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Table of Contents

 
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
     
þ   QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the Quarterly Period Ended March 31, 2011
or
     
o   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the Transition Period From _________ To _________
Commission File Number: 000-30421
HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)
     
Delaware   95-4788120
     
(State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
     
3660 Wilshire Boulevard, Penthouse Suite A    
Los Angeles, California   90010
     
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)
(213) 382-2200
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)
Not Applicable
(Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, If Changed Since Last Report)
     Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
Yes þ No o
     Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit and post such files).
Yes o No o
     Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
             
Large Accelerated Filer o   Accelerated Filer þ   Non-Accelerated Filer o   Smaller Reporting Company o
        (Do Not Check if a Smaller Reporting Company)    
     Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).
Yes o No þ
     As of April 29, 2011, there were 151,258,390 outstanding shares of the Registrant’s Common Stock.
 
 

 


 

HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
QUARTERLY REPORT ON FORM 10-Q
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011
TABLE OF CONTENTS
         
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PART I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
       
       
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PART II — OTHER INFORMATION
 
       
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 EX-31.1
 EX-31.2
 EX-32.1
 EX-32.2

 


Table of Contents

PART I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (UNAUDITED)
(Dollars in Thousands, Except Share Data)
                 
    March 31,     December 31,  
    2011     2010  
ASSETS
               
Cash and Due From Banks
  $ 67,507     $ 60,983  
Interest-Bearing Deposits in Other Banks
    83,354       158,737  
Federal Funds Sold
    19,500       30,000  
 
           
 
               
Cash and Cash Equivalents
    170,361       249,720  
 
               
Securities Held to Maturity, at Amortized Cost (Fair Value of $840 as of March 31, 2011 and $847 as of December 31, 2010)
    838       845  
Investment Securities Available for Sale, at Fair Value (Amortized Cost of $540,685 as of March 31, 2011 and $415,491 as of December 31, 2010)
    538,356       413,118  
Loans Receivable, Net of Allowance for Loan Losses of $125,780 as of March 31, 2011 and $146,059 as of December 31, 2010
    1,999,986       2,084,447  
Loans Held for Sale, at the Lower of Cost or Fair Value
    47,649       36,620  
Accrued Interest Receivable
    8,796       8,048  
Premises and Equipment, Net
    17,165       17,599  
Other Real Estate Owned, Net
    2,642       4,089  
Customers’ Liability on Acceptances
    805       711  
Servicing Assets
    2,698       2,890  
Other Intangible Assets, Net
    2,015       2,233  
Federal Home Loan Bank Stock, at Cost
    26,200       27,282  
Federal Reserve Bank Stock, at Cost
    7,449       7,449  
Income Taxes Receivable
    9,188       9,188  
Bank-Owned Life Insurance
    27,581       27,350  
Other Assets
    17,937       15,559  
 
           
 
               
TOTAL ASSETS
  $ 2,879,666     $ 2,907,148  
 
           
 
               
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
               
LIABILITIES:
               
Deposits:
               
Noninterest-Bearing
  $ 576,733     $ 546,815  
Interest-Bearing
    1,854,207       1,919,906  
 
           
 
               
Total Deposits
    2,430,940       2,466,721  
 
               
Accrued Interest Payable
    14,184       15,966  
Bank’s Liability on Acceptances
    805       711  
Federal Home Loan Bank Advances
    153,565       153,650  
Other Borrowings
    1,386       1,570  
Junior Subordinated Debentures
    82,406       82,406  
Other Liabilities
    12,329       12,868  
 
           
 
               
Total Liabilities
    2,695,615       2,733,892  
 
           
 
               
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
               
 
               
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY:
               
Common Stock, $0.001 Par Value; Authorized 500,000,000 Shares; Issued 155,890,890 Shares (151,258,390 Shares Outstanding) and 155,830,890 Shares (151,198,390 Shares Outstanding) as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, Respectively
    156       156  
Additional Paid-In Capital
    472,676       472,335  
Unearned Compensation
    (246 )     (219 )
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income — Unrealized Gain on Securities Available for Sale and Interest-Only Strips, Net of Income Taxes of $602 as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010
    (2,920 )     (2,964 )
Accumulated Deficit
    (215,603 )     (226,040 )
Less Treasury Stock, at Cost: 4,632,500 Shares as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010
    (70,012 )     (70,012 )
 
           
 
               
Total Stockholders’ Equity
    184,051       173,256  
 
           
 
               
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
  $ 2,879,666     $ 2,907,148  
 
           
See Accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited).

1


Table of Contents

HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS (UNAUDITED)
(Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Data)
                 
    Three Months Ended  
    March 31,  
    2011     2010  
INTEREST AND DIVIDEND INCOME:
               
Interest and Fees on Loans
  $ 30,905     $ 36,695  
Taxable Interest on Investment Securities
    2,673       1,070  
Dividends on Federal Reserve Bank Stock
    112       118  
Interest on Interest-Bearing Deposits in Other Banks
    89       55  
Tax-Exempt Interest on Investment Securities
    40       77  
Interest on Term Federal Funds Sold
    27        
Dividends on Federal Home Loan Bank Stock
    21       21  
Interest on Federal Funds Sold and Securities Purchased Under Resale Agreements
    8       17  
 
           
 
               
Total Interest and Dividend Income
    33,875       38,053  
 
           
 
               
INTEREST EXPENSE:
               
Interest on Deposits
    6,735       9,704  
Interest on Federal Home Loan Bank Advances
    333       346  
Interest on Junior Subordinated Debentures
    698       669  
 
           
 
               
Total Interest Expense
    7,766       10,719  
 
           
 
               
NET INTEREST INCOME BEFORE PROVISION FOR CREDIT LOSSES
    26,109       27,334  
Provision for Credit Losses
          57,996  
 
           
 
               
NET INTEREST INCOME (LOSS) AFTER PROVISION FOR CREDIT LOSSES
    26,109       (30,662 )
 
           
 
               
NON-INTEREST INCOME:
               
Service Charges on Deposit Accounts
    3,141       3,726  
Insurance Commissions
    1,260       1,278  
Remittance Fees
    462       462  
Trade Finance Fees
    297       351  
Other Service Charges and Fees
    333       412  
Bank-Owned Life Insurance Income
    230       231  
Net Gain on Sales of Investment Securities
          105  
Net Loss on Sales of Loans
    (338 )      
Other Operating Income
    123       440  
 
           
 
               
Total Non-Interest Income
    5,508       7,005  
 
           
 
               
NON-INTEREST EXPENSE:
               
Salaries and Employee Benefits
    9,124       8,786  
Occupancy and Equipment
    2,565       2,725  
Deposit Insurance premiums and Regulatory Assessments
    2,070       2,224  
Data Processing
    1,399       1,499  
Other Real Estate Owned Expense
    829       5,700  
Professional Fees
    789       1,066  
Directors and Officers Liability Insurance
    734       716  
Supplies and Communications
    578       517  
Advertising and Promotion
    566       535  
Loan-Related Expense
    225       307  
Amortization of Other Intangible Assets
    218       328  
Other Operating Expenses
    1,964       1,821  
 
           
 
               
Total Non-Interest Expense
    21,061       26,224  
 
           
 
               
INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE PROVISION (BENEFIT) FOR INCOME TAXES
    10,556       (49,881 )
Provision (Benefit) for Income Taxes
    119       (395 )
 
           
 
               
NET INCOME (LOSS)
  $ 10,437     $ (49,486 )
 
           
 
               
EARNINGS (LOSS) PER SHARE:
               
Basic
  $ 0.07     $ (0.97 )
Diluted
  $ 0.07     $ (0.97 )
 
               
WEIGHTED-AVERAGE SHARES OUTSTANDING:
               
Basic
    151,061,012       50,998,990  
Diluted
    151,287,573       50,998,990  
 
               
DIVIDENDS DECLARED PER SHARE
  $     $  
See Accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited).

2


Table of Contents

HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS) (UNAUDITED)
(Dollars in Thousands)
                                                                                 
    Common Stock — Number of Shares   Stockholders’ Equity  
                                                    Accumulated                      
                                    Additional             Other             Treasury     Total  
            Treasury             Common     Paid-in     Unearned     Comprehensive     Accumulated     Stock,     Stockholders’  
    Issued     Stock     Outstanding     Stock     Capital     Compensation     Income     Deficit     at Cost     Equity  
BALANCE AS OF JANUARY 1, 2010
    55,814,890       (4,632,500 )     51,182,390     $ 56     $ 357,174     $ (302 )   $ 859     $ (138,031 )   $ (70,012 )   $ 149,744  
 
                                                           
 
                                                                               
Share-Based Compensation Expense
                            185       21                         206  
 
                                                                               
Comprehensive Loss:
                                                                               
Net Loss
                                              (49,486 )           (49,486 )
Change in Unrealized Gain on Securities
Available for Sale and Interest-Only Strips,
Net of Income Taxes
                                        558                   558  
 
                                                           
 
                                                                               
Total Comprehensive Loss
                                                                            (48,928 )
 
                                                                             
 
                                                                               
BALANCE AS OF MARCH 31, 2010
    55,814,890       (4,632,500 )     51,182,390     $ 56     $ 357,359     $ (281 )   $ 1,417     $ (187,517 )   $ (70,012 )   $ 101,022  
 
                                                           
 
                                                                               
BALANCE AS OF JANUARY 1, 2011
    155,830,890       (4,632,500 )     151,198,390     $ 156     $ 472,335     $ (219 )   $ (2,964 )   $ (226,040 )   $ (70,012 )   $ 173,256  
 
                                                           
 
                                                                               
Share-Based Compensation Expense
                            263       51                         314  
Restricted Stock Awards
    60,000             60,000             78       (78 )                        
 
                                                                               
Comprehensive Income:
                                                                               
Net Income
                                              10,437             10,437  
Change in Unrealized Gain on Securities
Available for Sale and Interest-Only Strips,
Net of Income Taxes
                                        44                   44  
 
                                                           
 
                                                                               
Total Comprehensive Income
                                                                            10,481  
 
                                                                             
 
                                                                               
BALANCE AS OF MARCH 31, 2011
    155,890,890       (4,632,500 )     151,258,390     $ 156     $ 472,676     $ (246 )   $ (2,920 )   $ (215,603 )   $ (70,012 )   $ 184,051  
 
                                                           
See Accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited).

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (UNAUDITED)
(In Thousands)
                 
    Three Months Ended  
    March 31,  
    2011     2010  
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
               
Net Income (Loss)
  $ 10,437     $ (49,486 )
Adjustments to Reconcile Net Income (Loss) to Net Cash Provided By Operating Activities:
               
Depreciation and Amortization of Premises and Equipment
    547       644  
Amortization of Premiums and Accretion of Discounts on Investments, Net
    717       200  
Amortization of Other Intangible Assets
    218       327  
Amortization of Servicing Assets
    192       252  
Share-Based Compensation Expense
    314       206  
Provision for Credit Losses
          57,996  
Net Gain on Sales of Securities Available for Sale
          (105 )
Net Gain on Sales of Loans
    (1,883 )      
Loss on Sales of Other Real Estate Owned
    219       95  
Provision for Valuation Allowance on Other Real Estate Owned
    441       5,537  
Lower of Cost or Fair Value Adjustment for Loans Held for Sale
    2,221        
Deferred Tax Benefit
          3,208  
Origination of Loans Held for Sale
    (1,771 )     (3,369 )
Proceeds from Sales of Loans Held for Sale
    27,944       2,959  
(Increase) Decrease in Accrued Interest Receivable
    (748 )     466  
Changes in Fair Value of Stock Warrants
    14        
Loss on Investment in Affordable Housing Partnership
    220       220  
Increase in Cash Surrender Value of Bank-Owned Life Insurance
    (231 )     (231 )
Increase in Other Assets
    (2,598 )     (3,450 )
Increase in Income Taxes Receivable
          (3,126 )
Increase (Decrease) in Accrued Interest Payable
    (1,782 )     540  
Increase (Decrease) in Other Liabilities
    722       524  
 
           
 
               
Net Cash Provided By Operating Activities
    35,193       13,407  
 
           
 
               
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
               
Proceeds from Redemption of Federal Home Loan Bank and Federal Reserve Bank Stock
    1,082        
Proceeds from Matured or Called Securities Available for Sale
    19,173       16,953  
Proceeds from Matured or Called Securities Held to Maturity
    7       7  
Proceeds from Sales of Investment Securities Available for Sale
          3,252  
Proceeds from Sales of Other Real Estate Owned
    1,752       2,482  
Net Decrease in Loans Receivable
    44,680       105,980  
Purchases of Investment Securities Available for Sale
    (145,083 )     (305 )
Purchases of Premises and Equipment
    (113 )     (223 )
 
           
 
               
Net Cash (Used In) Provided By Investing Activities
    (78,502 )     128,146  
 
           
 
               
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
               
(Decrease) Increase in Deposits
    (35,781 )     (99,047 )
Repayment of Long-Term Federal Home Loan Bank Advances and Other Borrowings
    (413 )     (80 )
Net Change in Short-Term Federal Home Loan Bank Advances and Other Borrowings
    144       2,681  
 
           
 
               
Net Cash Used In Financing Activities
    (36,050 )     (96,446 )
 
           
 
               
NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
    (79,359 )     45,107  
Cash and Cash Equivalents at Beginning of Period
    249,720       154,110  
 
           
 
               
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT END OF PERIOD
  $ 170,361     $ 199,217  
 
           
 
               
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURES OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION:
               
Cash Paid During the Period for:
               
Interest Paid
  $ 9,548     $ 10,179  
Income Taxes Paid
  $     $ 2  
Non-Cash Activities:
               
Transfer of Loans to Loans Held for Sale
  $ 37,540     $ 4,684  
Transfer of Loans to Other Real Estate Owned
  $ 1,476     $ 4,397  
Loan Provided in the Sale of Loans Held for Sale
  $ 1,850     $  
Loan Provided in the Sale of Other Real Estate Owned
  $ 511     $ 190  
See Accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited).

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Table of Contents

HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010
NOTE 1 — BASIS OF PRESENTATION
     Hanmi Financial Corporation (“Hanmi Financial,” “we” or “us”) is a Delaware corporation and is subject to the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended. Our primary subsidiary is Hanmi Bank (the “Bank”), a California state chartered bank. Our other subsidiaries are Chun-Ha Insurance Services, Inc. (“Chun-Ha”) and All World Insurance Services, Inc. (“All World”).
     In the opinion of management, the accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements of Hanmi Financial Corporation and Subsidiaries reflect all adjustments of a normal and recurring nature that are necessary for a fair presentation of the results for the interim period ended March 31, 2011, but are not necessarily indicative of the results that will be reported for the entire year. Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in annual financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) have been condensed or omitted. In the opinion of management, the aforementioned unaudited consolidated financial statements are in conformity with GAAP. Such interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the instructions to Form 10-Q pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission. The interim information should be read in conjunction with our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2010 (the “2010 Annual Report on Form 10-K”).
     The preparation of interim consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.
     Descriptions of our significant accounting policies are included in “Note 2 Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” in our 2010 Annual Report on Form 10-K.
     Certain reclassifications were made to the prior period’s presentation to conform to the current period’s presentation.
NOTE 2 — REGULATORY MATTERS AND GOING CONCERN CONSIDERATION
     On November 2, 2009, the members of the Board of Directors of the Bank consented to the issuance of the Final Order (“Order”) with the California Department of Financial Institutions (the “DFI”). On the same date, Hanmi Financial and the Bank entered into a Written Agreement (the “Agreement”) with the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco (the “FRB”). The Order and the Agreement contain a list of strict requirements ranging from a capital directive to developing a contingency funding plan.
     While Hanmi Financial intends to take such actions as may be necessary to enable Hanmi Financial and the Bank to comply with the requirements of the Order and Agreement, there can be no assurance that Hanmi Financial or the Bank will be able to comply fully with the provisions of the Order and the Agreement, or that compliance with the Order and the Agreement will not have material and adverse effects on the operations and financial condition of Hanmi Financial and the Bank. Any material failure to comply with the provisions of the Order and the Agreement could result in further enforcement actions by both the DFI and the FRB, or the placing of the Bank into conservatorship or receivership.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 2 — REGULATORY MATTERS AND GOING CONCERN CONSIDERATION (Continued)
Final Order and Written Agreement
     The Order and the Agreement contain substantially similar provisions. The Order and the Agreement require the Board of Directors of the Bank to prepare and submit written plans to the DFI and the FRB that address the following items: (i) strengthening Board oversight of the management and operation of the Bank; (ii) strengthening credit risk management practices; (iii) improving credit administration policies and procedures; (iv) improving the Bank’s position with respect to problem assets; (v) maintaining adequate reserves for loan and lease losses; (vi) improving the capital position of the Bank and, with respect to the Agreement, of Hanmi Financial; (vii) improving the Bank’s earnings through a strategic plan and a budget for 2010; (viii) improving the Bank’s liquidity position and funds management practices; and (ix) contingency funding. In addition, the Order and the Agreement place restrictions on the Bank’s lending to borrowers who have adversely classified loans with the Bank and requires the Bank to charge off or collect certain problem loans. The Order and the Agreement also require the Bank to review and revise its methodology for calculating allowance for loan and lease losses consistent with relevant supervisory guidance. The Bank is also prohibited from paying dividends, incurring, increasing or guaranteeing any debt, or making certain changes to its business without prior approval from the DFI, and Hanmi Financial and the Bank must obtain prior approval from the FRB prior to declaring and paying dividends.
     Under the Order, the Bank is also required to increase its capital and maintain certain regulatory capital ratios prior to certain dates specified in the Order. By July 31, 2010, the Bank was required to increase its contributed equity capital by not less than an additional $100 million. The Bank was required to maintain a ratio of tangible stockholders’ equity to total tangible assets as follows:
     
