation of the historical loss trends and the current economic and business environment.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets: The Company evaluates a property for potential impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that its carrying amount may not be recoverable. On a quarterly basis, we evaluate our entire portfolio for impairment based on current operating information. In the event that these periodic assessments reflect that the carrying amount of a property exceeds the sum of the undiscounted cash flows (excluding interest) that are expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the property, the Company would recognize an impairment loss to the extent the carrying amount exceeded the estimated fair value of the property. The estimation of expected future net cash flows is inherently uncertain and relies on subjective assumptions dependent upon future and current market conditions and events that affect the ultimate value of the property. Management must make assumptions related to the property such as future rental rates, tenant allowances, operating expenditures, property taxes, capital improvements, occupancy levels and the estimated proceeds generated from the future sale of the property. These assumptions could differ materially from actual results in future periods. Our intent to hold properties over the long-term directly decreases the likelihood of recording an impairment loss. If our strategy changes or if market conditions otherwise dictate an earlier sale date, an impairment loss could be recognized, and such loss could be material.

Depreciation: We compute depreciation on our buildings and improvements using the straight-line method based on estimated useful lives generally ranging from five to 30 years. A significant portion of the acquisition cost of each property is recorded to building and building components. The recording of the acquisition cost to building and building components, as well as the determination of their useful lives, are based on estimates. If we do not appropriately record to these components or we incorrectly estimate the useful lives of these components, our computation of depreciation expense may not appropriately reflect the actual impact of these costs over future periods, which will affect net income. In addition, the net book value of real estate assets could be overstated or understated. The statement of cash flows, however, would not be affected.

Accruals of Operating Expenses: The Company accrues for property tax expenses, performance bonuses and other operating expenses each quarter based on historical trends and anticipated disbursements. If these estimates are incorrect, the timing and amount of expense recognized will be affected.

 

24


Accruals for Contingencies: The Company is exposed to business and legal liability risks with respect to events that may have occurred, but in accordance with GAAP has not accrued for such potential liabilities because the loss is either not probable or not estimable. Future events could result in such potential losses becoming probable and estimable, which could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition or results of operations.

Effect of Economic Conditions on the Company’s Operations: During 2014, most markets reflected signs of improving occupancy and rental rates. Overall, new rental rates for the Company improved over expiring rental rates on executed leases as economic conditions continue to improve. However, the Virginia, Maryland and Orange County markets continue to be slower to recover than other markets as the Company continues to see rental rate declines and modest growth in occupancy. Current and future economic conditions and competition will continue to have an impact on the Company, potentially resulting in further reductions in occupancy and rental rates.

Tenant Credit Risk: The Company historically has experienced a low level of write-offs of uncollectable rents, but there is inherent uncertainty in a tenant’s ability to continue paying rent and meet its full lease obligation. The table below summarizes the impact to the Company from tenants’ inability to pay rent or continue to meet their lease obligations (in thousands):

 

     For The Years Ended
December 31,
 
     2014     2013     2012  

Annual write — offs of uncollectible rent

   $ 1,101     $ 955     $ 1,115  

Annual write — offs as a percentage of rental income

     0.3     0.3     0.3

Square footage of leases terminated prior to their scheduled expiration due to business failures/bankruptcies

     362        431        570   

Accelerated depreciation and amortization related to unamortized tenant improvements and lease commissions associated with early terminations

   $ 460     $ 2,071     $ 1,493  

As of February 16, 2015, the Company had 34,000 square feet of leased space occupied by tenants that are protected by Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. From time to time, tenants contact us, requesting early termination of their lease, a reduction in space under lease, or rent deferment or abatement. At this time, the Company cannot anticipate what impact, if any, the ultimate outcome of these discussions will have on our future operating results.

Company Performance and Effect of Economic Conditions on Primary Markets: The Company’s operations are substantially concentrated in eight regions. During the year ended December 31, 2014, initial rental rates on new and renewed leases within the Company’s total portfolio increased 0.5% over expiring rents, an improvement from the year ended December 31, 2013, in which initial rental rates on new and renewed leases declined by 0.3%. The Company’s Same Park (defined below) occupancy rate at December 31, 2014 was 93.4%, compared to 93.0% at December 31, 2013. The Company’s total portfolio occupancy rate at December 31, 2014 was 92.3%, compared to 91.2% at December 31, 2013. Each of the eight regions in which the Company owns assets is subject to its own unique market influences. See “Supplemental Property Data and Trends” below for more information on regional operating data.

Effect of Acquisitions and Dispositions of Properties on the Company’s Operations: The Company is focused on growing its operations by looking for opportunities to expand its presence in existing and new markets through strategic acquisitions that meet the Company’s focus on multi-tenant flex, industrial and office parks in markets where it has or may obtain a substantial market presence. The Company may from time to time dispose of assets based on market conditions.

On December 30, 2014, the Company acquired Charcot Business Park II, an eight-building, 119,000 square foot multi-tenant flex park in San Jose, California, for $16.0 million. The park is contiguous to the Company’s existing 164,000 square foot Charcot Business Park. On November 3, 2014, the Company acquired a 246,000 square foot multi-tenant industrial building in Austin, Texas, for a purchase price of $10.6 million. On August 21, 2014, the Company acquired a 145,000 square foot multi-tenant flex park consisting of five single-story buildings located in Dallas, Texas, for a purchase price of $5.1 million. On July 28, 2014, the Company

 

25


acquired a 19,000 square foot building in Dallas, Texas, for $1.1 million. The flex building is located in the Company’s 389,000 square foot Arapaho Business Park. On July 24, 2014, the Company acquired a 149,000 square foot building in Miami, Florida, for $12.7 million. The building is located within the Company’s 3.3 million square foot Miami Industrial Commerce Center.

