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EX-32.2 - Wizard World, Inc.ex32-2.htm
EX-31.1 - Wizard World, Inc.ex31-1.htm
EX-32.1 - Wizard World, Inc.ex32-1.htm
EX-31.2 - Wizard World, Inc.ex31-2.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

[X] QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended:
June 30, 2015

 

OR

 

[  ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from __________ to __________

 

Commission File No. 000-33383

 

WIZARD WORLD, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   98-0357690
(State or other jurisdiction   (IRS Employer
of incorporation)   Identification No.)

 

2201 Park Place, Suite 101

El Segundo, CA 90245

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(310) 648-8428

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the past 12 months, and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (Sec.232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files. Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:

 

Large accelerated filer [  ] Accelerated filer [  ]
Non-accelerated filer [  ] Smaller reporting company [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes [  ] No [X]

 

As of August 3, 2015, there were 51,368,386 shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock.

 

 

 

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION  
     
Item 1. Financial Statements. 3
     
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. 4
     
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk. 13
     
Item 4. Controls and Procedures. 13
     
PART II – OTHER INFORMATION  
     
Item 1. Legal Proceedings. 14
     
Item 1A. Risk Factors. 14
     
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds. 14
     
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities. 14
     
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures. 14
     
Item 5. Other Information. 14
     
Item 6. Exhibits. 14
     
Signatures 15

 

2
 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements.

 

Wizard World, Inc.

 

June 30, 2015 and 2014

 

Index to the Consolidated Financial Statements

 

Contents   Page(s)
     
Consolidated Balance Sheets at June 30, 2015 (Unaudited) and December 31, 2014   F-1
     
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 (Unaudited)   F-2
     
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 (Unaudited)   F-3
     
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)   F-4

 

3
   

 

Wizard World, Inc.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

   June 30, 2015   December 31, 2014 
   (Unaudited)     
Assets           
           
Current Assets           
Cash  $4,559,223   $5,790,724 
Accounts receivable, net   104,596    - 
Inventory   6,714    - 
Prepaid expenses   1,995,766    1,977,360 
Total Current Assets    6,666,299    7,768,084 
           
Property and equipment, net    234,129    264,742 
           
Investment    24,997    24,997 
           
Investment in CONtv joint venture    201,292    117,507 
           
Security deposit    21,066    20,066 
           
Total Assets   $7,147,783   $8,195,396 
           
Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity           
           
Current Liabilities           
Accounts payable and accrued liabilites  $3,320,390   $1,594,341 
Unearned convention revenue   1,199,609    2,022,235 
Unearned ConBox revenue   124,028    - 
Due to CONtv joint venture   341,761    313,412 
           
Total Current Liabilities    4,985,788    3,929,988 
           
Total Liabilities    4,985,788    3,929,988 
           
Commitments and contingencies           
           
Stockholders’ Equity           
Preferred stock par value $0.0001: 20,000,000 shares authorized; 50,000 shares designated          
Series A convertible preferred stock par value $0.0001: 50,000 shares designated; 39,101 shares issued and converted   -    - 
Common stock par value $0.0001: 80,000,000 shares authorized; 51,368,386 and 51,358,386 shares issued and outstanding, respectively   5,138    5,137 
Additional paid-in capital   16,708,596    16,021,400 
Accumulated deficit   (14,545,953)   (11,761,129)
Total Stockholders’ Equity    2,167,781    4,265,408 
           
Non-controlling interest   (5,786)   - 
           
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity   $7,147,783   $8,195,396 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements

 

F-1
   

 

Wizard World, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Operations

 

   For the Three Months Ended   For the Six Months Ended 
   June 30, 2015   June 30, 2014   June 30, 2015   June 30, 2014 
   (Unaudited)   (Unaudited)   (Unaudited)   (Unaudited) 
Convention revenue   $7,444,085   $7,110,940   $13,545,514   $12,284,138 
                     
ConBox revenue    132,309    -    132,309    - 
                     
Cost of revenue    6,838,712    4,348,167    11,420,876    7,608,194 
                     
Gross margin    737,682    2,762,773    2,256,947    4,675,944 
                     
Operating expenses                     
Compensation   1,386,211    1,295,859    2,775,665    2,053,027 
Consulting fees   151,165    115,825    281,556    180,749 
General and administrative   542,015    591,247    1,091,900    990,124 
                     
Total operating expenses    2,079,391    2,002,931    4,149,121    3,223,900 
                     
Loss (income) from operations    (1,341,709)   759,842    (1,892,174)   1,452,045 
                     
Other expenses                     
Interest expense   -    (139)   -    (300)
Loss on CONtv joint venture   (466,960)   -    (898,436)   - 
                     
Other expenses, net    (466,960)   (139)   (898,436)   (300)
                     
(Loss) Income before income tax provision    (1,808,669)   759,703    (2,790,610)   1,451,744 
                     
Income tax provision    -    -    -    - 
                     
Net (loss) income    (1,808,669)   759,703    (2,790,610)   1,451,744 
                     
Net loss attributable to non-controlling interest    (5,786)   -    (5,786)   - 
                     
Net income (loss) attributable to common stockholders   $(1,802,883)  $759,703   $(2,784,824)  $1,451,744 
                     
Earnings per share                     
Basic   $(0.04)  $0.01   $(0.05)  $0.03 
Diluted   $(0.04)  $0.01   $(0.05)  $0.03 
                     
Weighted average common shares outstanding - basic    51,363,221    51,341,524    51,365,789    51,243,527 
Weighted average common shares outstanding - diluted    51,363,221    57,364,024    51,365,789    57,266,027 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements

 

F-2
   

 

Wizard World, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

   For the Six Months Ended 
   June 30, 2015   June 30, 2014 
   (Unaudited)   (Unaudited) 
Cash Flows From Operating Activities:           
Net income  $(2,790,610)  $1,451,744 
Adjustments to reconcile net (loss) income to net cash (used in) provided by operating activities:          
Depreciation   53,225    7,624 
Loss on CONtv joint venture   898,436      
Share-based compensation   683,197    264,991 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts receivable   (104,596)   (89,949)
Inventory   (6,714)   - 
Prepaid expenses   (18,406)   (459,656)
Security deposit   (1,000)   11,400 
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities   1,726,049    717,559 
Unearned Conbox revenue   124,028    - 
Unearned convention revenue   (822,626)   92,568 
           
Net Cash (Used in) Provided by Operating Activities    (259,017)   1,996,281 
           
Cash Flows from Investing Activities:           
Purchase of property and equipment   (22,612)   (15,073)
Investment in CONtv joint venture - net   (953,872)   - 
           
Net Cash Used In Investing Activities    (976,484)   (15,073)
           
Cash Flows from Financing Activities:           
Proceeds from the exercise of options   4,000    - 
           
Net Cash Provided By Financing Activities    4,000    - 
           
Net change in cash    (1,231,501)   1,981,208 
           
Cash at beginning of reporting period    5,790,724    3,633,846 
           
Cash at end of reporting period   $4,559,223   $5,615,054 
           
Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information:           
Interest paid  $-   $- 
Income tax paid  $-   $- 
           
Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing activities:           
Issuance of common stock for settlement of accrued liabilites  $-   $103,750 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements

 

F-3
   

 

Wizard World, Inc.

June 30, 2015 and 2014

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

 

Note 1 – Organization and Operations

 

Wizard World, Inc.

 

Wizard World, Inc., formerly GoEnergy, Inc. (“Wizard World” or the “Company”) was incorporated on May 2, 2001, under the laws of the State of Delaware.

 

Kick the Can Corp.

 

Kick The Can Corp. was incorporated on September 20, 2010, under the laws of the State of Nevada.

 

Kicking the Can, L.L.C.

 

Kicking The Can, L.L.C. was formed on April 17, 2009, under the laws of the State of Delaware.

 

Wizard Conventions, Inc.

 

Wizard Conventions, Inc. was incorporated on February 28, 1997, under the laws of the State of New York. The Company is a producer of pop culture and live multimedia conventions across North America that provides a social networking and entertainment venue for popular fiction enthusiasts of movies, TV shows, video games, technology, toys, social networking/gaming platforms, comic books and graphic novels.

 

Acquisition of Kick the Can Corp. / Wizard Conventions, Inc. Recognized as a Reverse Acquisition

 

On December 7, 2010, the Company entered into and consummated a share exchange agreement (“Share Exchange Agreement”) with successor, Kick the Can Corp. (“KTC Corp.”) and its predecessors Wizard Conventions, Inc. and Kicking The Can, L.L.C. (collectively, “Conventions”). Pursuant to the Exchange Agreement, the Company issued 32,927,596 shares of its common stock to the KTC Corp. shareholders in exchange for 100% of the issued and outstanding shares of KTC Corp. The shares issued represented approximately 94.9% of the issued and outstanding common stock immediately after the consummation of the Share Exchange Agreement.

 

As a result of the controlling financial interest of the former stockholder of Conventions, for financial statement reporting purposes, the merger between the Company and Conventions has been treated as a reverse acquisition with KTC Corp. deemed the accounting acquirer and the Company deemed the accounting acquiree under the acquisition method of accounting in accordance with section 805-10-55 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. The reverse merger is deemed a capital transaction and the net assets of KTC Corp. (the accounting acquirer) are carried forward to the Company (the legal acquirer and the reporting entity) at their carrying value before the combination. The acquisition process utilizes the capital structure of the Company and the assets and liabilities of KTC Corp. which are recorded at historical cost. The equity of the Company is the historical equity of KTC Corp. retroactively restated to reflect the number of shares issued by the Company in the transaction. Because of the predecessor/successor relationship between the Company and KTC Corp., Conventions ultimately became the accounting acquirer.

 

Wizard World Digital, Inc.

 

On March 18, 2011, the Company formed a wholly owned subsidiary called Wizard World Digital, Inc., a Nevada corporation (“Digital”). Digital never commenced operations or has employees, and Digital is currently dormant, pending execution of a digital strategy.

 

F-4
   

 

Wiz Wizard, LLC

 

On December 29, 2014, the Company and a member of the Board of Directors (the “Board”) of the Company formed Wiz Wizard, LLC (“Wiz Wizard”) under the law of the State of Delaware. The Company and the member of the Board each own 50% of the membership interest and shall allocate the profits and losses accordingly upon repayment of the initial capital contributions on a pro rata basis. The Company consolidates its 50% equity interest and reports the remaining 50% equity interest owned by a member of the Board as the non-controlling interest in Wiz Wizard as the management of the Company believes that the Company has the control of Wiz Wizard. In addition, the Company and Wiz Wizard, launched ComicConBox (“ConBox”) in April 2015. ConBox is a subscription-based premium monthly box service featuring collectibles, exclusives, toys, tech and gaming, licensed artwork, superior comics and apparel, Comic Con tickets, special VIP discounts and more, which will be shipped on or around the end of every month. The Company plans to continue to partner with major Comic Con related brands and celebrities to deliver a high quality and variation of products directly to the front doors of its subscribers.