    Ratio of Tangible Shareholder’s
Date   Equity to Total Tangible Assets
From December 31, 2010 and Until the Order is Terminated
  Not Less Than 9.5 Percent
     If the Bank is not able to maintain the capital ratios identified in the Order, it must notify the DFI, and Hanmi Financial and the Bank are required to notify the FRB if their respective capital ratios fall below those set forth in the capital plan approved by the FRB. On July 27, 2010, we completed a registered rights and best efforts offering by which we raised $116.8 million in net proceeds. As a result, we satisfied the $100 million capital contribution requirement set forth in the Order. The Bank had tangible stockholders’ equity to total tangible assets ratio of 9.10 percent at March 31, 2011. Accordingly, we notified the DFI and FRB that our tangible stockholders’ equity to total tangible assets ratio was below the requirements in the Order. As of December 31, 2010, the Bank had tangible stockholders’ equity to total tangible assets ratio of 8.59 percent.
     In addition to complying with the provisions of the Order and the Agreement, we entered into a definitive securities purchase agreement with Woori Finance Holdings Co. Ltd. (“Woori”) on May 25, 2010 which provides that upon satisfactions of all conditions to closing, we will issue 175 million shares of common stock to Woori at a purchase price per share of $1.20, for aggregate gross consideration of $210 million. On November 30, 2010, the agreement with Woori was amended to, among other things, extend the termination date to December 31, 2010, to release us from exclusivity with Woori, to eliminate our obligation to pay a termination fee upon the occurrence of certain events and to allow us to pursue further fundraising efforts. Accordingly, the agreement with Woori is currently terminable at will by either Hanmi Financial or Woori without any obligation to pay any fee in connection with such termination.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 2 — REGULATORY MATTERS AND GOING CONCERN CONSIDERATION (Continued)
Risk-Based Capital
     The regulatory agencies require a minimum ratio of qualifying total capital to risk-weighted assets of 8.0 percent and a minimum ratio of Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets of 4.0 percent. In addition to the risk-based guidelines, regulators require banking organizations to maintain a minimum ratio of Tier 1 capital to average total assets, referred to as the leverage ratio, of 4.0 percent. For a bank rated in the highest of the five categories used by regulators to rate banks, the minimum leverage ratio is 3.0 percent. In addition to these uniform risk-based capital guidelines that apply across the industry, the regulators have the discretion to set individual minimum capital requirements for specific institutions at rates significantly above the minimum guidelines and ratios.
     As of March 31, 2011, Hanmi Financial’s Tier 1 capital (stockholders’ equity plus junior subordinated debentures less intangible assets) was $247.2 million. This represented an increase of $14.5 million, or 6.3 percent, over Tier 1 capital of $232.7 million as of December 31, 2010. The capital ratios of Hanmi Financial and the Bank were as follows as of March 31, 2011:
                                                 
                                    To be Categorized as
                    Minimum   “Well Capitalized”
                    Regulatory   under Prompt Corrective
    Actual   Requirement   Action Provision
    Amount   Ratio   Amount   Ratio   Amount   Ratio
    (Dollars in Thousands)
March 31, 2011
                                               
 
                                               
Total Capital (to Risk-Weighted Assets):
                                               
Hanmi Financial
  $ 294,446       13.05 %   $ 180,446       8.00 %     N/A       N/A  
Hanmi Bank
  $ 292,650       13.00 %   $ 180,055       8.00 %   $ 225,069       10.00 %
Tier 1 Capital (to Risk-Weighted Assets):
                                               
Hanmi Financial
  $ 247,235       10.96 %   $ 90,223       4.00 %     N/A       N/A  
Hanmi Bank
  $ 263,285       11.70 %   $ 90,027       4.00 %   $ 135,041       6.00 %
Tier 1 Capital (to Average Assets):
                                               
Hanmi Financial
  $ 247,235       8.51 %   $ 116,272       4.00 %     N/A       N/A  
Hanmi Bank
  $ 263,285       9.08 %   $ 115,980       4.00 %   $ 144,976       5.00 %
Going Concern
     As previously mentioned, we are required by federal regulatory authorities to maintain adequate levels of capital to support our operations. As part of the Order issued on November 2, 2009, the Bank is also required to increase its capital and maintain certain regulatory capital ratios prior to certain dates specified in the Order. By July 31, 2010, the Bank was required to increase its contributed equity capital by not less than an additional $100 million and maintain a ratio of tangible stockholders’ equity to total tangible assets of at least 9.0 percent. As a result of the successful completion of the registered rights and best efforts offering in July 2010, the capital contribution requirement set forth in the Order has been satisfied. However, the tangible capital ratio requirement set forth in the Order has not been satisfied at March 31, 2011. Further, should our asset quality continue to erode and require significant additional provision for credit losses, resulting in added future net operating losses at the Bank, our capital levels will additionally decline requiring the raising of more capital than the amount currently required to satisfy our agreements with our regulators. An inability to raise additional capital when needed or comply with the terms of the Order or Agreement, raises substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.
     The accompanying interim consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the discharge of liabilities in the normal course of business for the foreseeable future, and do not include any adjustments to reflect the possible future effects on the recoverability or classification of assets, and the amounts or classification of liabilities that may result from the outcome of any regulatory action including being placed into receivership or conservatorship.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 2 — REGULATORY MATTERS AND GOING CONCERN CONSIDERATION (Continued)
     As set forth above, on May 25, 2010, we entered into a definitive securities purchase agreement with Woori and are currently awaiting final regulatory approval for the applications filed by Woori in connection with the transactions contemplated by the securities purchase agreement. If the transaction with Woori is consummated, we will inject a substantial portion of the net proceeds from the Woori transaction as new capital into Hanmi Bank. However, we cannot provide assurance that we will be successful in consummating the transaction with Woori or that such regulatory approvals will be granted.
NOTE 3 — FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS
Fair Value Option and Fair Value Measurements
     We determine the fair value of our assets and liabilities in accordance with ASC 820, which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. We determine the fair value of an asset or liability based on the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. An orderly transaction is a transaction that assumes exposure to the market for a period prior to the measurement date to allow for market activities that are usual and customary for transactions involving such assets and liabilities; it is not a forced transaction. Market participants are buyers and sellers in the principal market that are (i) independent, (ii) knowledgeable, (iii) able to transact and (iv) willing to transact for the asset or liability.
     In determining fair value, we use various methods including market and income approaches. Based on these approaches, we utilize certain assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability. These inputs can be readily observable, market corroborated, or generally unobservable inputs. We utilize valuation techniques that maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. Based on the observability of the inputs used in the valuation techniques, we classify and disclose assets and liabilities based on the fair value hierarchy presented below. The hierarchy is based on the quality and reliability of the information used to determine fair values. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices available in active markets and the lowest priority to data lacking transparency.
     FASB ASU 2010-06, “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures (Topic 820)” — ASU 2010-06 adds new requirements for disclosures about transfers into and out of Level 1 and 2 and separate disclosures about purchases, sales, issuances and settlements relating to Level 3 measurements. It also clarifies existing fair value disclosures about the level of disaggregation, entities will be required to provide fair value measurement disclosures for each class of assets and liabilities, and about inputs and valuation techniques used to measure fair value. ASU 2010-06 is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2009, except for the disclosures about purchases, sales, issuances and settlements in the roll forward of activity in Level 3 fair value measurements. Those disclosures are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2010. The adoption of FASB ASU 2010-06 did not have a material effect on our financial condition or result of operations.
     We used the following methods and significant assumptions to estimate fair value:
     Investment Securities Available for Sale — The fair values of investment securities available for sale are determined by obtaining quoted prices on nationally recognized securities exchanges or matrix pricing, which is a mathematical technique used widely in the industry to value debt securities without relying exclusively on quoted prices for the specific securities but rather by relying on the securities’ relationship to other benchmark quoted securities. The fair values of investment securities are determined by reference to the average of at least two quoted

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 3 — FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS (Continued)
market prices obtained from independent external brokers or independent external pricing service providers who have experience in valuing these securities. In obtaining such valuation information from third parties, we have evaluated the methodologies used to develop the resulting fair values. We perform a monthly analysis on the broker quotes received from third parties to ensure that the prices represent a reasonable estimate of the fair value. The procedures include, but are not limited to, initial and on-going review of third party pricing methodologies, review of pricing trends, and monitoring of trading volumes.
     Level 1 investment securities include U.S. government and agency debentures and equity securities that are traded on an active exchange or by dealers or brokers in active over-the-counter markets. The fair value of these securities is determined by quoted prices on an active exchange or over-the-counter market. Level 2 investment securities primarily include mortgage-backed securities, municipal bonds, collateralized mortgage obligations, and asset-backed securities. In determining the fair value of the securities’ categorized as Level 2, we obtain reports from nationally recognized broker-dealers detailing the fair value of each investment security we hold as of each reporting date. The broker-dealers use observable market information to value our fixed income securities, with the primary sources being nationally recognized pricing services. The fair value of the municipal securities is based on a proprietary model maintained by the broker-dealer. We review the market prices provided by the broker-dealer for our securities for reasonableness based on our understanding of the marketplace and we consider any credit issues related to the bonds. As we have not made any adjustments to the market quotes provided to us and they are based on observable market data, they have been categorized as Level 2 within the fair value hierarchy.
     Securities classified as Level 3 investment securities are instruments that are not traded in the market. As such, no observable market data for the instrument is available. This necessitates the use of significant unobservable inputs into our proprietary valuation model. As of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, we had no level 3 investment securities.
     SBA Loans Held for Sale — Loans held for sale are carried at the lower of cost or fair value. As of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, we had $12.9 million and $10.0 million of SBA loans held for sale, respectively. Management obtains quotes, bids or pricing indication sheets on all or part of these loans directly from the purchasing financial institutions. Premiums received or to be received on the quotes, bids or pricing indication sheets are indicative of the fact that cost is lower than fair value. At March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, the entire balance of loans held for sale was recorded at its cost. We record loans held for sale on a nonrecurring basis with Level 2 inputs.
     Non-performing Loans Held for Sale— We reclassify certain non-performing loans when the decision to sell those loans is made. The fair value of non-performing loans held for sale is generally based upon the quotes, bids or sales contract price which approximate the fair value. Non-performing loans held for sale are recorded at estimated fair value less anticipated liquidation cost. As of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, we had $34.8 million and $26.6 million of non-performing loans held for sale, respectively. We measure non-performing loans held for sale at fair value on a nonrecurring basis with Level 3 inputs.
     Impaired Loans — FASB ASC 820 applies to loans measured for impairment using the practical expedients permitted by FASB ASC 310, “Receivables,” including impaired loans measured at an observable market price (if available), or at the fair value of the loan’s collateral (if the loan is collateral dependent). Fair value of the loan’s collateral, when the loan is dependent on collateral, is determined by appraisals or independent valuation, which is then adjusted for the cost related to liquidation of the collateral. These loans are classified as Level 3 and subject to non-recurring fair value adjustments.
     Other Real Estate Owned — Other real estate owned is measured at fair value less selling costs. Fair value was determined based on third-party appraisals of fair value in an orderly sale. Selling costs were based on standard market factors. We classify other real estate owned as Level 3 and subject to non-recurring fair value adjustments.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 3 — FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS (Continued)
     Servicing Assets and Servicing Liabilities — The fair values of servicing assets and servicing liabilities are based on a valuation model that calculates the present value of estimated net future cash flows related to contractually specified servicing fees. The valuation model incorporates assumptions that market participants would use in estimating future cash flows. We are able to compare the valuation model inputs and results to widely available published industry data for reasonableness. Fair value measurements of servicing assets and servicing liabilities use significant unobservable inputs. As such, we classify them as Level 3.
     Other Intangible Assets — Other intangible assets consists of a core deposit intangible and acquired intangible assets arising from acquisitions, including non-compete agreements, trade names, carrier relationships and client/insured relationships. The valuation of other intangible assets is based on information and assumptions available to us at the time of acquisition, using income and market approaches to determine fair value. We test our other intangible assets annually for impairment, or when indications of potential impairment exist. Fair value measurements of other intangible assets use significant unobservable inputs. As such, we classify them as Level 3 and subject to non-recurring fair value adjustments.
     Stock Warrants — The fair value of stock warrants was determined by the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The expected stock volatility is based on historical volatility of our common stock over the expected term of the warrants. The expected life assumption is based on the contract term. The dividend yield of zero is based on the fact that we have no present intention to pay cash dividends. The risk free rate used for the warrant is equal to the zero coupon rate in effect at the time of the grant. As such, we classify them as Level 3 and subject to recurring fair value adjustments.
     Fair Value Measurement
     FASB ASC 820 defines fair value as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. FASB ASC 820 also establishes a three-level fair value hierarchy that requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value are defined as follows:
             
 
    Level 1   Quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets that the entity has the ability to access as of the measurement date.
 
           
 
    Level 2   Significant other observable inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities, quoted prices in markets that are not active, and other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data.
 
           
 
    Level 3   Significant unobservable inputs that reflect a company’s own assumptions about the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability.
     Fair value is used on a recurring basis for certain assets and liabilities in which fair value is the primary basis of accounting. Additionally, fair value is used on a non-recurring basis to evaluate assets or liabilities for impairment or for disclosure purposes in accordance with ASC 825, Financial Instruments.
     We record investment securities available for sale at fair value on a recurring basis. Certain other assets, such as loans held for sale, mortgage servicing assets, impaired loans, other real estate owned, and other intangible assets, are recorded at fair value on a non-recurring basis. Non-recurring fair value measurements typically involve assets that are periodically evaluated for impairment and for which any impairment is recorded in the period in which the re-measurement is performed.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 3 — FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS (Continued)
Assets and Liabilities Measured at Fair Value on a Recurring Basis
     There were no transfers of assets between Level 1 and Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy for the three months ended March 31, 2011. We recognize transfers of assets between levels at the end of each respective quarterly reporting period.
     As of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis are as follows:
                                 
    Level 1     Level 2     Level 3        
            Significant                
            Observable                
            Inputs With                
    Quoted Prices in     No Active             Balance as of  
    Active Markets     Market With     Significant     March 31,  
    for Identical     Identical     Unobservable     2011 and  
    Assets     Characteristics     Inputs     December 31, 2010  
    (In Thousands)  
March 31, 2011
                               
ASSETS:
                               
Debt Securities Available for Sale:
                               
Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
  $     $ 183,299     $     $ 183,299  
U.S. Government Agency Securities
    177,068                   177,068  
Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities
          125,761     $       125,761  
Municipal Bonds
          21,036             21,036  
Corporate Bonds
          20,114             20,114  
Asset-Backed Securities
          6,882             6,882  
Other Securities
          3,243             3,243  
 
                       
Total Debt Securities Available for Sale
  $ 177,068     $ 360,335     $     $ 537,403  
 
                       
 
                               
Equity Securities Available for Sale:
                               
Financial Services Industry
  $ 953                 $ 953  
 
                       
 
                               
Total Equity Securities Available for Sale
  $ 953     $     $     $ 953  
 
                       
 
                               
Total Securities Available for Sale
  $ 178,021     $ 360,335     $     $ 538,356  
 
                       
 
                               
LIABILITIES:
                               
Stock Warrants
  $     $     $ 1,614     $ 1,614  
 
                               
December 31, 2010
                               
ASSETS:
                               
Debt Securities Available for Sale:
                               
 
                               
Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
  $     $ 137,193     $     $ 137,193  
U.S. Government Agency Securities
    113,334                   113,334  
Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities
          109,842     $       109,842  
Municipal Bonds
          21,028             21,028  
Corporate Bonds
          20,205             20,205  
Asset-Backed Securities
          7,384             7,384  
Other Securities
          3,259             3,259  
 
                       
Total Debt Securities Available for Sale
  $ 113.334     $ 298,911     $     $ 412,245  
 
                       
 
                               
Equity Securities Available for Sale:
                               
Financial Services Industry
  $ 873                 $ 873  
 
                       
 
                               
Total Equity Securities Available for Sale
  $ 873     $     $     $ 873  
 
                       
 
                               
Total Securities Available for Sale
  $ 114,207     $ 298,911     $     $ 413,118  
 
                       
 
                               
LIABILITIES:
                               
Stock Warrants
  $     $     $ 1,600     $ 1,600  

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 3 — FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS (Continued)
     The table below presents a reconciliation and income statement classification of gains and losses for all assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) for the three months ended March 31, 2011:
                                                 
    Fair Value Measurements Using Significant Unobservable Inputs (Level 3)
                            Realized and            
                            Unrealized            
    Beginning           Realized and   Gains or Losses           Ending
    Balance as of   Purchases,   Unrealized   in Other   Transfers   Balance as of
    January 1,   Issuances and   Gains or Losses   Comprehensive   In and/or Out   March 31,
    2011   Settlements   in Earnings   Income   of Level 3   2011
    (In Thousands)
LIABILITIES:
                                               
Stock Warrants (1)
  $ (1,600 )   $     $ (14 )   $     $     $ (1,614 )
 
(1)   Reflects warrants issued to Cappello Capital Corp. in connection with services it provided to us as a placement agent in connection with our best efforts public offering and as our financial adviser in connection with our completed rights offering. The warrants were immediately exercisable when issued at a purchase price of $1.20 per share of our common stock and expire on October 14, 2015. See “Note 8 — Stockholders’ Equity” for more details.
Assets and Liabilities Measured at Fair Value on a Non-Recurring Basis
     As of March 31, 2011 and 2010, assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis are as follows:
                                 
    Level 1   Level 2   Level 3    
            Significant            
            Observable            
            Inputs With            
    Quoted Prices in   No Active           Losses During The
    Active Markets   Market With   Significant   Three Months
    for Identical   Identical   Unobservable   Ended March 31,
    Assets   Characteristics   Inputs   2011 and 2010
    (In Thousands)
March 31, 2011
                               
ASSETS:
                               
Nonperforming Loans Held for Sale
  $     $     $ 30,713 (1)   $ 12,965  
Impaired Loans
  $     $     $ 155,352 (2)   $ 3,883  
Other Real Estate Owned
  $     $     $ 1,350 (3)   $ 882  
 
                               
March 31, 2010
                               
ASSETS:
                               
Nonperforming Loans Held for Sale
  $     $     $ 4,684 (4)   $ 577  
Impaired Loans
  $     $     $ 175,701 (5)   $ 27,079  
Other Real Estate Owned
  $     $     $ 20,137 (6)   $ 5,537  
 
(1)   Includes commercial property loans of $3.2 million, commercial term loan of $21.3 million, and SBA loans of $6.2 million.
 