As of December 31, 2014, the blended occupancy rate of the 11 assets acquired from 2012 to 2014 was 84.2% compared to a blended occupancy rate of 63.5% at the time of acquisition. As of December 31, 2014, the Company had 536,000 square feet of vacancy spread over these 11 acquisitions, which we believe provides the Company with considerable opportunity to generate additional rental income given that the Company’s Same Park assets in these same submarkets have a weighted average occupancy of 95.0% at December 31, 2014. The table below contains the assets acquired from 2012 to 2014 (in thousands):

 

Property

 

Date Acquired

 

Location

  Purchase Price     Square
Feet
    Occupancy
Acquisition
    Occupancy at
December 31, 2014
 
Charcot Business Park II   December, 2014   San Jose, California   $ 16,000       119       96.7     96.7
McNeil 1   November, 2014   Austin, Texas     10,550       246       53.3     53.3
Springlake Business Center II   August, 2014   Dallas, Texas     5,148       145       35.4     39.6
Arapaho Business Park 9   July, 2014   Dallas, Texas     1,134       19       100.0     100.0
MICC — Center 23   July, 2014   Miami, Florida     12,725       149       0.0     100.0
Bayshore Corporate Center   December, 2013   San Mateo, California     60,500       340       81.8     84.8
Valwood Business Park   November, 2013   Dallas, Texas     12,425       245       83.5     88.3
Dallas Flex Portfolio   October, 2013   Dallas, Texas     27,900       559       72.1     77.5

Arapaho Business Park

  July, 2013   Dallas, Texas     14,750       389       66.5     87.7
Austin Flex Buildings   December, 2012   Austin, Texas     14,900       226       86.1     100.0
212th Business Park   July, 2012   Kent Valley, Washington     37,550       958       52.3     91.6
     

 

 

   

 

 

     

Total

      $ 213,582       3,395       63.5     84.2
     

 

 

   

 

 

     

On November 21, 2014, the Company completed the sale of three business parks, consisting of 42 buildings aggregating 656,000 square feet, located in Phoenix, Arizona, for net proceeds of $52.2 million, resulting in a net gain of $29.6 million.

On October 1, 2014, the Company completed the sale of two business parks, Cornell Oaks Corporate Center and Creekside Corporate Park along with 11.5 acres of adjacent land, located in Beaverton, Oregon, for net proceeds of $159.9 million, resulting in a net gain of $62.8 million. The parks consist of 18 buildings aggregating 1.2 million square feet.

Subsequent to December 31, 2014, the Company completed the sale of Milwaukie Business Park located in Milwaukie, Oregon, for net proceeds of $10.6 million. The park consists of six multi-tenant flex buildings aggregating 102,000 square feet.

The Milwaukie Business Park, as well as a 23,000 square foot park in Tempe, Arizona, have been classified as properties held for disposition as of December 31, 2014 and 2013. The Company anticipates completing the sale of the Tempe asset later in 2015.

In October, 2012, the Company completed the sale of Quail Valley Business Park, a 66,000 square foot flex park in Houston, Texas, for a gross sales price of $2.3 million, resulting in a net gain of $935,000.

At the beginning of 2013, the Company reclassified a 125,000 square foot building located in Northern Virginia to land and building held for development as the Company intends to redevelop the property. In conjunction with the reclassification, the Company ceased depreciation of the asset. In July, 2013, the Company entered into a joint venture agreement, which it will maintain a 95.0% economic interest in, with a real estate development company to pursue a multi-family development of this property. During the entitlement phase, all costs related to the pre-development will be split evenly between the Company and its joint venture partner. Subsequent to December 31, 2014, the Company received entitlements which allow it to develop a multi-family building up to 450,000 square feet on the property. The property will be contributed to the joint venture upon commencement of construction, which will occur in 2015. The asset and capitalized development costs were $18.4 million and $16.2 million at December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively, which includes the Company’s basis in the land. For the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, the Company capitalized costs of $2.2 million and $752,000, respectively, related to this development, of which $944,000 and $359,000, respectively, related to capitalized interest costs.

 

26


Scheduled Lease Expirations: In addition to the 2.2 million square feet, or 7.7%, of space available in our total portfolio as of December 31, 2014, 2,318 leases representing 27.4% of the leased square footage of our total portfolio or 25.7% of annualized rental income are scheduled to expire in 2015. Our ability to re-lease available space will depend upon market conditions in the specific submarkets in which our properties are located. As a result, we cannot predict with certainty the rate at which expiring leases will be re-leased.

Impact of Inflation: Although inflation has not been significant in recent years, it remains a potential factor in our economy, and the Company continues to seek ways to mitigate its potential impact. A substantial portion of the Company’s leases require tenants to pay operating expenses, including real estate taxes, utilities, and insurance, as well as increases in common area expenses, partially reducing the Company’s exposure to inflation.

Concentration of Portfolio by Region: The table below reflects the Company’s square footage from continuing operations based on regional concentration as of December 31, 2014, excluding assets held for sale or sold. As part of the table below, we have reconciled total NOI to income from continuing operations (in thousands):

 

Region

   Square
Footage
     Percent of
Square
Footage
    2014
NOI
    Percent
of NOI
 

California

         

Northern California

     7,612        26.8   $ 53,530       22.3

Southern California

     3,988        14.0     35,821       14.9

Texas

         

Northern Texas

     3,125        11.0     16,733       7.0

Southern Texas

     1,963        6.9     13,304       5.5

Virginia

     4,040        14.2     55,665       23.2

Florida

     3,866        13.6     23,497       9.8

Maryland

     2,352        8.3     31,778       13.3

Washington

     1,479        5.2     9,545       4.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

     28,425        100.0   $ 239,873       100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Reconciliation of NOI to income from continuing operations

                    

Total NOI

        $ 239,873    

Other income and (expenses):

         

NOI from assets held for sale or sold

          11,634    

LTEIP amortization:

         

Cost of operations

          (2,623  

General and administrative

          (4,802  

Facility management fees

          660    

Interest and other income

          372    

Interest and other expenses

          (13,593  

Depreciation and amortization

          (110,357  

General and administrative

          (8,837  

Gain on sale of real estate facilities

          92,373    
       

 

 

   

Income from continuing operations

        $ 204,700    
       

 

 

   

 

27


Concentration of Credit Risk by Industry: The information below depicts the industry concentration of our tenant base as of December 31, 2014, excluding assets held for sale. The Company analyzes this concentration to minimize significant industry exposure risk.

 

Industry

   Percent of
Annualized
Rental Income
 

Business services

     17.7

Government

     10.4

Computer hardware, software and related services

     10.2

Warehouse, distribution, transportation and logistics

     10.0

Health services

     9.9

Retail, food, and automotive

     6.3

Engineering and construction

     6.3

Insurance and financial services

     4.9

Home furnishings

     3.1

Electronics

     2.9

Aerospace/defense products and services

     2.8

Communications

     2.3

Educational services

     1.7

Other

     11.5
  

 

 

 

Total

     100.0
  

 

 

 

The information below depicts the Company’s top 10 customers by annualized rental income as of December 31, 2014, excluding assets held for sale (in thousands):

 

Tenants

   Square
Footage
     Annualized
Rental Income(1)
     Percent of
Annualized
Rental Income
 

US Government

     845      $ 21,212        5.9

Kaiser Permanente

     199        4,462        1.2

Lockheed Martin Corporation

     171        4,440        1.2

Keeco LLC

     460        3,295        0.9

Luminex Corporation

     185        3,003        0.8

Wells Fargo

     118        2,410        0.7

Salient Federal Solutions, Inc.

