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EX-32.2 - EXHIBIT 32.2 - Wizard World, Inc.ex32-2.htm
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EXCEL - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - Wizard World, Inc.Financial_Report.xls

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

[X] QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended: March 31, 2014

 

OR

 

[  ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from __________ to __________

 

Commission File No. 000-33383

 

WIZARD WORLD, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   98-0357690
(State or other jurisdiction
of incorporation)
  (IRS Employer
Identification No.)

 

225 California Street

El Segundo, CA 90245

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(310) 648-8428

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the past 12 months, and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (Sec. 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files. Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:

 

Large accelerated filer [  ] Accelerated filer [  ]
Non-accelerated filer [  ] Smaller reporting company [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes [  ] No [X]

 

As of May 7, 2014, there were 51,354,024 shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock.

 

 

 

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION
       
Item 1. Financial Statements.   3
       
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.   4
       
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.   12
       
Item 4. Controls and Procedures.   12
       
PART II – OTHER INFORMATION
       
Item 1. Legal Proceedings.   13
       
Item 1A. Risk Factors.   13
       
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.   13
       
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities.   13
       
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.   13
       
Item 5. Other Information.   13
       
Item 6. Exhibits.   13
       
Signatures   14

 

2
 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements.

 

Wizard World, Inc.

 

March 31, 2014 and 2013

 

Index to the Consolidated Financial Statements

 

Contents   Page(s)
     
Consolidated Balance Sheets at March 31, 2014 (Unaudited) and December 31, 2013   F-1
     
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2014 and 2013 (Unaudited)   F-2
     
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2014 and 2013 (Unaudited)   F-3
     
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)   F-4

 

3
 

 

Wizard World, Inc.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

   March 31, 2014   December 31, 2013 
   (Unaudited)     
Assets          
Current Assets          
Cash  $3,463,632   $3,633,846 
Accounts receivable, net   375,739    17,757 
Inventory   27,002    27,002 
Prepaid expenses   1,308,957    620,188 
Total Current Assets   5,175,330    4,298,793 
           
Property and equipment, net   61,114    50,960 
           
Security deposit   23,400    34,800 
           
Total Assets  $5,259,844   $4,384,553 
           
Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity          
Current Liabilities          
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities  $1,202,617   $1,230,799 
Unearned convention revenue   866,346    861,627 
           
Total Current Liabilities   2,068,963    2,092,426 
           
Total Liabilities   2,068,963    2,092,426 
           
Commitments and contingencies          
           
Stockholders’ Equity          
Series A convertible preferred stock par value $0.0001: 50,000 shares authorized; none issued and outstanding   -    - 
Common stock par value $0.0001: 80,000,000 shares authorized; 51,354,024 and 51,204,024 shares issued and outstanding, respectively   5,136    5,111 
Additional paid-in capital   15,250,450    15,043,762 
Accumulated deficit   (12,064,705)   (12,756,746)
Total Stockholders’ Equity   3,190,881    2,292,127 
           
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity  $5,259,844   $4,384,553 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements

 

F-1
 

 

Wizard World, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Operations

 

   For the Three Months Ended 
   March 31, 2014   March 31, 2013 
   (Unaudited)   (Unaudited) 
         
Convention revenue  $5,173,198   $1,793,476 
           
Cost of revenue   3,260,027    976,877 
           
Gross margin   1,913,171    816,599 
           
Operating expenses          
Compensation   757,168    306,029 
Consulting fees   64,924    190,752 
General and administrative   398,877    193,726 
           
Total operating expenses   1,220,969    690,507 
           
Income from operations   692,202    126,092 
           
Other income (expenses)          
Interest expense   (161)   (1,161)
Change in the fair value of derivative liabilities   -    1,049,926 
           
Other income (expenses), net   (161)   1,048,765 
           
Income before income tax provision   692,041    1,174,857 
           
Income tax provision   -    - 
           
Net income   692,041    1,174,857 
           
Deemed dividend on Series A Convertible Preferred Stock   -    (70,681)
           
Net income attributable to common stockholders  $692,041   $1,104,176 
           
Net income attributable to common stockholders          
Basic  $0.01   $0.03 
Diluted  $0.01   $0.02 
           
Weighted average common shares outstanding - basic   51,156,802    35,237,501 
Weighted average common shares outstanding - diluted   55,629,302    57,207,420 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements

 

F-2
 

 

Wizard World, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

   For the Three Months Ended 
   March 31, 2014   March 31, 2013 
   (Unaudited)   (Unaudited) 
         
Cash Flows From Operating Activities:          
Net income  $692,041   $1,174,857 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:          
Depreciation   3,830    554 
Change in fair value of derivative liabilities   -    (1,049,926)
Share based payments   102,963    93,802 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts receivable   (357,982)   (29,497)
Prepaid expenses   (688,770)   (292,698)
Security deposit   11,400    - 
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities   75,569    133,007 
Unearned convention revenue   4,719    161,762 
           
Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Operating Activities   (156,230)   191,861 
           
Cash Flows from Investing Activities:          
Purchase of property and equipment   (13,984)   (29,298)
           
Net Cash Used In Investing Activities   (13,984)   (29,298)
           
Net change  in cash   (170,214)   162,563 
           
Cash at beginning of reporting period   3,633,846    1,957,060 
           
Cash at end of reporting period  $3,463,632   $2,119,623 
           
Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information:          
Interest paid  $-   $- 
Income tax paid  $-   $- 
           
Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing activities:          
Issuance of common stock for settlement of accrued liabilities  $103,750   $- 
Deemed dividend  $-   $70,681 

  

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements

 

F-3
 

 

Wizard World, Inc.

March 31, 2014 and 2013

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

 

Note 1 – Organization and Operations

 

Wizard World, Inc.

 

Wizard World, Inc., formerly GoEnergy, Inc. (“Wizard World” or the “Company”) was incorporated on May 2, 2001, under the laws of the State of Delaware.

 

Kick the Can Corp.

 

Kick The Can Corp. was incorporated on September 20, 2010, under the laws of the State of Nevada.

 

Kicking the Can, L.L.C.

 

Kicking The Can, L.L.C. was formed on April 17, 2009, under the laws of the State of Delaware.

 

Wizard Conventions, Inc.

 

Wizard Conventions, Inc. was incorporated on February 28, 1997, under the laws of the State of New York. The Company is a producer of pop culture and live multimedia conventions across North America that provides a social networking and entertainment venue for popular fiction enthusiasts of movies, TV shows, video games, technology, toys, social networking/gaming platforms, comic books and graphic novels.

 

Acquisition of Kick the Can Corp./ Wizard Conventions, Inc. Recognized as a Reverse Acquisition

 

On December 7, 2010, the Company entered into and consummated a share exchange agreement (“Share Exchange Agreement”) with successor, Kick the Can Corp. (“KTC Corp.”) and its predecessors Wizard Conventions, Inc. and Kicking The Can, L.L.C. (collectively, “Conventions”). Pursuant to the Exchange Agreement, the Company issued 32,927,596 shares of its common stock to the shareholders of KTC Corp. in exchange for 100% of the issued and outstanding shares of KTC Corp. The shares issued represented approximately 94.9% of the issued and outstanding common stock immediately after the consummation of the Share Exchange Agreement.

 

As a result of the controlling financial interest of the former stockholder of Conventions, for financial statement reporting purposes, the merger between the Company and Conventions has been treated as a reverse acquisition with KTC Corp. deemed the accounting acquirer and the Company deemed the accounting acquiree under the acquisition method of accounting in accordance with section 805-10-55 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. The reverse merger is deemed a capital transaction and the net assets of KTC Corp. (the accounting acquirer) are carried forward to the Company (the legal acquirer and the reporting entity) at their carrying value before the combination. The acquisition process utilizes the capital structure of the Company and the assets and liabilities of KTC Corp. which are recorded at historical cost. The equity of the Company is the historical equity of KTC Corp. retroactively restated to reflect the number of shares issued by the Company in the transaction. Because of the predecessor/successor relationship between the Company and KTC Corp., Conventions ultimately became the accounting acquirer.