 

Note 2 - Significant and Critical Accounting Policies and Practices

 

The management of the Company is responsible for the selection and use of appropriate accounting policies and the appropriateness of accounting policies and their application. Critical accounting policies and practices are those that are both most important to the portrayal of the Company’s financial condition and results and require management’s most difficult, subjective, or complex judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effects of matters that are inherently uncertain. The Company’s significant and critical accounting policies and practices are disclosed below as required by generally accepted accounting principles.

 

Basis of Presentation - Unaudited Interim Financial Information

 

The accompanying unaudited interim consolidated financial statements and related notes have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) for interim financial information, and in accordance with the rules and regulations of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) with respect to Form 10-Q and Article 8 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by U.S. GAAP for complete financial statements. The unaudited interim consolidated financial statements furnished reflect all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring accruals) which are, in the opinion of management, necessary to a fair statement of the results for the interim periods presented. Interim results are not necessarily indicative of the results for the full year. These unaudited interim consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements of the Company for the year ended December 31, 2014 and notes thereto contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2014, as filed with the SEC on March 17, 2015.

 

Use of Estimates and Assumptions and Critical Accounting Estimates and Assumptions

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date(s) of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period(s).

 

Critical accounting estimates are estimates for which (a) the nature of the estimate is material due to the levels of subjectivity and judgment necessary to account for highly uncertain matters or the susceptibility of such matters to change and (b) the impact of the estimate on financial condition or operating performance is material. The Company’s critical accounting estimates and assumptions affecting the financial statements were:

 

  (i) Allowance for doubtful accounts: Management’s estimate of the allowance for doubtful accounts is based on historical sales, historical loss levels, and an analysis of the collectability of individual accounts; and general economic conditions that may affect a client’s ability to pay. The Company evaluated the key factors and assumptions used to develop the allowance in determining that it is reasonable in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole.
     
  (ii) Inventory Obsolescence and Markdowns: The Company’s estimate of potentially excess and slow-moving inventories is based on evaluation of inventory levels and aging, review of inventory turns and historical sales experiences. The Company’s estimate of reserve for inventory shrinkage is based on the historical results of physical inventory cycle counts.

 

F-5
   

 

  (iii) Fair value of long-lived assets: Fair value is generally determined using the asset’s expected future discounted cash flows or market value, if readily determinable. If long-lived assets are determined to be recoverable, but the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives are shorter than originally estimated, the net book values of the long-lived assets are depreciated over the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives. The Company considers the following to be some examples of important indicators that may trigger an impairment review: (i) significant under-performance or losses of assets relative to expected historical or projected future operating results; (ii) significant changes in the manner or use of assets or in the Company’s overall strategy with respect to the manner or use of the acquired assets or changes in the Company’s overall business strategy; (iii) significant negative industry or economic trends; (iv) increased competitive pressures; (v) a significant decline in the Company’s stock price for a sustained period of time; and (vi) regulatory changes. The Company evaluates acquired assets for potential impairment indicators at least annually and more frequently upon the occurrence of such events.
     
  (iv) Valuation allowance for deferred tax assets: Management assumes that the realization of the Company’s net deferred tax assets resulting from its net operating loss (“NOL”) carry–forwards for Federal income tax purposes that may be offset against future taxable income was not considered more likely than not and accordingly, the potential tax benefits of the net loss carry-forwards are offset by a full valuation allowance. Management made this assumption based on (a) the Company has incurred recurring losses, (b) general economic conditions, and (c) its ability to raise additional funds to support its daily operations by way of a public or private offering, among other factors.
     
  (v) Estimates and assumptions used in valuation of equity instruments: Management estimates expected term of share options and similar instruments, expected volatility of the Company’s common shares and the method used to estimate it, expected annual rate of quarterly dividends, and risk free rate(s) to value share options and similar instruments.

 

These significant accounting estimates or assumptions bear the risk of change due to the fact that there are uncertainties attached to these estimates or assumptions, and certain estimates or assumptions are difficult to measure or value.

 

Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various assumptions that are believed to be reasonable in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources.

 

Management regularly evaluates the key factors and assumptions used to develop the estimates utilizing currently available information, changes in facts and circumstances, historical experience and reasonable assumptions. After such evaluations, if deemed appropriate, those estimates are adjusted accordingly.

 

Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The Company applies the guidance of Topic 810 “Consolidation” of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to determine whether and how to consolidate another entity. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 810-10-15-10, all majority-owned subsidiaries—all entities in which a parent has a controlling financial interest—shall be consolidated except (1) when control does not rest with the parent, the majority owner; (2) if the parent is a broker-dealer within the scope of Topic 940 and control is likely to be temporary; (3) consolidation by an investment company within the scope of Topic 946 of a non-investment-company investee. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 810-10-15-8, the usual condition for a controlling financial interest is ownership of a majority voting interest, and, therefore, as a general rule ownership by one reporting entity, directly or indirectly, of more than 50 percent of the outstanding voting shares of another entity is a condition pointing toward consolidation. The power to control may also exist with a lesser percentage of ownership, for example, by contract, lease, agreement with other stockholders, or by court decree. The Company consolidates all less-than-majority-owned subsidiaries, if any, in which the parent’s power to control exists.

 

F-6
   

 

The consolidated financial statements include all accounts of the entities as of the reporting period ending date(s) and for the reporting period(s) as follows:

 

Name of consolidated subsidiary
or entity
  State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization
  Date of incorporation or formation
(date of acquisition, if applicable)
  Attributable interest 
           
KTC Corp.  The State of Nevada, U.S.A.  September 20, 2010   100%
            
Kicking the Can L.L.C.  The State of Delaware, U.S.A.  April 17, 2009   100%
            
Wizard Conventions, Inc.  The State of New York, U.S.A.  February 28, 1997   100%
            
Wizard World Digital, Inc.  The State of Nevada, U.S.A.  March 18, 2011   100%
            
Wiz Wizard, LLC  The State of Delaware, U.S.A.  December 29, 2014   50%

 

All inter-company balances and transactions have been eliminated. Non–controlling interest represents the minority equity investment in the Company’s subsidiaries, plus the minority investors’ share of the net operating results and other components of equity relating to the non–controlling interest.

 

As of June 30, 2015, the non-controlling interest in ConBox was $5,786 and is separately disclosed on the Consolidated Balance Sheet.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company follows paragraph 825-10-50-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for disclosures about fair value of its financial instruments and paragraph 820-10-35-37 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Paragraph 820-10-35-37”) to measure the fair value of its financial instruments. Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a framework for measuring fair value in US GAAP, and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. To increase consistency and comparability in fair value measurements and related disclosures, Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value into three (3) broad levels. The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs. The three (3) levels of fair value hierarchy defined by Paragraph 820-10-35-37 are described below:

 

Level 1   Quoted market prices available in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the reporting date.
     
Level 2   Pricing inputs other than quoted prices in active markets included in Level 1, which are either directly or indirectly observable as of the reporting date.
     
Level 3   Pricing inputs that are generally unobservable and not corroborated by market data.

 

Financial assets are considered Level 3 when their fair values are determined using pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar techniques and at least one significant model assumption or input is unobservable.

 

The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs. If the inputs used to measure the financial assets and liabilities fall within more than one level described above, the categorization is based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement of the instrument.

 

F-7
   

 

The carrying amount of the Company’s financial assets and liabilities, such as cash, accounts receivable, inventory, prepaid expenses, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, and unearned convention and ConBox revenue approximate their fair value because of the short maturity of those instruments.

 

Transactions involving related parties cannot be presumed to be carried out on an arm’s-length basis, as the requisite conditions of competitive, free-market dealings may not exist. Representations about transactions with related parties, if made, shall not imply that the related party transactions were consummated on terms equivalent to those that prevail in arm’s-length transactions unless such representations can be substantiated.

 

Fair Value of Non-Financial Assets or Liabilities Measured on a Recurring Basis

 

The Company’s non-financial assets include inventory. The Company identifies potentially excess and slow-moving inventory by evaluating turn rates, inventory levels and other factors. Excess quantities are identified through evaluation of inventory aging, review of inventory turns and historical sales experiences. The Company provides lower of cost or market reserves for such identified excess and slow-moving inventories. The Company establishes a reserve for inventory shrinkage, if any, based on the historical results of physical inventory cycle counts.

 

Carrying Value, Recoverability and Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company has adopted Section 360-10-35 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for its long-lived assets. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 360-10-35-17, an impairment loss shall be recognized only if the carrying amount of a long-lived asset (asset group) is not recoverable and exceeds its fair value. The carrying amount of a long-lived asset (asset group) is not recoverable if it exceeds the sum of the undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the asset (asset group). That assessment shall be based on the carrying amount of the asset (asset group) at the date it is tested for recoverability. An impairment loss shall be measured as the amount by which the carrying amount of a long-lived asset (asset group) exceeds its fair value. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 360-10-35-20, if an impairment loss is recognized, the adjusted carrying amount of a long-lived asset shall be its new cost basis. For a depreciable long-lived asset, the new cost basis shall be depreciated (amortized) over the remaining useful life of that asset. Restoration of a previously recognized impairment loss is prohibited.

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 360-10-35-21, the Company’s long-lived asset (asset group) is tested for recoverability whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that its carrying amount may not be recoverable. The Company considers the following to be some examples of such events or changes in circumstances that may trigger an impairment review: (a) significant decrease in the market price of a long-lived asset (asset group); (b) a significant adverse change in the extent or manner in which a long-lived asset (asset group) is being used or in its physical condition; (c) a significant adverse change in legal factors or in the business climate that could affect the value of a long-lived asset (asset group), including an adverse action or assessment by a regulator; (d) an accumulation of costs significantly in excess of the amount originally expected for the acquisition or construction of a long-lived asset (asset group); (e) a current-period operating or cash flow loss combined with a history of operating or cash flow losses or a projection or forecast that demonstrates continuing losses associated with the use of a long-lived asset (asset group); and (f) a current expectation that, more likely than not, a long-lived asset (asset group) will be sold or otherwise disposed of significantly before the end of its previously estimated useful life. The Company tests its long-lived assets for potential impairment indicators at least annually and more frequently upon the occurrence of such events.

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraphs 360-10-45-4 and 360-10-45-5, an impairment loss recognized for a long-lived asset (asset group) to be held and used shall be included in income from continuing operations before income taxes in the income statement of a business entity. If a subtotal such as income from operations is presented, it shall include the amount of that loss. A gain or loss recognized on the sale of a long-lived asset (disposal group) that is not a component of an entity shall be included in income from continuing operations before income taxes in the income statement of a business entity. If a subtotal such as income from operations is presented, it shall include the amounts of those gains or losses.

 

F-8
   

 

Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with a maturity of three months or less when purchased to be cash equivalents.