     58        1,959        0.5

Raytheon

     80        1,819        0.5

Investorplace Media, LLC

     46        1,736        0.5

Inova Health Care Services

     63        1,670        0.5
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     2,225      $ 46,006        12.7
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) For leases expiring prior to December 31, 2015, annualized rental income represents income to be received under existing leases from January 1, 2015 through the date of expiration.

Comparison of 2014 to 2013

Results of Operations: Net income for the year ended December 31, 2014 was $204.7 million compared to $116.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2013. Net income allocable to common shareholders for the year ended December 31, 2014 was $113.2 million compared to $43.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2013. Net income per common share on a diluted basis was $4.19 for the year ended December 31, 2014 compared to $1.77 for the year ended December 31, 2013 (based on weighted average diluted common shares outstanding of 27,000,000 and 24,833,000, respectively). The increase in net income allocable to common shareholders was due to the gain on sale of real estate facilities of $92.4 million combined with an increase in NOI, offset by an increase in general and administrative expenses resulting primarily from non-cash stock compensation charges (discussed in more detail below and in Note 10 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Form 10-K).

 

28


Effective March, 2014, the Company entered into a performance-based restricted stock unit program, the Senior Management Long-Term Equity Incentive Program for 2014-2017 (“2014 LTEIP”), with certain employees of the Company. Net compensation expense of $7.4 million related to the 2014 LTEIP was recognized for the year ended December 31, 2014.

Effective January 1, 2012, the Company entered into a performance-based restricted stock unit program, the Senior Management Long-Term Equity Incentive Program for 2012-2015 (“2012 LTEIP”), with certian employees of the Company. While the Company saw improvements in operating metrics and delivered strong total shareholder return over 2012 and 2013, the original targets under the 2012 LTEIP were based on an assumption of a strong economic recovery starting in 2012. Given the pace of the economic recovery during those two years, the targets for 2012 and 2013 were not achieved and management determined in 2013 that it was not probable that the remaining targets under the 2012 LTEIP would be met. As such, the Company stopped recording amortization and recorded a reversal of all 2012 LTEIP amortization previously recorded in 2012 of $3.9 million during the year ended December 31, 2013. Net compensation expense of $3.9 million related to the 2012 LTEIP was recognized during the year ended December 31, 2012.

To present comparative results, the amortization of 2014 LTEIP and 2013 reversal of 2012 LTEIP in either cost of operations (for field leadership) or general and administrative expenses (for executive management) have been reflected as adjustments in the property operations tables below.

In order to evaluate the performance of the Company’s portfolio over comparable periods, management analyzes the operating performance of properties owned and operated throughout both periods (herein referred to as “Same Park”). The Same Park portfolio includes all operating properties owned or acquired prior to January 1, 2012, excluding 125,000 square feet of assets held for sale as of December 31, 2014. Therefore, Same Park rental income and cost of operations amounts exclude such assets. Operating properties that the Company acquired subsequent to January 1, 2012 are referred to as “Non-Same Park.” For the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, the Same Park facilities constitute 25.0 million rentable square feet, representing 87.4% of the 28.6 million square feet in the Company’s portfolio as of December 31, 2014.

 

29


The following table presents the operating results of the Company’s properties for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 in addition to other income and expenses items affecting income from continuing operations (in thousands, except per square foot data):

 

     For The Years Ended
December 31,
       
     2014     2013     Change  

Rental income:

      

Same Park (25.0 million rentable square feet)

   $ 333,363     $ 324,983       2.6

Non-Same Park (3.4 million rentable square feet)

     23,500       7,511       212.9
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total rental income

     356,863       332,494       7.3
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Cost of operations:

      

Same Park

     106,904       103,307       3.5

Non-Same Park

     10,086       3,345       201.5
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total cost of operations

     116,990       106,652       9.7
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Net operating income:

      

Same Park

     226,459       221,676       2.2

Non-Same Park

     13,414       4,166       222.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total net operating income

     239,873       225,842       6.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Other income and (expenses):

      

NOI from assets held for sale or sold (1)

     11,634       15,080       (22.9 %) 

Lease buyout payments (2)

            2,252       (100.0 %) 

LTEIP amortization (3):

      

Cost of operations

     (2,623     1,241       (311.4 %) 

General and administrative

     (4,802     2,652       (281.1 %) 

Facility management fees

     660       639       3.3

Other income and expenses

     (13,221     (14,681     (9.9 %) 

Depreciation and amortization

     (110,357     (108,917     1.3

General and administrative

     (8,487     (7,110     19.4

Acquisition transaction costs

     (350     (854     (59.0 %) 

Gain on sale of real estate facilities

     92,373              100.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Income from continuing operations

   $ 204,700     $ 116,144       76.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Same Park gross margin (4)

     67.9     68.2     (0.4 %) 

Same Park weighted average occupancy

     92.9     91.2     1.9

Non-Same Park weighted average occupancy

     77.7     66.5     16.8

Same Park realized rent per square foot (5)

   $ 14.34     $ 14.23       0.8

 

(1) Represents NOI from assets held for sale or sold. These assets generated rental income of $19.4 million and $24.5 million for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. Cost of operations for such assets was $7.8 million and $9.4 million for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

(2) Represents a lease buyout payment recorded in the fourth quarter of 2013 associated with a 75,000 square foot lease in Oregon which terminated as of December 31, 2013.

 

(3) Represents the 2014 LTEIP amortization recorded in 2014 and the reversal of the 2012 LTEIP amortization in 2013 of all amounts originally expensed in 2012.

 

(4) Computed by dividing Same Park NOI by Same Park rental income.

 

(5) Represents the annualized Same Park rental income earned per occupied square foot.

Supplemental Property Data and Trends: NOI from continuing operations is summarized for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 by region below. See Item 2, “Properties” above for more information on NOI, including why the Company presents NOI and how the Company uses NOI. The Company’s calculation of NOI may not be comparable to those of other companies and should not be used as an alternative to measures of performance calculated in accordance with GAAP.