(2)   Includes real estate loans of $70.5 million, commercial and industrial loans of $84.4 million, and consumer loans of $517,000 .
 
(3)   Includes properties from the foreclosure of commercial property loans of $360,000 and SBA loans of $990,000.
 
(4)   Includes commercial term loans of $4.7 million.
 
(5)   Includes real estate loans of $70.2 million, commercial and industrial loans of $104.8 million, and consumer loans of $659,000 .
 
(6)   Includes properties from the foreclosure of real estate loans of $19.7 million, and commercial and industrial loans of $468,000.
     FASB ASC 825 requires disclosure of the fair value of financial assets and financial liabilities, including those financial assets and financial liabilities that are not measured and reported at fair value on a recurring basis or non-recurring basis. The methodologies for estimating the fair value of financial assets and financial liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis or non-recurring basis are discussed above.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 3 — FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS (Continued)
     The estimated fair value of financial instruments has been determined by using available market information and appropriate valuation methodologies. However, considerable judgment is required to interpret market data in order to develop estimates of fair value. Accordingly, the estimates presented herein are not necessarily indicative of the amounts that we could realize in a current market exchange. The use of different market assumptions and/or estimation methodologies may have a material effect on the estimated fair value amounts.
     The estimated fair values of financial instruments were as follows:
                                 
    March 31, 2011   December 31, 2010
    Carrying   Estimated   Carrying   Estimated
    or Contract   Fair   or Contract   Fair
    Amount   Value   Amount   Value
    (In Thousands)
Financial Assets:
                               
Cash and Cash Equivalents
  $ 170,361     $ 170,361     $ 249,720     $ 249,720  
Investment Securities Held to Maturity
    838       840       845       847  
Investment Securities Available for Sale
    538,356       538,356       413,118       413,118  
Loans Receivable, Net of Allowance for Loan Losses
    2,047,635       2,009,569       2,121,067       2,061,988  
Accrued Interest Receivable
    8,796       8,796       8,048       8,048  
Investment in Federal Home Loan Bank Stock
    26,200       26,200       27,282       27,282  
Investment in Federal Reserve Bank Stock
    7,449       7,449       7,449       7,449  
 
                               
Financial Liabilities:
                               
Noninterest-Bearing Deposits
    576,733       576,733       546,815       546,815  
Interest-Bearing Deposits
    1,854,207       1,864,023       1,919,906       1,927,314  
Borrowings
    237,357       232,409       237,626       233,077  
Accrued Interest Payable
    14,184       14,184       15,966       15,966  
 
                               
Off-Balance Sheet Items:
                               
Commitments to Extend Credit
    167,225       106       178,424       130  
Standby Letters of Credit
    15,103       42       15,226       50  
     The methods and assumptions used to estimate the fair value of each class of financial instruments for which it was practicable to estimate that value are explained below:
     Cash and Cash Equivalents — The carrying amounts approximate fair value due to the short-term nature of these instruments.
     Investment Securities — The fair value of securities was generally obtained from market bids for similar or identical securities or obtained from independent securities brokers or dealers.
     Loans Receivable, Net of Allowance for Loan Losses — Fair values were estimated for loans based on the discounted cash flow approach. The discount rate was derived from the associated yield curve plus spreads, and reflects the offering rates offered by the Bank for loans with similar financial characteristics. Yield curves are constructed by product type using the Bank’s loan pricing model for like-quality credits. The discount rates used in the Bank’s model represent the rates the Bank would offer to current borrowers for like-quality credits. These rates could be different from what other financial institutions could offer for these loans. No adjustments have been made for changes in credit within the loan portfolio. It is our opinion that the allowance for loan losses relating to performing and nonperforming loans results in a fair valuation of such loans. Additionally, the fair value of our loans may differ significantly from the values that would have been used had a ready market existed for such loans and may differ materially from the values that we may ultimately realize.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 3 — FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS (Continued)
     Accrued Interest Receivable — The carrying amount of accrued interest receivable approximates its fair value.
     Investment in Federal Home Loan Bank and Federal Reserve Bank Stock — The carrying amounts approximate fair value as the stock may be resold to the issuer at carrying value.
     Noninterest-Bearing Deposits — The fair value of noninterest-bearing deposits was the amount payable on demand at the reporting date.
     Interest-Bearing Deposits — The fair value of interest-bearing deposits, such as savings accounts, money market checking, and certificates of deposit, was estimated based on discounted cash flows. The cash flows for non-maturity deposits, including savings accounts and money market checking, were estimated based on their historical decaying experiences. The discount rate used for fair valuation was based on interest rates currently being offered by the Bank on comparable deposits as to amount and term.
     Borrowings — Borrowings consist of FHLB advances, junior subordinated debentures and other borrowings. Discounted cash flows have been used to value borrowings.
     Accrued Interest Payable — The carrying amount of accrued interest payable approximates its fair value.
     Stock Warrants — The fair value of stock warrants was determined by the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The expected stock volatility is based on historical volatility of our common stock over expected term of the warrants. The expected life assumption is based on the contract term. The dividend yield of zero is based on the fact that we have no present intention to pay cash dividends. The risk free rate used for the warrant is equal to the zero coupon rate in effect at the time of the grant.
     Commitments to Extend Credit and Standby Letters of Credit — The fair values of commitments to extend credit and standby letters of credit were based upon the difference between the current value of similar loans and the price at which the Bank has committed to make the loans.
     The following is a summary of investment securities held to maturity:
                                 
            Gross     Gross     Estimated  
    Amortized     Unrealized     Unrealized     Fair  
    Cost     Gain     Loss     Value  
    (In Thousands)  
March 31, 2011:
                               
Municipal Bonds
  $ 697     $     $     $ 697  
Mortgage-Backed Securities (1)
    141       2             143  
 
                       
 
                               
 
  $ 838     $ 2     $     $ 840  
 
                       
 
                               
December 31, 2010:
                               
Municipal Bonds
  $ 696     $     $     $ 696  
Mortgage-Backed Securities (1)
    149       2             151  
 
                       
 
                               
 
  $ 845     $ 2     $     $ 847  
 
                       
 
(1)   Collateralized by residential mortgages and guaranteed by U.S. government sponsored entities.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 4 — INVESTMENT SECURITIES
     The following is a summary of investment securities available for sale:
                                 
            Gross     Gross     Estimated  
    Amortized     Unrealized     Unrealized     Fair  
    Cost     Gain     Loss     Value  
    (In Thousands)  
March 31, 2011:
                               
Collateralized Mortgage Obligations (1)
  $ 184,732     $ 503     $ 1,936     $ 183,299  
U.S. Government Agency Securities
    178,055       67       1,054       177,068  
Mortgage-Backed Securities (1)
    124,477       2,014       730       125,761  
Municipal Bonds
    22,366       49       1,379       21,036  
Corporate Bonds
    20,452       10       348       20,114  
Asset-Backed Securities
    6,651       231             6,882  
Other Securities
    3,305             62       3,243  
Equity Securities (2)
    647       306             953  
 
                       
 
                               
 
  $ 540,685     $ 3,180     $ 5,509     $ 538,356  
 
                       
 
                               
December 31, 2010:
                               
Collateralized Mortgage Obligations (1)
  $ 139,053     $ 470     $ 2,330     $ 137,193  
U.S. Government Agency Securities
    114,066       98       830       113,334  
Mortgage-Backed Securities (1)
    108,436       2,137       731       109,842  
Municipal Bonds
    22,420       48       1,440       21,028  
Corporate Bonds
    20,449       13       257       20,205  
Asset-Backed Securities
    7,115       269             7,384  
Other Securities
    3,305             46       3,259  
Equity Securities (2)
    647       226             873  
 
                       
 
                               
 
  $ 415,491     $ 3,261     $ 5,634     $ 413,118  
 
                       
 
(1)   Collateralized by residential mortgages and guaranteed by U.S. government sponsored entities. .
 
(2)   Balances presented for amortized cost, representing two corporate bonds, were net of an OTTI charge of $790,000, which was related to a credit loss, as of December 31, 2010. We recorded an OTTI charge of $790,000 to write down the value of one investment security to its fair value during the year ended December 31, 2010.
     The amortized cost and estimated fair value of investment securities at March 31, 2011, by contractual maturity, are shown below. Although mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations have contractual maturities through 2041, expected maturities may differ from contractual maturities because borrowers may have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without call or prepayment penalties.
                                 
    Available for Sale     Held to Maturity  
    Amortized     Estimated     Amortized     Estimated  
    Cost     Fair Value     Cost     Fair Value  
    (In Thousands)  
Within One Year
  $     $     $     $  
Over One Year Through Five Years
    178,438       177,230       697       697  
Over Five Years Through Ten Years
    32,440       32,238              
Over Ten Years
    19,951       18,875              
Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
    184,732       183,299              
Mortgage-Backed Securities
    124,477       125,761       141       143  
Equity Securities
    647       953              
 
                       
 
                               
 
  $ 540,685     $ 538,356     $ 838     $ 840  
 
                       
     In accordance with FASB ASC 320, “Investments — Debt and Equity Securities,” amended current other-than-temporary impairment (“OTTI”) guidance, we periodically evaluate our investments for OTTI. For the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, there were no OTTI charges recorded in earnings.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 4 — INVESTMENT SECURITIES (Continued)
     We perform periodic reviews for impairment in accordance with FASB ASC 320. Gross unrealized losses on investment securities available for sale, the estimated fair value of the related securities and the number of securities aggregated by investment category and length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position, were as follows as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010:
                                                                         
    Holding Period  
    Less than 12 Months     12 Months or More     Total  
    Gross     Estimated     Number     Gross     Estimated     Number     Gross     Estimated     Number  
Investment Securities   Unrealized     Fair     of     Unrealized     Fair     of     Unrealized     Fair     of  
Available for Sale   Losses     Value     Securities     Losses     Value     Securities     Losses     Value     Securities  
    (In Thousands)  
March 31, 2011:
                                                                       
Mortgage-Backed Securities
  $ 730     $ 73,164       21     $     $           $ 730     $ 73,164       21  
Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
    1,936       127,190       27                         1,936       127,190       27  
Municipal Bonds
    1,379       17,914       12                         1,379       17,914       12  
U.S. Government Agency Securities
    1,054       131,016       35                         1,054       131,016       35  
Other Securities
    11       1,989       2       52       948       1       63       2,937       3  
Corporate Bonds
    348       17,120       5                         348       17,120       5  
 
                                                     
 
                                                                       
 
  $ 5,458     $ 368,393       102     $ 52     $ 948       1     $ 5,510     $ 369,341       103  
 
                                                     
 
                                                                       
December 31, 2010:
                                                                       
Mortgage-Backed Securities
  $ 731     $ 62,738       16     $     $           $ 731     $ 62,738       16  
Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
    2,330       99,993       20                         2,330       99,993       20  
Municipal Bonds
    1,440       16,907       11                         1,440       16,907       11  
U.S. Government Agency Securities
    830       69,266       14                         830       69,266       14  
Other Securities
    3       1,997       2       43       957       1       46       2,954       3  
Corporate Bonds
    257       17,210       5                         257       17,210       5  
 
                                                     
 
                                                                       
 
  $ 5,591     $ 268,111       68     $ 43     $ 957       1     $ 5,634     $ 269,068       69  
 
                                                     
     All individual securities that have been in a continuous unrealized loss position for 12 months or longer as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 had investment grade ratings upon purchase. The issuers of these securities have not established any cause for default on these securities and the various rating agencies have reaffirmed these securities’ long-term investment grade status as of March 31, 2011. These securities have fluctuated in value since their purchase dates as market interest rates have fluctuated.
     The unrealized losses on investments in U.S. agencies securities were caused by interest rate increases subsequent to the purchase of these securities. The contractual terms of these investments do not permit the issuer to settle the securities at a price less than par. Because the Bank does not intend to sell the securities in this class and it is not likely that the Bank will be required to sell these securities before recovery of their amortized cost basis, which may include holding each security until contractual maturity, the unrealized losses on these investments are not considered other-than-temporarily impaired.
     The unrealized losses on obligations of political subdivisions were caused by changes in market interest rates or the widening of market spreads subsequent to the initial purchase of these securities. Management monitors published credit ratings of these securities and no adverse ratings changes have occurred since the date of purchase of obligations of political subdivisions which are in an unrealized loss position as of March 31, 2011. Because the decline in fair value is attributable to changes in interest rates or widening market spreads and not credit quality, and because the Bank does not intend to sell the securities in this class and it is not likely that the Bank will be required to sell these securities before recovery of their amortized cost basis, which may include holding each security until maturity, the unrealized losses on these investments are not considered other-than-temporarily impaired.
     Of the residential mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations portfolio in an unrealized loss position at March 31, 2011, all of them are issued and guaranteed by U.S. government sponsored entities. The unrealized losses on residential mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations were caused by changes in market interest rates or the widening of market spreads subsequent to the initial purchase of these securities, and no concerns regarding the underlying credit of the issuers or the underlying collateral.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 4 — INVESTMENT SECURITIES (Continued)
It is expected that these securities will not be settled at a price less than the amortized cost of each investment. Because the decline in fair value is attributable to changes in interest rates or widening market spreads and not credit quality, and because the Bank does not intend to sell the securities in this class and it is not likely that the Bank will be required to sell these securities before recovery of their amortized cost basis, which may include holding each security until contractual maturity, the unrealized losses on these investments are not considered other-than-temporarily impaired.
     FASB ASC 320 requires other-than-temporarily impaired investment securities to be written down when fair value is below amortized cost in circumstances where: (1) an entity has the intent to sell a security; (2) it is more likely than not that an entity will be required to sell the security before recovery of its amortized cost basis; or (3) an entity does not expect to recover the entire amortized cost basis of the security. If an entity intends to sell a security or if it is more likely than not the entity will be required to sell the security before recovery, an OTTI write-down is recognized in earnings equal to the entire difference between the security’s amortized cost basis and its fair value. If an entity does not intend to sell the security or it is not more likely than not that it will be required to sell the security before recovery, the OTTI write-down is separated into an amount representing credit loss, which is recognized in earnings, and the amount related to all other factors, which is recognized in other comprehensive income. We do not intend to sell these securities and it is not more likely than not that we will be required to sell the investments before the recovery of its amortized cost bases. Therefore, in management’s opinion, all securities that have been in a continuous unrealized loss position for the past 12 months or longer as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 are not other-than-temporarily impaired, and therefore, no impairment charges as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 are warranted.
     Realized gains and losses on sales of investment securities, proceeds from sales of investment securities and the tax expense on sales of investment securities were as follows for the periods indicated:
                 
    Three Months Ended March 31,  
    2011     2010  
    (In Thousands)  
Gross Realized Gains on Sales of Investment Securities
  $     $ 210  
Gross Realized Losses on Sales of Investment Securities
          (105 )
 
           
 
               
Net Realized Gains on Sales of Investment Securities
  $     $ 105  
 
           
 
               
Proceeds from Sales of Investment Securities
  $     $ 3,252  
Tax Expense on Sales of Investment Securities
  $     $ 45  
     There were $0 and $105,000 in net realized gains on sales of securities available for sale during the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively. For the three months ended March 31, 2011, no investment securities were sold. For the three months ended March 31, 2011, $43,000 ($24,000, net of income taxes) of net unrealized gains arose during the period and was included in comprehensive income. For the three months ended March 31, 2010, $1.0 million ($605,000, net of income taxes) of net unrealized gains arose during the period and was included in comprehensive income and previously net unrealized gains of $99,000 ($57,000, net of income taxes) were realized in earnings.
     Investment securities available for sale with carrying values of $127.3 million and $118.0 million as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively, were pledged to secure FHLB advances, public deposits and for other purposes as required or permitted by law.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 5 — LOANS
     The Board of Directors and management review and approve the Bank’s loan policy and procedures on a regular basis to reflect issues such as regulatory and organizational structure change, strategic planning revisions, concentrations of credit, loan delinquencies and no-performing loans, problem loans, and policy adjustments.
     Real estate loans are subject to loans secured by liens or interest in real estate, to provide purchase, construction, and refinance on real estate properties. Commercial and industrial loans are consisted of commercial term loans, commercial lines of credit, and SBA loans. Consumer loans are consisted of auto loans, credit cards, personal loans, and home equity lines of credit. We maintain management loan review and monitoring departments that review and monitor pass graded loans as well as problem loans to prevent further deterioration.
     Concentrations of Credit: The majority of the Bank’s loan portfolio consists of commercial real estate loans and commercial and industrial loans. The Bank has been diversifying and monitoring commercial real estate loans based on property types, tightening underwriting standards, and portfolio liquidity and management, and has not exceeded certain specified limits set forth in the Bank’s loan policy. Most of the Bank’s lending activity occurs within the Southern California.
Loans Receivable
     Loans receivable consisted of the following as of the dates indicated:
                 
    March 31,     December 31,  
    2011     2010  
    (In Thousands)  
Real Estate Loans:
               
Commercial Property
  $ 695,357     $ 729,222  
Construction
    56,707       60,995  
Residential Property
    60,352       62,645  
 
           
Total Real Estate Loans
    812,416       852,862  
 
           
Commercial and Industrial Loans: (1)
               
Commercial Term
    1,058,250       1,118,999  
SBA
    101,079       105,688  
Commercial Lines of Credit
    59,318       59,056  
International
    46,860       44,167  
 
           
Total Commercial and Industrial Loans
    1,265,507       1,327,910  
 
           
Consumer Loans
    48,120       50,300  
 
           
Total Gross Loans
    2,126,043       2,231,072  
Allowance for Loans Losses
    (125,780 )     (146,059 )
Deferred Loan Fees
    (277 )     (566 )
 
           
Loans Receivable, Net
  $ 1,999,986     $ 2,084,447  
 
           
 
(1)   Commercial and industrial loans include owner-occupied property loans of $864.7 million and $894.8 million as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively.
     Accrued interest on loans receivable amounted to $6.6 million and $6.5 million at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively. At March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, loans receivable totaling $976.3 million and $1.03 billion, respectively, was pledged to secure FHLB advances and the Fed Discount Window.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 5 — LOANS (Continued)
     The following table details the information on the purchases, sales and reclassification of loan receivables to held for sale by portfolio segment for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010.
                                 