 

Wizard World Digital, Inc.

 

On March 18, 2011, the Company formed a wholly owned subsidiary called Wizard World Digital, Inc., a Nevada corporation (“Digital”). Digital never commenced operations or has employees, and Digital is currently dormant, pending execution of a digital strategy.

 

Note 2 – Significant and Critical Accounting Policies and Practices

 

The Management of the Company is responsible for the selection and use of appropriate accounting policies and the appropriateness of accounting policies and their application. Critical accounting policies and practices are those that are both most important to the portrayal of the Company’s financial condition and results and require management’s most difficult, subjective, or complex judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effects of matters that are inherently uncertain. The Company’s significant and critical accounting policies and practices are disclosed below as required by generally accepted accounting principles.

 

F-4
 

 

Basis of Presentation - Unaudited Interim Financial Information

 

The accompanying unaudited interim consolidated financial statements and related notes have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) for interim financial information, and in accordance with the rules and regulations of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) with respect to Form 10-Q and Article 8 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by U.S. GAAP for complete financial statements. The unaudited interim consolidated financial statements furnished reflect all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring accruals) which are, in the opinion of management, necessary to a fair statement of the results for the interim periods presented. Interim results are not necessarily indicative of the results for the full year. These unaudited interim consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements of the Company for the year ended December 31, 2013 and notes thereto contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2013, as filed with the SEC on March 3, 2014.

 

Use of Estimates and Assumptions and Critical Accounting Estimates and Assumptions

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date(s) of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period(s).

 

Critical accounting estimates are estimates for which (a) the nature of the estimate is material due to the levels of subjectivity and judgment necessary to account for highly uncertain matters or the susceptibility of such matters to change and (b) the impact of the estimate on financial condition or operating performance is material. The Company’s critical accounting estimates and assumptions affecting the financial statements were:

 

(i)Allowance for doubtful accounts: Management’s estimate of the allowance for doubtful accounts is based on historical sales, historical loss levels, and an analysis of the collectability of individual accounts; and general economic conditions that may affect a client’s ability to pay. The Company evaluated the key factors and assumptions used to develop the allowance in determining that it is reasonable in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole.
   
(ii)Inventory Obsolescence and Markdowns: The Company’s estimate of potentially excess and slow-moving inventories is based on evaluation of inventory levels and aging, review of inventory turns and historical sales experiences. The Company’s estimate of reserve for inventory shrinkage is based on the historical results of physical inventory cycle counts.
   
(iii)Fair value of long-lived assets: Fair value is generally determined using the asset’s expected future discounted cash flows or market value, if readily determinable. If long-lived assets are determined to be recoverable, but the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives are shorter than originally estimated, the net book values of the long-lived assets are depreciated over the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives. The Company considers the following to be some examples of important indicators that may trigger an impairment review: (i) significant under-performance or losses of assets relative to expected historical or projected future operating results; (ii) significant changes in the manner or use of assets or in the Company’s overall strategy with respect to the manner or use of the acquired assets or changes in the Company’s overall business strategy; (iii) significant negative industry or economic trends; (iv) increased competitive pressures; (v) a significant decline in the Company’s stock price for a sustained period of time; and (vi) regulatory changes. The Company evaluates acquired assets for potential impairment indicators at least annually and more frequently upon the occurrence of such events.
   
(iv)Valuation allowance for deferred tax assets: Management assumes that the realization of the Company’s net deferred tax assets resulting from its net operating loss (“NOL”) carry–forwards for Federal income tax purposes that may be offset against future taxable income was not considered more likely than not and accordingly, the potential tax benefits of the net loss carry-forwards are offset by a full valuation allowance. Management made this assumption based on (a) the Company has incurred recurring losses, (b) general economic conditions, and (c) its ability to raise additional funds to support its daily operations by way of a public or private offering, among other factors.
   
(v)Estimates and assumptions used in valuation of equity instruments: Management estimates expected term of share options and similar instruments, expected volatility of the Company’s common shares and the method used to estimate it, expected annual rate of quarterly dividends, and risk free rate(s) to value share options and similar instruments.

 

These significant accounting estimates or assumptions bear the risk of change due to the fact that there are uncertainties attached to these estimates or assumptions, and certain estimates or assumptions are difficult to measure or value.

 

Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various assumptions that are believed to be reasonable in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources.

 

Management regularly evaluates the key factors and assumptions used to develop the estimates utilizing currently available information, changes in facts and circumstances, historical experience and reasonable assumptions. After such evaluations, if deemed appropriate, those estimates are adjusted accordingly.

 

Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

F-5
 

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The Company applies the guidance of Topic 810 “Consolidation” of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to determine whether and how to consolidate another entity. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 810-10-15-10 all majority-owned subsidiaries—all entities in which a parent has a controlling financial interest—shall be consolidated except (1) when control does not rest with the parent, the majority owner; (2) if the parent is a broker-dealer within the scope of Topic 940 and control is likely to be temporary; (3) consolidation by an investment company within the scope of Topic 946 of a non-investment-company investee. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 810-10-15-8, the usual condition for a controlling financial interest is ownership of a majority voting interest, and, therefore, as a general rule ownership by one reporting entity, directly or indirectly, of more than 50 percent of the outstanding voting shares of another entity is a condition pointing toward consolidation. The power to control may also exist with a lesser percentage of ownership, for example, by contract, lease, agreement with other stockholders, or by court decree. The Company consolidates all less-than-majority-owned subsidiaries, if any, in which the parent’s power to control exists.

 

The consolidated financial statements include all accounts of the entities as of the reporting period ending date(s) and for the reporting period(s) as follows:

 

Name of consolidated subsidiary or entity  State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization  Date of incorporation or formation
(date of acquisition, if applicable)
  Attributable interest 
           
KTC Corp.  The State of Nevada, U.S.A.  September 20, 2010   100%
            
Kicking the Can L.L.C.  The State of Delaware, U.S.A.  April 17, 2009   100%
            
Wizard Conventions, Inc.  The State of New York, U.S.A.  February 28, 1997   100%
            
Wizard World Digital, Inc.  The State of Nevada, U.S.A.  March 18, 2011   100%

 

All inter-company balances and transactions have been eliminated.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company follows paragraph 825-10-50-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for disclosures about fair value of its financial instruments and paragraph 820-10-35-37 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Paragraph 820-10-35-37”) to measure the fair value of its financial instruments. Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a framework for measuring fair value in accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (U.S. GAAP), and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. To increase consistency and comparability in fair value measurements and related disclosures, Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value into three (3) broad levels. The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs. The three (3) levels of fair value hierarchy defined by Paragraph 820-10-35-37 are described below:

 

Level 1   Quoted market prices available in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the reporting date.
     
Level 2   Pricing inputs other than quoted prices in active markets included in Level 1, which are either directly or indirectly observable as of the reporting date.
     
Level 3   Pricing inputs that are generally observable inputs and not corroborated by market data.

 

Financial assets are considered Level 3 when their fair values are determined using pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar techniques and at least one significant model assumption or input is unobservable.

 

The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs. If the inputs used to measure the financial assets and liabilities fall within more than one level described above, the categorization is based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement of the instrument.

 

F-6
 

 

The carrying amount of the Company’s financial assets and liabilities, such as cash, accounts receivable, prepaid expenses, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, accrued dividends and unearned convention revenue approximate their fair value because of the short maturity of those instruments.

 

The Company had no financial instruments measured using Level 3 as of March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013.

 

Transactions involving related parties cannot be presumed to be carried out on an arm’s-length basis, as the requisite conditions of competitive, free-market dealings may not exist. Representations about transactions with related parties, if made, shall not imply that the related party transactions were consummated on terms equivalent to those that prevail in arm’s-length transactions unless such representations can be substantiated.