 

30


The following table summarizes the Same Park and Non-Same Park operating results by region for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013. In addition, the table reflects the comparative impact on the overall rental income, cost of operations and NOI from properties that have been acquired since January 1, 2012, and the impact of such is included in Non-Same Park facilities in the table below. As part of the table below, we have reconciled total NOI to income from continuing operations (in thousands):

 

Region

  Rental Income
December 31,
2014
    Rental Income
December 31,
2013
    Increase
(Decrease)
    Cost of
Operations
December 31,
2014
    Cost of
Operations
December 31,
2013
    Increase
(Decrease)
    NOI
December 31,
2014
    NOI
December 31,
2013
    Increase
(Decrease)
 

Same Park

                 

Northern California

  $ 68,973      $ 64,625        6.7   $ 19,853      $ 19,956        (0.5 %)    $ 49,120      $ 44,669        10.0

Southern California

    54,864        53,897        1.8     19,043        18,128        5.0     35,821        35,769        0.1

Northern Texas

    18,666        17,963        3.9     6,022        5,750        4.7     12,644        12,213        3.5

Southern Texas

    17,681        17,329        2.0     6,055        5,928        2.1     11,626        11,401        2.0

Virginia

    81,312        82,317        (1.2 %)      25,647        25,139        2.0     55,665        57,178        (2.6 %) 

Florida

    33,920        32,297        5.0     10,259        10,022        2.4     23,661        22,275        6.2

Maryland

    49,252        48,253        2.1     17,474        15,815        10.5     31,778        32,438        (2.0 %) 

Washington

    8,695        8,302        4.7     2,551        2,569        (0.7 %)      6,144        5,733        7.2
 

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total Same Park

    333,363        324,983        2.6     106,904        103,307        3.5     226,459        221,676        2.2
 

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

   

Non-Same Park

                 

Northern California

    7,266        197        3588.3     2,856        100        2756.0     4,410        97        4446.4

Northern Texas

    8,667        1,924        350.5     4,578        1,005        355.5     4,089        919        344.9

Southern Texas

    2,431        1,958        24.2     753        634        18.8     1,678        1,324        26.7

Florida

    83               100.0     247               100.0     (164            (100.0 %) 

Washington

    5,053        3,432        47.2     1,652        1,606        2.9     3,401        1,826        86.3
 

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total Non-Same Park

    23,500        7,511        212.9     10,086        3,345        201.5     13,414        4,166        222.0
 

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total

  $ 356,863      $ 332,494        7.3   $ 116,990      $ 106,652        9.7   $ 239,873      $ 225,842        6.2
 

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

   
Reconciliation of NOI to income from continuing operations                                

Total NOI

  

  $ 239,873      $ 225,842        6.2

Other income and (expenses):

  

     

NOI from assets held for sale or sold

  

    11,634        15,080        (22.9 %) 

Lease buyout payments

  

           2,252        (100.0 %) 

LTEIP amortization:

  

     

Cost of operations

  

    (2,623     1,241        (311.4 %) 

General and administrative

  

    (4,802     2,652        (281.1 %) 

Facility management fees

  

    660        639        3.3

Other income and expenses

  

    (13,221     (14,681     (9.9 %) 

Depreciation and amortization

  

    (110,357     (108,917     1.3

General and administrative

  

    (8,487     (7,110     19.4

Acquisition transaction costs

  

    (350     (854     (59.0 %) 

Gain of sale of real estate facilities

  

    92,373               100.0
             

 

 

   

 

 

   

Income from continuing operations

  

  $ 204,700      $ 116,144        76.2
             

 

 

   

 

 

   

The following table summarizes Same Park weighted average occupancy rates and realized rent per square foot by region for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013.

 

     Weighted Average Occupancy Rates       Realized Rent Per Square Foot     

Region

   2014   2013   Change   2014    2013    Change

Northern California

   94.6%   89.4%   5.8%   $10.19    $10.11    0.8%

Southern California

   92.4%   92.3%   0.1%   $14.89    $14.65    1.6%

Northern Texas

   90.7%   90.2%   0.6%   $11.63    $11.25    3.4%

Southern Texas

   94.0%   93.9%   0.1%   $12.62    $12.38    1.9%

Virginia

   90.3%   91.0%   (0.8%)   $22.29    $22.38    (0.4%)

Florida

   95.9%   95.5%   0.4%   $9.51    $9.10    4.5%

Maryland

   87.8%   87.1%   0.8%   $23.86    $23.55    1.3%

Washington

   97.4%   94.3%   3.3%   $17.13    $16.89    1.4%

Total Same Park

   92.9%   91.2%   1.9%   $14.34    $14.23    0.8%

Rental Income: Excluding rental income of $19.4 million and $26.8 million from assets held for sale or sold and the lease buyout payment for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively, rental income increased $24.4 million from $332.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 to $356.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2014. The increase was a result of a $16.0 million increase in rental income from Non-Same

 

31


Park facilities combined with an increase in rental income from the Same Park portfolio of $8.4 million. The Same Park increase was due to an increase in occupancy, while the increase in Non-Same Park was due to a combination of an increase in occupancy and the acquisition of additional parks during the latter half of 2013. Including the assets held for sale or sold and the lease buyout payment, rental income increased $17.0 million from $359.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 to $376.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2014.

Facility Management Fees: Facility management fees, derived from PS, account for a small portion of the Company’s revenues. During the year ended December 31, 2014, $660,000 of revenue was recognized from facility management fees compared to $639,000 for the year ended December 31, 2013.

Cost of Operations: Excluding the adjustment for the LTEIP amortization noted above and cost of operations of $7.8 million and $9.4 million from assets held for sale or sold, cost of operations for the year ended December 31, 2014 was $117.0 million compared to $106.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, an increase of $10.3 million, or 9.7%. The increase was a result of a $6.7 million increase in cost of operations from Non-Same Park facilities combined with a $3.6 million or 3.5%, increase from the Same Park portfolio. The increase in Same Park cost of operation was driven by an increase in snow removal costs of $1.6 million in Maryland and Virginia as a result of severe winter storms in 2014 compared to the same period in 2013 combined with increases in utility costs and property taxes. Including the LTEIP amortization and assets held for sale or sold, cost of operations increased $12.5 million from $114.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 to $127.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014.

Depreciation and Amortization Expense: Depreciation and amortization expense was $110.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 compared to $108.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2013. The increase in depreciation and amortization expense was due to depreciation from 2013 acquisitions, partially offset by the disposition of assets.

General and Administrative Expenses: Excluding the adjustment for the LTEIP amortization and acquisition transaction costs, for the year ended December 31, 2014, general and administrative expenses increased $1.4 million, or 19.4%, over 2013 as a result of a non-cash expense of $840,000 relating to adjustments made to outstanding stock options as a result of the Special Cash Dividend paid in December, 2014 as well as an adjustment to the shares to be granted to directors upon retirement. Including the LTEIP amortization and acquisition transaction costs, for the year ended December 31, 2014, general and administrative expenses increased $8.3 million, or 156.8%, over 2013.

Interest and Other Income: Interest and other income was $372,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014 compared to $1.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013. During 2013, the Company sold to PS its ownership interest in STOR-Re Mutual Insurance Company, Inc. (“STOR-Re”) for $1.1 million, representing a 4.0% ownership interest, and accordingly, the Company recorded a gain on sale of the ownership interest of such amount as interest and other income. As of December 31, 2013, the Company had no ownership interest in STOR-Re.