 

Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

Pursuant to FASB ASC Paragraph 310-10-35-47, trade receivables that management has the intent and ability to hold for the foreseeable future shall be reported in the balance sheet at outstanding principal adjusted for any charge-offs and the allowance for doubtful accounts. The Company follows FASB ASC Paragraphs 310-10-35-7 through 310-10-35-10 to estimate the allowance for doubtful accounts. Pursuant to FASB ASC Paragraph 310-10-35-9, losses from uncollectible receivables shall be accrued when both of the following conditions are met: (a) information available before the financial statements are issued or are available to be issued (as discussed in Section 855-10-25) indicates that it is probable that an asset has been impaired at the date of the financial statements, and (b) the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. Those conditions may be considered in relation to individual receivables or in relation to groups of similar types of receivables. If the conditions are met, accrual shall be made even though the particular receivables that are uncollectible may not be identifiable. The Company reviews individually each trade receivable for collectability and performs on-going credit evaluations of its customers and adjusts credit limits based upon payment history and the customer’s current credit worthiness, as determined by the review of their current credit information; and determines the allowance for doubtful accounts based on historical write-off experience, customer specific facts and general economic conditions that may affect a client’s ability to pay. Bad debt expense is included in general and administrative expenses, if any.

 

Pursuant to FASB ASC Paragraph 310-10-35-41, credit losses for trade receivables (uncollectible trade receivables), which may be for all or part of a particular trade receivable, shall be deducted from the allowance. The related trade receivable balance shall be charged off in the period in which the trade receivables are deemed uncollectible. Recoveries of trade receivables previously charged off shall be recorded when received. The Company charges off its trade account receivables against the allowance after all means of collection have been exhausted and the potential for recovery is considered remote.

 

The Company had no bad debt expense for the reporting period ended June 30, 2015 or 2014.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are recorded at cost. Expenditures for major additions and betterments are capitalized. Maintenance and repairs are charged to operations as incurred. Depreciation is computed by the straight-line method (after taking into account their respective estimated residual values) over the estimated useful lives of the respective assets as follows:

 

   Estimated Useful
Life (Years)
 
     
Computer equipment   3 
      
Equipment   5 
      
Furniture and fixture   7 
      
Leasehold improvement   * 

 

(*) Amortized on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease or the estimated useful lives, whichever is shorter.

 

Upon sale or retirement of property and equipment, the related cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts and any gain or loss is reflected in the consolidated statements of operations.

 

F-9
   

 

Investments - Cost Method, Equity Method and Joint Venture

 

The Company accounts for investments in common stock or in-substance common stock (or both common stock and in-substance common stock) of an investee of which the Company has significant influence (see Paragraph 323-10-15-6) in the operating or financial policies even though the Company holds 50% or less of the common stock or in-substance common stock, in accordance with sub-topic 323-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Sub-topic 323-10”).

 

Method of Accounting

 

Investments held in stock of entities other than subsidiaries, namely corporate joint ventures and other non-controlled entities usually are accounted for by one of three methods (i) the fair value method (addressed in Topic 320), (ii) the equity method (addressed in Topic 323), or (iii) the cost method (addressed in Subtopic 325-20). Pursuant to Paragraph 323-10-05-5, the equity method tends to be most appropriate if an investment enables the investor to influence the operating or financial policies of the investee.

 

The Ability to Exercise Significant Influence

 

Pursuant to paragraph 323-10-15-6 the ability to exercise significant influence over operating and financial policies of an investee may be indicated in several ways, including but limited to the following: (a.) representation on the board of directors, (b.) participation in policy-making processes, (c.) material intra-entity transactions, (d.) interchange of managerial personnel, and (e.) technological dependency. Pursuant to Paragraph 323-10-15-8, an investment (direct or indirect) of 20 percent or more of the voting stock of an investee shall lead to a presumption that in the absence of predominant evidence to the contrary an investor has the ability to exercise significant influence over an investee. Conversely, an investment of less than 20 percent of the voting stock of an investee shall lead to a presumption that an investor does not have the ability to exercise significant influence unless such ability can be demonstrated.

 

Initial and Subsequent Measurement

 

Pursuant to Paragraph 323-10-30-2, an investor shall measure an investment in the common stock of an investee (including a joint venture) initially at cost in accordance with the guidance in Section 805-50-30. An investor shall initially measure, at fair value, a retained investment in the common stock of an investee (including a joint venture) in a deconsolidation transaction in accordance with paragraphs 810-10-40-3A through 40-5.

 

Pursuant to Section 323-10-35, under the equity method, an investor shall recognize its share of the earnings or losses of an investee in the periods for which they are reported by the investee in its financial statements rather than in the period in which an investee declares a dividend. An investor shall adjust the carrying amount of an investment for its share of the earnings or losses of the investee after the date of investment including adjustments similar to those made in preparing consolidated financial statements and shall report the recognized earnings or losses in income. An investor’s share of losses of an investee may equal or exceed the carrying amount of an investment accounted for by the equity method plus advances made by the investor. An equity method investor shall continue to report losses up to the investor’s investment carrying amount, including any additional financial support made or committed to by the investor and the investor ordinarily shall discontinue applying the equity method if the investment (and net advances) is reduced to zero and shall not provide for additional losses unless the investor has guaranteed obligations of the investee or is otherwise committed to provide further financial support for the investee. If the investee subsequently reports net income, the investor shall resume applying the equity method only after its share of that net income equals the share of net losses not recognized during the period the equity method was suspended. If a series of operating losses of an investee or other factors indicate that a decrease in value of the investment has occurred that is other than temporary the loss in value of an investment that is other than a temporary decline shall be recognized. Evidence of a loss in value might include, but would not necessarily be limited to, absence of an ability to recover the carrying amount of the investment or inability of the investee to sustain an earnings capacity that would justify the carrying amount of the investment. A current fair value of an investment that is less than its carrying amount may indicate a loss in value of the investment. However, a decline in the quoted market price below the carrying amount or the existence of operating losses alone is not necessarily indicative of a loss in value that is other than temporary.

 

F-10
   

 

Disclosure

 

Pursuant to Paragraph 323-10-50-3, all of the following disclosures generally shall apply to the equity method of accounting for investments in common stock:

 

a. Financial statements of an investor shall disclose all of the following parenthetically, in notes to financial statements, or in separate statements or schedules: (1) the name of each investee and percentage of ownership of common stock. (2) The accounting policies of the investor with respect to investments in common stock. Disclosure shall include the names of any significant investee entities in which the investor holds 20 percent or more of the voting stock, but the common stock is not accounted for on the equity method, together with the reasons why the equity method is not considered appropriate, and the names of any significant investee corporations in which the investor holds less than 20 percent of the voting stock and the common stock is accounted for on the equity method, together with the reasons why the equity method is considered appropriate. (3) The difference, if any, between the amount at which an investment is carried and the amount of underlying equity in net assets and the accounting treatment of the difference.
   
b. For those investments in common stock for which a quoted market price is available, the aggregate value of each identified investment based on the quoted market price usually shall be disclosed.
   
c. If investments in common stock of corporate joint ventures or other investments accounted for under the equity method are, in the aggregate, material in relation to the financial position or results of operations of an investor, it may be necessary for summarized information as to assets, liabilities, and results of operations of the investees to be presented in the notes or in separate statements, either individually or in groups, as appropriate.
   
d. Conversion of outstanding convertible securities, exercise of outstanding options and warrants, and other contingent issuances of an investee may have a significant effect on an investor’s share of reported earnings or losses. Accordingly, material effects of possible conversions, exercises, or contingent issuances shall be disclosed in notes to financial statements of an investor.

 

Investment in CONTV

 

On August 27, 2014, the Company entered into a Joint Venture and executed an Operating Agreement with Cinedigm Entertainment Corp. (“Cinedigm”), ROAR, LLC (a related party partially owned by a member of the Board) (“ROAR”) and Bristol Capital, LLC (a related party controlled by a member of the Board) (“Bristol Capital”). The Company owns a 47.50% interest in the newly formed entity, CON TV LLC (“CONtv”). The Company is accounting for the interest in the joint venture utilizing the equity method of accounting. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2015, the Company recognized $466,960 and $898,436 in losses from this venture, respectively.

 

Related Parties

 

The Company follows subtopic 850-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for the identification of related parties and disclosure of related party transactions.

 

Pursuant to Section 850-10-20, the related parties include: (a.) affiliates of the Company (“Affiliate” means, with respect to any specified Person, any other Person that, directly or indirectly through one or more intermediaries, controls, is controlled by or is under common control with such Person, as such terms are used in and construed under Rule 405 under the Securities Act); (b.) entities for which investments in their equity securities would be required, absent the election of the fair value option under the Fair Value Option Subsection of Section 825–10–15, to be accounted for by the equity method by the investing entity; (c.) trusts for the benefit of employees, such as pension and profit-sharing trusts that are managed by or under the trusteeship of management; (d.) principal owners of the Company; (e.) management of the Company; (f.) other parties with which the Company may deal if one party controls or can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the other to an extent that one of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests; and (g.) other parties that can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the transacting parties or that have an ownership interest in one of the transacting parties and can significantly influence the other to an extent that one or more of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests.

 

F-11
   

 

The financial statements shall include disclosures of material-related party transactions, other than compensation arrangements, expense allowances, and other similar items in the ordinary course of business. However, disclosure of transactions that are eliminated in the preparation of consolidated or combined financial statements is not required in those statements. The disclosures shall include: (a.) the nature of the relationship(s) involved; (b.) a description of the transactions, including transactions to which no amounts or nominal amounts were ascribed, for each of the periods for which income statements are presented, and such other information deemed necessary to an understanding of the effects of the transactions on the financial statements; (c.) the dollar amounts of transactions for each of the periods for which income statements are presented and the effects of any change in the method of establishing the terms from that used in the preceding period; and (d.) amounts due from or to related parties as of the date of each balance sheet presented and, if not otherwise apparent, the terms and manner of settlement.

 

Commitments and Contingencies

 

The Company follows subtopic 450-20 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to report accounting for contingencies. Certain conditions may exist as of the date the consolidated financial statements are issued, which may result in a loss to the Company but which will only be resolved when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. The Company assesses such contingent liabilities, and such assessment inherently involves an exercise of judgment. In assessing loss contingencies related to legal proceedings that are pending against the Company or un-asserted claims that may result in such proceedings, the Company evaluates the perceived merits of any legal proceedings or un-asserted claims as well as the perceived merits of the amount of relief sought or expected to be sought therein.

 

If the assessment of a contingency indicates that it is probable that a material loss has been incurred and the amount of the liability can be estimated, then the estimated liability would be accrued in the Company’s consolidated financial statements. If the assessment indicates that a potential material loss contingency is not probable but is reasonably possible, or is probable but cannot be estimated, then the nature of the contingent liability, and an estimate of the range of possible losses, if determinable and material, would be disclosed.

 

Loss contingencies considered remote are generally not disclosed unless they involve guarantees, in which case the guarantees would be disclosed.

 

Revenue Recognition and Cost of Revenues

 

The Company follows Paragraph 605-10-S99-1 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for revenue recognition. The Company will recognize revenue when it is realized or realizable and earned. The Company considers revenue realized or realizable and earned when all of the following criteria are met: (i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (ii) the product has been shipped or the services have been rendered to the customer, (iii) the sales price is fixed or determinable, and (iv) collectability is reasonably assured.