 

Fair Value of Non-Financial Assets or Liabilities Measured on a Recurring Basis

 

The Company’s non-financial assets include inventory. The Company identifies potentially excess and slow-moving inventory by evaluating turn rates, inventory levels and other factors. Excess quantities are identified through evaluation of inventory aging, review of inventory turns and historical sales experiences. The Company provides lower of cost or market reserves for such identified excess and slow-moving inventories. The Company establishes a reserve for inventory shrinkage, if any, based on the historical results of physical inventory cycle counts.

 

Carrying Value, Recoverability and Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company has adopted paragraph 360-10-35-17 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for its long-lived assets. The Company’s long-lived assets, which include property and equipment, are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable.

 

The Company assesses the recoverability of its long-lived assets by comparing the projected undiscounted net cash flows associated with the related long-lived asset or group of long-lived assets over their remaining estimated useful lives against their respective carrying amounts. Impairment, if any, is based on the excess of the carrying amount over the fair value of those assets. Fair value is generally determined using the asset’s expected future discounted cash flows or market value, if readily determinable. If long-lived assets are determined to be recoverable, but the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives are shorter than originally estimated, the net book values of the long-lived assets are depreciated over the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives.

 

The Company considers the following to be some examples of important indicators that may trigger an impairment review: (i) significant under-performance or losses of assets relative to expected historical or projected future operating results; (ii) significant changes in the manner or use of assets or in the Company’s overall strategy with respect to the manner or use of the acquired assets or changes in the Company’s overall business strategy; (iii) significant negative industry or economic trends; (iv) increased competitive pressures; and (v) regulatory changes. The Company evaluates acquired assets for potential impairment indicators at least annually and more frequently upon the occurrence of such events.

 

The key assumptions used in management’s estimates of projected cash flow deal largely with forecasts of sales levels, gross margins, and operating costs of the manufacturing facilities. These forecasts are typically based on historical trends and take into account recent developments as well as management’s plans and intentions. Any difficulty in manufacturing or sourcing raw materials on a cost effective basis would significantly impact the projected future cash flows of the Company’s manufacturing facilities and potentially lead to an impairment charge for long-lived assets. Other factors, such as increased competition or a decrease in the desirability of the Company’s products, could lead to lower projected sales levels, which would adversely impact cash flows. A significant change in cash flows in the future could result in an impairment of long lived assets.

 

The impairment charges, if any, are included in operating expenses in the accompanying statements of operations.

 

Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with a maturity of three months or less when purchased to be cash equivalents.

 

F-7
 

 

Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

Accounts receivable are recorded at the invoiced amount, net of an allowance for doubtful accounts. The Company follows paragraph 310-10-50-9 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to estimate the allowance for doubtful accounts. The Company performs on-going credit evaluations of its customers and adjusts credit limits based upon payment history and the customer’s current credit worthiness, as determined by the review of their current credit information; and determines the allowance for doubtful accounts based on historical write-off experience, customer specific facts and economic conditions.

 

Pursuant to paragraph 310-10-50-2 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification account balances are charged off against the allowance after all means of collection have been exhausted and the potential for recovery is considered remote. The Company has adopted paragraph 310-10-50-6 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification and determine when receivables are past due or delinquent based on how recently payments have been received.

 

Outstanding account balances are reviewed individually for collectability. The allowance for doubtful accounts is the Company’s best estimate of the amount of probable credit losses in the Company’s existing accounts receivable. Bad debt expense is included in general and administrative expenses, if any.

 

The Company had no bad debt expense for the reporting period ended March 31, 2014 or 2013.

 

The Company does not have any off-balance-sheet credit exposure to its customers.

 

Inventory

 

Inventory Valuation

 

The Company values inventory, entirely consisting of finished goods, at the lower of cost or market. Cost is determined on the first-in and first-out (“FIFO”) method. The Company reduces inventory for the diminution of value, resulting from product obsolescence, damage or other issues affecting marketability, equal to the difference between the cost of the inventory and its estimated market value. Factors utilized in the determination of estimated market value include: (i) current sales data and historical return rates, (ii) estimates of future demand, and (iii) competitive pricing pressures.

 

Inventory Obsolescence and Markdowns

 

The Company evaluates its current level of inventory considering historical sales and other factors and, based on this evaluation, classify inventory markdowns in the income statement as a component of cost of goods sold pursuant to Paragraph 420-10-S99 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to adjust inventory to net realizable value. These markdowns are estimates, which could vary significantly from actual requirements if future economic conditions, customer demand or competition differ from expectations.

 

There was no inventory obsolescence at March 31, 2014 or December 31, 2013.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are recorded at cost. Expenditures for major additions and betterments are capitalized. Maintenance and repairs are charged to operations as incurred. Depreciation is computed by the straight-line method (after taking into account their respective estimated residual values) over the estimated useful lives of the respective assets as follows:

 

   Estimated Useful
Life (Years)
 
     
Computer equipment  3 
     
Equipment  5 
     
Furniture and fixture  7 
     
Leasehold improvement  * 

 

(*) Amortized on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease or the estimated useful lives, whichever is shorter.

 

Upon sale or retirement of property and equipment, the related cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts and any gain or loss is reflected in statements of operations.

 

F-8
 

 

Related Parties

 

The Company follows subtopic 850-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for the identification of related parties and disclosure of related party transactions.

 

Pursuant to Section 850-10-20, the related parties include: (a.) affiliates of the Company; (b.) entities for which investments in their equity securities would be required, absent the election of the fair value option under the Fair Value Option Subsection of Section 825–10–15, to be accounted for by the equity method by the investing entity; (c.) trusts for the benefit of employees, such as pension and profit-sharing trusts that are managed by or under the trusteeship of management; (d.) principal owners of the Company; (e.) management of the Company; (f.) other parties with which the Company may deal if one party controls or can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the other to an extent that one of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests; and (g.) other parties that can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the transacting parties or that have an ownership interest in one of the transacting parties and can significantly influence the other to an extent that one or more of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests.

 

The financial statements shall include disclosures of material related party transactions, other than compensation arrangements, expense allowances, and other similar items in the ordinary course of business. However, disclosure of transactions that are eliminated in the preparation of consolidated or combined financial statements is not required in those statements. The disclosures shall include: (a.) the nature of the relationship(s) involved; (b.) a description of the transactions, including transactions to which no amounts or nominal amounts were ascribed, for each of the periods for which income statements are presented, and such other information deemed necessary to an understanding of the effects of the transactions on the financial statements; (c.) the dollar amounts of transactions for each of the periods for which income statements are presented and the effects of any change in the method of establishing the terms from that used in the preceding period; and (d.) amounts due from or to related parties as of the date of each balance sheet presented and, if not otherwise apparent, the terms and manner of settlement.

 

Commitments and Contingencies

 

The Company follows subtopic 450-20 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to report accounting for contingencies. Certain conditions may exist as of the date the consolidated financial statements are issued, which may result in a loss to the Company but which will only be resolved when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. The Company assesses such contingent liabilities, and such assessment inherently involves an exercise of judgment. In assessing loss contingencies related to legal proceedings that are pending against the Company or un-asserted claims that may result in such proceedings, the Company evaluates the perceived merits of any legal proceedings or un-asserted claims as well as the perceived merits of the amount of relief sought or expected to be sought therein.

 

If the assessment of a contingency indicates that it is probable that a material loss has been incurred and the amount of the liability can be estimated, then the estimated liability would be accrued in the Company’s consolidated financial statements. If the assessment indicates that a potential material loss contingency is not probable but is reasonably possible, or is probable but cannot be estimated, then the nature of the contingent liability, and an estimate of the range of possible losses, if determinable and material, would be disclosed.

 

Loss contingencies considered remote are generally not disclosed unless they involve guarantees, in which case the guarantees would be disclosed. Management does not believe, based upon information available at this time, that these matters will have a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows. However, there is no assurance that such matters will not materially and adversely affect the Company’s business, financial position, and results of operations or cash flows.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company follows paragraph 605-10-S99-1 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for revenue recognition. The Company will recognize revenue when it is realized or realizable and earned. The Company considers revenue realized or realizable and earned when all of the following criteria are met: (i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (ii) the product has been shipped or the services have been rendered to the customer, (iii) the sales price is fixed or determinable, and (iv) collectability is reasonably assured.