            Commercial              
    Real Estate     and Industrial     Consumer     Total  
    (Dollars in Thousands)  
March 31, 2011
                               
Loans Held for Sale:
                               
Beginning Balance
  $ 3,666     $ 32,954     $     $ 36,620  
Reclassification from Loan Receivables to Loans Held for sale
    17,909       23,081             40,990  
Sales of Loans Held for sale
    (17,989 )     (9,316 )           (27,305 )
Principal Payoffs and Amortization
    (7 )     (407 )           (414 )
Valuation Adjustments
    (66 )     (2,176 )           (2,242 )
 
                       
Ending Balance
  $ 3,513     $ 44,136     $     $ 47,649  
 
                       
 
                               
March 31, 2010
                               
Loans Held for Sale:
                               
Beginning Balance
  $     $ 5,010     $     $ 5,010  
Reclassification from Loan Receivables to Loans Held for sale
    12,816       19,153             31,969  
Sales of Loans Held for sale
    (12,816 )     (13,993 )           (26,809 )
Principal Payoffs and Amortization
          (66 )           (66 )
Valuation Adjustments
                       
 
                       
Ending Balance
  $     $ 10,104     $     $ 10,104  
 
                       
     For the three months ended March 31, 2011, loan receivables of $41.0 million were reclassified as loans held for sale and loans held for sale of $27.3 million were sold. For the same quarter ended March 31, 2010, loan receivables of $32.0 million were reclassified as loans held for sale and loans held for sale of $26.8 million were sold. There were no purchases of loans receivables for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010.
Allowance for Loan Losses and Allowance for Off-Balance Sheet Items
     Activity in the allowance for loan losses and allowance for off-balance sheet items was as follows for the periods indicated:
                         
    As of and for the Three Months Ended  
    March 31,     December 31,     March 31,  
    2011     2010     2010  
    (In Thousands)  
Allowance for Loan Losses:
                       
Balance at Beginning of Period
  $ 146,059     $ 176,063     $ 144,996  
Actual Charge-Offs
    (25,181 )     (37,787 )     (30,114 )
Recoveries on Loans Previously Charged Off
    3,626       2,538       3,721  
 
                 
Net Loan Charge-Offs
    (21,555 )     (35,249 )     (26,393 )
 
                 
Provision Charged to Operating Expense
    1,276       5,245       59,217  
 
                 
Balance at End of Period
  $ 125,780     $ 146,059     $ 177,820  
 
                 
 
                       
Allowance for Off-Balance Sheet Items:
                       
Balance at Beginning of Period
  $ 3,417     $ 3,662     $ 3,876  
Provision Charged to (Reversal of Charged to) Operating Expense
    (1,276 )     (245 )     (1,221 )
 
                 
Balance at End of Period
  $ 2,141     $ 3,417     $ 2,655  
 
                 

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 5 — LOANS (Continued)
     The following table details the information on the allowance for credit losses by portfolio segment for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010.
                                         
            Commercial                    
    Real Estate     and Industrial     Consumer     Unallocated     Total  
    (Dollars in Thousands)  
March 31, 2011
                                       
Allowance for Loan Losses:
                                       
Beginning Balance
  $ 32,766     $ 108,986     $ 2,079     $ 2,228     $ 146,059  
Charge-Offs
    7,053       17,955       173             25,181  
Recoveries on Loans Previously Charged Off
    521       3,096       9             3,626  
Provision
    (350 )     (249 )     (183 )     2,058       1,276  
 
                             
Ending Balance
  $ 25,884     $ 93,878     $ 1,732     $ 4,286     $ 125,780  
 
                             
Ending Balance: Individually Evaluated for Impairment
  $ 3,855     $ 27,599     $ 81     $     $ 31,535  
 
                             
Ending Balance: Collectively Evaluated for Impairment
  $ 22,029     $ 66,279     $ 1,651     $ 4,286     $ 94,245  
 
                             
Loans Receivable:
                                       
Ending Balance
  $ 812,416     $ 1,265,507     $ 48,120     $     $ 2,126,043  
 
                             
Ending Balance: Individually Evaluated for Impairment
  $ 75,154     $ 107,585     $ 903     $     $ 183,642  
 
                             
Ending Balance: Collectively Evaluated for Impairment
  $ 737,262     $ 1,157,922     $ 47,217     $     $ 1,942,401  
 
                             
 
                                       
March 31, 2010
                                       
Allowance for Loan Losses:
                                       
Beginning Balance
  $ 30,080     $ 112,225     $ 2,691     $     $ 144,996  
Charge-Offs
    5,404       24,091       619             30,114  
Recoveries on Loans Previously Charged Off
    1,703       1,982       36             3,721  
Provision
    5,218       53,878       121             59,217  
 
                             
Ending Balance
  $ 31,597     $ 143,994     $ 2,229     $     $ 177,820  
 
                             
Ending Balance: Individually Evaluated for Impairment
  $ 4,213     $ 22,685     $ 268     $     $ 27,166  
 
                             
Ending Balance: Collectively Evaluated for Impairment
  $ 27,384     $ 121,309     $ 1,961     $     $ 150,654  
 
                             
Loans Receivable:
                                       
Ending Balance
  $ 986,417     $ 1,628,446     $ 58,886     $     $ 2,673,749  
 
                             
Ending Balance: Individually Evaluated for Impairment
  $ 110,358     $ 143,669     $ 659     $     $ 254,686  
 
                             
Ending Balance: Collectively Evaluated for Impairment
  $ 876,059     $ 1,484,777     $ 58,227     $     $ 2,419,063  
 
                             
     Credit Quality Indicators
As part of the on-going monitoring of the credit quality of our loan portfolio, we utilize an internal loan grading system to identify credit risk and assign appropriate grade for each and every loan in our loan portfolio on a grade of 0 to 8.
Pass-grade (0 to 4) loans are reviewed for reclassification on an annual basis, while criticized (5) and classified (6 and 7) loans are reviewed semi-annually. Additional adjustments may be made daily as needed. The loan grade definitions are as follows:
     Pass: pass loans are loans conforming in all respects to the Bank credit policy and regulatory requirements, that do not exhibit any potential or defined weaknesses as defined under Special Mention, Substandard or Doubtful. This is the lowest level of the Bank’s loan grading system. It incorporates all performing loans with no credit weaknesses. It includes cash and stock/security secured loans or other investment grade loans. Following are sub categories within Pass grade:
Pass 0: loans secured in full by cash or cash equivalents.
Pass 1: requires a very strong, well-structured credit relationship with an established borrower. The relationship should be supported by audited financial statements indicating cash flow, well in excess of debt service requirement, excellent liquidity, and very strong capital.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 5 — LOANS (Continued)
Pass 2: requires a well-structured credit that may not be as seasoned or as high quality as grade 1. Capital, liquidity, debt service capacity, and collateral coverage must all be well above average, this category includes individuals with substantial net worth centered in liquid assets and strong income.
Pass 3: loans or commitments to borrowers exhibiting a fully acceptable credit risk. These borrowers should have sound balance sheet proportions and significant cash flow coverage, although they may be somewhat more leveraged and exhibit grater fluctuations in earning and financing but generally would be considered very attractive to the Bank as a borrower. The borrower has historically demonstrated the ability to manage economic adversity. Real estate and asset-based loans which are designated this grade must have characteristics that place them well above the minimum underwriting requirements. Asset-based borrowers assigned this grade must exhibit extremely favorable leverage and cash flow characteristics and consistently demonstrate a high level of unused borrowing capacity
Pass 4: loans or commitments to borrowers exhibiting either somewhat weaker balance sheet proportions or positive, but inconsistent, cash flow coverage. These borrowers may exhibit somewhat greater credit risk, and as a result of this the Bank may have secured its exposure in an effort to mitigate the risk. If so, the collateral taken should provide an unquestionable ability to repay the indebtedness in full through liquidation, if necessary. Cash flows should be adequate to cover debt service and fixed obligations, although there may be a question about the borrower’s ability to provide alternative sources of funds in emergencies. Better quality real estate and asset-based borrowers who fully comply with all underwriting standards and are performing according to projections would be assigned this grade.
     Special Mention or 5: Special Mention credits are potentially weak, as the borrower is exhibiting deteriorating trends which, if not corrected, could jeopardize repayment of the debt and result in a substandard classification. Credits which have significant actual, not potential, weaknesses are considered more severely classified.
     Substandard or 6: A Substandard credit has a well-defined weakness that jeopardizes the liquidation of the debt. A credit graded Substandard is not protected by the sound worth and paying capacity of the borrower, or of the value and type of collateral pledged. With a Substandard loan, there is a distinct possibility that the Bank will sustain some loss if the weaknesses or deficiencies are not corrected.
     Doubtful or 7: A Doubtful credit is one that has critical weaknesses that would make the collection or liquidation of the full amount due improbable. However, there may be pending events which may work to strengthen the credit, and therefore the amount or timing of a possible loss cannot be determined at the current time.
     Loss or 8: Loans classified Loss are considered uncollectible and of such little value that their continuance as bank-able assets is not warranted. This classification does not mean that the loan has absolutely no recovery or salvage value, but rather it is not practical or desirable to defer writing off this basically worthless asset even though partial recovery may be affected in the future. Loans classified Loss will be charged off in a timely manner.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 5 — LOANS (Continued)
                                 
    Pass     Criticized     Classified        
    (Grade 0-4)     (Grade 5)     (Grade 6-7)     Total Loans  
    (In Thousands)  
March 31, 2011:
                               
Real Estate Loans:
                               
Commercial Property
                               
Retail
  $ 308,057     $ 18,347     $ 30,391     $ 356,795  
Land
    3,639             28,596       32,235  
Other
    253,168       20,040       33,119       306,327  
Construction
    8,752       18,758       29,197       56,707  
Residential Property
    56,956             3,396       60,352  
 
                               
Commercial and Industrial Loans:
                               
Commercial Term
                               
Unsecured
    123,222       25,507       55,678       204,407  
Secured by Real Estate
    607,526       114,749       131,568       853,843  
Commercial Lines of Credit
    41,684       9,902       7,732       59,318  
SBA
    65,658       2,385       33,036       101,079  
International
    41,422       4,786       652       46,860  
 
                               
Consumer Loans
    45,670       590       1,860       48,120  
 
                       
Total
  $ 1,555,754     $ 215,064     $ 355,225     $ 2,126,043  
 
                       
 
                               
December 31, 2010:
                               
Real Estate Loans:
                               
Commercial Property
                               
Retail
  $ 302,696     $ 18,507     $ 38,568     $ 359,771  
Land
    3,845             37,353       41,198  
Other
    265,957       20,804       41,493       328,254  
Construction
    12,958       25,897       22,139       60,994  
Residential Property
    59,329             3,315       62,644  
 
                               
Commercial and Industrial Loans:
                               
Commercial Term
                               
Unsecured
    134,709       24,620       63,739       223,068  
Secured by Real Estate
    617,200       107,645       171,086       895,931  
Commercial Lines of Credit
    40,195       8,019       10,841       59,055  
SBA
    68,994       731       35,965       105,690  
International
    38,447       4,693       1,027       44,167  
 
                               
Consumer Loans
    48,027       347       1,926       50,300  
 
                       
Total
  $ 1,592,357     $ 211,263     $ 427,452     $ 2,231,072  
 
                       

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 5 — LOANS (Continued)
     The following is an aging analysis of past due loans, disaggregated by class of loan, as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010:
                                                         
                                                    Accruing 90  
                    90 Days or                             Days or  
    30-59 Days Past     60-89 Days     More Past     Total Past                     More Past  
    Due     Past Due     Due     Due     Current     Total Loans     Due  
    (In Thousands)  
March 31, 2011:
                                                       
Real Estate Loans:
                                                       
Commercial Property
                                                       
Retail
  $     $     $     $     $ 356,796     $ 356,796     $  
Land
    1,000             22,523       23,523       8,711       32,234        
Other
    1,852       688       517       3,057       303,270       306,327        
Construction
                19,750       19,750       36,957       56,707        
Residential Property
    2,069             1,342       3,411       56,941       60,352        
 
                                                       
Commercial and Industrial Loans:
                                                       
Commercial Term
                                                       
Unsecured
    2,309       1,743       2,863       6,915       197,493       204,408        
Secured by Real Estate
    4,959       3,503       2,899       11,361       842,481       853,842        
Commercial Lines of Credit
    1,266       191       1,422       2,879       56,439       59,318        
SBA
    9,129       1,554       12,012       22,695       78,384       101,079        
International
                            46,860       46,860        
 
                                                       
Consumer Loans
    126       607       148       881       47,239       48,120        
 
                                         
Total
  $ 22,710     $ 8,286     $ 63,476     $ 94,472     $ 2,031,571     $ 2,126,043     $  
 
                                         
 
                                                       
December 31, 2010:
                                                       
Real Estate Loans:
                                                       
Commercial Property
                                                       
Retail
  $     $     $ 7,857     $ 7,857     $ 351,913     $ 359,770     $  
Land
                25,725       25,725       15,471       41,196        
Other
                7,212       7,212       321,043       328,255        
Construction
    10,409             8,477       18,886       42,108       60,994        
Residential Property
    522             1,240       1,762       60,883       62,645        
 
                                                       
Commercial and Industrial Loans:
                                                       
Commercial Term
                                                       
Unsecured
    2,208       2,781       6,842       11,831       211,237       223,068        
Secured by Real Estate
    5,111       3,720       10,530       19,361       876,570       895,931        
Commercial Lines of Credit
    454             1,745       2,199       56,857       59,056        
SBA
    2,287       8,205       13,957       24,449       81,241       105,690        
International
                            44,167       44,167        
 
                                                       
Consumer Loans
    596       202       865       1,663       48,637       50,300        
 
                                         
Total
  $ 21,587     $ 14,908     $ 84,450     $ 120,945     $ 2,110,127     $ 2,231,072     $  
 
                                         

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 5 — LOANS (Continued)
Impaired Loans
     Loans are considered impaired specifically when, non-accrual and principal or interest payments have been contractually past due for 90 days or more, unless the loan is both well-collateralized and in the process of collection; or Troubled Debt Restructuring (TDR) loans to offer terms not typically granted by the Bank or when current information or events make it unlikely to collect in full according to the contractual terms of the loan agreements; or Substandard loans in the amount over 5% of the Bank’s Tier 1 Capital; or a deterioration in the borrower’s financial condition raises uncertainty as to timely collection of either principal or interest; or full payment of both interest and principal is in doubt according to the original contractual terms.
     We evaluate loan impairment in accordance with applicable GAAP. Loans are considered impaired when it is probable that we will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement, including scheduled interest payments. Impaired loans are measured based on the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate or, as a practical expedient, at the loan’s observable market price or the fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent, less costs to sell. If the measure of the impaired loan is less than the recorded investment in the loan, the deficiency will be charged off against the allowance for loan losses or, alternatively, a specific allocation will be established. Additionally, loans that are considered impaired are specifically excluded from the quarterly migration analysis when determining the amount of the allowance for loan losses required for the period.
     The allowance for the collateral-dependent loans is calculated by the difference between the outstanding loan balance and the value of the collateral as determined by recent appraisals. The allowance for collateral-dependent loans varies from loan to loan based on the collateral coverage of the loan at the time of designation as non-performing. We continue to monitor the collateral coverage, based on recent appraisals, on these loans on a quarterly basis and adjust the allowance accordingly.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 5 — LOANS (Continued)
     The following table provides information on impaired loans, disaggregated by class of loan, as of the dates indicated:
                                                         
                                                    Interest  
                                                    Income  
                    With No                             Recognized  
            Unpaid     Related     With an             Average     for the Three  
    Recorded     Principal     Allowance     Allowance     Related     Recorded     Months  
    Investment     Balance     Recorded     Recorded     Allowance     Investment     Ended (1)  
    (In Thousands)  
March 31, 2011:
                                                       
Real Estate Loans:
                                                       