 

Unearned convention revenue is deposits received for conventions that have not yet taken place, which are fully or partially refundable depending upon the terms and conditions of the agreements.

 

Unearned ConBox revenue is non-refundable up-front payments for services. These payments are initially deferred and subsequently recognized over the subscription period, typically three months, and upon shipment of the product.

 

The Company recognizes cost of revenues in the period in which the revenues was earned. In the event the Company incurs cost of revenues for conventions that are yet to occur, the Company records such amounts as prepaid expenses and such prepaid expenses are expensed during the period the convention takes place.

 

Stock-Based Compensation for Obtaining Employee Services

 

The Company accounts for share-based payment transactions issued to employees under the guidance of the Topic 718 Compensation—Stock Compensation of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC Topic 718”).

 

F-12
   

 

Pursuant to ASC Section 718-10-20, an employee is an individual over whom the grantor of a share-based compensation award exercises or has the right to exercise sufficient control to establish an employer-employee relationship based on common law as illustrated in case law and currently under U.S. Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) Revenue Ruling 87-41. A non-employee director does not satisfy this definition of employee. Nevertheless, non-employee directors acting in their role as members of a board of directors are treated as employees if those directors were elected by the employer’s shareholders or appointed to a board position that will be filled by shareholder election when the existing term expires. However, that requirement applies only to awards granted to non-employee directors for their services as directors. Awards granted to non-employee directors for other services shall be accounted for as awards to non-employees.

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraphs 718-10-30-2 and 718-10-30-3, a share-based payment transaction with employees shall be measured based on the fair value of the equity instruments issued and an entity shall account for the compensation cost from share-based payment transactions with employees in accordance with the fair value-based method, i.e., the cost of services received from employees in exchange for awards of share-based compensation generally shall be measured based on the grant-date fair value of the equity instruments issued or the fair value of the liabilities incurred/settled.

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraphs 718-10-30-6 and 718-10-30-9, the measurement objective for equity instruments awarded to employees is to estimate the fair value at the grant date of the equity instruments that the entity is obligated to issue when employees have rendered the requisite service and satisfied any other conditions necessary to earn the right to benefit from the instruments (for example, to exercise share options). That estimate is based on the share price and other pertinent factors, such as expected volatility, at the grant date. As such, the fair value of an equity share option or similar instrument shall be estimated using a valuation technique such as an option pricing model. For this purpose, a similar instrument is one whose fair value differs from its intrinsic value, that is, an instrument that has time value.

 

If the Company’s shares of common stock are traded in one of the national exchanges the grant-date share price of the Company’s common stock will be used to measure the fair value of the common shares issued, however, if the Company’s shares of common stock are thinly traded the use of share prices established in its most recent private placement memorandum (“PPM”), or weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 718-10-55-21, if an observable market price is not available for a share option or similar instrument with the same or similar terms and conditions, an entity shall estimate the fair value of that instrument using a valuation technique or model that meets the requirements in Paragraph 718-10-55-11 and takes into account, at a minimum, all of the following factors:

 

a. The exercise price of the option.
   
b. The expected term of the option, taking into account both the contractual term of the option and the effects of employees’ expected exercise and post-vesting employment termination behavior: The expected life of options and similar instruments represents the period of time the option and/or warrant are expected to be outstanding. Pursuant to Paragraph 718-10-S99-1, it may be appropriate to use the simplified method, i.e., expected term = ((vesting term + original contractual term) / 2), if (i) a company does not have sufficient historical exercise data to provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term due to the limited period of time its equity shares have been publicly traded; (ii) a company significantly changes the terms of its share option grants or the types of employees that receive share option grants such that its historical exercise data may no longer provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term; or (iii) a company has or expects to have significant structural changes in its business such that its historical exercise data may no longer provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term. The Company uses the simplified method to calculate expected term of share options and similar instruments as the company does not have sufficient historical exercise data to provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term.
   
c. The current price of the underlying share.

 

F-13
   

 

d. The expected volatility of the price of the underlying share for the expected term of the option. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 718-10-55-25, a newly publicly traded entity might base expectations about future volatility on the average volatilities of similar entities for an appropriate period following their going public. A nonpublic entity might base its expected volatility on the average volatilities of otherwise similar public entities. For purposes of identifying otherwise similar entities, an entity would likely consider characteristics such as industry, stage of life cycle, size, and financial leverage. Because of the effects of diversification that are present in an industry sector index, the volatility of an index should not be substituted for the average of volatilities of otherwise similar entities in a fair value measurement. Pursuant to Paragraph 718-10-S99-1, if shares of a company are thinly traded the use of weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as the volatility calculation using daily observations for such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market. The Company uses the average historical volatility of the comparable companies over the expected term of the share options or similar instruments as its expected volatility.
   
e. The expected dividends on the underlying share for the expected term of the option. The expected dividend yield is based on the Company’s current dividend yield as the best estimate of projected dividend yield for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.
   
f. The risk-free interest rate(s) for the expected term of the option. Pursuant to ASC 718-10-55-28, a U.S. entity issuing an option on its own shares must use as the risk-free interest rates the implied yields currently available from the U.S. Treasury zero-coupon yield curve over the contractual term of the option if the entity is using a lattice model incorporating the option’s contractual term. If the entity is using a closed-form model, the risk-free interest rate is the implied yield currently available on U.S. Treasury zero-coupon issues with a remaining term equal to the expected term used as the assumption in the model.

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraphs 718-10-30-11 and 718-10-30-17, a restriction that stems from the forfeitability of instruments to which employees have not yet earned the right, such as the inability either to exercise a non-vested equity share option or to sell non-vested shares, is not reflected in estimating the fair value of the related instruments at the grant date. Instead, those restrictions are taken into account by recognizing compensation cost only for awards for which employees render the requisite service and a non-vested equity share or non-vested equity share unit awarded to an employee shall be measured at its fair value as if it were vested and issued on the grant date.

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraphs 718-10-35-2 and 718-10-35-3, the compensation cost for an award of share-based employee compensation classified as equity shall be recognized over the requisite service period, with a corresponding credit to equity (generally, paid-in capital). The requisite service period is the period during which an employee is required to provide service in exchange for an award, which often is the vesting period. The total amount of compensation cost recognized at the end of the requisite service period for an award of share-based compensation shall be based on the number of instruments for which the requisite service has been rendered (that is, for which the requisite service period has been completed). An entity shall base initial accruals of compensation cost on the estimated number of instruments for which the requisite service is expected to be rendered. That estimate shall be revised if subsequent information indicates that the actual number of instruments is likely to differ from previous estimates. The cumulative effect on current and prior periods of a change in the estimated number of instruments for which the requisite service is expected to be or has been rendered shall be recognized in compensation cost in the period of the change. Previously recognized compensation cost shall not be reversed if an employee share option (or share unit) for which the requisite service has been rendered expires unexercised (or unconverted).

 

Under the requirement of ASC Paragraph 718-10-35-8, the Company made a policy decision to recognize compensation cost for an award with only service conditions that has a graded vesting schedule on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period for the entire award.

 

F-14
   

 

Equity Instruments Issued to Parties Other Than Employees for Acquiring Goods or Services

 

The Company accounts for equity instruments issued to parties other than employees for acquiring goods or services under the guidance of sub-topic 505-50 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Sub-topic 505-50”).

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 505-50-25-7, if fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments are issued at the date the grantor and grantee enter into an agreement for goods or services (no specific performance is required by the grantee to retain those equity instruments), then, because of the elimination of any obligation on the part of the counterparty to earn the equity instruments, a measurement date has been reached. A grantor shall recognize the equity instruments when they are issued (in most cases, when the agreement is entered into). Whether the corresponding cost is an immediate expense or a prepaid asset (or whether the debit should be characterized as contra-equity under the requirements of Paragraph 505-50-45-1) depends on the specific facts and circumstances. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 505-50-45-1, a grantor may conclude that an asset (other than a note or a receivable) has been received in return for fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments that are issued at the date the grantor and grantee enter into an agreement for goods or services (and no specific performance is required by the grantee in order to retain those equity instruments). Such an asset shall not be displayed as contra-equity by the grantor of the equity instruments. The transferability (or lack thereof) of the equity instruments shall not affect the balance sheet display of the asset. This guidance is limited to transactions in which equity instruments are transferred to other than employees in exchange for goods or services.

 

Pursuant to Paragraphs 505-50-25-8 and 505-50-25-9, an entity may grant fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments that are exercisable by the grantee only after a specified period of time if the terms of the agreement provide for earlier exercisability if the grantee achieves specified performance conditions. Any measured cost of the transaction shall be recognized in the same period(s) and in the same manner as if the entity had paid cash for the goods or services or used cash rebates as a sales discount instead of paying with, or using, the equity instruments. A recognized asset, expense, or sales discount shall not be reversed if a stock option that the counterparty has the right to exercise expires unexercised.

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraphs 505-50-30-2 and 505-50-30-11, share-based payment transactions with nonemployees shall be measured at the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The issuer shall measure the fair value of the equity instruments in these transactions using the stock price and other measurement assumptions as of the earlier of the following dates, referred to as the measurement date: (a) the date at which a commitment for performance by the counterparty to earn the equity instruments is reached (a performance commitment); or (b) the date at which the counterparty’s performance is complete. If the Company’s common shares are traded in one of the national exchanges the grant-date share price of the Company’s common stock will be used to measure the fair value of the common shares issued, however, if the Company’s common shares are thinly traded the use of share prices established in the Company’s most recent PPM, or weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 718-10-55-21, if an observable market price is not available for a share option or similar instrument with the same or similar terms and conditions, an entity shall estimate the fair value of that instrument using a valuation technique or model that meets the requirements in Paragraph 718-10-55-11 and takes into account, at a minimum, all of the following factors:

 

a. The exercise price of the option.
   
b. The expected term of the option, taking into account both the contractual term of the option and the effects of employees’ expected exercise and post-vesting employment termination behavior: Pursuant to Paragraph 718-10-50-2(f)(2)(i) of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, the expected term of share options and similar instruments represents the period of time the options and similar instruments are expected to be outstanding taking into consideration of the contractual term of the instruments and holder’s expected exercise behavior into the fair value (or calculated value) of the instruments. The Company uses historical data to estimate holder’s expected exercise behavior. If the Company is a newly formed corporation or shares of the Company are thinly traded the contractual term of the share options and similar instruments is used as the expected term of share options and similar instruments as the Company does not have sufficient historical exercise data to provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term.