 

Unearned convention revenue is deposits received for conventions that have not yet taken place, which are fully or partially refundable depending upon the terms and conditions of the agreements.

 

F-9
 

 

Stock-Based Compensation for Obtaining Employee Services

 

The Company accounts for its stock based compensation in which the Company obtains employee services in share-based payment transactions under the recognition and measurement principles of the fair value recognition provisions of section 718-10-30 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Pursuant to paragraph 718-10-30-6 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, all transactions in which goods or services are the consideration received for the issuance of equity instruments are accounted for based on the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instrument issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The measurement date used to determine the fair value of the equity instrument issued is the earlier of the date on which the performance is complete or the date on which it is probable that performance will occur. If shares of the Company are thinly traded the use of share prices established in the Company’s most recent private placement memorandum (“PPM”), or weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.

 

The fair value of share options and similar instruments is estimated on the date of grant using a Black-Scholes option-pricing valuation model. The ranges of assumptions for inputs are as follows:

 

Expected term of share options and similar instruments: The expected life of options and similar instruments represents the period of time the option and/or warrant are expected to be outstanding. Pursuant to Paragraph 718-10-50-2(f)(2)(i) of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, the expected term of share options and similar instruments represents the period of time the options and similar instruments are expected to be outstanding taking into consideration of the contractual term of the instruments and employees’ expected exercise and post-vesting employment termination behavior into the fair value (or calculated value) of the instruments. Pursuant to paragraph 718-10-S99-1, it may be appropriate to use the simplified method, i.e., expected term = ((vesting term + original contractual term) / 2), if (i) A company does not have sufficient historical exercise data to provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term due to the limited period of time its equity shares have been publicly traded; (ii) A company significantly changes the terms of its share option grants or the types of employees that receive share option grants such that its historical exercise data may no longer provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term; or (iii) A company has or expects to have significant structural changes in its business such that its historical exercise data may no longer provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term. The Company uses the simplified method to calculate expected term of share options and similar instruments as the company does not have sufficient historical exercise data to provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term.
   
Expected volatility of the entity’s shares and the method used to estimate it. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 718-10-50-2(f)(2)(ii), a thinly-traded or nonpublic entity that uses the calculated value method shall disclose the reasons why it is not practicable for the Company to estimate the expected volatility of its share price, the appropriate industry sector index that it has selected, the reasons for selecting that particular index, and how it has calculated historical volatility using that index. The Company uses the average historical volatility of the comparable companies over the expected contractual life of the share options or similar instruments as its expected volatility. If shares of a company are thinly traded the use of weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as the volatility calculation using daily observations for such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.
   
Expected annual rate of quarterly dividends. An entity that uses a method that employs different dividend rates during the contractual term shall disclose the range of expected dividends used and the weighted-average expected dividends. The expected dividend yield is based on the Company’s current dividend yield as the best estimate of projected dividend yield for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.
   
  Risk-free rate(s). An entity that uses a method that employs different risk-free rates shall disclose the range of risk-free rates used. The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.

 

The Company’s policy is to recognize compensation cost for awards with only service conditions and a graded vesting schedule on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period for the entire award.

 

Equity Instruments Issued to Parties Other Than Employees for Acquiring Goods or Services

 

The Company accounts for equity instruments issued to parties other than employees for acquiring goods or services under guidance of Sub-topic 505-50 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Sub-topic 505-50”).

 

F-10
 

 

Pursuant to ASC Section 505-50-30, all transactions in which goods or services are the consideration received for the issuance of equity instruments are accounted for based on the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instrument issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The measurement date used to determine the fair value of the equity instrument issued is the earlier of the date on which the performance is complete or the date on which it is probable that performance will occur. If shares of the Company are thinly traded the use of share prices established in the Company’s most recent PPM, or weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.

 

The fair value of share options and similar instruments is estimated on the date of grant using a Black-Scholes option-pricing valuation model. The ranges of assumptions for inputs are as follows:

 

Expected term of share options and similar instruments: Pursuant to Paragraph 718-10-50-2(f)(2)(i) of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, the expected term of share options and similar instruments represents the period of time the options and similar instruments are expected to be outstanding taking into consideration of the contractual term of the instruments and holder’s expected exercise behavior into the fair value (or calculated value) of the instruments. The Company uses historical data to estimate holder’s expected exercise behavior. If the Company is a newly formed corporation or shares of the Company are thinly traded the contractual term of the share options and similar instruments is used as the expected term of share options and similar instruments as the Company does not have sufficient historical exercise data to provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term.
   
Expected volatility of the entity’s shares and the method used to estimate it. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 718-10-50-2(f)(2)(ii), a thinly-traded or nonpublic entity that uses the calculated value method shall disclose the reasons why it is not practicable for the Company to estimate the expected volatility of its share price, the appropriate industry sector index that it has selected, the reasons for selecting that particular index, and how it has calculated historical volatility using that index. The Company uses the average historical volatility of the comparable companies over the expected contractual life of the share options or similar instruments as its expected volatility. If shares of a company are thinly traded the use of weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as the volatility calculation using daily observations for such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.
   
Expected annual rate of quarterly dividends. An entity that uses a method that employs different dividend rates during the contractual term shall disclose the range of expected dividends used and the weighted-average expected dividends. The expected dividend yield is based on the Company’s current dividend yield as the best estimate of projected dividend yield for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.
   
Risk-free rate(s). An entity that uses a method that employs different risk-free rates shall disclose the range of risk-free rates used. The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 505-50-25-7, if fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments are issued at the date the grantor and grantee enter into an agreement for goods or services (no specific performance is required by the grantee to retain those equity instruments), then, because of the elimination of any obligation on the part of the counterparty to earn the equity instruments, a measurement date has been reached. A grantor shall recognize the equity instruments when they are issued (in most cases, when the agreement is entered into). Whether the corresponding cost is an immediate expense or a prepaid asset (or whether the debit should be characterized as contra-equity under the requirements of paragraph 505-50-45-1) depends on the specific facts and circumstances. Pursuant to ASC paragraph 505-50-45-1, a grantor may conclude that an asset (other than a note or a receivable) has been received in return for fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments that are issued at the date the grantor and grantee enter into an agreement for goods or services (and no specific performance is required by the grantee in order to retain those equity instruments). Such an asset shall not be displayed as contra-equity by the grantor of the equity instruments. The transferability (or lack thereof) of the equity instruments shall not affect the balance sheet display of the asset. This guidance is limited to transactions in which equity instruments are transferred to other than employees in exchange for goods or services. Section 505-50-30 provides guidance on the determination of the measurement date for transactions that are within the scope of this Subtopic.

 

Pursuant to Paragraphs 505-50-25-8 and 505-50-25-9, an entity may grant fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments that are exercisable by the grantee only after a specified period of time if the terms of the agreement provide for earlier exercisability if the grantee achieves specified performance conditions. Any measured cost of the transaction shall be recognized in the same period(s) and in the same manner as if the entity had paid cash for the goods or services or used cash rebates as a sales discount instead of paying with, or using, the equity instruments. A recognized asset, expense, or sales discount shall not be reversed if a stock option that the counterparty has the right to exercise expires unexercised.

 

Pursuant to ASC paragraph 505-50-30-S99-1, if the Company receives a right to receive future services in exchange for unvested, forfeitable equity instruments, those equity instruments are treated as unissued for accounting purposes until the future services are received (that is, the instruments are not considered issued until they vest). Consequently, there would be no recognition at the measurement date and no entry should be recorded.

 

F-11
 

 

Income Tax Provision

 

The Company accounts for income taxes under Section 740-10-30 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are determined based upon differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities and are measured using the enacted tax rates and laws that will be in effect when the differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance to the extent management concludes it is more likely than not that the assets will not be realized. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the statements of operations in the period that includes the enactment date.