Interest and Other Expenses: Interest and other expenses was $13.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 compared to $16.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2013. The decrease in interest and other expenses was primarily attributable to the repayments on the Term Loan and mortgage notes payable of $18.1 million during 2013 partially offset by an increase in interest capitalized for the joint venture development. Included in interest and other expenses for the year ended December 31, 2013 was amortization of the remaining commitment fee of $383,000 as a result of the repayment in full of the Term Loan.

Gain on Sale of Real Estate Facilities: On November 21, 2014, the Company completed the sale of three business parks, consisting of 42 buildings aggregating 656,000 square feet, located in Phoenix, Arizona, for net proceeds of $52.2 million, resulting in a net gain of $29.6 million.

On October 1, 2014, the Company completed the sale of two business parks, Cornell Oaks Corporate Center and Creekside Corporate Park along with 11.5 acres of adjacent land, located in Beaverton, Oregon, for net proceeds of $159.9 million, resulting in a net gain of $62.8 million. The parks consist of 18 buildings aggregating 1.2 million square feet.

 

32


Net Income Allocable to Noncontrolling Interests: Net income allocable to noncontrolling interests reflects the net income allocable to equity interests in the Operating Partnership that are not owned by the Company. Net income allocable to noncontrolling interests was $30.7 million and $13.0 million of allocated income to common unit holders for the years December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The increase was due to the gain on sale of real estate facilities of $92.4 million combined with an increase in NOI, offset by an increase in general and administrative expenses resulting primarily from non-cash stock compensation charges.

Comparison of 2013 to 2012

Results of Operations: Net income for the year ended December 31, 2013 was $116.1 million compared to $95.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. Net income allocable to common shareholders for the year ended December 31, 2013 was $43.9 million compared to $19.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. Net income per common share on a diluted basis was $1.77 for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to $0.81 for the year ended December 31, 2012 (based on weighted average diluted common shares outstanding of 24,833,000 and 24,323,000, respectively). The increase in net income allocable to common shareholders was due to the net impact of preferred equity transactions in 2013 and 2012 and the reversal of the 2012 LTEIP amortization (discussed in more detail below and in Note 10 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Form 10-K) combined with an increase in net operating income in 2013 and a decrease in interest expense.

As noted under the “Comparison of 2014 to 2013”, the targets for 2012 and 2013 were not achieved for the 2012 LTEIP and management determined in 2013 that it was not probable that the remaining targets under the 2012 LTEIP would be met. As such, the Company stopped recording amortization and recorded a reversal of all 2012 LTEIP amortization previously recorded in 2012 of $3.9 million during the year ended December 31, 2013. Net compensation expense of $3.9 million related to the 2012 LTEIP was recognized during the year ended December 31, 2012.

To present comparative results, the reversal and all amounts originally expensed in prior periods in either cost of operations (for field leadership) or general and administrative expenses (for executive management) have been reflected as adjustments in the property operations tables below.

For the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, the Same Park facilities constitute 25.0 million rentable square feet, representing 84.2% of the 29.7 million square feet in the Company’s portfolio as of December 31, 2013.

 

33


The following table presents the operating results of the Company’s properties for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012 in addition to other income and expenses items affecting income from continuing operations (in thousands, except per square foot data):

 

     For The Years Ended
December 31,
       
     2013     2012     Change  

Rental income:

      

Same Park (25.0 million rentable square feet)

   $ 324,983     $ 319,584       1.7

Non-Same Park (2.7 million rentable square feet)

     7,511       1,401       436.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total rental income

     332,494       320,985       3.6
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Cost of operations:

      

Same Park

     103,307       102,679       0.6

Non-Same Park

     3,345       683       389.8
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total cost of operations

     106,652       103,362       3.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Net operating income:

      

Same Park

     221,676       216,905       2.2

Non-Same Park

     4,166       718       480.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total net operating income

     225,842       217,623       3.8
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Other income and (expenses):

      

NOI from assets held for sale or sold (1)

     15,080       14,275       5.6

Lease buyout payments (2)

     2,252       1,783       26.3

LTEIP amortization (3):

      

Cost of operations

     1,241       (1,241     (200.0 %) 

General and administrative

     2,652       (2,652     (200.0 %) 

Facility management fees

     639       649       (1.5 %) 

Other income and expenses

     (14,681     (20,377     (28.0 %) 

Depreciation and amortization

     (108,917     (109,398     (0.4 %) 

General and administrative

     (7,110     (5,917     20.2

Acquisition transaction costs

     (854     (350     144.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Income from continuing operations

   $ 116,144     $ 94,395       23.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Same Park gross margin (4)

     68.2     67.9     0.4

Same Park weighted average occupancy

     91.2     90.0     1.3

Non-Same Park weighted average occupancy

     66.5     52.7     26.2

Same Park realized rent per square foot (5)

   $ 14.23     $ 14.19       0.3

 

(1) Represents NOI from assets held for sale or sold. These assets generated rental income of $24.5 million and $23.8 million for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Cost of operations for such assets was $9.4 million and $9.5 million for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

 

(2) Represents a lease buyout payment recorded in the fourth quarter of 2013 associated with a 75,000 square foot lease in Oregon which terminated as of December 31, 2013 and a lease buyout payment recorded in the fourth quarter of 2012 associated with a 39,000 square foot lease in Virginia which terminated as of December 25, 2012.

 

(3) Represents the reversal of the 2012 LTEIP amortization in 2013 and the amortization originally recorded in 2012.

 

(4) Computed by dividing Same Park NOI by Same Park rental income.

 

(5) Represents the annualized Same Park rental income earned per occupied square foot.

 

34


Supplemental Property Data and Trends: NOI from continuing operations is summarized for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012 by region below. The Company’s calculation of NOI may not be comparable to those of other companies and should not be used as an alternative to measures of performance calculated in accordance with GAAP.