 

F-15
   

 

c. The current price of the underlying share.
   
d. The expected volatility of the price of the underlying share for the expected term of the option. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 718-10-55-25, a newly publicly traded entity might base expectations about future volatility on the average volatilities of similar entities for an appropriate period following their going public. A nonpublic entity might base its expected volatility on the average volatilities of otherwise similar public entities. For purposes of identifying otherwise similar entities, an entity would likely consider characteristics such as industry, stage of life cycle, size, and financial leverage. Because of the effects of diversification that are present in an industry sector index, the volatility of an index should not be substituted for the average of volatilities of otherwise similar entities in a fair value measurement. Pursuant to Paragraph 718-10-S99-1, if shares of a company are thinly traded the use of weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as the volatility calculation using daily observations for such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market. The Company uses the average historical volatility of the comparable companies over the expected term of the share options or similar instruments as its expected volatility.
   
e. The expected dividends on the underlying share for the expected term of the option. The expected dividend yield is based on the Company’s current dividend yield as the best estimate of projected dividend yield for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.
   
f. The risk-free interest rate(s) for the expected term of the option. Pursuant to ASC 718-10-55-28, a U.S. entity issuing an option on its own shares must use as the risk-free interest rates the implied yields currently available from the U.S. Treasury zero-coupon yield curve over the contractual term of the option if the entity is using a lattice model incorporating the option’s contractual term. If the entity is using a closed-form model, the risk-free interest rate is the implied yield currently available on U.S. Treasury zero-coupon issues with a remaining term equal to the expected term used as the assumption in the model.

 

Pursuant to ASC paragraph 505-50-S99-1, if the Company receives a right to receive future services in exchange for unvested, forfeitable equity instruments, those equity instruments are treated as unissued for accounting purposes until the future services are received (that is, the instruments are not considered issued until they vest). Consequently, there would be no recognition at the measurement date and no entry should be recorded.

 

Deferred Tax Assets and Income Taxes Provision

 

The Company accounts for income taxes under Section 740-10-30 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are determined based upon differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities and are measured using the enacted tax rates and laws that will be in effect when the differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance to the extent management concludes it is more likely than not that the assets will not be realized. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the statements of operations in the period that includes the enactment date.

 

The Company adopted Section 740-10-25 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Section 740-10-25”). Section 740-10-25 addresses the determination of whether tax benefits claimed or expected to be claimed on a tax return should be recorded in the financial statements. Under Section 740-10-25, the Company may recognize the tax benefit from an uncertain tax position only if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such a position should be measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than fifty percent (50%) likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. Section 740-10-25 also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties on income taxes, accounting in interim periods and requires increased disclosures.

 

F-16
   

 

The estimated future tax effects of temporary differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities are reported in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets, as well as tax credit carry-backs and carry-forwards. The Company periodically reviews the recoverability of deferred tax assets recorded on its consolidated balance sheets and provides valuation allowances as management deems necessary.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2014, the Company partially utilized all NOL carry-forwards and has prepaid $575,000 in taxes payable. During the six months ended June 30, 2015, the Company recognized additional losses.

 

Management makes judgments as to the interpretation of the tax laws that might be challenged upon an audit and cause changes to previous estimates of tax liability. In addition, the Company operates within multiple taxing jurisdictions and is subject to audit in these jurisdictions. In management’s opinion, adequate provisions for income taxes have been made for all years. If actual taxable income by tax jurisdiction varies from estimates, additional allowances or reversals of reserves may be necessary.

 

Tax years that remain subject to examination by major tax jurisdictions

 

The Company discloses tax years that remain subject to examination by major tax jurisdictions pursuant to ASC Paragraph 740-10-50-15.

 

Earnings per Share

 

Earnings per share (“EPS”) is the amount of earnings attributable to each share of common stock. For convenience, the term is used to refer to either earnings or loss per share. EPS is computed pursuant to Section 260-10-45 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Pursuant to ASC Paragraphs 260-10-45-10 through 260-10-45-16, basic EPS shall be computed by dividing income available to common stockholders (the numerator) by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding (the denominator) during the period. Income available to common stockholders shall be computed by deducting both the dividends declared in the period on preferred stock (whether or not paid) and the dividends accumulated for the period on cumulative preferred stock (whether or not earned) from income from continuing operations (if that amount appears in the income statement) and also from net income. The computation of diluted EPS is similar to the computation of basic EPS except that the denominator is increased to include the number of additional common shares that would have been outstanding if the dilutive potential common shares had been issued during the period to reflect the potential dilution that could occur from common shares issuable through contingent shares issuance arrangement, stock options or warrants.

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraphs 260-10-45-45-21 through 260-10-45-45-23, diluted EPS shall be based on the most advantageous conversion rate or exercise price from the standpoint of the security holder. The dilutive effect of outstanding call options and warrants (and their equivalents) issued by the reporting entity shall be reflected in diluted EPS by application of the treasury stock method unless the provisions of Paragraphs 260-10-45-35 through 45-36 and 260-10-55-8 through 55-11 require that another method be applied. Equivalents of options and warrants include non-vested stock granted to employees, stock purchase contracts, and partially paid stock subscriptions (see paragraph 260–10–55–23). Anti-dilutive contracts, such as purchased put options and purchased call options, shall be excluded from diluted EPS. Under the treasury stock method: (a.) exercise of options and warrants shall be assumed at the beginning of the period (or at time of issuance, if later) and common shares shall be assumed to be issued, (b.) the proceeds from exercise shall be assumed to be used to purchase common stock at the average market price during the period. (See Paragraphs 260-10-45-29 and 260-10-55-4 through 55-5.), and (c.) the incremental shares (the difference between the number of shares assumed issued and the number of shares assumed purchased) shall be included in the denominator of the diluted EPS computation.

 

The Company’s contingent shares issuance arrangement, stock options or warrants are as follows:

 

   Contingent shares issuance
arrangement, stock options or warrants
 
   For the Interim
Period Ended
June 30, 2015
   For the Interim
Period Ended
June 30, 2014
 
         
Stock options   7,580,000    6,022,500 
     
Total contingent shares issuance arrangement, stock options or warrants   7,580,000

 

6,022,500 

 

F-17
   

 

There were approximately 3,179,558 and 1,020,281 potentially outstanding dilutive common shares under the Treasury Stock Method for the reporting period ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

 

Cash Flows Reporting

 

The Company adopted Paragraph 230-10-45-24 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for cash flows reporting, classifies cash receipts and payments according to whether they stem from operating, investing, or financing activities and provides definitions of each category, and uses the indirect or reconciliation method (the “Indirect Method”) as defined by Paragraph 230-10-45-25 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to report net cash flow from operating activities by adjusting net income to reconcile it to net cash flow from operating activities by removing the effects of (a) all deferrals of past operating cash receipts and payments and all accruals of expected future operating cash receipts and payments and (b) all items that are included in net income that do not affect operating cash receipts and payments.

 

Subsequent Events

 

The Company follows the guidance in Section 855-10-50 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for the disclosure of subsequent events. The Company will evaluate subsequent events through the date when the financial statements were issued. Pursuant to ASU 2010-09 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, the Company as an SEC filer considers its financial statements issued when they are widely distributed to users, such as through filing them on EDGAR.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2014, the FASB issued the FASB Accounting Standards Update No. 2014-09 “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606)” (“ASU 2014-09”).

 

This guidance amends the existing FASB Accounting Standards Codification, creating a new Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customer. The core principle of the guidance is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.

 

To achieve that core principle, an entity should apply the following steps:

 

  1. Identify the contract(s) with the customer;
     
  2. Identify the performance obligations in the contract;
     
  3. Determine the transaction price;
     
  4. Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract; and
     
  5. Recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligations

 

The ASU also provides guidance on disclosures that should be provided to enable financial statement users to understand the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue recognition and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. Qualitative and quantitative information is required about the following:

 

  1. Contracts with customers – including revenue and impairments recognized, disaggregation of revenue, and information about contract balances and performance obligations (including the transaction price allocated to the remaining performance obligations).

 

F-18
   

 

  2. Significant judgments and changes in judgments – determining the timing of satisfaction of performance obligations (over time or at a point in time), and determining the transaction price and amounts allocated to performance obligations.
     
  3. Assets recognized from the costs to obtain or fulfill a contract.

 

ASU 2014-09 is effective for periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period for all public entities. Early application is not permitted.

 

In January 2015, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2015-01, Income Statement - Extraordinary and Unusual Items (Subtopic 225-20): Simplifying Income Statement Presentation by Eliminating the Concept of Extraordinary Items” (“ASU 2015-01”). The new guidance eliminates the separate presentation of extraordinary items, net of tax and the related earnings per share, but does not affect the requirement to disclose material items that are unusual in nature or infrequently occurring. The ASU applies to all entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2015. Entities have the option to apply the new guidance prospectively or retrospectively, and can choose early adoption. The Company does not expect the adoption of this ASU to significantly impact the consolidated financial statements.

 

In February 2015, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2015-02, “Consolidation (Topic 810): Amendments to the Consolidation Analysis” (“ASU 2015-02”). The new consolidation standard changes the way reporting enterprises evaluate whether (a) they should consolidate limited partnerships and similar entities, (b) fees paid to a decision maker or service provider are variable interests in a variable interest entity (“VIE”), and (c) variable interests in a VIE held by related parties of the reporting enterprise require the reporting enterprise to consolidate the VIE. The guidance is effective for public business entities for annual and interim periods in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015. Early adoption is allowed, including early adoption in an interim period. A reporting entity may apply a modified retrospective approach by recording a cumulative-effect adjustment to equity as of the beginning of the fiscal year of adoption or may apply the amendments retrospectively. The Company is currently assessing the impact, if any, of the adoption of this guidance on the consolidated financial statements.

 

In March 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2015-03, “Interest - Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30): Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs” (“ASU 2015-03”). The amendments in this ASU require that debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability be presented in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the carrying amount of that debt liability, consistent with debt discounts. The recognition and measurement guidance for debt issuance costs are not affected by the amendments in this ASU. The amendments are effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption of the amendments is permitted for financial statements that have not been previously issued. The amendments should be applied on a retrospective basis, wherein the balance sheet of each individual period presented should be adjusted to reflect the period-specific effects of applying the new guidance. Upon transition, an entity is required to comply with the applicable disclosures for a change in an accounting principle. These disclosures include the nature of and reason for the change in accounting principle, the transition method, a description of the prior-period information that has been retrospectively adjusted, and the effect of the change on the financial statement line items (i.e., debt issuance cost asset and the debt liability). The Company is currently evaluating the effects of ASU 2015-03 on the consolidated financial statements.

 

Management does not believe that any recently issued, but not yet effective accounting pronouncements, when adopted, will have a material effect on the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

 

F-19
   

 

Note 3 – Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment stated at cost, less accumulated depreciation and amortization, consisted of the following:

 

   June 30, 2015   December 31, 2014   Estimated Useful Life
Computer Equipment  $30,246    27,743   3 years
Equipment   264,260    244,150   5 years
Furniture & Fixtures   48,951    48,951   7 years
    343,457    320,844    
Less: Accumulated depreciation and amortization   (109,328)   (56,102)   
   $234,129   $264,742    

 

(i) Impairment

 

The Company completed its annual impairment test of property and equipment and determined that there was no impairment as the fair value of property and equipment, exceeded their carrying values at December 31, 2014.

 

(ii) Depreciation and Amortization Expense

 

Depreciation and amortization expense was $53,225 and $7,624 for the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

 

Note 4 – Investment in CONtv Joint Venture

 

On August 27, 2014, the Company entered into a Joint Venture and executed an Operating Agreement with Cinedigm, ROAR and Bristol Capital. The Company owns a 47.50% interest in the newly formed entity, CONtv. The Company is accounting for the interest in the joint venture utilizing the equity method of accounting. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2015, the Company recognized $466,960 and $898,436 in losses from this venture, respectively.