 

The Company adopted section 740-10-25 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Section 740-10-25”). Section 740-10-25 addresses the determination of whether tax benefits claimed or expected to be claimed on a tax return should be recorded in the financial statements. Under Section 740-10-25, the Company may recognize the tax benefit from an uncertain tax position only if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such a position should be measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than fifty percent (50%) likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. Section 740-10-25 also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties on income taxes, accounting in interim periods and requires increased disclosures.

 

The estimated future tax effects of temporary differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities are reported in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets, as well as tax credit carry-backs and carry-forwards. The Company periodically reviews the recoverability of deferred tax assets recorded on its consolidated balance sheets and provides valuation allowances as management deems necessary.

 

Management makes judgments as to the interpretation of the tax laws that might be challenged upon an audit and cause changes to previous estimates of tax liability. In addition, the Company operates within multiple taxing jurisdictions and is subject to audit in these jurisdictions. In management’s opinion, adequate provisions for income taxes have been made for all years. If actual taxable income by tax jurisdiction varies from estimates, additional allowances or reversals of reserves may be necessary.

 

Uncertain Tax Positions

 

The Company did not take any uncertain tax positions and had no adjustments to its income tax liabilities or benefits pursuant to the provisions of Section 740-10-25 for the reporting period ended March 31, 2014 or 2013.

 

Net Income (Loss) per Common Share

 

Net income (loss) per common share is computed pursuant to Section 260-10-45 of the Codification. Basic net income (loss) per common share is computed by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted net income (loss) per common share is computed by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of shares of common stock and potentially outstanding shares of common stock during the period to reflect the potential dilution that could occur from common shares issuable through convertible debt, stock options or warrants.

 

The following table shows the potentially outstanding dilutive common shares included in the diluted net income (loss) per share calculation:

 

   Potentially Outstanding Dilutive
Common Shares
 
   For the Three
Months Ended
March 31, 2014
   For the Three
Months Ended
March 31, 2013
 
         
Convertible preferred stock   -    21,112,540 
           
Stock options   4,472,500    300,000 
           
Stock purchase warrants   -    - 
           
Total potentially outstanding dilutive common shares   4,472,500    21,412,542 

 

F-12
 

 

Cash Flows Reporting

 

The Company adopted paragraph 230-10-45-24 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for cash flows reporting, classifies cash receipts and payments according to whether they stem from operating, investing, or financing activities and provides definitions of each category, and uses the indirect or reconciliation method (the “Indirect Method”) as defined by paragraph 230-10-45-25 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to report net cash flow from operating activities by adjusting net income to reconcile it to net cash flow from operating activities by removing the effects of (a) all deferrals of past operating cash receipts and payments and all accruals of expected future operating cash receipts and payments and (b) all items that are included in net income that do not affect operating cash receipts and payments

 

Subsequent Events

 

The Company follows the guidance in Section 855-10-50 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for the disclosure of subsequent events. The Company will evaluate subsequent events through the date when the financial statements were issued. Pursuant to ASU 2010-09 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, the Company as an SEC filer considers its financial statements issued when they are widely distributed to users, such as through filing them on EDGAR.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

The U.S. Financial Accounting Standards Board issued Accounting Standards Update 2014-08, Reporting Discontinued Operations and Disclosures of Disposals of Components of an Entity (ASU 2014-08) in April 2014.

 

This new standard:

 

raises the threshold for disposals to qualify as discontinued operations,

 

allows companies to have significant continuing involvement and continuing cash flows with the discontinued operation, and

 

provides for new and additional disclosures of discontinued operations and individually material disposal transactions.

 

The Company anticipates adopting the new standard when it becomes effective in the first quarter of 2015.

 

Management does not believe that any recently issued, but not yet effective accounting pronouncements, if adopted, would have a material effect on the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

 

Note 3 – Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment stated at cost, less accumulated depreciation and amortization, consisted of the following:

 

   March 31, 2014   December 31, 2013   Estimated Useful Life
Computer Equipment  $19,428    16,544   3 years
Equipment   7,175    7,175   5 years
Furniture & Fixtures   48,950    37,850   7 years
    75,553    61,569    
Less: Accumulated depreciation and amortization   (14,439)   (10,609)   
   $61,114   $50,960    

 

Depreciation and Amortization Expense

 

Depreciation and amortization expense was $3,830 and $554 for the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

F-13
 

 

Note 4 – Related Party Transactions

 

Related Parties

 

Related parties with whom the Company had transactions are:

 

Related Parties   Relationship
     
Bristol Capital, LLC   An entity owned and controlled by a member of the board of directors (the “Board”) of the Company
     
225 California Street, LLC   An entity owned and controlled by significant stockholder and Chief Executive Officer of the Company

 

Operating Lease with Related Parties

 

Effective April 22, 2013, the Company entered into a commercial real estate lease, as lessee, with Bristol Capital, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“Bristol”), and 225 California Street, LLC, a California limited liability company (“225 California”), as lessors, for new office space located in El Segundo, California (the “Lease”), with each of Bristol and 225 California holding an undivided 50% tenant-in-common interest. The initial term of the Lease is for seven (7) years ending on March 31, 2020. Pursuant to the Lease, the Company shall pay base rent of $6,900 per month and property taxes.

 

Future minimum lease payments inclusive of related tax required under the non-cancelable operating lease are as follows:

 

Fiscal year ending March 31:     
      
2014 (remainder of the year)    62,100 
       
2015    82,800 
       
2016    82,800 
       
2017    82,800 
       
2018    82,800 
       
2019    82,800 
       
2020    20,700 
       
    $496,800 

 

Note 5 – Stockholders’ Equity

 

Common Stock

 

On February 27, 2014, the Company formally mutually terminated the Michael Mathews Consulting Agreement effective October 10, 2012. The Company and Mr. Mathews agreed to waive all compensation, fees, and penalties except for the 250,000 shares of the Company’s common stock that was due to Mr. Mathews. As of December 31, 2013, the Company has an accrued liability in the amount of $103,750 relating to this issuance. On March 12, 2014, the Company issued Mr. Mathews 250,000 shares of the Company’s common stock to satisfy the accrued liability.

 

Stock Options

 

On January 16, 2014, the Board resolved to authorize the issuance of 10,000 stock options to a strategic partner of the Company. The options are fully vested at issuance, exercisable at $0.40 and are exercisable for a period of five years. The Company valued the issuance using a Black-Scholes option pricing model, and recorded and expense of $3,324 as a result of the fully vested issuance.

 

The following assumptions were utilized: vesting: immediate; fair value of the common stock: $0.35; exercise price: $0.40; volatility: 176%; dividend rate: 0%; risk-free interest rate: 1.66%.

 

F-14
 

 

Note 6 – Credit Risk

 

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to significant concentration of credit risk consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents. As of March 31, 2014, substantially all of the Company’s cash and cash equivalents were held by major financial institutions and the balance at certain accounts exceeded the maximum amount insured by the Federal Deposits Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”). However, the Company has not experienced losses on these accounts and management believes that the Company is not exposed to significant risks on such accounts.

 

Note 7 – Subsequent Events

 

The Company has evaluated all events that occurred after the balance sheet date through the date when the financial statements were issued to determine if they must be reported. The Management of the Company determined that there were certain reportable subsequent event(s) to be disclosed as follows:

 

On April 2, 2014, the Board granted a strategic partner 20,000 options to purchase the Company’s common stock. The options are exercisable at $0.44 per option, mature in 5 years and were fully vested on the date of grant.

 

On May 5, 2014, the Board authorized the granting to each independent member of the Board on May 9, 2014, a non-qualified stock option to purchase up to three hundred thousand (300,000) shares of the Company’s common stock, which shall be exercisable for a period of five (5) years at an exercise price per share equal to the closing price of the Company on the day of grant and such option shall vest in equal amounts of a period of three (3) years at the rate of twenty-five thousand (25,000) shares per fiscal quarter at the end of such quarter, commencing in the quarter ended June 30, 2014, and pro-rated for the number of days each independent member of the Board serves on the Board during such fiscal quarter.