Commercial Property
                                                       
Retail
  $ 16,757     $ 17,134     $ 7,204     $ 9,553     $ 1,881     $ 17,016     $ 174  
Land
    27,515       27,515       22,523       4,992       1,602       29,655        
Other
    5,448       5,578       3,470       1,978       138       5,383       28  
Construction
    23,421       23,643       14,264       9,157       195       23,536       76  
Residential Property
    2,014       2,091       1,651       362       39       2,068       10  
 
                                                       
Commercial and Industrial Loans:
                                                       
Commercial Term
                                                       
Unsecured
    12,785       13,339       2,149       10,636       9,057       13,229       145  
Secured by Real Estate
    82,068       83,757       26,833       55,235       15,853       83,745       1,136  
Commercial Lines of Credit
    3,428       3,483       1,549       1,879       826       3,469       23  
SBA
    18,038       19,503       9,176       8,862       1,740       18,712       290  
International
    123       139             124       123       135       2  
 
                                                       
Consumer Loans
    903       921       654       249       81       915       10  
 
                                         
Total
  $ 192,500     $ 197,103     $ 89,473     $ 103,027     $ 31,535     $ 197,863     $ 1,894  
 
                                         
 
                                                       
December 31, 2010:
                                                       
Real Estate Loans:
                                                       
Commercial Property
                                                       
Retail
  $ 17,606     $ 18,050     $ 6,336     $ 11,270     $ 1,543     $ 21,190     $ 30  
Land
    35,207       35,295       5,482       29,725       1,485       40,858        
Other
    11,357       11,476       10,210       1,147       33       15,342       42  
Construction
    17,691       17,831       13,992       3,699       280       12,311        
Residential Property
    1,926       1,990       1,926                   2,383       19  
 
                                                       
Commercial and Industrial Loans:
                                                       
Commercial Term
                                                       
Unsecured
    17,847       18,799       6,465       11,382       10,313       18,460       198  
Secured by Real Estate
    80,213       81,395       35,154       45,059       11,831       101,617       318  
Commercial Lines of Credit
    4,067       4,116       1,422       2,645       1,321       4,988       15  
SBA
    17,715       18,544       7,112       10,603       2,122       23,213       301  
International
    127       141             127       127       397       3  
 
                                                       
Consumer Loans
    934       951       393       541       393       639       6  
 
                                         
Total
  $ 204,690     $ 208,588     $ 88,492     $ 116,198     $ 29,448     $ 241,398     $ 932  
 
                                         
 
(1)   Represents interest income recognized on impaired loans subsequent to classification as impaired.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 5 — LOANS (Continued)
The following is a summary of interest foregone on impaired loans for the periods indicated:
                 
    Three Months Ended  
    March 31,     March 31,  
    2011     2010  
    (In Thousands)  
Interest Income That Would Have Been Recognized Had Impaired Loans Performed in Accordance With Their Original Terms
  $ 4,429     $ 5,569  
Less: Interest Income Recognized on Impaired Loans
    (2,485 )     (2,771 )
 
           
 
               
Interest Foregone on Impaired Loans
  $ 1,944     $ 2,798  
 
           
     There were no commitments to lend additional funds to borrowers whose loans are included above.
Non-Accrual Loans
     Loans are placed on non-accrual status when, in the opinion of management, the full timely collection of principal or interest is in doubt. Generally, the accrual of interest is discontinued when principal or interest payments become more than 90 days past due, unless management believes the loan is adequately collateralized and in the process of collection. However, in certain instances, we may place a particular loan on non-accrual status earlier, depending upon the individual circumstances surrounding the loan’s delinquency. When a loan is placed on non-accrual status, previously accrued but unpaid interest is reversed against current income. Subsequent collections of cash are applied as principal reductions when received, except when the ultimate collectibility of principal is probable, in which case interest payments are credited to income. Non-accrual loans may be restored to accrual status when principal and interest become current and full repayment is expected.
     The following table details non-accrual loans, disaggregated by class of loan, for the periods indicated:
                 
    March 31,     December 31,  
    2011     2010  
    (In Thousands)  
Real Estate Loans:
               
Commercial Property
               
Retail
  $ 8,669     $ 10,998  
Land
    22,523       25,725  
Other
    2,177       8,953  
Construction
    23,421       17,691  
Residential Property
    2,014       1,926  
 
               
Commercial and Industrial Loans:
               
Commercial Term
               
Unsecured
    10,370       17,065  
Secured by Real Estate
    27,959       31,053  
Commercial Lines of Credit
    2,169       2,798  
SBA
    24,327       25,054  
International
    123       127  
 
               
Consumer Loans
    966       1,047  
 
           
Total
  $ 124,718     $ 142,437  
 
           

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 5 — LOANS (Continued)
The following table details non-performing assets as of the dates indicated:
                 
    March 31,     December 31,  
    2011     2010  
    (In Thousands)  
Non-Accrual Loans
  $ 124,718     $ 142,437  
Loans 90 Days or More Past Due and Still Accruing
           
 
           
Total Non-Performing Loans
    124,718       142,437  
Other Real Estate Owned
    2,642       4,089  
 
           
Total Non-Performing Assets
  $ 127,360     $ 146,526  
 
           
Troubled Debt Restructurings on Accrual Status
  $ 43,311     $ 47,395  
 
           
     Loans on non-accrual status, excluding loans held for sale, totaled $124.7 million as of March 31, 2011, compared to $142.4 million as of December 31, 2010, representing a 12.4 percent decrease. Delinquent loans (defined as 30 days or more past due), excluding loans held for sale, were $94.5 million as of March 31, 2011, compared to $120.9 million as of December 31, 2010, representing a 21.9 percent decrease.
     As of March 31, 2011, other real estate owned consisted of seven properties, primarily located in California, with a combined net carrying value of $2.6 million. During the three months ended March 31, 2011, two properties, with a carrying value of $1.5 million, were transferred from loans receivable to other real estate owned and three properties, with a carrying value of $2.0 million, were sold and a loss of $219,000 was recognized. As of December 31, 2010, other real estate owned consisted of eight properties with a combined net carrying value of $4.1 million.
     During the three months ended March 31, 2011, we restructured monthly payments on 43 loans, with a net carrying value of $46.2 million as of March 31, 2011, through temporary payment structure modification from principal and interest due monthly to interest only due monthly for six months or less. For the restructured loans on accrual status, we determined that, based on the financial capabilities of the borrowers at the time of the loan restructuring and the borrowers’ past performance in the payment of debt service under the previous loan terms, we believe that performance and collection under the revised terms is probable. As of March 31, 2011, troubled debt restructured loans,excluding loans held for sale, totaled $63.3 million and a $12.0 million reserve relating to these loans was included in the allowance for loan losses. As of December 31, 2010, troubled debt restructured loans, excluding loans held for sale, totaled $72.2 million and the related allowance was $10.2 million.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 6 — INCOME TAXES
     Under GAAP, a valuation allowance must be recorded if it is “more likely than not” that such deferred tax assets will not be realized. Appropriate consideration is given to all available evidence (both positive and negative) related to the realization of the deferred tax assets on a quarterly basis.
     In conducting our regular quarterly evaluation, we decided to maintain a full deferred tax asset valuation allowance as of March 31, 2011 based primarily upon the existence of a three-year cumulative loss position. Although our current financial forecasts indicate that sufficient taxable income will be generated in the future to ultimately realize the existing deferred tax benefits, those forecasts were not considered to constitute sufficient positive evidence to overcome the observable negative evidence associated with the three-year cumulative loss position determined as of March 31, 2011.
     At March 31, 2011, valuation allowance decreased to $88.6 million compared to $92.7 million in December 31, 2010. This decrease was mainly due to a decrease of deferred tax assets balance related to credit loss provision. We had zero balance of net deferred tax assets as of March 31, 2011 and March 31, 2010. During the first quarter of 2010, we recorded a valuation allowance of $23.6 million against our deferred tax assets, totaling $68.8 million of valuation allowance as of March 31, 2010.
NOTE 7 — SHARE-BASED COMPENSATION
Share-Based Compensation Expense
     For the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, share-based compensation expense was $314,000 and $206,000, respectively, and the related tax benefits were $132,000 and $87,000, respectively.
Unrecognized Share-Based Compensation Expense
     As of March 31, 2011, unrecognized share-based compensation expense was as follows:
                 
    Unrecognized     Average Expected  
    Expense     Recognition Period  
    (Dollars in Thousands)  
Stock Option Awards
  $ 235     2.0 years
Restricted Stock Awards
    246     2.5 years
 
             
 
               
Total Unrecognized Share-Based Compensation Expense
  $ 481     2.2 years
 
             

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 7 — SHARE-BASED COMPENSATION (Continued)
Share-Based Payment Award Activity
     The table below provides stock option information for the three months ended March 31, 2011:
                                 
            Weighted-     Weighted-     Aggregate  
            Average     Average     Intrinsic  
    Number     Exercise     Remaining     Value of  
    of     Price Per     Contractual     In-the-Money  
    Shares     Share     Life     Options  
    (Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Data)  
Options Outstanding at Beginning of Period
    1,066,891     $ 11.93     5.3 years   $  (1)
 
                               
Options Granted
    150,000     $ 1.30     9.9 years        
Options Expired
    (4,000 )   $ 18.22     4.9 years        
Options Forfeited
    (2,800 )   $ 18.00     5.1 years        
 
                             
 
                               
Options Outstanding at End of Period
    1,210,091     $ 10.58     5.7 years   $  (2)
 
                             
 
                               
Options Exercisable at End of Period
    843,691     $ 13.18     4.7 years   $  (2)
 
(1)   Intrinsic value represents the excess of the closing stock price on the last trading day of the period, which was $1.15 as of December 31, 2010, over the exercise price, multiplied by the number of options.
 
(2)   Intrinsic value represents the excess of the closing stock price on the last trading day of the period, which was $1.24 as of March 31, 2011, over the exercise price, multiplied by the number of options.
     There were no options exercised during the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010.
Restricted Stock Awards
     The table below provides information for restricted stock awards for the three months ended March 31, 2011:
                 
            Weighted-  
            Average  
    Number     Grant Date  
    of     Fair Value  
    Shares     Per Share  
Restricted Stock at Beginning of Period
    145,600     $ 1.77  
 
               
Restricted Stock Granted
    60,000     $ 1.30  
Restricted Stock Forfeited
        $  
Restricted Stock Vested
    (20,000 )   $ 1.30  
 
             
 
               
Restricted Stock at End of Period
    185,600     $ 1.72  
 
             
NOTE 8 — STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
     Stock Warrants
     As part of the agreement with the placement agency company executed on July 27, 2010, we issued warrants to purchase two million shares of common stock for services performed. The warrants have an exercise price of $1.20 per share. According to the agreement, the warrants vested on October 14, 2010 and are exercisable until its expiration on October 14, 2015. The Company followed the guidance of FASB ASC Topic 815- 40, “Derivatives and Hedging — Contracts in Entity’s Own Stock” (“ASC 815- 40”), which establishes a framework for determining whether certain freestanding and embedded instruments are indexed to a company’s own stock for purposes of evaluation of the accounting for such instruments under existing accounting literature. Under GAAP, the issuer is required to measure the fair value of the equity instruments in the transaction as of earlier of i) the date at which a commitment for performance by the counterparty to earn the equity instruments is reached or ii) the date at which the counterparty’s performance is complete.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 8 — STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (Continued)
The fair value of the warrants at the date of issuance totaling $2.0 million was recorded as a liability and a cost of equity, which was determined by the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The expected stock volatility is based on historical volatility of our common stock over the expected term of the warrants. We used a weighted average expected stock volatility of 111.46%. The expected life assumption is based on the contract term of five years. The dividend yield of zero is based on the fact that we have no present intention to pay cash dividends. The risk free rate of 2.07% used for the warrant is equal to the zero coupon rate in effect at the time of the grant.
     Upon re-measuring the fair value of the stock warrants at March 31, 2011, compared to $1.6 million at December 31, 2010, the fair value decreased by $14,000, which we have included in other operating expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2011. We used a weighted average expected stock volatility of 84.01% and a remaining contractual life of 4.5 years based on the contract terms. We also used a dividend yield of zero as we have no present intention to pay cash dividends. The risk free rate of 2.33% used for the warrant is equal to the zero coupon rate in effect at the end of the measurement period.
NOTE 9 — EARNINGS (LOSS) PER SHARE
     Earnings (loss) per share (“EPS”) is calculated on both a basic and a diluted basis. Basic EPS excludes dilution and is computed by dividing income available to common stockholders by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted EPS reflects the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock or resulted from the issuance of common stock that then shared in earnings, excluding common shares in treasury. Unvested restricted stock is excluded from the calculation of weighted-average common shares for basic EPS. For diluted EPS, weighted-average common shares include the impact of restricted stock under the treasury method.
     The following tables present a reconciliation of the components used to derive basic and diluted EPS for the periods indicated:
                                                 
    Three Months Ended March 31,  
    2011     2010  
    (Numerator)     (Denominator)             (Numerator)     (Denominator)        
          Weighted-     Per           Weighted-     Per  
    Net     Average     Share     Net     Average     Share  
    Income     Shares     Amount     Loss     Shares     Amount  
    (Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Data)  
Basic EPS
  $ 10,437       151,061,012     $ 0.07     $ (49,486 )     50,998,990     $ (0.97 )
Effect of Dilutive Securities — Options, Warrants and Unvested Restricted Stock
          226,561                          
 
                                   
 
                                               
Diluted EPS
  $ 10,437       151,287,573     $ 0.07     $ (49,486 )     50,998,990     $ (0.97 )
 
                                   
     For the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, there were 1,210,091 and 1,320,915 options, warrants and unvested restricted stock outstanding, respectively, that were not included in the computation of diluted EPS because their effect would be anti-dilutive.
NOTE 10 — OFF-BALANCE SHEET COMMITMENTS
     We are a party to financial instruments with off-balance sheet risk in the normal course of business to meet the financing needs of our customers. These financial instruments include commitments to extend credit and standby letters of credit. These instruments involve, to varying degrees, elements of credit and interest rate risk in excess of the amount recognized in the Consolidated Balance Sheets. The Bank’s exposure to credit losses in the event of non-performance by the other party to commitments to extend credit and standby letters of credit is represented by the contractual notional amount of those instruments.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 10 — OFF-BALANCE SHEET COMMITMENTS (Continued)
The Bank uses the same credit policies in making commitments and conditional obligations as it does for extending loan facilities to customers. The Bank evaluates each customer’s creditworthiness on a case-by-case basis. The amount of collateral obtained, if deemed necessary by the Bank upon extension of credit, is based on management’s credit evaluation of the counterparty.
     Collateral held varies but may include accounts receivable; inventory; property, plant and equipment; and income-producing or borrower-occupied properties. The following table shows the distribution of undisbursed loan commitments as of the dates indicated:
                 
    March 31,     December 31,  
    2011     2010  
    (In Thousands)  
Commitments to Extend Credit
  $ 167,225     $ 178,424  
Standby Letters of Credit
    15,103       15,226  
Commercial Letters of Credit
    8,694       11,899  
Unused Credit Card Lines
    23,990       24,649  
 
           
 
               
Total Undisbursed Loan Commitments
  $ 215,012     $ 230,198  
 
           
NOTE 11 — SEGMENT REPORTING
     Through our branch network and lending units, we provide a broad range of financial services to individuals and companies located primarily in Southern California. These services include demand, time and savings deposits; and commercial and industrial, real estate and consumer lending. While our chief decision makers monitor the revenue streams of our various products and services, operations are managed and financial performance is evaluated on a company-wide basis. Accordingly, we consider all of our operations to be aggregated in one reportable operating segment.
NOTE 12 — LIQUIDITY
Hanmi Financial
     Currently, management believes that Hanmi Financial, on a stand-alone basis, has adequate liquid assets to meet its operating cash needs through December 31, 2011. On August 29, 2008, we elected to suspend payment of quarterly dividends on our common stock in order to preserve our capital position. In addition, Hanmi Financial has elected to defer quarterly interest payments on its outstanding junior subordinated debentures until further notice, beginning with the interest payment that was due on January 15, 2009. As of March 31, 2011, Hanmi Financial’s liquid assets, including amounts deposited with the Bank, totaled $7.1 million, down from $7.7 million as of December 31, 2010.
Hanmi Bank
     Management believes that the Bank, on a stand-alone basis, has adequate liquid assets to meet its current obligations. The Bank’s primary funding source will continue to be deposits originated through its branch platform. The Bank’s wholesale funds historically consisted of FHLB advances and brokered deposits. As of March 31, 2011, in compliance with its regulatory restrictions, the Bank had no brokered deposits, and had FHLB advances of only $153.6 million that slightly decreased $85,000 in 2011.
     The Bank’s primary source of borrowings is the FHLB, from which the Bank is eligible to borrow up to 15 percent of its total assets. As of March 31, 2011, the total borrowing capacity available based on pledged collateral and the remaining available borrowing capacity were $435.1 million and $281.5 million, respectively. The Bank’s FHLB borrowings as of March 31, 2011 totaled $153.6 million, representing 5.3 percent of total assets.