 

As of June 30, 2015, the investment in CONtv was as follows:

 

Investment in CONtv – December 31, 2014  $117,507 
Investment into CONtv   982,221 
Loss on CONtv for the six months ended June 30, 2015   (898,436)
Investment in CONtv – June 30, 2015  $201,292 

 

As of June 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014, the Company has a balance due to CONtv of $341,761 and $313,412, respectively, an increase of $28,349.

 

Note 5 – Related Party Transactions

 

Related Parties

 

On September 1, 2012, the Company entered into an agreement with ROAR an entity which is partially owned by a director of the Company. ROAR agrees to provide the Company strategic management consulting services. The term is for three (3) months and following the initial three (3) months, month to month thereafter. The Company agrees to compensate ROAR with a $7,500 per month payment and a 10% commission on any contractual introduction for business development introduced by ROAR.

 

Effective April 1, 2014, the Company entered into an agreement with Bristol pursuant to which Bristol Capital agrees to provide the Company strategic management consulting services. The term of the agreement is month to month and Bristol Capital shall receive a payment of $5,000 per month.

 

Bristol Capital and ROAR each received a 2.5% profits participation and ownership interest in CONtv.

 

On December 29, 2014, the Company and a member of the Board formed Wiz Wizard, LLC in the State of Delaware. The Company and the member of the Board each own 50% of the membership interest and shall allocate the profits and losses accordingly upon repayment of the initial capital contributions on a pro rata basis.

 

F-20
   

 

Note 6 – Commitments and Contingencies

 

Amended and Restated Employment Agreement

 

On September 16, 2014, the Company entered into an amended and restated employment agreement (the “Employment Agreement”) with Mr. John Macaluso (“Mr. Macaluso”) pursuant to which Mr. Macaluso shall continue to serve as the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer. The initial term of the Employment Agreement commenced on September 16, 2014 (the “Commencement Date”) and shall expire on March 18, 2018 (the “Initial Term”). The Initial Term will be automatically extended for additional terms of one (1) year each (each a “Renewal Term” and together with the Initial Term, the “Term”), unless either the Company or Mr. Macaluso gives prior written notice of non-renewal to the other party no later than sixty (60) days prior to the expiration of the then current Term.

 

During the Term, the Company will pay Mr. Macaluso a base salary of $41,666.67 per month (the “Base Salary”). In addition, subject to the terms and conditions of the Employment Agreement, Mr. Macaluso will receive an annual bonus equal to the following, calculated cumulatively: (i) when the Company achieves annual Adjusted EBITDA (as defined in the Employment Agreement) of between $1.00 and $1,000,000, Mr. Macaluso shall receive a cash bonus of 30% of such annual Adjusted EBITDA; (ii) when the Company achieves annual Adjusted EBITDA of between $1,000,001 and $2,000,000, Mr. Macaluso shall receive an additional cash bonus of 20% of such annual Adjusted EBITDA which exceeds $1,000,000; and (iii) when the Company achieves annual Adjusted EBITDA greater than $2,000,000, Mr. Macaluso shall receive an additional cash bonus of 10% of such annual Adjusted EBITDA which exceeds $2,000,000. Mr. Macaluso shall also be entitled to a monthly car allowance of $1,200. There was no bonus accrued during the three and six months ended June 30, 2015.

 

The Company also granted to Mr. Macaluso 2,700,000 options to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.0001 per share.

 

Non-Compete Agreement

 

In conjunction with the Employment Agreement, Mr. Macaluso entered into a non-compete, non-solicitation and non-disclosure agreement, dated September 16, 2014, with the Company (the “Non-Compete Agreement”). Under the Non-Compete Agreement, Mr. Macaluso must keep the Company’s confidential and proprietary information confidential and is prohibited from inducing or attempting to induce any employee of the Company from terminating his or her employment with the Company, and soliciting the business of any client or customer of the Company, during the period commencing on the Commencement Date and ending on the termination of Mr. Macaluso’s employment with the Company for any reason. Further, Mr. Macaluso is prohibited from engaging in a venture or business substantially similar to that of the Company or that is in direct or indirect competition with the Company in the United States during the period commencing on the Commencement Date and ending on the termination of Mr. Macaluso’s employment with the Company for any reason.

 

Operating Lease

 

Effective July 17, 2014, the Company entered into a sublease, as lessee, with Ironclad Performance Wear Corporation, for new space located in El Segundo, California (the “Sublease”). The term of the Sublease is for one year and ten (10) months commencing on September 1, 2014. Pursuant to the Sublease, the Company shall pay base rent of $11,132 per month and an initial security deposit of $11,466 is required.

 

Future minimum lease payments inclusive of related tax required under the non-cancelable operating lease are as follows:

 

Fiscal year ending December 31:        
         
2015 (remainder)   $ 66,792  
         
2016     66,792  
         
    $ 133,584  

 

Note 7 – Credit Risk

 

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to significant concentration of credit risk consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents. As of June 30, 2015, substantially all of the Company’s cash and cash equivalents were held by major financial institutions and the balance at certain accounts exceeded the maximum amount insured by the Federal Deposits Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”). However, the Company has not experienced losses on these accounts and management believes that the Company is not exposed to significant risks on such accounts.

 

Note 8 – Subsequent Events

 

The Company has evaluated all events that occurred after the balance sheet date through the date when the financial statements were issued to determine if they must be reported. The Management of the Company determined that there were no reportable subsequent event(s) to be disclosed.  

 

F-21
 

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

This quarterly report on Form 10-Q and other reports filed by Wizard World, Inc. (the “Company”) from time to time with the SEC (collectively, the “Filings”) contain or may contain forward-looking statements and information that are based upon beliefs of, and information currently available to, the Company’s management as well as estimates and assumptions made by Company’s management. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which are only predictions and speak only as of the date hereof. When used in the Filings, the words “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “future,” “intend,” “plan,” or the negative of these terms and similar expressions as they relate to the Company or the Company’s management identify forward-looking statements. Such statements reflect the current view of the Company with respect to future events and are subject to risks, uncertainties, assumptions, and other factors, including the risks relating to the Company’s business, industry, and the Company’s operations and results of operations. Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should the underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may differ significantly from those anticipated, believed, estimated, expected, intended, or planned.

 

Although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, the Company cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance, or achievements. Except as required by applicable law, including the securities laws of the United States, the Company does not intend to update any of the forward-looking statements to conform these statements to actual results.

 

Our financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”). These accounting principles require us to make certain estimates, judgments and assumptions. We believe that the estimates, judgments and assumptions upon which we rely are reasonable based upon information available to us at the time that these estimates, judgments and assumptions are made. These estimates, judgments and assumptions can affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities as of the date of the financial statements as well as the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the periods presented. Our financial statements would be affected to the extent there are material differences between these estimates and actual results. In many cases, the accounting treatment of a particular transaction is specifically dictated by GAAP and does not require management’s judgment in its application. There are also areas in which management’s judgment in selecting any available alternative would not produce a materially different result. The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and notes thereto appearing elsewhere in this report.

 

Overview

 

We intend for this discussion to provide information that will assist in understanding our financial statements, the changes in certain key items in those financial statements, and the primary factors that accounted for those changes, as well as how certain accounting principles affect our financial statements. This discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and accompanying notes for the three and six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, included elsewhere in this report.

 

We are a producer of pop culture and multimedia conventions (“Comic Cons”) across North America that market movies, TV shows, video games, technology, toys, social networking/gaming platforms, comic books and graphic novels. These Comic Cons provide sales, marketing, promotions, public relations, advertising and sponsorship opportunities for entertainment companies, toy companies, gaming companies, publishing companies, marketers, corporate sponsors, and retailers.

 

Plan of Operation

 

Our Company has two lines of business: (i) live multimedia events, which involve admissions and exhibitor booth space, and (ii) sponsorships and advertising. Our current focus is two-fold and includes both growing our existing Comic Cons by obtaining new exhibitors and dealers and attracting more high profile celebrities and VIPs, and identifying new markets in which to produce additional Comic Cons. We also plan to expose our database of fans and our target market of young adults and families to our content through digital media such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, and Tumblr, and draw higher traffic to our website www.wizardworld.com by creating content from our live multimedia events and promoting such events through emails and newsletters.

 

4
 

 

We expect to produce 27 live events during the year ending December 31, 2015. To date, we have operated profitable live events in Philadelphia, Chicago, New Orleans, Columbus, Portland, Nashville, Austin, Sacramento, Louisville, Minneapolis, San Antonio, Atlanta, Tulsa, Reno and St. Louis, but we have operated at a deficit in other events. In order for us to operate a successful event, we must produce an event that is relevant to the public in order to drive admissions, booth sales, sponsorship, and advertising. In order for the Company to grow the digital business, we must attract unique users and drive traffic to our online site. To date, we have exhausted considerable resources developing our media platform, but we have yet to earn a profit from the platform.

 

In addition, the Company through its subsidiary, Wiz Wizard, launched ComicConBox™ (“ConBox”) in April 2015. ConBox is a subscription-based premium monthly box service featuring collectibles, exclusives, toys, tech and gaming, licensed artwork, superior comics and apparel, Comic Con tickets, special VIP discounts and more, which will be shipped on or around the end of every month. The Company plans to continue to partner with major Comic Con related brands and celebrities to deliver a high quality and variation of products directly to the front doors of its subscribers.

 

We continue to develop the Wizard World digital strategy and grow our existing database through social media, on-site activation, and the Company’s digital presence on properties that include Facebook®, Twitter®, YouTube®, Flickr®, Instagram® and Tumblr®. Also, as additional events are added, more people join the Wizard World universe and become loyal to the brand and its affiliated properties.

 

Wizardworlddigital.com continues to be the hub for all Comic Con and related events news and content, and wizardworld.com continues to act as the e-commerce engine for all admissions, VIP experiences, one-of-a-kind packages, and more.

 

Results of Operations

 

Summary of Statements of Operations for the Three Months Ended June 30, 2015 and 2014:

 

   Three Months Ended  
   June 30, 2015    June 30, 2014  
Convention revenue  $7,444,085   $7,110,940 
ConBox revenue  $132,309   $- 
Gross profit  $737,682   $2,762,773 
Operating expenses  $2,079,391   $(2,002,931)
(Loss) income from operations  $(1,341,709)  $759,842 
Other expenses  $(466,960)  $(139)
Net (loss) income attributable to common shareholder  $(1,802,883)  $759,703 
(Loss) income per common share – basic and diluted  $(0.04)  $0.01 

 

Convention Revenue

 

Convention revenue was $7,444,085 for the three months ended June 30, 2015, as compared to $7,110,940 for the comparable period ended June 30, 2014, an increase of $333,145. The increase in convention revenue is primarily attributable to running better advertised and marketed events. In addition, the Company increased admission prices and the overall size and scope of each event. The Company ran six events during the period ended June 30, 2015, as compared to four events during the comparable period ended June 30, 2014. Average revenue generated per event in the second quarter of 2015 was $1,240,681 as compared to $1,777,735 during 2014.