 

In addition, effective as of May 1, 2014, the independent members of the Board shall be compensated as follows: (i) for their participation in meetings of the Board and its committees, such member will be compensated $1,000 for each in person meeting that is attended, and $250 - $500 per telephonic meeting, depending on the length of the telephonic meeting and (ii) each member shall be provided a monthly retainer of $750.

 

F-15
 

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

This quarterly report on Form 10-Q and other reports filed by Wizard World, Inc. (the “Company”) from time to time with the SEC (collectively, the “Filings”) contain or may contain forward-looking statements and information that are based upon beliefs of, and information currently available to, the Company’s management as well as estimates and assumptions made by Company’s management. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which are only predictions and speak only as of the date hereof. When used in the Filings, the words “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “future,” “intend,” “plan,” or the negative of these terms and similar expressions as they relate to the Company or the Company’s management identify forward-looking statements. Such statements reflect the current view of the Company with respect to future events and are subject to risks, uncertainties, assumptions, and other factors, including the risks relating to the Company’s business, industry, and the Company’s operations and results of operations. Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should the underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may differ significantly from those anticipated, believed, estimated, expected, intended, or planned.

 

Although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, the Company cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance, or achievements. Except as required by applicable law, including the securities laws of the United States, the Company does not intend to update any of the forward-looking statements to conform these statements to actual results.

 

Our financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”). These accounting principles require us to make certain estimates, judgments and assumptions. We believe that the estimates, judgments and assumptions upon which we rely are reasonable based upon information available to us at the time that these estimates, judgments and assumptions are made. These estimates, judgments and assumptions can affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities as of the date of the financial statements as well as the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the periods presented. Our financial statements would be affected to the extent there are material differences between these estimates and actual results. In many cases, the accounting treatment of a particular transaction is specifically dictated by GAAP and does not require management’s judgment in its application. There are also areas in which management’s judgment in selecting any available alternative would not produce a materially different result. The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and notes thereto appearing elsewhere in this report.

 

Overview

 

We intend for this discussion to provide information that will assist in understanding our financial statements, the changes in certain key items in those financial statements, and the primary factors that accounted for those changes, as well as how certain accounting principles affect our financial statements. This discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and accompanying notes for the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, included elsewhere in this report.

 

We are a producer of pop culture and multimedia conventions (“Comic Cons”) across North America that market movies, TV shows, video games, technology, toys, social networking/gaming platforms, comic books and graphic novels. These Comic Cons provide sales, marketing, promotions, public relations, advertising and sponsorship opportunities for entertainment companies, toy companies, gaming companies, publishing companies, marketers, corporate sponsors, and retailers.

 

Plan of Operation

 

Our Company has two lines of business: (i) live multimedia events, which involve admissions and exhibitor booth space, and (ii) sponsorships and advertising. Our current focus is two-fold and includes both growing our existing Comic Cons by obtaining new exhibitors and dealers and attracting more high profile celebrities and VIPs, and identifying new markets in which to produce additional Comic Cons. We also plan to expose our database of fans and our target market of young adults and families to our content through digital media such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, and Tumblr, and draw higher traffic to our website www.wizardworld.com by creating content from our live multimedia events and promoting such events through emails and newsletters.

 

4
 

 

We expect to produce sixteen (16) live events during the year ending December 31, 2014. To date, we have operated profitable live events in Philadelphia, Chicago, New Orleans, Columbus, Portland, Nashville, Austin, and St. Louis, but we have operated at a deficit in other events. In order for us to operate a successful event, we must produce an event that is relevant to the public in order to drive admissions, booth sales, sponsorship, and advertising. In order for the Company to grow the digital business, we must attract unique users and drive traffic to our online site. To date, we have exhausted considerable resources developing our media platform, but we have yet to earn a profit from the platform.

 

We continue to develop the Wizard World digital strategy and grow our existing database through social media, on-site activation, and the Company’s digital presence on properties that include Facebook®, Twitter®, YouTube®, Flickr®, and Tumblr®. Also, as additional events are added, more people join the Wizard World universe and become loyal to the brand and its affiliated properties.

 

Wizardworlddigital.com continues to be the hub for all Comic Con and related events news and content, and wizardworld.com continues to act as the e-commerce engine for all admissions, VIP experiences, one-of-a-kind packages, and more.

 

Results of Operations

 

Summary of Statements of Operations for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2014 and 2013:

 

   Three Months Ended 
   March 31, 2014   March 31, 2013 
Convention revenue  $5,173,198   $1,793,476 
Gross profit  $1,913,171   $816,599 
Operating expenses  $(1,220,969)  $(690,507)
Income from operations  $692,202   $126,092 
Other income (expenses)  $(161)  $1,048,765 
Net income attributable to common shareholder  $692,041   $1,104,176 
Income per common share – basic  $0.01   $0.03 
Income per common share - diluted  $0.01   $0.02 

 

Convention Revenue

 

Convention revenue was $5,173,198 for the three months ended March 31, 2014, as compared to $1,793,476 for the comparable period ended March 31, 2013, an increase of $3,379,722. The increase in convention revenue is primarily attributable to running better advertised and marketed events. In addition, the Company increased admission prices and the overall size and scope of each event. The Company ran four events during the period ended March 31, 2014, as compared to two events during the comparable period ended March 31, 2013. Average revenue generated per event in 2014 was $1,293,299 as compared to $896,737 during 2013.

 

Gross Profit

 

Gross profit percentage decreased from a gross profit of 46% during the three months ended March 31, 2013, to a gross profit of 37% during the three months ended March 31, 2014. The decrease in gross profit is primarily attributable to running more advertising and marketing per event. The Company ran four events during the period ended March 31, 2014, as compared to two events during the comparable period ended March 31, 2013.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2014, were $1,220,969, as compared to $690,507 for the three months ended March 31, 2013. The $530,462 increase is primarily attributable to an increase in salaries and the year-end bonus paid to the Company’s Chief Executive Officer. The Company’s employee count increased from 10 as of March 31, 2013 to 27 as of March 31, 2014.

 

5
 

 

Income from Operations

 

Income from operations for the three months ended March 31, 2014, was $692,202 as compared to income of $126,092 for the three months ended March 31, 2013. The increase is primarily attributable to running more events with the same fixed costs during the three months ended March 31, 2014 as compared to the three months ended March 31, 2013.

 

Other income (expenses)

 

Other income (expense) for the three months ended March 31, 2014, was $(161), as compared to $1,048,765 for the three months ended March 31, 2013. The decrease is primarily attributable to the gain on the fair value of the Company’s derivative liabilities recorded during the three months ended March 31, 2013 being no longer an other income or expense item because all derivative instruments have been extinguished.

 

Net Income Attributable to Common Shareholder

 

Net income attributable to common shareholder for three months ended March 31, 2014, was $692,041 or income per share of $0.01, as compared to $1,104,176 or income per share of $0.03, for the three months ended March 31, 2013. The per share amounts are calculated net of deemed dividends.

 

Inflation did not have a material impact on the Company’s operations for the applicable period. Other than the foregoing, management knows of no trends, demands, or uncertainties that are reasonably likely to have a material impact on the Company’s results of operations.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

The following table summarizes total current assets, liabilities and working capital at March 31, 2014, compared to December 31, 2013:

 

   March 31, 2014   December 31, 2013   Increase/Decrease 
Current Assets  $5,175,330   $4,298,793   $876,537 
Current Liabilities  $2,068,963   $2,092,426   $(23,462)
Working Capital  $3,106,367   $2,206,367   $899,999 

 

At March 31, 2014, we had working capital of $3,106,367, as compared to a working capital of $2,206,367, at December 31, 2013, an increase of $900,000. The increase is primarily attributable to the Company running more events during the current year without incurring an increase in current liabilities.