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HANMI FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2011 AND 2010 (Continued)
NOTE 12 — LIQUIDITY (Continued)
     As of May 6, 2011, the Bank’s FHLB borrowing capacity available based on pledged collateral and the remaining available borrowing capacity were $435.1 million and $281.5 million, respectively. The amount that the FHLB is willing to advance differs based on the quality and character of qualifying collateral pledged by the Bank, and the advance rates for qualifying collateral may be adjusted upwards or downwards by the FHLB from time to time. To the extent deposit renewals and deposit growth are not sufficient to fund maturing and withdrawable deposits, repay maturing borrowings, fund existing and future loans and investment securities and otherwise fund working capital needs and capital expenditures, the Bank may utilize the remaining borrowing capacity from its FHLB borrowing arrangement.
     As a means of augmenting its liquidity, the Bank had an available borrowing source of $165.8 million from the Federal Reserve Discount Window (the “Fed Discount Window”), to which the Bank pledged loans with a carrying value of $354.6 million, and had no borrowings as of March 31, 2011. The Bank is currently in the secondary program of the Borrower in Custody Program of the Fed Discount Window, which allows the Bank to request very short-term credit (typically overnight) at a rate that is above the primary credit rate within a specified period. In August 2010, South Street Securities LLC extended a line of credit to the Bank for reverse repurchase agreements up to a maximum of $100.0 million.
          Current market conditions have limited the Bank’s liquidity sources principally to interest-bearing deposits, unpledged marketable securities, and secured funding outlets such as the FHLB and Fed Discount Window. There can be no assurance that actions by the FHLB or Federal Reserve Bank would not reduce the Bank’s borrowing capacity or that the Bank would be able to continue to replace deposits at competitive rates. As of March 31, 2011, in compliance with its regulatory restrictions, the Bank did not have any brokered deposits and would consult in advance with its regulators if it were to consider accepting brokered deposits in the future.
          The Bank has Contingency Funding Plans (“CFPs”) designed to ensure that liquidity sources are sufficient to meet its ongoing obligations and commitments, particularly in the event of a liquidity contraction. The CFPs are designed to examine and quantify its liquidity under various “stress” scenarios. Furthermore, the CFPs provide a framework for management and other critical personnel to follow in the event of a liquidity contraction or in anticipation of such an event. The CFPs address authority for activation and decision making, liquidity options and the responsibilities of key departments in the event of a liquidity contraction.
     The Bank believes that it nonetheless has adequate liquidity resources to fund its obligations with its interest-bearing deposits, unpledged marketable securities, and secured credit lines with the FHLB and Fed Discount Window.
NOTE 13 — SUBSEQUENT EVENTS
     Management has evaluated subsequent events through the date of issuance of the financial data included herein. There have been no subsequent events that occurred during such period that would require disclosure in this Form 10-Q or would be required to be recognized in the Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) as of March 31, 2011.

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ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
     The following is management’s discussion and analysis of the major factors that influenced our results of operations and financial condition as of and for the three months ended March 31, 2011. This analysis should be read in conjunction with our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010 and with the unaudited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto set forth in this Report.
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
     Some of the statements under “Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and elsewhere in this Form 10-Q constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). All statements in this Form 10-Q other than statements of historical fact are “forward —looking statements” for purposes of federal and state securities laws, including, but not limited to, statements about anticipated future operating and financial performance, financial position and liquidity, business strategies, regulatory and competitive outlook, investment and expenditure plans, capital and financing needs, plan and availability, plans and objectives of management for future operations, developments regarding our securities purchase agreement with Woori, and other similar forecasts and statements of expectation and statements of assumption underlying any of the foregoing. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “expects,” “plans,” “intends,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential,” or “continue,” or the negative of such terms and other comparable terminology. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. These statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to differ from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statement. These factors include the following:
    our ability to continue as going concern;
 
    closure of Hanmi Bank and appointment of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation as receiver;
 
    failure to complete the transaction contemplated by the securities purchase agreement with Woori Finance Holdings Co., Ltd.;
 
    failure to raise enough capital to support our operations or meet our regulatory requirements;
 
    failure to maintain adequate levels of capital to support our operations;
 
    conditions in the capital markets for raising capital;
 
    a significant number of customers failing to perform under their loans and other terms of credit agreements;
 
    our compliance with and the effect of regulatory orders we have entered into and potential future supervisory or governmental actions against us or Hanmi Bank;
 
    fluctuations in interest rates and a decline in the level of our interest rate spread;
 
    failure to attract or retain deposits and restrictions on taking brokered deposits;
 
    sources of liquidity available to us and to Hanmi Bank becoming limited or our potential inability to access sufficient sources of liquidity when needed or the requirement that we obtain government waivers to do so;
 
    adverse changes in domestic or global financial markets, economic conditions or business conditions;
 
    regulatory restrictions on Hanmi Bank’s ability to pay dividends to us and on our ability to make payments on our obligations;
 
    significant reliance on loans secured by real estate and the associated vulnerability to downturns in the local real estate market, natural disasters and other variables impacting the value of real estate;
 
    failure to attract or retain our key employees;
 
    adequacy of our allowance for loan losses;
 
    credit quality and the effect of credit quality on our provision for credit losses and allowance for loan losses;
 
    volatility and disruption in financial, credit and securities markets, and the price of our common stock;
 
    deterioration in financial markets that may result in impairment charges relating to our securities portfolio;
 
    competition in our primary market areas;.

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    demographic changes in our primary market areas;
 
    global hostilities, acts of war or terrorism, including but not limited to, conflict between North and South Korea;
 
    the effects of climate change and attendant regulation on our customers and borrowers;
 
    the effects of litigation against us;
 
    significant government regulations, legislation and potential changes thereto; and
 
    other risks described herein and in the other reports and statements we file with the SEC.
     For a discussion of some of the other factors that might cause such a difference, see the discussion contained in this Form 10-Q under the heading “Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” Also see “Item 1A. Risk Factors” and “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010 as well as other factors we identify from time to time in our periodic reports filed pursuant to the Exchange Act. We undertake no obligation to update these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances that occur after the date on which such statements were made, except as required by law.
CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES
     We have established various accounting policies that govern the application of GAAP in the preparation of our financial statements. Our significant accounting policies are described in the “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010. Certain accounting policies require us to make significant estimates and assumptions that have a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets and liabilities, and we consider these critical accounting policies. For a description of these critical accounting policies, see “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Critical Accounting Policies” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010. We use estimates and assumptions based on historical experience and other factors that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results could differ significantly from these estimates and assumptions, which could have a material impact on the carrying value of assets and liabilities at the balance sheet dates and our results of operations for the reporting periods. Management has discussed the development and selection of these critical accounting policies with the Audit Committee of Hanmi Financial’s Board of Directors.

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SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
     The following tables set forth certain selected financial data for the periods indicated.
                 
    As of and for the  
    Three Months Ended  
    March 31,  
    2011     2010  
    (Dollars in Thousands, Except Per Share Data)  
AVERAGE BALANCES:
               
Average Gross Loans, Net (1)
  $ 2,234,110     $ 2,765,701  
Average Investment Securities
  $ 473,113     $ 125,340  
Average Interest-Earning Assets
  $ 2,892,404     $ 3,010,938  
Average Total Assets
  $ 2,906,253     $ 3,086,198  
Average Deposits
  $ 2,458,836     $ 2,662,960  
Average Borrowings
  $ 237,452     $ 257,132  
Average Interest-Bearing Liabilities
  $ 2,133,097     $ 2,360,992  
Average Stockholders’ Equity
  $ 178,221     $ 137,931  
 
               
PER SHARE DATA:
               
Earnings (Loss) Per Share — Basic
  $ 0.07     $ (0.97 )
Earnings (Loss) Per Share — Diluted
  $ 0.07     $ (0.97 )
Common Shares Outstanding
    151,258,390       51,182,390  
Book Value Per Share (2)
  $ 1.22     $ 1.97  
 
               
SELECTED PERFORMANCE RATIOS:
               
Return on Average Assets (3) (4)
    1.46 %     (6.50 %)
Return on Average Stockholders’ Equity (3) (5)
    23.75 %     (145.50 %)
Efficiency Ratio (6)
    66.61 %     76.37 %
Net Interest Spread (7)
    3.27 %     3.29 %
Net Interest Margin (8)
    3.66 %     3.69 %
Average Stockholders’ Equity to Average Total Assets
    6.13 %     4.47 %
 
               
SELECTED CAPITAL RATIOS: (9)
               
Total Risk-Based Capital Ratio:
               
Hanmi Financial
    13.05 %     7.86 %
Hanmi Bank
    13.00 %     7.81 %
Tier 1 Risk-Based Capital Ratio:
               
Hanmi Financial
    10.96 %     4.80 %
Hanmi Bank
    11.70 %     6.49 %
Tier 1 Leverage Ratio:
               
Hanmi Financial
    8.51 %     4.20 %
Hanmi Bank
    9.08 %     5.68 %
 
               
SELECTED ASSET QUALITY RATIOS:
               
Non-Performing Loans to Total Gross Loans (10)
    6.98 %     9.77 %
Non-Performing Assets to Total Assets (11)
    5.36 %     9.43 %
Net Loan Charge-Offs to Average Total Gross Loans (12)
    3.91 %     3.87 %
Allowance for Loan Losses to Total Gross Loans
    5.79 %     6.63 %
Allowance for Loan Losses to Non-Performing Loans
    82.90 %     67.81 %
 
(1)   Loans are net of deferred fees and related direct costs.
 
(2)   Total stockholders’ equity divided by common shares outstanding.
 
(3)   Calculation based upon annualized net income (loss).
 
(4)   Net income (loss) divided by average total assets.
 
(5)   Net income (loss) divided by average stockholders’ equity.
 
(6)   Total non-interest expenses divided by the sum of net interest income before provision for credit losses and total non-interest income.
 
(7)   Average yield earned on interest-earning assets less average rate paid on interest-bearing liabilities. Computed on a tax-equivalent basis using an effective marginal rate of 35 percent.
 
(8)   Net interest income before provision for credit losses divided by average interest-earning assets. Computed on a tax-equivalent basis using an effective marginal rate of 35 percent.
 
(9)   The required ratios for a “well-capitalized” institution, as defined by regulations of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, are 10 percent for the Total Risk-Based Capital Ratio (total capital divided by total risk-weighted assets); 6 percent for the Tier 1 Risk-Based Capital Ratio (Tier 1 capital divided by total risk-weighted assets); and 5 percent for the Tier 1 Leverage Ratio (Tier 1 capital divided by average total assets).
 
(10)   Non-performing loans consist of non-accrual loans and loans past due 90 days or more and still accruing interest.
 
(11)   Non-performing assets consist of non-performing loans (see footnote (10) above) and other real estate owned.
 
(12)   Calculation based upon annualized net loan charge-offs.
Non-GAAP Financial Measures
     Tangible Stockholders’ Equity to Tangible Assets Ratio
     Tangible Stockholders’ equity to tangible assets ratio is supplemental financial information determined by a method other than in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). This non-GAAP measure is used by management in the analysis of Hanmi Bank’s capital strength. Tangible equity is calculated by subtracting goodwill and other intangible assets from total stockholders’ equity.

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Banking and financial institution regulators also exclude goodwill and other intangible assets from total stockholders’ equity when assessing the capital adequacy of a financial institution. Management believes the presentation of this financial measure excluding the impact of these items provides useful supplemental information that is essential to a proper understanding of the capital strength of Hanmi Bank. This disclosure should not be viewed as a substitution for results determined in accordance with GAAP, nor is it necessarily comparable to non-GAAP performance measures that may be presented by other companies.
     The following table reconciles this non-GAAP performance measure to the GAAP performance measure for the periods indicated:
     Hanmi Bank
                 
    March 31,     March 31,  
    2011     2010  
    (In Thousands)  
Total Assets
  $ 2,872,804     $ 3,011,524  
Less Intangible Assets
    (303 )     (1,058 )
 
           
 
               
Tangible Assets
  $ 2,872,501     $ 3,010,466  
 
           
 
               
Total Stockholders’ Equity
  $ 261,639     $ 178,513  
Less Intangible Assets
    (303 )     (1,058 )
 
           
 
               
Tangible Stockholders’ Equity
  $ 261,336     $ 177,455  
 
           
 
               
Total Stockholders’ Equity to Total Assets Ratio
    9.11 %     5.93 %
Tangible Stockholders’ Equity to Tangible Assets Ratio
    9.10 %     5.89 %
     As of March 31, 2011 and 2010, the Bank had tangible stockholders’ equity to tangible assets ratio of 9.10% and 5.89%, respectively.
EXECUTIVE OVERVIEW
     For the first quarter ended March 31, 2011, we recognized net income of $10.4 million or $0.07 per diluted share, compared to net income of $5.3 million or $0.04 per diluted share and net losses of $49.5 million or $(0.97) per share for the fourth quarter ended December 31, 2010 and the first quarter ended March 31, 2010, respectively. The increase in net income for the first quarter of 2011 was primarily driven by the lack of any provision for credit losses for the first quarter of 2011, reflecting the continuous improvement in our credit quality metrics. We recorded $5.0 million and $58.0 million in provision for credit losses for the fourth quarter ended December 31, 2010 and the first quarter ended March 31, 2010, respectively.
     On July 27, 2010, we successfully completed a $120 million registered rights and best efforts offering to strengthen our capital position. As a result, we satisfied the $100 million capital contribution requirement set forth in the Order and the Bank has met the threshold for being considered “well-capitalized” for regulatory purposes since September 30, 2010. However, the tangible capital ratio requirement set forth in the Order has not been satisfied as of March 31, 2011. Accordingly, we notified the DFI and the FRB of such event. For a further discussion of the Bank’s capital condition and capital resources, see “Capital Resources and Liquidity.”
     We have made continuous efforts to improve our asset quality through proactive loan monitoring, accelerated problem loan resolutions, and sales of non-performing assets. In accordance with our liquidity preservation strategy, funds raised from the secondary stock offerings and sales of loans were placed into highly liquid assets. As a result, we maintained a strong liquidity position with $709.6 million in cash and marketable securities as of March 31, 2011.
     Significant financial highlights include (as of and for the period ended March 31, 2011):
    The Bank’s total risk-based capital ratio improved to 13.00% as of March 31, 2011 compared to 12.22% as of December 31, 2010. The Bank’s tangible common equity to tangible assets also improved to 9.10% as of March 31, 2011 compared to 8.59% as of December 31, 2010.
 
    Non-performing loans decreased to $151.7 million, or 6.98% of total gross loans, as of March 31, 2011 compared to $169.0 million, or 7.45% as of December 31, 2010. Non-performing assets decreased to $154.4 million, or 5.36% of total assets, as of March 31, 2011 compared to $173.1 million, or 5.95% as of December 31, 2010.

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    The average loan yield improved by 23 basis points to 5.61% in the first quarter of 2011 compared to 5.38% for the same period of 2010, reflecting the improvement in credit quality.
 
    The cost of funds decreased primarily through downward re-pricing of matured time deposits. The average funding cost decreased by 32 basis points to 1.17% in the first quarter of 2011 compared to 1.49% for the same period of 2010.
Outlook for 2011
     As set forth in our Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010, our strategic focuses for 2011 will be to enhance our capital position, continue to improve our credit quality and to fully comply with all of the requirements of the Order and the Agreement.
     We believe that our continuous proactive initiatives to manage credit risk exposure have resulted in improvement of our asset quality over the past several quarters. Our commitment to elevate our credit risk management systems will continue in order to meet the challenges of our uncertain economic environment.
     In addition to sustained credit quality improvement, we will focus on growth and expansion in two primary areas: quality loans and core deposits. We intend to continue to launch innovative new core deposit products and services as well as generate quality new loans to expand our existing customer base with the goal of improving our profitability.
     We are actively evaluating various opportunities to further enhance our capital position with additional capital, including Woori Finance’s proposed investment, so as to strengthen our balance sheet for future growth and unexpected economic events, and to fully comply with regulatory orders we are subject to. We expect to make progress during the second quarter of 2011.
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
Net Interest Income Before Provision for Credit Losses
     Our earnings depend largely upon the difference between the interest income received from our loan portfolio and other interest-earning assets and the interest paid on deposits and borrowings. The difference is “net interest income.” The difference between the yield earned on interest-earning assets and the cost of interest-bearing liabilities is “net interest spread.” Net interest income, when expressed as a percentage of average total interest-earning assets, is referred to as the “net interest margin.”
     Net interest income is affected by the change in the level and mix of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities, referred to as “volume changes.” Our net interest income also is affected by changes in the yields earned on interest-earning assets and rates paid on interest-bearing liabilities, referred to as “rate changes.” Interest rates charged on loans are affected principally by the demand for such loans, the supply of money available for lending purposes and competitive factors. Those factors are affected by general economic conditions and other factors beyond our control, such as Federal economic policies, the general supply of money in the economy, income tax policies, governmental budgetary matters and the actions of the FRB.