The following table summarizes the Same Park and Non-Same Park operating results by region for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012. In addition, the table reflects the comparative impact on the overall rental income, cost of operations and NOI from properties that have been acquired since January 1, 2012, and the impact of such is included in Non-Same Park facilities in the table below. As part of the table below, we have reconciled total NOI to income from continuing operations (in thousands):

 

Region

  Rental
Income
December 31,
2013
    Rental
Income
December 31,
2012
    Increase
(Decrease)
    Cost of
Operations
December 31,
2013
    Cost of
Operations
December 31,
2012
    Increase
(Decrease)
    NOI
December 31,
2013
    NOI
December 31,
2012
    Increase
(Decrease)
 

Same Park

                 

Northern California

  $ 64,625      $ 62,036        4.2   $ 19,956      $ 19,536        2.1   $ 44,669      $ 42,500        5.1

Southern California

    53,897        52,344        3.0     18,128        17,586        3.1     35,769        34,758        2.9

Northern Texas

    17,963        17,787        1.0     5,750        5,783        (0.6 %)      12,213        12,004        1.7

Southern Texas

    17,329        16,325        6.2     5,928        5,711        3.8     11,401        10,614        7.4

Virginia

    82,317        82,437        (0.1 %)      25,139        25,859        (2.8 %)      57,178        56,578        1.1

Florida

    32,297        31,541        2.4     10,022        10,030        (0.1 %)      22,275        21,511        3.6

Maryland

    48,253        48,965        (1.5 %)      15,815        15,627        1.2     32,438        33,338        (2.7 %) 

Washington

    8,302        8,149        1.9     2,569        2,547        0.9     5,733        5,602        2.3
 

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total Same Park

    324,983        319,584        1.7     103,307        102,679        0.6     221,676        216,905        2.2
 

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

   

Non-Same Park

                 

Northern California

    197               100.0     100               100.0     97               100.0

Northern Texas

    1,924               100.0     1,005               100.0     919               100.0

Southern Texas

    1,958        63        3007.9     634        15        4126.7     1,324        48        2658.3

Washington

    3,432        1,338        156.5     1,606        668        140.4     1,826        670        172.5
 

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total Non-Same Park

    7,511        1,401        436.1     3,345        683        389.8     4,166        718        480.2
 

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total

  $ 332,494      $ 320,985        3.6   $ 106,652      $ 103,362        3.2   $ 225,842      $ 217,623        3.8
 

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

Reconciliation of NOI to income from continuing operations

                 

Total NOI

  $      225,842      $      217,623              3.8

Other income and (expenses):

     

NOI from assets held for sale or sold

    15,080        14,275        5.6

Lease buyout payments

    2,252        1,783        26.3

LTEIP amortization:

     

Cost of operations

    1,241        (1,241     (200.0 %) 

General and administrative

    2,652        (2,652     (200.0 %) 

Facility management fees

    639        649        (1.5 %) 

Other income and expenses

    (14,681     (20,377     (28.0 %) 

Depreciation and amortization

    (108,917     (109,398     (0.4 %) 

General and administrative

    (7,110     (5,917     20.2

Acquisition transaction costs

    (854     (350     144.0
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

Income from continuing operations

  $ 116,144      $ 94,395        23.0
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

The following table summarizes Same Park weighted average occupancy rates and realized rent per square foot by region for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012. Realized rent per square foot for Virginia and Total Same Park excludes a $1.8 million lease buyout payment for the year ended December 31, 2012.

 

     Weighted Average Occupancy Rates          

Realized Rent Per Square Foot

        

Region

   2013     2012     Change     2013      2012      Change  

Northern California

     89.4     85.5     4.6   $ 10.11       $ 10.15         (0.4 %) 

Southern California

     92.3     90.9     1.5   $ 14.65       $ 14.45         1.4

Northern Texas

     90.2     93.7     (3.7 %)    $ 11.25       $ 10.72         4.9

Southern Texas

     93.9     92.6     1.4   $ 12.38       $ 11.82         4.7

Virginia

     91.0     90.8     0.2   $ 22.38       $ 22.46         (0.4 %) 

Florida

     95.5     95.7     (0.2 %)    $ 9.10       $ 8.87         2.6

Maryland

     87.1     87.3     (0.2 %)    $ 23.55       $ 23.85         (1.3 %) 

Washington

     94.3     91.4     3.2   $ 16.90       $ 17.11         (1.2 %) 

Total Same Park

     91.2     90.0     1.3   $ 14.23       $ 14.19         0.3

 

35


Rental Income: Excluding rental income of $26.8 million and $25.6 million from assets held for sale or sold and certain lease buyout payments for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively, rental income increased $11.5 million from $321.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 to $332.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013. The increase was a result of a $6.1 million increase in rental income from Non-Same Park facilities combined with an increase of $5.4 million from the Same Park portfolio. The Same Park increase was due to an increase in occupancy while the increase in Non-Same Park was due to a combination of an increase in occupancy and the acquisition of additional parks. Including the assets held for sale or sold and the lease buyout payments, rental income increased $12.7 million from $346.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 to $359.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2013.

Facility Management Fees: Facility management fees, derived from PS, account for a small portion of the Company’s revenues. During the year ended December 31, 2013, $639,000 of revenue was recognized from facility management fees compared to $649,000 for the year ended December 31, 2012.

Cost of Operations: Excluding the adjustment for the LTEIP amortization noted above and cost of operations of $9.4 million and $9.5 million from assets held for sale or sold, cost of operations for the year ended December 31, 2013 was $106.7 million compared to $103.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, an increase of $3.3 million, or 3.2%. The increase was a result of $2.7 million increase in cost of operations from Non-Same Park facilities combined with a $628,000 or 0.6%, increase from the Same Park portfolio. The increase in Same Park cost of operations was driven by increases in compensation and utility costs partially offset by a decrease in repairs and maintenance costs. Including the LTEIP amortization and assets held for sale or sold, cost of operations increased $723,000 from $114.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 to $114.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2013.

Depreciation and Amortization Expense: Depreciation and amortization expense was $108.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to $109.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. The decrease was primarily due to an increase in fully depreciated assets partially offset by depreciation relating to property acquisitions.

General and Administrative Expenses: Excluding the adjustment for the LTEIP amortization and acquisition transaction costs, for the year ended December 31, 2013, general and administrative expenses increased $1.2 million, or 20.2%, over 2012 as a result of a increases in executive compensation partially offset by costs related to preferred equity redemptions reported during 2012. Including the LTEIP amortization and acquisition transaction costs, for the year ended December 31, 2013, general and administrative expenses decreased $3.6 million, or 40.4%, over 2012.

Interest and Other Income: Interest and other income was $1.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to $241,000 for the year ended December 31, 2012. During 2013, the Company sold to PS its ownership interest in STOR-Re for $1.1 million, representing a 4.0% ownership interest, and accordingly, the Company recorded a gain on sale of the ownership interest of such amount as interest and other income. As of December 31, 2013, the Company had no ownership interest in STOR-Re.

Interest and Other Expenses: Interest and other expenses was $16.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to $20.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. For the year ended December 31, 2013, interest and other expenses included amortization of the remaining commitment fee of $383,000 as a result of the repayment in full of the Term Loan. The decrease in interest and other expenses were primarily attributable to the repayments on the Term Loan and mortgage notes payable of $18.1 million during 2013 combined with no borrowings on the Credit Facility partially offset by the amortization of the remaining commitment fee.

Gain on Sale of Real Estate Facility: Included in total discontinued operations is the gain on the sale of Quail Valley Business Park, a 66,000 square foot flex park in Houston, Texas, for a gross sales price of $2.3 million, resulting in a net gain of $935,000 during October, 2012.