 

Net Cash

 

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities for the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, was $(156,230) and $191,861, respectively. The net income for the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013 was $692,041 and $1,174,857, respectively. The Company’s use of cash in operations for the current period is due primarily to the funding of prepaid expenses for upcoming shows during 2014.

 

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Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

As of March 31, 2014, the Company had no off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

We believe that the following accounting policies are the most critical to aid you in fully understanding and evaluating this “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation.”

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with US GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date(s) of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period(s).

 

Critical accounting estimates are estimates for which (a) the nature of the estimate is material due to the levels of subjectivity and judgment necessary to account for highly uncertain matters or the susceptibility of such matters to change and (b) the impact of the estimate on financial condition or operating performance is material. The Company’s critical accounting estimates and assumptions affecting the financial statements were:

 

  (i) Allowance for doubtful accounts: Management’s estimate of the allowance for doubtful accounts is based on historical sales, historical loss levels, and an analysis of the collectability of individual accounts; and general economic conditions that may affect a client’s ability to pay. The Company evaluated the key factors and assumptions used to develop the allowance in determining that it is reasonable in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole.
     
  (ii) Inventory Obsolescence and Markdowns: The Company’s estimate of potentially excess and slow-moving inventories is based on evaluation of inventory levels and aging, review of inventory turns and historical sales experiences. The Company’s estimate of reserve for inventory shrinkage is based on the historical results of physical inventory cycle counts.
     
  (iii) Fair value of long-lived assets: Fair value is generally determined using the asset’s expected future discounted cash flows or market value, if readily determinable. If long-lived assets are determined to be recoverable, but the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives are shorter than originally estimated, the net book values of the long-lived assets are depreciated over the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives. The Company considers the following to be some examples of important indicators that may trigger an impairment review: (i) significant under-performance or losses of assets relative to expected historical or projected future operating results; (ii) significant changes in the manner or use of assets or in the Company’s overall strategy with respect to the manner or use of the acquired assets or changes in the Company’s overall business strategy; (iii) significant negative industry or economic trends; (iv) increased competitive pressures; (v) a significant decline in the Company’s stock price for a sustained period of time; and (vi) regulatory changes. The Company evaluates acquired assets for potential impairment indicators at least annually and more frequently upon the occurrence of such events.
     
  (iv) Valuation allowance for deferred tax assets: Management assumes that the realization of the Company’s net deferred tax assets resulting from its net operating loss (“NOL”) carry–forwards for Federal income tax purposes that may be offset against future taxable income was not considered more likely than not and accordingly, the potential tax benefits of the net loss carry-forwards are offset by a full valuation allowance. Management made this assumption based on (a) the Company has incurred recurring losses, (b) general economic conditions, and (c) its ability to raise additional funds to support its daily operations by way of a public or private offering, among other factors.

 

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  (v) Estimates and assumptions used in valuation of equity instruments: Management estimates expected term of share options and similar instruments, expected volatility of the Company’s common shares and the method used to estimate it, expected annual rate of quarterly dividends, and risk free rate(s) to value share options and similar instruments.

 

These significant accounting estimates or assumptions bear the risk of change due to the fact that there are uncertainties attached to these estimates or assumptions, and certain estimates or assumptions are difficult to measure or value.

 

Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various assumptions that are believed to be reasonable in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources.

 

Management regularly evaluates the key factors and assumptions used to develop the estimates utilizing currently available information, changes in facts and circumstances, historical experience and reasonable assumptions. After such evaluations, if deemed appropriate, those estimates are adjusted accordingly.

 

Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes under Section 740-10-30 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are determined based upon differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities and are measured using the enacted tax rates and laws that will be in effect when the differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance to the extent management concludes it is more likely than not that the assets will not be realized. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the statements of operations in the period that includes the enactment date.

 

The Company adopted section 740-10-25 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Section 740-10-25”). Section 740-10-25 addresses the determination of whether tax benefits claimed or expected to be claimed on a tax return should be recorded in the financial statements. Under Section 740-10-25, the Company may recognize the tax benefit from an uncertain tax position only if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such a position should be measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than fifty percent (50%) likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. Section 740-10-25 also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties on income taxes, accounting in interim periods and requires increased disclosures.

 

The estimated future tax effects of temporary differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities are reported in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets, as well as tax credit carry-backs and carry-forwards. The Company periodically reviews the recoverability of deferred tax assets recorded on its consolidated balance sheets and provides valuation allowances as management deems necessary.

 

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Management makes judgments as to the interpretation of the tax laws that might be challenged upon an audit and cause changes to previous estimates of tax liability. In addition, the Company operates within multiple taxing jurisdictions and is subject to audit in these jurisdictions. In management’s opinion, adequate provisions for income taxes have been made for all years. If actual taxable income by tax jurisdiction varies from estimates, additional allowances or reversals of reserves may be necessary.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company follows paragraph 605-10-S99-1 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for revenue recognition. The Company will recognize revenue when it is realized or realizable and earned. The Company considers revenue realized or realizable and earned when all of the following criteria are met: (i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (ii) the product has been shipped or the services have been rendered to the customer, (iii) the sales price is fixed or determinable, and (iv) collectability is reasonably assured.

 

Unearned convention revenue is deposits received for conventions that have not yet taken place, which are fully or partially refundable depending upon the terms and conditions of the agreements.

 

Stock-Based Compensation for Obtaining Employee Services

 

The Company accounts for its stock based compensation in which the Company obtains employee services in share-based payment transactions under the recognition and measurement principles of the fair value recognition provisions of section 718-10-30 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Pursuant to paragraph 718-10-30-6 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, all transactions in which goods or services are the consideration received for the issuance of equity instruments are accounted for based on the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instrument issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The measurement date used to determine the fair value of the equity instrument issued is the earlier of the date on which the performance is complete or the date on which it is probable that performance will occur. If shares of the Company are thinly traded the use of share prices established in the Company’s most recent private placement memorandum (“PPM”), or weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.

 

The fair value of share options and similar instruments is estimated on the date of grant using a Black-Scholes option-pricing valuation model. The ranges of assumptions for inputs are as follows:

 

Expected volatility of the entity’s shares and the method used to estimate it. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 718-10-50-2(f)(2)(ii) of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, a thinly-traded or nonpublic entity that uses the calculated value method shall disclose the reasons why it is not practicable for the Company to estimate the expected volatility of its share price, the appropriate industry sector index that it has selected, the reasons for selecting that particular index, and how it has calculated historical volatility using that index. The Company uses the average historical volatility of the comparable companies over the expected contractual life of the share options or similar instruments as its expected volatility. If shares of a company are thinly traded the use of weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as the volatility calculation using daily observations for such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.
   
Expected annual rate of quarterly dividends. An entity that uses a method that employs different dividend rates during the contractual term shall disclose the range of expected dividends used and the weighted-average expected dividends. The expected dividend yield is based on the Company’s current dividend yield as the best estimate of projected dividend yield for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.
   
Risk-free rate(s). An entity that uses a method that employs different risk-free rates shall disclose the range of risk-free rates used. The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.

 

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The Company’s policy is to recognize compensation cost for awards with only service conditions and a graded vesting schedule on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period for the entire award.

 

Equity Instruments Issued to Parties Other Than Employees for Acquiring Goods or Services

 

The Company accounts for equity instruments issued to parties other than employees for acquiring goods or services under guidance of Sub-topic 505-50 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Sub-topic 505-50”).

 

Pursuant to ASC Section 505-50-30, all transactions in which goods or services are the consideration received for the issuance of equity instruments are accounted for based on the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instrument issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The measurement date used to determine the fair value of the equity instrument issued is the earlier of the date on which the performance is complete or the date on which it is probable that performance will occur. If shares of the Company are thinly traded the use of share prices established in the Company’s most recent PPM, or weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.