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     The following table shows the average balances of assets, liabilities and stockholders’ equity; the amount of interest income and interest expense; the average yield or rate for each category of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities; and the net interest spread and the net interest margin for the periods indicated. All average balances are daily average balances.
                                                 
    Three Months Ended  
    March 31, 2011     March 31, 2010  
            Interest     Average             Interest     Average  
    Average     Income/     Yield/     Average     Income/     Yield/  
    Balance     Expense     Rate     Balance     Expense     Rate  
    (Dollars in Thousands)  
ASSETS
                                               
Interest-Earning Assets:
                                               
Gross Loans, Net (1)
  $ 2,234,110     $ 30,905       5.61 %   $ 2,765,701     $ 36,695       5.38 %
Municipal Securities:
                                               
Taxable
    17,531       178       4.06 %                  
Tax — Exempt (2)
    4,466       62       5.55 %     7,549       118       6.25 %
Obligations of Other U.S. Government Agencies
    146,312       623       1.70 %     32,120       383       4.77 %
Other Debt Securities
    304,804       1,872       2.46 %     85,671       701       3.27 %
Equity Securities
    35,557       132       1.48 %     39,369       125       1.27 %
Federal Funds Sold
    6,699       8       0.48 %     14,118       17       0.48 %
Term Federal Funds Sold
    19,778       27       0.55 %                  
Interest-Earning Deposits
    123,147       89       0.29 %     66,410       55       0.33 %
 
                                       
 
                                               
Total Interest-Earning Assets
    2,892,404       33,896       4.75 %     3,010,938       38,094       5.13 %
 
                                       
 
                                               
Noninterest-Earning Assets:
                                               
Cash and Cash Equivalents
    67,854                       67,157                  
Allowance for Loan Losses
    (145,784 )                     (157,296 )                
Other Assets
    91,779                       165,399                  
 
                                           
 
                                               
Total Noninterest-Earning Assets
    13,849                       75,260                  
 
                                           
 
                                               
TOTAL ASSETS
  $ 2,906,253                     $ 3,086,198                  
 
                                           
 
                                               
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
                                               
Interest-Bearing Liabilities:
                                               
Deposits:
                                               
Savings
  $ 113,080       749       2.69 %   $ 115,625       824       2.89 %
Money Market Checking and NOW Accounts
    448,807       1,002       0.91 %     558,916       1,622       1.18 %
Time Deposits of $100,000 or More
    1,051,340       4,059       1.57 %     924,055       4,677       2.05 %
Other Time Deposits
    282,418       925       1.33 %     505,264       2,581       2.07 %
Federal Home Loan Bank Advances
    153,609       333       0.88 %     173,062       346       0.81 %
Other Borrowings
    1,437                   1,664              
Junior Subordinated Debentures
    82,406       698       3.44 %     82,406       669       3.29 %
 
                                       
 
                                               
Total Interest-Bearing Liabilities
    2,133,097       7,766       1.48 %     2,360,992       10,719       1.84 %
 
                                       
 
                                               
Noninterest-Bearing Liabilities:
                                               
Demand Deposits
    563,191                       559,100                  
Other Liabilities
    31,744                       28,175                  
 
                                           
 
                                               
Total Noninterest-Bearing Liabilities
    594,935                       587,275                  
 
                                           
 
                                               
Total Liabilities
    2,728,032                       2,948,267                  
Stockholders’ Equity
    178,221                       137,931                  
 
                                           
 
                                               
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
  $ 2,906,253                     $ 3,086,198                  
 
                                           
 
                                               
NET INTEREST INCOME
          $ 26,130                     $ 27,375          
 
                                           
 
                                               
NET INTEREST SPREAD (3)
                    3.27 %                     3.29 %
 
                                           
 
                                               
NET INTEREST MARGIN (4)
                    3.66 %                     3.69 %
 
                                           
 
(1)   Loans are net of deferred fees and related direct costs, but excluding the allowance for loan losses. Non-accrual loans are included in the average loan balance. Loan fees have been included in the calculation of interest income. Loan fees were $495,000 and $450,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.
 
(2)   Computed on a tax-equivalent basis using an effective marginal rate of 35 percent.
 
(3)   Represents the average rate earned on interest-earning assets less the average rate paid on interest-bearing liabilities.
 
(4)   Represents annualized net interest income as a percentage of average interest-earning assets.

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     The table below shows changes in interest income and interest expense and the amounts attributable to variations in interest rates and volumes for the periods indicated. The variances attributable to simultaneous volume and rate changes have been allocated to the change due to volume and the change due to rate categories in proportion to the relationship of the absolute dollar amount attributable solely to the change in volume and to the change in rate.
                         
    Three Months Ended March 31, 2011 vs.  
    Three Months Ended March 31, 2010  
    Increases (Decreases) Due to Change in  
    Volume     Rate     Total  
    (In Thousands)  
Interest and Dividend Income:
                       
Gross Loans, Net
  $ (7,299 )   $ 1,509     $ (5,790 )
Municipal Securities:
                       
Taxable
    178             178  
Tax — Exempt
    (44 )     (12 )     (56 )
Obligations of Other U.S. Government Agencies
    620       (380 )     240  
Other Debt Securities
    1,386       (215 )     1,171  
Equity Securities
    (13 )     20       7  
Federal Funds Sold
    (9 )           (9 )
Term Federal Funds Sold
    27             27  
Interest-Earning Deposits
    42       (8 )     34  
 
                 
 
                       
Total Interest and Dividend Income
    (5,112 )     914       (4,198 )
 
                 
 
                       
Interest Expense:
                       
Savings
    (18 )     (57 )     (75 )
Money Market Checking and NOW Accounts
    (286 )     (334 )     (620 )
Time Deposits of $100,000 or More
    588       (1,206 )     (618 )
Other Time Deposits
    (913 )     (743 )     (1,656 )
Federal Home Loan Bank Advances
    (41 )     28       (13 )
Junior Subordinated Debentures
          29       29  
 
                 
 
                       
Total Interest Expense
    (670 )     (2,283 )     (2,953 )
 
                 
 
                       
Change in Net Interest Income
  $ (4,442 )   $ 3,197     $ (1,245 )
 
                 
     For the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, net interest income before provision for credit losses on a tax-equivalent basis was $26.1 million and $27.4 million, respectively. Interest income decreased 11.02 percent to $33.9 million for the three months ended March 31, 2011 from $38.1 million for the same period in 2010 and interest expense decreased 27.55 percent to $7.8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2011 from $10.7 million for the same period in 2010. The net interest spread and net interest margin for the three months ended March 31, 2011 were 3.27 percent and 3.66 percent, respectively, compared to 3.29 percent and 3.69 percent, respectively, for the same period in 2010. The decrease in net interest income was primarily due to the decrease in gross loans resulting from the disposition of non-performing assets under the credit quality improvement strategy, coupled with relatively weak loan demand in current challenging business and economic conditions. This decrease was partially offset by lower deposit costs resulting from the replacement of high-cost promotional time deposits with low-cost deposit products through a series of core deposit campaigns.
     Average gross loans decreased by $531.6 million, or 19.22 percent, to $2.23 billion for the three months ended March 31, 2011 from $2.77 billion for the same period in 2010. Average investment securities increased by $347.8 million, or 277.5 percent, to $473.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2011 from $125.3 million for the same period in 2010. Average interest-earning assets decreased by $118.5 million, or 3.94 percent, to $2.89 billion for the three months ended March 31, 2011 from $3.01 billion for the same period in 2010. The decrease in average interest earning assets was a direct result of our balance sheet deleveraging and credit quality improvement strategy during 2010 through the disposition of problem assets while maintaining strong level of liquidity with the increased investment in short and mid-term instruments. Consistent with this strategy, the average interest-bearing liabilities decreased by $227.9 million, or 9.65 percent to $2.13 billion for the three months ended March 31, 2011 from $2.36 billion for the same period in 2010. Average FHLB advances decreased by $19.5 million, or 11.24 percent, to $153.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2011 from $173.1 million for the same period in 2010.

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     The average yield on interest-earning assets decreased by 38 basis points from 5.13 percent for the three months ended March 31, 2010 to 4.75 percent for the same period in 2011, primarily due to lower yields on investment securities in the current low interest rate environment, partially offset by an increase in loan portfolio yields. Total loan interest and fee income decreased by $5.8 million, or 15.78 percent to $30.9 million for the three months ended March 31, 2011 from $36.7 million for the same period in 2010 due primarily to a 19.22 percent decrease in the average gross loans. The average yield on loans increased from 5.38 percent for the three months ended March 31, 2010 to 5.61 percent for the same period in 2011. This increase reflected substantial improvement in credit quality metrics, including delinquent loan levels and non-performing loans. The average cost on interest-bearing liabilities decreased by 36 basis points from 1.84 percent for the three months ended March 31, 2010 to 1.48 percent for the same period in 2011. This decrease was primarily due to a continued shift in funding sources toward lower-cost funds through disciplined deposit pricing while reducing wholesale funds and rate sensitive deposits. Average brokered deposits decreased to zero for the three months ended March 31, 2011 from $63.4 million for the same period in 2010. Average FHLB advances decreased by $19.5 million, or 11.24 percent to $153.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2011 from $173.1 million for the same period in 2010.
Provision for Credit Losses
     For the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, the provision for credit losses was zero and $58.0 million, respectively. The substantial decrease in the provision for credit losses is attributable to decreases in net charge-offs and problem loans, reflecting the improvement in asset quality through aggressive management of our problem assets. Net charge-offs decreased $4.8 million, or 18.3 percent, from $26.4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 to $21.6 million for the same period in 2011. Non-performing loans decreased from $262.2 million, or 9.77 percent of total gross loans, as of March 31, 2010 to $151.7 million, or 6.98 percent of total gross loans, as of March 31, 2011. See “Non-Performing Assets” and “Allowance for Loan Losses and Allowance for Off-Balance Sheet Items” for further details.
Non-Interest Income
     The following table sets forth the various components of non-interest income for the periods indicated:
                                 
    Three Months Ended        
    March 31,     Increase (Decrease)  
    2011     2010     Amount     Percentage  
    (Dollars in Thousands)  
Service Charges on Deposit Accounts
  $ 3,141     $ 3,726     $ (585 )     (15.7 %)
Insurance Commissions
    1,260       1,278       (18 )     (1.4 %)
Remittance Fees
    462       462              
Trade Finance Fees
    297       351       (54 )     (15.4 %)
Other Service Charges and Fees
    333       412       (79 )     (19.2 %)
Bank-Owned Life Insurance Income
    230       231       (1 )     (0.4 %)
Net Gain on Sales of Investment Securities
          105       (105 )     (100.0 %)
Net Gain (Loss) on Sales of Loans
    (338 )           (338 )      
Other Operating Income
    123       440       (317 )     (72.0 %)
 
                       
 
                               
Total Non-Interest Income
  $ 5,508     $ 7,005     $ (1,497 )     (21.4 %)
 
                       
     For the three months ended March 31, 2011, non-interest income was $5.5 million, a decrease of $1.5 million, or 21.4 percent, from $7.0 million for the same period in 2010. The decrease in non-interest income is primarily attributable to the decreases in service charges on deposit accounts, net gain on sales of loans and investment securities, and other operating income. The service charges on deposit accounts decreased by $585,000, or 15.7 percent, to $3.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2011 compared to $3.7 million for the same period in 2010, due mainly to a decrease of $520,000 in NSF charges, reflecting the continued underlying decline in activity as customers better managed their account balances. Net loss on sales of loans increased by $338,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2011 compared to the same period in 2010. The net loss on sales of loans reflected $2.2 million valuation adjustment on loans held for sale, partially offset by $1.9 million gains from the sales of loans held for sale. Net gain on sales of investment securities decreased by $105,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2011 compared to the same period in 2010. The sales of investment securities for the March 31, 2010 were a direct result of our balance-sheet deleveraging strategy. The proceeds from the sale of investment securities provided additional liquidity to reduce our wholesale funds. No investment security was sold during the first quarter of 2011. Other operating income decreased by $317,000, or 72.0 percent, to $123,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2011 compared to $440,000 for the same period in 2010.

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The decrease was attributable primarily to a $274,000 recovery on a previously recorded loss on sale of OREO during the three months ended March 31, 2010. There was no such recovery for the same period in 2011.
Non-Interest Expense
     The following table sets forth the breakdown of non-interest expense for the periods indicated:
                                 
    Three Months Ended        
    March 31,     Increase (Decrease)  
    2011     2010     Amount     Percentage  
    (Dollars in Thousands)  
Salaries and Employee Benefits
  $ 9,124     $ 8,786     $ 338       3.8 %
Occupancy and Equipment
    2,565       2,725       (160 )     (5.9 %)
Deposit Insurance Premiums and Regulatory Assessments
    2,070       2,224       (154 )     (6.9 %)
Data Processing
    1,399       1,499       (100 )     (6.7 %)
Other Real Estate Owned Expense
    829       5,700       (4,871 )     (85.5 %)
Professional Fees
    789       1,066       (277 )     (26.0 %)
Directors and Officers Liability Insurance
    734       716       18       2.5 %
Supplies and Communications
    578       517       61       11.8 %
Advertising and Promotion
    566       535       31       5.8 %
Loan-Related Expense
    225       307       (82 )     (26.7 %)
Amortization of Other Intangible Assets
    218       328       (110 )     (33.5 %)
Other Operating Expenses
    1,964       1,821       143       7.9 %
 
                       
 
                               
Total Non-Interest Expense
  $ 21,061     $ 26,224     $ (5,163 )     (19.7 %)
 
                       
     For the three months ended March 31, 2011, non-interest expense was $21.1 million, a decrease of $5.2 million, or 19.7 percent, from $26.2 million for the same period in 2010. The efficiency ratio for the three months ended March 31, 2011 was 66.61 percent, compared to 76.37 percent for the same period in 2010. The $5.2 million decrease in non-interest expense was primarily due to the decreases in OREO expense and professional fees, partially offset by an increase in compensation. OREO expense decreased by $4.9 million, or 85.5 percent to $829,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2011 compared to $5.7 million for the same period in 2010, primarily as a result of a $5.1 million decrease in valuation allowance. Professional fees decreased by $277,000, or 26.0 percent, to $789,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2011 compared to $1.1 million for the same period in 2010, primarily due to the absence of expenses paid for due diligence and tax consulting service during the three months ended March 31, 2010. Salaries and employee benefits increased by $338,000, or 3.8 percent, from $8.8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 to $9.1 million for the same period in 2010, primarily due to $293,000 of severance payments recognized during the quarter ended March 31, 2011.
Provision (Benefit) for Income Taxes
     For the three months ended March 31, 2011, income tax expenses of $119,000 were recognized on pre-tax income of $10.6 million, representing an effective tax rate of 1.13 percent, compared to income tax benefits of $395,000 recognized on pre-tax loss of $49.9 million, representing an effective tax rate of 0.8 percent, for the same period in 2010. This income tax expenses primarily resulted from the changes in FIN 48 reserve during the first quarter in 2011.
FINANCIAL CONDITION
Investment Portfolio
     Investment securities are classified as held to maturity or available for sale in accordance with GAAP. Those securities that we have the ability and the intent to hold to maturity are classified as “held to maturity.” All other securities are classified as “available for sale.” There were no trading securities as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010. Securities classified as held to maturity are stated at cost, adjusted for amortization of premiums and accretion of discounts, and available for sale securities are stated at fair value. The composition of our investment portfolio reflects our investment strategy of providing a relatively stable source of interest income while maintaining an appropriate level of liquidity. The investment portfolio also provides a source of liquidity by pledging as collateral or through repurchase agreement and collateral for certain public funds deposits.
     As of March 31, 2011, the investment portfolio was composed primarily of mortgage-backed securities, U.S. government agency securities, and collateralized mortgage obligations.

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Investment securities available for sale were 99.84 percent and 99.80 percent of the total investment portfolio as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively. Most of the securities held carried fixed interest rates. Other than holdings of U.S. government agency securities, there were no investments in securities of any one issuer exceeding 10 percent of stockholders’ equity as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010.
     As of March 31, 2011, securities available for sale were $538.4 million, or 18.7 percent of total assets, compared to $413.1 million, or 14.2 percent of total assets, as of December 31, 2010. Securities available for sale increased in 2011, due mainly to our liquidity-preservation and earnings-enhancement strategies that we put additional funds from amortization and sales of loans into marketable securities. For the three months ended March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, we purchased $145.1 million and $153.8 million, respectively, of various types of marketable securities to replenish the portfolio for principal repayments in the form of calls, prepayments and scheduled amortization and to maintain an investment portfolio mix and size consistent with our capital market expectations and asset-liability management strategies.
     The following table summarizes the amortized cost, estimated fair value and unrealized gain (loss) on investment securities as of the dates indicated:
                                                 
    March 31, 2011     December 31, 2010  
            Estimated     Unrealized             Estimated     Unrealized  
    Amortized     Fair     Gain     Amortized     Fair     Gain  
    Cost     Value     (Loss)     Cost     Value     (Loss)  
    (In Thousands)  
Securities Held to Maturity:
                                               
Municipal Bonds
  $ 697     $ 697     $     $ 696     $ 696     $  
Mortgage-Backed Securities (1)
    141       143       2       149       151       2  
 
                                   
 
                                               
Total Securities Held to Maturity
  $ 838     $ 840     $ 2     $ 845     $ 847     $ 2  
 
                                   
 
                                               
Securities Available for Sale:
                                               
Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
  $ 184,732     $ 183,299     $ (1,433 )   $ 139,053     $ 137,193     $ (1,860 )
U.S. Government Agency Securities
    178,055       177,068       (987 )     114,066       113,334       (732 )
Mortgage-Backed Securities (1)
    124,477       125,761       1,284       108,436       109,842       1,460  
Municipal Bonds
    22,366       21,036       (1,330 )     22,420       21,028       (1,392 )
Corporate Bonds
    20,452       20,114       (338 )     20,449       20,205       (244 )
Asset-Backed Securities
    6,651       6,882       231       7,115       7,384       269  
Other Securities
    3,305       3,243       (62 )     3,305       3,259       (46 )
Equity Securities (2)
    647       953       306       647       873       226  
 
                                   
 
                                               
Total Securities Available for Sale
  $ 540,685     $ 538,356     $ (2,329 )   $ 415,491     $ 413,118     $ (2,373 )
 
                                   
 
(1)   Collateralized by residential mortgages and guaranteed by U.S. government sponsored entities.
 
(2)   Balances presented for amortized cost, representing two corporate bonds, were net of an OTTI charge of $790,000, which was related to a credit loss, as of December 31, 2010. We recorded an OTTI charge of $790,000 to write down the value of one investment security to its fair value during the year ended December 31, 2010.
     The amortized cost and estimated fair value of investment securities as of March 31, 2011, by contractual maturity, are shown below. Although mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations have contractual maturities through 2041, expected maturities may differ from contractual maturities because borrowers may have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without call or prepayment penalties.
                                 