Net Income Allocable to Noncontrolling Interests: Net income allocable to noncontrolling interests reflects the net income allocable to equity interests in the Operating Partnership that are not owned by the Company. Net income allocable to noncontrolling interests was $13.0 million of allocated income to common unit holders for the year December 31, 2013 compared to $6.3 million allocated income ($323,000 allocated to preferred unit

 

36


holders and $6.0 million allocated to common unit holders) for the year ended December 31, 2012. The increase was due to the net impact of preferred equity transactions in 2013 and 2012 and the reversal of the 2012 LTEIP amortization combined with an increase in net operating income in 2013 and a decrease in interest expense.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Cash and cash equivalents increased $121.0 million from $31.5 million at December 31, 2013 to $152.5 million at December 31, 2014 for the reasons noted below.

Net cash provided by operating activities for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 was $227.8 million and $222.3 million, respectively. The increase of $5.5 million in net cash provided by operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2014 compared to the same period in 2013 was primarily due to an increase in net operating income of $4.5 million combined with a decrease in interest and other expenses. Management believes that the Company’s internally generated net cash provided by operating activities will be sufficient to enable it to meet its operating expenses, capital expenditures, debt service requirements and distributions to shareholders for the foreseeable future.

Net cash provided by investing activities was $113.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 compared to net cash used in investing activities of $172.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2013. The change was primarily due to net proceeds of $212.2 million received from the sale of assets located in Beaverton, Oregon and Phoenix, Arizona during 2014 combined with a decrease in cash paid of $68.9 million for acquisitions. The Company paid $45.0 million for acquisitions in Texas, Florida and California in 2014 compared to $113.0 million for acquisitions in Texas and California in 2013.

Net cash used in financing activities was $220.0 million and $30.8 million for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The change was primarily due to the use of net proceeds from the issuance of common and preferred equity offerings of $298.6 million to repay debt of $218.1 million during 2013 combined with an increase in common distributions as a result of the Special Cash Dividend paid in December, 2014 and common dividend increase effective March, 2014.

As described in Item 1, “Business — Borrowings,” the Company had an outstanding mortgage note payable of $250.0 million at December 31, 2014 and 2013. The Company had no balance outstanding on its $250.0 million Credit Facility at December 31, 2014 and 2013. The Company fully repaid the outstanding balance of $200.0 million on its Term Loan in November, 2013. See Notes 5 and 6 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Form 10-K for a summary of the Company’s outstanding borrowings as of December 31, 2014.

The Company’s preferred equity outstanding decreased to 25.1% of its market capitalization during the year ended December 31, 2014 primarily due to an increase in stock price from $76.42 at December 31, 2013 to $79.54 at December 31, 2014. As of December 31, 2014, the Company had one fixed-rate mortgage note totaling $250.0 million, which represented 6.3% of its total market capitalization. The Company calculates market capitalization by adding (1) the liquidation preference of the Company’s outstanding preferred equity, (2) principal value of the Company’s outstanding debt and (3) the total number of common shares and common units outstanding at December 31, 2014 multiplied by the closing price of the stock on that date. The interest rate for the mortgage note is 5.45% per annum. The Company had 21.3% of its properties, in terms of net book value, encumbered at December 31, 2014.

The Company focuses on retaining cash for reinvestment as we believe that this provides the greatest level of financial flexibility. While operating results have been negatively impacted by the slow economic conditions, we believe it is likely that as the economy recovers and operating fundamentals improve, additional increases in distributions to the Company’s common shareholders will be required. Going forward, the Company will continue to monitor its taxable income and the corresponding dividend requirements. During the first quarter of 2014, the Company increased its quarterly dividend from $0.44 per common share to $0.50 per common share, increasing quarterly distributions by approximately $2.0 million per quarter. Dividends declared for the three months ended December 31, 2014 included a one-time special cash dividend of $2.75 per share along with the fourth quarter regular dividend of $0.50 per share. The Special Cash Dividend was declared to distribute a portion of the excess income attributable to gains on sales from asset dispositions during 2014, as discussed in Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Form 10-K.

 

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Issuance of Preferred Stock: On March 14, 2013, the Company issued $110.0 million or 4.4 million depositary shares, each representing 1/1,000 of a share of the 5.70% Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series V, at $25.00 per depositary share.

On September 14, 2012, the Company issued $230.0 million or 9.2 million depositary shares, each representing 1/1,000 of a share of the 5.75% Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series U, at $25.00 per depositary share.

On May 14, 2012, the Company issued $350.0 million or 14.0 million depositary shares, each representing 1/1,000 of a share of the 6.00% Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series T, at $25.00 per depositary share.

On January 18, 2012, the Company issued $230.0 million or 9.2 million depositary shares, each representing 1/1,000 of a share of the 6.45% Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series S, at $25.00 per depositary share.

Issuance of Common Stock: On November 7, 2013, the Company sold 1,495,000 shares of common stock in a public offering and concurrently sold 950,000 shares of common stock at the public offering price to PS. The aggregate net proceeds were $192.3 million.

Redemption of Preferred Equity: On October 9, 2012, the Company completed the redemption of its 6.70% Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series P, at its par value of $132.3 million. The Company reported the excess of the redemption amount over the carrying amount of $3.8 million, equal to the original issuance costs, as a reduction of net income allocable to common shareholders and unit holders for the year ended December 31, 2012.

On June 15, 2012, the Company completed the redemption of its 7.00% Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series H, at its par value of $158.5 million and its 6.875% Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series I, at its par value of $68.6 million. The Company reported the excess of the redemption amount over the carrying amount of $8.1 million, equal to the original issuance costs, as a reduction of net income allocable to common shareholders and unit holders for the year ended December 31, 2012.

On June 8, 2012, the Company redeemed 223,300 units of its 7.125% Series N Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Units for $5.6 million. The Company reported the excess of the redemption amount over the carrying amount of $149,000, equal to the original issuance costs, as a reduction of net income allocable to common shareholders and unit holders for the year ended December 31, 2012.

During February, 2012, the Company completed the redemption of its 7.20% Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series M, at its par value of $79.6 million and its 7.375% Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series O, at its par value of $84.6 million. The Company reported the excess of the redemption amount over the carrying amount of $5.3 million, equal to the original issuance costs, as a reduction of net income allocable to common shareholders and unit holders for the year ended December 31, 2012.

Repurchase of Common Stock: No shares of common stock were repurchased under the board approved common stock repurchase program during the years ended December 31, 2014 or 2013.

Mortgage Note Repayment: In January, 2013, the Company repaid two mortgage notes payable totaling $18.1 million with a combined weighted average stated interest rate of 5.60%.