 

The fair value of share options and similar instruments is estimated on the date of grant using a Black-Scholes option-pricing valuation model. The ranges of assumptions for inputs are as follows:

 

Expected term of share options and similar instruments: Pursuant to Paragraph 718-10-50-2(f)(2)(i) of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, the expected term of share options and similar instruments represents the period of time the options and similar instruments are expected to be outstanding taking into consideration of the contractual term of the instruments and holder’s expected exercise behavior into the fair value (or calculated value) of the instruments. The Company uses historical data to estimate holder’s expected exercise behavior. If the Company is a newly formed corporation or shares of the Company are thinly traded the contractual term of the share options and similar instruments is used as the expected term of share options and similar instruments as the Company does not have sufficient historical exercise data to provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term.
   
Expected volatility of the entity’s shares and the method used to estimate it. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 718-10-50-2(f)(2)(ii) of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, a thinly-traded or nonpublic entity that uses the calculated value method shall disclose the reasons why it is not practicable for the Company to estimate the expected volatility of its share price, the appropriate industry sector index that it has selected, the reasons for selecting that particular index, and how it has calculated historical volatility using that index. The Company uses the average historical volatility of the comparable companies over the expected contractual life of the share options or similar instruments as its expected volatility. If shares of a company are thinly traded the use of weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as the volatility calculation using daily observations for such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.
   
Expected annual rate of quarterly dividends. An entity that uses a method that employs different dividend rates during the contractual term shall disclose the range of expected dividends used and the weighted-average expected dividends. The expected dividend yield is based on the Company’s current dividend yield as the best estimate of projected dividend yield for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.
   
Risk-free rate(s). An entity that uses a method that employs different risk-free rates shall disclose the range of risk-free rates used. The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.

 

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Pursuant to ASC paragraph 505-50-25-7, if fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments are issued at the date the grantor and grantee enter into an agreement for goods or services (no specific performance is required by the grantee to retain those equity instruments), then, because of the elimination of any obligation on the part of the counterparty to earn the equity instruments, a measurement date has been reached. A grantor shall recognize the equity instruments when they are issued (in most cases, when the agreement is entered into). Whether the corresponding cost is an immediate expense or a prepaid asset (or whether the debit should be characterized as contra-equity under the requirements of paragraph 505-50-45-1) depends on the specific facts and circumstances. Pursuant to ASC paragraph 505-50-45-1, a grantor may conclude that an asset (other than a note or a receivable) has been received in return for fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments that are issued at the date the grantor and grantee enter into an agreement for goods or services (and no specific performance is required by the grantee in order to retain those equity instruments). Such an asset shall not be displayed as contra-equity by the grantor of the equity instruments. The transferability (or lack thereof) of the equity instruments shall not affect the balance sheet display of the asset. This guidance is limited to transactions in which equity instruments are transferred to other than employees in exchange for goods or services. Section 505-50-30 provides guidance on the determination of the measurement date for transactions that are within the scope of this subtopic.

 

Pursuant to Paragraphs 505-50-25-8 and 505-50-25-9, an entity may grant fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments that are exercisable by the grantee only after a specified period of time if the terms of the agreement provide for earlier exercisability if the grantee achieves specified performance conditions. Any measured cost of the transaction shall be recognized in the same period(s) and in the same manner as if the entity had paid cash for the goods or services or used cash rebates as a sales discount instead of paying with, or using, the equity instruments. A recognized asset, expense, or sales discount shall not be reversed if a stock option that the counterparty has the right to exercise expires unexercised.

 

Pursuant to ASC paragraph 505-50-30-S99-1, if the Company receives a right to receive future services in exchange for unvested, forfeitable equity instruments, those equity instruments are treated as unissued for accounting purposes until the future services are received (that is, the instruments are not considered issued until they vest). Consequently, there would be no recognition at the measurement date and no entry should be recorded.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

The U.S. Financial Accounting Standards Board issued Accounting Standards Update 2014-08, Reporting Discontinued Operations and Disclosures of Disposals of Components of an Entity (ASU 2014-08) in April 2014.

 

This new standard:

 

  raises the threshold for disposals to qualify as discontinued operations,
     
 

allows companies to have significant continuing involvement and continuing cash flows with the discontinued operation, and

     
 

provides for new and additional disclosures of discontinued operations and individually material disposal transactions.

 

The Company anticipates adopting the new standard when it becomes effective in the first quarter of 2015.

 

Management does not believe that any other recently issued, but not yet effective accounting pronouncements, if adopted, would have a material effect on the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

 

Management does not believe that any other recently issued, but not yet effective accounting pronouncements, if adopted, would have a material effect on the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

 

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Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

 

We do not hold any derivative instruments and do not engage in any hedging activities.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

 

(a) Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures.

 

Pursuant to Rule 13a-15(b) under the Exchange Act, the Company carried out an evaluation, with the participation of the Company’s management, including the Company’s Principal Executive Officer (“PEO”) and Principal Financial Officer (“PFO”), of the effectiveness of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures (as defined under Rule 13a-15(e) under the Exchange Act) as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based upon that evaluation, the Company’s PEO and PFO concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that the Company files or submits under the Exchange Act, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to the Company’s management, including the Company’s PEO and PFO, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

(b) Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting.

 

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act, during our most recently completed fiscal quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings.

 

We are currently not involved in any litigation that we believe could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations. There is no action, suit, proceeding, inquiry or investigation before or by any court, public board, government agency, self-regulatory organization or body pending or, to the knowledge of the executive officers of our Company or any of our subsidiaries, threatened against or affecting our company, our common stock, any of our subsidiaries or of our companies or our subsidiaries’ officers or directors in their capacities as such, in which an adverse decision could have a material adverse effect.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

 

We believe there are no changes that constitute material changes from the risk factors previously disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed with the SEC on March 3, 2014.

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.

 

On January 16, 2013, the Board approved the issuance of 10,000 options to purchase common stock of the Company to a strategic partner of the Company. The options are fully vested at issuance, exercisable at $0.40 and are exercisable for a period of five years.

 

The above issuance was made in reliance on an exemption from registration set forth in Section 4(2) of the Securities Act. The issuances did not result in any proceeds to the Company.

 

Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities.

 

There has been no default in the payment of principal, interest, sinking or purchase fund installment, or any other material default, with respect to any indebtedness of the Company.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 5. Other Information.

 

On May 5, 2014, the Board authorized the granting of a non-qualified stock option to purchase up to three hundred thousand (300,000) shares of the Company’s common stock to each independent member of the Board on May 9, 2014, which shall be exercisable for a period of five (5) years at an exercise price per share equal to the closing price of the Company on the day of grant and such option shall vest in equal amounts of a period of three (3) years at the rate of twenty-five thousand (25,000) shares per fiscal quarter at the end of such quarter, commencing in the quarter ended June 30, 2014, and pro-rated for the number of days each independent member of the Board serves on the Board during such fiscal quarter.

 

In addition, effective as of May 1, 2014, the independent members of the Board shall be compensated as follows: (i) for their participation in meetings of the Board and its committees, such member will be compensated $1,000 for each in person meeting that is attended, and $250 - $500 per telephonic meeting, depending on the length of such telephonic meeting and (ii) each member shall be provided a monthly retainer of $750.

 

Item 6. Exhibits.

 

Exhibit No.   Description
     
31.1   Certification by the Principal Executive Officer of Registrant pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Rule 13a-14(a) or Rule 15d-14(a)). *
     
31.2   Certification by the Principal Financial Officer of Registrant pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Rule 13a-14(a) or Rule 15d-14(a)). *
     
32.1   Certification by the Principal Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. *
     
32.2   Certification by the Principal Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. *
     
101.INS   XBRL Instance Document *
     
101.SCH   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema *
     
101.CAL   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase *
     
101.DEF   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase *
     
101.LAB   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase *
     
101.PRE   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase *

 

* Filed herewith.

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

  WIZARD WORLD, INC.
     
Date: May 7, 2014 By: /s/ John Macaluso
  Name: John Macaluso
  Title: Chief Executive Officer
(Principal Executive Officer)
(Principal Financial Officer)
(Principal Accounting Officer)

 

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