 

ConBox Revenue

 

ConBox revenue was $132,309 for the three months ended June 30, 2015, as compared to $0 for the comparable period ended June 30, 2014, an increase of $132,309. The increase in ConBox revenue is primarily attributable to the introduction of the operations during the current quarter.

 

5
 

 

Gross Profit

 

Gross profit percentage decreased from a gross profit of 39% during the three months ended June 30, 2014, to a gross profit of 10% during the three months ended June 30, 2015. The Company produced six events during the period ended June 30, 2015, as compared to four events during the comparable period ended June 30, 2014. The gross profit percentage decrease was attributable to running more advertising and marketing per event, increasing investment in the programming and increasing convention center build-out, in order to improve the fan experience at the Company’s events. These factors are coupled with operating two new shows during the three months ended June 30, 2015.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expenses for the three months ended June 30, 2015, was $2,079,391, as compared to $2,002,931 for the three months ended June 30, 2014. The increase is primarily attributable to an increase employee compensation. The Company’s employee count increased from 35 as of June 30, 2014 to 47 as of June 30, 2015 as a result of the Company expecting to operate more events in 2015.

 

(Loss) Income from Operations

 

Loss from operations for the three months ended June 30, 2015, was $(1,808,669) as compared to income of $759,842 for the three months ended June 30, 2014. The decrease is primarily attributable to running more events with increased fixed costs during the three months ended June 30, 2015 as compared to the three months ended June 30, 2014. As a result of the Company increasing advertising and marketing per event and producing two new shows during the three months ended June 30, 2015, gross profit percentage decreased significantly. In addition, the Company is hiring more employees in order to service the expected increase in number of shows in 2015.

 

Other expenses

 

Other expense for the three months ended June 30, 2015, was $466,960, as compared to $139 for the three months ended June 30, 2014. The change is attributable to the Company’s $466,960 loss on the CONtv joint venture with Cinedigm. The Company incurred these losses in connection with the launching of CONtv, which occurred during the three months ended June 30, 2015.

 

Net (Loss) Income Attributable to Common Shareholder

 

Net (loss) income attributable to common shareholder for three months ended June 30, 2015, was $(1,802,883) or income per share of $(0.04), as compared to $759,703 or income per share of $0.01, for the three months ended June 30, 2014. The per share amounts are calculated net of deemed dividends.

 

Summary of Statements of Operations for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2015 and 2014:

 

   Six Months Ended  
   June 30, 2015    June 30, 2014  
Convention revenue  $13,545,514   $12,284,138 
ConBox revenue  $132,309   $- 
Gross profit  $2,256,947   $4,675,944 
Operating expenses  $(4,149,121)  $(3,223,900)
(Loss) income from operations  $(1,892,174)  $1,452,044 
Other expenses  $(898,436)  $(300)
Net (loss) income attributable to common shareholder  $(2,784,824)  $1,451,744 
(Loss) income per common share – basic  $(0.05)  $0.03 

 

Convention Revenue

 

Convention revenue was $13,545,514 for the six months ended June 30, 2015, as compared to $12,284,138 for the comparable period ended June 30, 2014, an increase of $1,261,376. The increase in convention revenue is primarily attributable to running better advertised and marketed events. In addition, the Company increased admission prices and the overall size and scope of each event. The Company ran thirteen events during the period ended June 30, 2015, as compared to eight events during the comparable period ended June 30, 2014. Average revenue generated per event in 2015 was $1,041,963 as compared to $1,535,517 during 2014.

 

6
 

 

ConBox Revenue

 

ConBox revenue was $132,309 for the six months ended June 30, 2015, as compared to $0 for the comparable period ended June 30, 2014, an increase of $132,309. The increase in ConBox revenue is primarily attributable to the introduction of the operations during the current period.

 

Gross Profit

 

Gross profit percentage decreased from a gross profit of 38% during the six months ended June 30, 2014, to a gross profit of 17% during the six months ended June 30, 2015. The Company produced thirteen events during the period ended June 30, 2015, as compared to eight events during the comparable period ended June 30, 2014. The gross profit percentage decrease was attributable to running more advertising and marketing per event, increasing investment in the programming and increasing convention center build-out, in order to improve the fan experience at the Company’s events. These factors are coupled with operating five new shows during the six months ended June 30, 2015.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expenses for the six months ended June 30, 2015, was $4,149,121, as compared to $3,223,900 for the six months ended June 30, 2014. The increase is primarily attributable to an increase in salaries and share-based payments. The Company’s headcount increase period over period as a result of the Company expecting to operate more events in 2015.

 

(Loss) Income from Operations

 

Loss from operations for the six months ended June 30, 2015, was $(1,892,174) as compared to income of $1,452,044 for the six months ended June 30, 2014. The decrease is primarily attributable to running more events with increased fixed costs during the six months ended June 30, 2015 as compared to the six months ended June 30, 2014. As a result of the Company increasing advertising and marketing per event and producing thirteen shows (including five new shows) during the six months ended June 30, 2015, gross profit percentage decreased significantly. In addition, the Company is hiring more employees in order to service the expected increase in number of shows in 2015.

 

Other expenses

 

Other expense for the six months ended June 30, 2015, was $898,436 as compared to $300 for the six months ended June 30, 2014. The change is primarily attributable to the Company’s $898,436 loss on the CONtv joint venture with Cinedigm. The Company incurred these losses in connection with the launching of CONtv, which occurred during the six months ended June 30, 2015.

 

Net (Loss) Income Attributable to Common Shareholder

 

Net income (loss) attributable to common shareholder for six months ended June 30, 2015, was $(2,784,824) or (loss) per share of $(0.05), as compared to $1,451,744 or income per share of $0.03, for the six months ended June 30, 2014. The per share amounts are calculated net of deemed dividends.

 

Inflation did not have a material impact on the Company’s operations for the applicable period. Other than the foregoing, management knows of no trends, demands, or uncertainties that are reasonably likely to have a material impact on the Company’s results of operations.

 

7
 

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

The following table summarizes total current assets, liabilities and working capital at June 30, 2015, compared to December 31, 2014:

 

   June 30, 2015    December 31, 2014    Increase/Decrease  
Current Assets  $6,666,299   $7,768,084   $(1,101,785)
Current Liabilities  $4,985,788   $3,929,988   $1,055,800 
Working Capital (Deficit)  $1,680,511   $3,838,096   $(2,157,585)

 

At June 30, 2015, we had working capital of $1,680,511, as compared to working capital of $3,838,096, at December 31, 2014, a decrease of $2,157,585. The decrease is primarily attributable to the Company recognizing a loss from operations during the three months ended June 30, 2015 coupled with the Company incurring a loss on the CONtv joint venture.

 

Net Cash

 

Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities for the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, was $(257,019) and $1,996,281, respectively. The net (loss) income attributable to common shareholder for the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, was $(2,790,610) and 1,451,744, respectively. The Company’s cash generated in operations primarily by running profitable events during the six months ended June 30, 2015.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

As of June 30, 2015, the Company had no off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

We believe that the following accounting policies are the most critical to aid you in fully understanding and evaluating this “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation.”

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date(s) of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period(s).

 

Critical accounting estimates are estimates for which (a) the nature of the estimate is material due to the levels of subjectivity and judgment necessary to account for highly uncertain matters or the susceptibility of such matters to change and (b) the impact of the estimate on financial condition or operating performance is material. The Company’s critical accounting estimates and assumptions affecting the financial statements were:

 

  (i) Allowance for doubtful accounts: Management’s estimate of the allowance for doubtful accounts is based on historical sales, historical loss levels, and an analysis of the collectability of individual accounts; and general economic conditions that may affect a client’s ability to pay. The Company evaluated the key factors and assumptions used to develop the allowance in determining that it is reasonable in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole.
     
  (ii) Inventory Obsolescence and Markdowns: The Company’s estimate of potentially excess and slow-moving inventories is based on evaluation of inventory levels and aging, review of inventory turns and historical sales experiences. The Company’s estimate of reserve for inventory shrinkage is based on the historical results of physical inventory cycle counts.

 

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  (iii) Fair value of long-lived assets: Fair value is generally determined using the asset’s expected future discounted cash flows or market value, if readily determinable. If long-lived assets are determined to be recoverable, but the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives are shorter than originally estimated, the net book values of the long-lived assets are depreciated over the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives. The Company considers the following to be some examples of important indicators that may trigger an impairment review: (i) significant under-performance or losses of assets relative to expected historical or projected future operating results; (ii) significant changes in the manner or use of assets or in the Company’s overall strategy with respect to the manner or use of the acquired assets or changes in the Company’s overall business strategy; (iii) significant negative industry or economic trends; (iv) increased competitive pressures; (v) a significant decline in the Company’s stock price for a sustained period of time; and (vi) regulatory changes. The Company evaluates acquired assets for potential impairment indicators at least annually and more frequently upon the occurrence of such events.
     
  (iv) Valuation allowance for deferred tax assets: Management assumes that the realization of the Company’s net deferred tax assets resulting from its net operating loss (“NOL”) carry–forwards for Federal income tax purposes that may be offset against future taxable income was not considered more likely than not and accordingly, the potential tax benefits of the net loss carry-forwards are offset by a full valuation allowance. Management made this assumption based on (a) the Company has incurred recurring losses, (b) general economic conditions, and (c) its ability to raise additional funds to support its daily operations by way of a public or private offering, among other factors.
     
  (v) Estimates and assumptions used in valuation of equity instruments: Management estimates expected term of share options and similar instruments, expected volatility of the Company’s common shares and the method used to estimate it, expected annual rate of quarterly dividends, and risk free rate(s) to value share options and similar instruments.

 

These significant accounting estimates or assumptions bear the risk of change due to the fact that there are uncertainties attached to these estimates or assumptions, and certain estimates or assumptions are difficult to measure or value.

 

Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various assumptions that are believed to be reasonable in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources.

 

Management regularly evaluates the key factors and assumptions used to develop the estimates utilizing currently available information, changes in facts and circumstances, historical experience and reasonable assumptions. After such evaluations, if deemed appropriate, those estimates are adjusted accordingly.

 

Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes under Section 740-10-30 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are determined based upon differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities and are measured using the enacted tax rates and laws that will be in effect when the differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance to the extent management concludes it is more likely than not that the assets will not be realized. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the statements of operations in the period that includes the enactment date.

 

The Company adopted section 740-10-25 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Section 740-10-25”). Section 740-10-25 addresses the determination of whether tax benefits claimed or expected to be claimed on a tax return should be recorded in the financial statements. Under Section 740-10-25, the Company may recognize the tax benefit from an uncertain tax position only if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such a position should be measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than fifty percent (50%) likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. Section 740-10-25 also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties on income taxes, accounting in interim periods and requires increased disclosures.

 

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The estimated future tax effects of temporary differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities are reported in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets, as well as tax credit carry-backs and carry-forwards. The Company periodically reviews the recoverability of deferred tax assets recorded on its consolidated balance sheets and provides valuation allowances as management deems necessary.