In November, 2012, the Company repaid $13.2 million on a mortgage note with a stated interest rate of 5.73%.

 

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Capital Expenditures: The Company defines recurring capital expenditures as those necessary to maintain and operate its commercial real estate at its current economic value. During the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, the Company expended $47.2 million, $49.2 million and $49.9 million, respectively, in recurring capital expenditures, or $1.59, $1.72 and $1.80 per weighted average square foot owned, respectively. Tenant improvement amounts exclude those amounts reimbursed by the tenants. Nonrecurring capital improvements include property renovations and expenditures related to repositioning acquisitions. The following table depicts capital expenditures (in thousands):

 

     For the Years Ended December 31,  
          2014                2013                2012       

Recurring capital expenditures

        

Capital improvements

   $ 8,664      $ 10,083      $ 8,394  

Tenant improvements

     27,824        29,224        34,236  

Lease commissions

     10,684        9,850        7,244  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total recurring capital expenditures

     47,172        49,157        49,874  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Nonrecurring capital improvements

     4,614        9,018        6,898  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total capital expenditures

   $ 51,786      $ 58,175      $ 56,772  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Capital expenditures on a per square foot owned basis are as follows:

 

     For the Years Ended December 31,  
         2014              2013              2012      

Recurring capital expenditures

        

Capital improvements

   $ 0.29      $ 0.35      $ 0.30  

Tenant improvements

     0.94        1.02        1.24  

Lease commissions

     0.36        0.35        0.26  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total recurring capital expenditures

     1.59        1.72        1.80  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Nonrecurring capital improvements

     0.16        0.32        0.25  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total capital expenditures

   $ 1.75      $ 2.04      $ 2.05  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

For the year ended December 31, 2014, recurring capital expenditures decreased $1.9 million, or 4.0%, over the same period in 2013 primarily due to cash paid for several significant tenant improvements projects within the Same Park portfolio in 2013. The decrease in nonrecurring capital improvements of $4.4 million, or 48.8%, was due to $5.6 million of repositioning projects spent on 2012 acquisitions in 2013, partially offset by repositioning projects relating to 2014 acquisitions.

Distributions: The Company has elected and intends to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes. In order to maintain its status as a REIT, the Company must meet, among other tests, sources of income, share ownership and certain asset tests. As a REIT, the Company is not taxed on that portion of its taxable income that is distributed to its shareholders provided that at least 90% of its taxable income is distributed to its shareholders prior to the filing of its tax return.

During 2014, the Company sold a combined total of 1.9 million square feet along with some parcels of land in Beaverton, Oregon and Phoenix, Arizona. Absent a special distribution in excess of our normal, recurring quarterly dividend, the Company would have had taxable income in excess of distributions resulting in federal income tax at the corporate level. To qualify for the dividends paid deduction for tax purposes and minimize this potential tax, on December 30, 2014, the Company paid a one-time special cash dividend of $2.75 per common share along with the fourth quarter 2014 regular dividend of $0.50 per common share. Holders of common partnership units of the Operating Partnership also received the same distribution on December 30, 2014. The Board of Directors will continue to evaluate our dividend rate in light of our actual and projected taxable income, liquidity requirements and other circumstances, and there can be no assurance that the future dividends declared by our Board of Directors will not differ materially.

 

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The Company’s funding strategy has been to primarily use permanent capital, including common and preferred stock, along with internally generated retained cash flows to meet its liquidity needs. In addition, the Company may sell properties that no longer meet its investment criteria. From time to time, the Company may use its Credit Facility or other forms of debt to facilitate real estate acquisitions or other capital allocations. The Company targets a minimum ratio of FFO to combined fixed charges and preferred distributions of 3.0 to 1.0. Fixed charges include interest expense and capitalized interest while preferred distributions include amounts paid to preferred shareholders and preferred Operating Partnership unit holders. For the year ended December 31, 2014, the FFO to fixed charges and preferred distributions coverage ratio was 3.2 to 1.0.

Non-GAAP Supplemental Disclosure Measure: Funds from Operations: Management believes that FFO is a useful supplemental measure of the Company’s operating performance. The Company computes FFO in accordance with the White Paper on FFO approved by the Board of Governors of NAREIT. The White Paper defines FFO as net income, computed in accordance with GAAP, before depreciation, amortization, gains or losses on asset dispositions, net income allocable to noncontrolling interests — common units, net income allocable to restricted stock unit holders, impairment charges and nonrecurring items. Management believes that FFO provides a useful measure of the Company’s operating performance and when compared year over year, reflects the impact to operations from trends in occupancy rates, rental rates, operating costs, development activities, general and administrative expenses and interest costs, providing a perspective not immediately apparent from net income.

FFO should be analyzed in conjunction with net income. However, FFO should not be viewed as a substitute for net income as a measure of operating performance or liquidity as it does not reflect depreciation and amortization costs or the level of capital expenditure and leasing costs necessary to maintain the operating performance of the Company’s properties, which are significant economic costs and could materially affect the Company’s results of operations.

Management believes FFO provides useful information to the investment community about the Company’s operating performance when compared to the performance of other real estate companies as FFO is generally recognized as the industry standard for reporting operations of REITs. Other REITs may use different methods for calculating FFO and, accordingly, our FFO may not be comparable to other real estate companies.

 

40


FFO for the Company is computed as follows (in thousands, except per share data):

 

     For The Years Ended December 31,  
     2014     2013     2012     2011     2010  

Net income allocable to common shareholders

   $ 113,154     $ 43,851     $ 19,805     $ 52,162     $ 38,959  

Gain on sale of land and real estate facilities

     (92,373            (935     (2,717     (5,153

Depreciation and amortization (1)

     110,357       108,917       109,494       84,682       78,868  

Net income allocable to noncontrolling interests —common units

     30,729       12,952       5,970       15,543       11,594  

Net income allocable to restricted stock unit holders

     329       125       138       127       152  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

FFO allocable to common and dilutive shares

     162,196       165,845       134,472       149,797       124,420  

FFO allocated to noncontrolling interests — common units

     (34,586     (37,755     (31,041     (34,319     (28,450

FFO allocated to restricted stock unit holders

     (256     (264     (455     (301     (374
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

FFO allocated to common shares

   $ 127,354     $ 127,826     $ 102,976     $ 115,177     $ 95,596  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted average common shares outstanding

     26,899       24,732       24,234       24,516       24,546  

Weighted average common Operating Partnership units outstanding

     7,305       7,305       7,305       7,305       7,305  

Weighted average restricted stock units outstanding

     69       51       107       64       96  

Weighted average common share equivalents outstanding

     101       101       89       83       141  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total common and dilutive shares

     34,374       32,189       31,735       31,968       32,088