 

Management makes judgments as to the interpretation of the tax laws that might be challenged upon an audit and cause changes to previous estimates of tax liability. In addition, the Company operates within multiple taxing jurisdictions and is subject to audit in these jurisdictions. In management’s opinion, adequate provisions for income taxes have been made for all years. If actual taxable income by tax jurisdiction varies from estimates, additional allowances or reversals of reserves may be necessary.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company follows paragraph 605-10-S99-1 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for revenue recognition. The Company will recognize revenue when it is realized or realizable and earned. The Company considers revenue realized or realizable and earned when all of the following criteria are met: (i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (ii) the product has been shipped or the services have been rendered to the customer, (iii) the sales price is fixed or determinable, and (iv) collectability is reasonably assured.

 

Unearned convention revenue is deposits received for conventions that have not yet taken place, which are fully or partially refundable depending upon the terms and conditions of the agreements.

 

Stock-Based Compensation for Obtaining Employee Services

 

The Company accounts for its stock based compensation in which the Company obtains employee services in share-based payment transactions under the recognition and measurement principles of the fair value recognition provisions of section 718-10-30 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Pursuant to paragraph 718-10-30-6 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, all transactions in which goods or services are the consideration received for the issuance of equity instruments are accounted for based on the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instrument issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The measurement date used to determine the fair value of the equity instrument issued is the earlier of the date on which the performance is complete or the date on which it is probable that performance will occur. If shares of the Company are thinly traded the use of share prices established in the Company’s most recent private placement memorandum (“PPM”), or weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.

 

The fair value of share options and similar instruments is estimated on the date of grant using a Black-Scholes option-pricing valuation model. The ranges of assumptions for inputs are as follows:

 

Expected volatility of the entity’s shares and the method used to estimate it. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 718-10-50-2(f)(2)(ii) of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, a thinly-traded or nonpublic entity that uses the calculated value method shall disclose the reasons why it is not practicable for the Company to estimate the expected volatility of its share price, the appropriate industry sector index that it has selected, the reasons for selecting that particular index, and how it has calculated historical volatility using that index. The Company uses the average historical volatility of the comparable companies over the expected contractual life of the share options or similar instruments as its expected volatility. If shares of a company are thinly traded the use of weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as the volatility calculation using daily observations for such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.
   
Expected annual rate of quarterly dividends. An entity that uses a method that employs different dividend rates during the contractual term shall disclose the range of expected dividends used and the weighted-average expected dividends. The expected dividend yield is based on the Company’s current dividend yield as the best estimate of projected dividend yield for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.

 

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Risk-free rate(s). An entity that uses a method that employs different risk-free rates shall disclose the range of risk-free rates used. The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.

 

The Company’s policy is to recognize compensation cost for awards with only service conditions and a graded vesting schedule on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period for the entire award.

 

Equity Instruments Issued to Parties Other Than Employees for Acquiring Goods or Services

 

The Company accounts for equity instruments issued to parties other than employees for acquiring goods or services under guidance of Sub-topic 505-50 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Sub-topic 505-50”).

 

Pursuant to ASC Section 505-50-30, all transactions in which goods or services are the consideration received for the issuance of equity instruments are accounted for based on the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instrument issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The measurement date used to determine the fair value of the equity instrument issued is the earlier of the date on which the performance is complete or the date on which it is probable that performance will occur. If shares of the Company are thinly traded the use of share prices established in the Company’s most recent PPM, or weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.

 

The fair value of share options and similar instruments is estimated on the date of grant using a Black-Scholes option-pricing valuation model. The ranges of assumptions for inputs are as follows:

 

Expected term of share options and similar instruments: Pursuant to Paragraph 718-10-50-2(f)(2)(i) of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, the expected term of share options and similar instruments represents the period of time the options and similar instruments are expected to be outstanding taking into consideration of the contractual term of the instruments and holder’s expected exercise behavior into the fair value (or calculated value) of the instruments. The Company uses historical data to estimate holder’s expected exercise behavior. If the Company is a newly formed corporation or shares of the Company are thinly traded the contractual term of the share options and similar instruments is used as the expected term of share options and similar instruments as the Company does not have sufficient historical exercise data to provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term.
   
Expected volatility of the entity’s shares and the method used to estimate it. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 718-10-50-2(f)(2)(ii) of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, a thinly-traded or nonpublic entity that uses the calculated value method shall disclose the reasons why it is not practicable for the Company to estimate the expected volatility of its share price, the appropriate industry sector index that it has selected, the reasons for selecting that particular index, and how it has calculated historical volatility using that index. The Company uses the average historical volatility of the comparable companies over the expected contractual life of the share options or similar instruments as its expected volatility. If shares of a company are thinly traded the use of weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as the volatility calculation using daily observations for such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.
   
Expected annual rate of quarterly dividends. An entity that uses a method that employs different dividend rates during the contractual term shall disclose the range of expected dividends used and the weighted-average expected dividends. The expected dividend yield is based on the Company’s current dividend yield as the best estimate of projected dividend yield for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.
   
Risk-free rate(s). An entity that uses a method that employs different risk-free rates shall disclose the range of risk-free rates used. The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.

 

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Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 505-50-25-7, if fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments are issued at the date the grantor and grantee enter into an agreement for goods or services (no specific performance is required by the grantee to retain those equity instruments), then, because of the elimination of any obligation on the part of the counterparty to earn the equity instruments, a measurement date has been reached. A grantor shall recognize the equity instruments when they are issued (in most cases, when the agreement is entered into). Whether the corresponding cost is an immediate expense or a prepaid asset (or whether the debit should be characterized as contra-equity under the requirements of paragraph 505-50-45-1) depends on the specific facts and circumstances. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 505-50-45-1, a grantor may conclude that an asset (other than a note or a receivable) has been received in return for fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments that are issued at the date the grantor and grantee enter into an agreement for goods or services (and no specific performance is required by the grantee in order to retain those equity instruments). Such an asset shall not be displayed as contra-equity by the grantor of the equity instruments. The transferability (or lack thereof) of the equity instruments shall not affect the balance sheet display of the asset. This guidance is limited to transactions in which equity instruments are transferred to other than employees in exchange for goods or services. Section 505-50-30 provides guidance on the determination of the measurement date for transactions that are within the scope of this subtopic.

 

Pursuant to Paragraphs 505-50-25-8 and 505-50-25-9, an entity may grant fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments that are exercisable by the grantee only after a specified period of time if the terms of the agreement provide for earlier exercisability if the grantee achieves specified performance conditions. Any measured cost of the transaction shall be recognized in the same period(s) and in the same manner as if the entity had paid cash for the goods or services or used cash rebates as a sales discount instead of paying with, or using, the equity instruments. A recognized asset, expense, or sales discount shall not be reversed if a stock option that the counterparty has the right to exercise expires unexercised.

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 505-50-30-S99-1, if the Company receives a right to receive future services in exchange for unvested, forfeitable equity instruments, those equity instruments are treated as unissued for accounting purposes until the future services are received (that is, the instruments are not considered issued until they vest). Consequently, there would be no recognition at the measurement date and no entry should be recorded.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2014, the FASB issued the FASB Accounting Standards Update No. 2014-09 “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606)” (“ASU 2014-09”).

 

This guidance amends the existing FASB Accounting Standards Codification, creating a new Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customer. The core principle of the guidance is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.

 

To achieve that core principle, an entity should apply the following steps:

 

  1. Identify the contract(s) with the customer;
     
  2. Identify the performance obligations in the contract;
     
  3. Determine the transaction price;
     
  4. Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract; and
     
  5. Recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligations.

 

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The ASU also provides guidance on disclosures that should be provided to enable financial statement users to understand the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue recognition and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. Qualitative and quantitative information is required about the following:

 

  1. Contracts with customers – including revenue and impairments recognized, disaggregation of revenue, and information about contract balances and performance obligations (including the transaction price allocated to the remaining performance obligations);
     
  2. Significant judgments and changes in judgments – determining the timing of satisfaction of performance obligations (over time or at a point in time), and determining the transaction price and amounts allocated to performance obligations; and
     
  3. Assets recognized from the costs to obtain or fulfill a contract.

 

ASU 2014-09 is effective for periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period for all public entities. Early application is not permitted.

 

Management does not believe that any recently issued, but not yet effective accounting pronouncements, if adopted, would have a material effect on the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

 

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

 

We do not hold any derivative instruments and do not engage in any hedging activities.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

 

(a) Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures.

 

Pursuant to Rule 13a- 15(b) under the Exchange Act, the Company carried out an evaluation, with the participation of the Company’s management, including the Company’s Principal Executive Officer (“PEO”) and Principal Financial Officer (“PFO”), of the effectiveness of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures (as defined under Rule 13a-15(e) under the Exchange Act) as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based upon that evaluation, the Company’s PEO and PFO concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that the Company files or submits under the Exchange Act, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to the Company’s management, including the Company’s PEO and PFO, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

(b) Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting.

 

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act, during our most recently completed fiscal quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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PART II – OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings.

 

We are currently not involved in any litigation that we believe could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations. There is no action, suit, proceeding, inquiry or investigation before or by any court, public board, government agency, self-regulatory organization or body pending or, to the knowledge of the executive officers of our Company or any of our subsidiaries, threatened against or affecting our company, our common stock, any of our subsidiaries or of our companies or our subsidiaries’ officers or directors in their capacities as such, in which an adverse decision could have a material adverse effect.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

 

We believe there are no changes that constitute material changes from the risk factors previously disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed with the SEC on March 17, 2015.

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.

 

On May 14, 2015, a holder of an option to purchase 10,000 shares of the Company’s common stock exercised such option at an exercise price of $0.40 per share. This share issuance was made in reliance on the exemption from registration provided by Section 4(2) of the Securities Act for transactions not involving a public offering.

 

Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities.

 

There has been no default in the payment of principal, interest, sinking or purchase fund installment, or any other material default, with respect to any indebtedness of the Company.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 5. Other Information.

 

There is no other information required to be disclosed under this item which was not previously disclosed.

 

Item 6. Exhibits.

 

Exhibit No.   Description
     
31.1   Certification by the Principal Executive Officer of Registrant pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Rule 13a-14(a) or Rule 15d-14(a)). *
     
31.2   Certification by the Principal Financial Officer of Registrant pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Rule 13a-14(a) or Rule 15d-14(a)). *
     
32.1   Certification by the Principal Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. *
     
32.2   Certification by the Principal Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. *
     
101.INS   XBRL Instance Document *
     
101.SCH   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema *
     
101.CAL   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase *
     
101.DEF   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase *
     
101.LAB   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase *
     
101.PRE   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase *

 

* Filed herewith

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

  WIZARD WORLD, INC.
     
Date: August 7, 2015 By: /s/ John Macaluso
  Name: John Macaluso
  Title: Chief Executive Officer
    (Principal Executive Officer)
    (Principal Financial Officer)
    (Principal Accounting Officer)

 

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