    Available for Sale     Held to Maturity  
            Estimated             Estimated  
    Amortized     Fair     Amortized     Fair  
    Cost     Value     Cost     Value  
    (In Thousands)  
Within One Year
  $     $     $     $  
Over One Year Through Five Years
    178,438       177,230       697       697  
Over Five Years Through Ten Years
    32,440       32,238              
Over Ten Years
    19,951       18,875              
Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
    184,732       183,299              
Mortgage-Backed Securities
    124,477       125,761       141       143  
Equity Securities
    647       953              
 
                       
 
                               
 
  $ 540,685     $ 538,356     $ 838     $ 840  
 
                       

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     We perform periodic reviews for impairment in accordance with FASB ASC 320. The impairment losses described previously are not included in the table below as the impairment losses were recorded. Gross unrealized losses on investment securities available for sale, the estimated fair value of the related securities and the number of securities aggregated by investment category and length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position, were as follows as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010:
                                                                         
    Holding Period  
    Less than 12 Months     12 Months or More     Total  
    Gross     Estimated     Number     Gross     Estimated     Number     Gross     Estimated     Number  
    Unrealized     Fair     of     Unrealized     Fair     of     Unrealized     Fair     of  
Investment Securities   Losses     Value     Securities     Losses     Value     Securities     Losses     Value     Securities  
Available for Sale   (In Thousands)  
March 31, 2011:
                                                                       
Mortgage-Backed Securities
  $ 730     $ 73,164       21     $     $           $ 730     $ 73,164       21  
Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
    1,936       127,190       27                         1,936       127,190       27  
Municipal Bonds
    1,379       17,914       12                         1,379       17,914       12  
U.S. Government Agency Securities
    1,054       131,016       35                         1,054       131,016       35  
Other Securities
    11       1,989       2       52       948       1       63       2,937       3  
Corporate Bonds
    348       17,120       5                         348       17,120       5  
 
                                                     
 
  $ 5,458     $ 368,393       102     $ 52     $ 948       1     $ 5,510     $ 369,341       103  
 
                                                     
 
                                                                       
December 31, 2010:
                                                                       
Mortgage-Backed Securities
  $ 731     $ 62,738       16     $     $           $ 731     $ 62,738       16  
Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
    2,330       99,993       20                         2,330       99,993       20  
Municipal Bonds
    1,440       16,907       11                         1,440       16,907       11  
U.S. Government Agency Securities
    830       69,266       14                         830       69,266       14  
Other Securities
    3       1,997       2       43       957       1       46       2,954       3  
Corporate Bonds
    257       17,210       5                         257       17,210       5  
 
                                                     
 
                                                                       
 
  $ 5,591     $ 268,111       68     $ 43     $ 957       1     $ 5,634     $ 269,068       69  
 
                                                     
     All individual securities that have been in a continuous unrealized loss position for 12 months or longer as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 had investment grade ratings upon purchase. The issuers of these securities have not established any cause for default on these securities and the various rating agencies have reaffirmed these securities’ long-term investment grade status as of March 31, 2011. These securities have fluctuated in value since their purchase dates as market interest rates have fluctuated.
     The unrealized losses on investments in U.S. agencies securities were caused by interest rate increases subsequent to the purchase of these securities. The contractual terms of these investments do not permit the issuer to settle the securities at a price less than par. Because the Bank does not intend to sell the securities in this class and it is not likely that the Bank will be required to sell these securities before recovery of their amortized cost basis, which may include holding each security until contractual maturity, the unrealized losses on these investments are not considered other-than-temporarily impaired.
     The unrealized losses on obligations of political subdivisions were caused by changes in market interest rates or the widening of market spreads subsequent to the initial purchase of these securities. Management monitors published credit ratings of these securities and no adverse ratings changes have occurred since the date of purchase of obligations of political subdivisions which are in an unrealized loss position as of March 31, 2011. Because the decline in fair value is attributable to changes in interest rates or widening market spreads and not credit quality, and because the Bank does not intend to sell the securities in this class and it is not more likely than not that the Bank will be required to sell these securities before recovery of their amortized cost basis, which may include holding each security until maturity, the unrealized losses on these investments are not considered other-than-temporarily impaired.
     Of the residential mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations portfolio in an unrealized loss position at March 31, 2011, all of them are issued and guaranteed by governmental sponsored entities. The unrealized losses on residential mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations were caused by changes in market interest rates or the widening of market spreads subsequent to the initial purchase of these securities, and no concerns regarding the underlying credit of the issuers or the underlying collateral. It is expected that these securities will not be settled at a price less than the amortized cost of each investment. Because the decline in fair value is attributable to changes in interest rates or widening market spreads and not credit quality, and because the Bank does not intend to sell the securities in this class and it is not likely that the Bank will be required to sell these securities before recovery of their amortized cost basis, which may include holding each security until contractual maturity, the unrealized losses on these investments are not considered other-than-temporarily impaired.

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     FASB ASC 320 requires an entity to assess whether the entity has the intent to sell the debt security or more likely than not will be required to sell the debt security before its anticipated recovery. We do not intend to sell these securities and it is not more likely than not that we will be required to sell the investments before the recovery of its amortized cost bases. Therefore, in the opinion of management, all securities that have been in a continuous unrealized loss position for the past 12 months or longer as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 are not other-than-temporarily impaired, and therefore, no impairment charges as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 are warranted.
     Investment securities available for sale with carrying values of $127.3 million and $118.0 million as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively, were pledged to secure FHLB advances, public deposits and for other purposes as required or permitted by law.
Loan Portfolio
     The following table shows the loan composition by type, including loans held for sale, as of the dates indicated.
                                 
    March 31,     December 31,     Increase (Decrease)  
    2011     2010     Amount     Percentage  
    (Dollars in Thousands)  
Real Estate Loans:
                               
Commercial Property (1)
  $ 698,869     $ 731,482     $ (32,613 )     (4.5 %)
Construction (2)
    56,707       62,400       (5,693 )     (9.1 %)
Residential Property
    60,352       62,645       (2,293 )     (3.7 %)
 
                       
 
                               
Total Real Estate Loans
    815,928       856,527       (40,599 )     (4.7 %)
 
                       
 
                               
Commercial and Industrial Loans: (3)
                               
Commercial Term (4)
    1,083,294       1,133,892       (50,598 )     (4.5 %)
Commercial Lines of Credit
    59,318       59,056       262       0.4 %
SBA (5)
    120,172       123,750       (3,578 )     (2.9 %)
International
    46,860       44,167       2,693       6.1 %
 
                       
 
                               
Total Commercial and Industrial Loans
    1,309,644       1,360,865       (51,221 )     (3.8 %)
 
                       
 
                               
Consumer Loans
    48,120       50,300       (2,180 )     (4.3 %)
 
                       
 
                               
Total Loans — Gross
    2,173,692       2,267,692       (94,000 )     (4.1 %)
 
                               
Deferred Loan Fees
    (277 )     (566 )     289       (51.1 %)
Allowance for Loan Losses
    (125,780 )     (146,059 )     20,279       (13.9 %)
 
                       
 
                               
Net Loans Receivable
  $ 2,047,635     $ 2,121,067     $ (73,432 )     (3.5 %)
 
                       
 
(1)   Includes loans held for sale, at the lower of cost or fair value, of $3.5 million and $2.3 million as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively.
 
(2)   Includes loans held for sale, at the lower of cost or fair value, of $0 and $1.4 million as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively.
 
(3)   Includes owner-occupied property loans of $864.7 million and $894.8 million as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively.
 
(4)   Includes loans held for sale, at the lower of cost or fair value, of $25.0 million and $14.9 million as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively.
 
(5)   Includes loans held for sale, at the lower of cost or fair value, of $19.1 million and $18.1 million as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively.
     As of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, loans receivable (including loans held for sale), net of deferred loan fees and allowance for loan losses, totaled $2.05 billion and $2.12 billion, respectively, a decrease of $73.4 million, or 3.5 percent. Total gross loans decreased by $94.0 million, or 4.1 percent, from $2.27 billion as of December 31, 2010 to $2.17 billion as of March 31, 2011.
     During the first quarter of 2011, total new loan production and advances amounted to $58.7 million. For the same period, we experienced decreases in loans totaling $152.7 million, comprised of $100.5 million in principal amortization and payoffs, $25.2 million in charge-offs, $25.5 million in problem loan sales, and $1.5 million that were transferred to OREO. For the three months ended March 31, 2011, the $32.6 million decrease in commercial property loans was attributable to $22.4 million in principal amortization and payoffs, $7.1 million in charge-offs, and $15.0 million in loan sales, partially offset by new loan production and advances of $11.9 million. The $50.6 million

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decrease in commercial term loans for the three months ended March 31, 2011 was attributable to $50.3 million in principal amortization and payoffs, $14.4 million in charge-offs, and $8.7 million in loan sales, partially offset by new loan production and advances of $22.8 million.
     Real estate loans, composed of commercial property, construction loans and residential property, decreased $40.6 million, or 4.7 percent, to $815.9 million as of March 31, 2011 from $856.5 million as of December 31, 2010, representing 37.5 percent and 37.8 percent, respectively, of total gross loans. Commercial and industrial loans, composed of owner-occupied commercial property, trade finance, SBA and commercial lines of credit, decreased $51.2 million, or 3.8 percent, to $1.31 billion as of March 31, 2011 from $1.36 billion as of December 31, 2010, representing 60.2 percent and 60.0 percent, respectively, of total gross loans. Consumer loans decreased $2.2 million, or 4.3 percent, to $48.1 million as of March 31, 2011 from $50.3 million as of December 31, 2010.
     As of March 31, 2011, our loan portfolio included the following concentrations of loans to one type of industry that were greater than 10 percent of total gross loans outstanding:
                 
    Balance as of     Percentage of Total  
Industry   March 31, 2011     Gross Loans Outstanding  
    (In Thousands)          
Lessors of Non-Residential Buildings
  $ 378,387       17.4 %
Accommodation/Hospitality
  $ 304,379       14.0 %
Gasoline Stations
  $ 281,569       13.0 %
     There was no other concentration of loans to any one type of industry exceeding ten percent of total gross loans outstanding.
Non-Performing Assets
     Non-performing loans consist of loans on non-accrual status and loans 90 days or more past due and still accruing interest. Non-performing assets consist of non-performing loans and OREO. Loans are placed on non-accrual status when, in the opinion of management, the full timely collection of principal or interest is in doubt. Generally, the accrual of interest is discontinued when principal or interest payments become more than 90 days past due, unless management believes the loan is adequately collateralized and in the process of collection. However, in certain instances, we may place a particular loan on non-accrual status earlier, depending upon the individual circumstances surrounding the loan’s delinquency. When an asset is placed on non-accrual status, previously accrued but unpaid interest is reversed against current income. Subsequent collections of cash are applied as principal reductions when received, except when the ultimate collectibility of principal is probable, in which case interest payments are credited to income. Non-accrual assets may be restored to accrual status when principal and interest become current and full repayment is expected. Interest income is recognized on the accrual basis for impaired loans not meeting the criteria for non-accrual. OREO consists of properties acquired by foreclosure or similar means that management intends to offer for sale.
     Management’s classification of a loan as non-accrual is an indication that there is reasonable doubt as to the full collectibility of principal or interest on the loan; at this point, we stop recognizing income from the interest on the loan and reverse any uncollected interest that had been accrued but unpaid. These loans may or may not be collateralized, but collection efforts are continuously pursued.
     Except for non-performing loans set forth below, management is not aware of any loans as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 for which known credit problems of the borrower would cause serious doubts as to the ability of such borrowers to comply with their present loan repayment terms, or any known events that would result in the loan being designated as non-performing at some future date. Management cannot, however, predict the extent to which a deterioration in general economic conditions, real estate values, increases in general rates of interest, or changes in the financial condition or business of borrower may adversely affect a borrower’s ability to pay.

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     The following table provides information with respect to the components of non-performing assets as of the dates indicated:
                                 
    March 31,     December 31,     Increase (Decrease)  
    2011     2010     Amount     Percentage  
            (Dollars in Thousands)          
Non-Performing Loans:
                               
Non-Accrual Loans:
                               
Real Estate Loans:
                               
Commercial Property
  $ 36,300     $ 47,937     $ (11,637 )     (24.3 %)
Construction
    23,421       19,097       4,324       22.6 %
Residential Property
    2,014       1,925       89       4.6 %
Commercial and Industrial Loans:
                               
Commercial Term
    56,198       63,012       (6,814 )     (10.8 %)
Commercial Lines of Credit
    2,169       2,798       (629 )     (22.5 %)
SBA
    30,539       33,085       (2,546 )     (7.7 %)
International
    123       127       (4 )     (3.1 %)
Consumer Loans
    966       1,047       (81 )     (7.7 %)
 
                       
Total Non-Accrual Loans
    151,730       169,028       (17,298 )     (10.2 %)
Loans 90 Days or More Past Due and Still Accruing (as to Principal or Interest):
                       
 
                       
Total Non-Performing Loans (1) (2)
    151,730       169,028       (17,298 )     (10.2 %)
Other Real Estate Owned
    2,642       4,089       (1,447 )     (35.4 %)
 
                       
Total Non-Performing Assets
  $ 154,372     $ 173,117     $ (18,745 )     (10.8 %)
 
                       
Non-Performing Loans as a Percentage of Total Gross Loans
    6.98 %     7.45 %                
Non-Performing Assets as a Percentage of Total Assets
    5.36 %     5.95 %                
Troubled Debt Restructured Performing Loans
  $ 43,311     $ 47,395     $ (4,084 )     (8.6 %)
 
                         
 
(1)   Includes troubled debt restructured non-performing loans of $34.2 million and $27.0 million as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively.
 
(2)   Includes loans held for sale.
     Non-accrual loans totaled $151.7 million as of March 31, 2011, compared to $169.0 million as of December 31, 2010, representing a 10.2 percent decrease. Delinquent loans (defined as 30 days or more past due) were $119.1 million as of March 31, 2011, compared to $147.5 million as of December 31, 2010, representing a 19.3 percent decrease. Of the $119.1 million delinquent loans as of March 31, 2011, $98.3 million was included in non-performing loans. The $126.1 million of $147.5 million delinquent loans as of December 31, 2010 was included in non-performing loans. During the first quarter of 2011, loans totaling $38.5 million were placed on nonaccrual status. The additions to nonaccrual loans of $38.5 million were offset by $22.1 million in charge-offs, $21.7 million in sales of problem loans, $8.3 million in principal paydowns and payoffs, $3.1 million that were placed back to accrual status, and $657,000 that were transferred to OREO.
     The ratio of non-performing loans to total gross loans also decreased to 6.98 percent at March 31, 2011 from 7.45 percent at December 31, 2010. During the same period, our allowance for loan losses decreased by $20.3 million, or 13.9 percent, to $125.8 million from $146.1 million. Of the $151.7 million non-performing loans, approximately $107.2 million were impaired based on the definition contained in FASB ASC 310, “Receivables,” which resulted in aggregate impairment reserve of $12.6 million as of March 31, 2011. We calculate our allowance for the collateral-dependent loans as the difference between the outstanding loan balance and the value of the collateral as determined by recent appraisals less estimated costs to sell. The allowance for collateral-dependent loans varies from loan to loan based on the collateral coverage of the loan at the time of designation as non-performing. We continue to monitor the collateral coverage, based on recent appraisals, on these loans on a quarterly basis and adjust the allowance accordingly.
     As of March 31, 2011, $128.8 million, or 84.9 percent, of the $151.7 million of non-performing loans were secured by real estate, compared to $138.1 million, or 81.7 percent, of the $169.0 million of non-performing loans as of December 31, 2010. In light of declining property values in the current challenging economic condition affecting the real estate markets, the Bank obtained current appraisals for most non-performing loan collaterals, but factored in adequate market discounts on some non-performing loan collaterals to compensate for their non-current appraisals.
     As of March 31, 2011, other real estate owned consisted of seven properties, primarily located in California, with a combined net carrying value of $2.6 million.

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During the three months ended March 31, 2011, two properties, with a carrying value of $1.5 million, were transferred from loans receivable to other real estate owned and three properties, with a carrying value of $2.0 million, were sold and a loss of $219,000 was recognized. As of December 31, 2010, other real estate owned consisted of eight properties with a combined net carrying value of $4.1 million.
     We evaluate loan impairment in accordance with applicable GAAP. Loans are considered impaired when it is probable that we will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement, including scheduled interest payments. Impaired loans are measured based on the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate or, as an expedient, at the loan’s observable market price or the fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent, less costs to sell. If the measure of the impaired loan is less than the recorded investment in the loan, the deficiency will be charged off against the allowance for loan losses or, alternatively, a specific allocation will be established. Additionally, impaired loans are specifically excluded from the quarterly migration analysis when determining the amount of the allowance for loan losses required for the period.
     The following table provides information on impaired loans as of the dates indicated:
                                                         
                                                    Interest  
                                                    Income  
                    With No                         Recognized  
            Unpaid     Related     With an             Average     for the Three  
    Recorded     Principal     Allowance     Allowance     Related     Recorded     Months  
    Investment     Balance     Recorded     Recorded     Allowance     Investment     Ended(1)  
 
  (In Thousands)  
March 31, 2011:
                                                       
Real Estate Loans:
                                                       
Commercial Property
                                                       
Retail
  $ 16,757     $ 17,134     $ 7,204     $ 9,553     $ 1,881     $ 17,016     $ 174  
Land
    27,515       27,515       22,523       4,992       1,602       29,655        
Other
    5,448       5,578       3,470       1,978       138       5,383       28  
Construction
    23,421       23,643       14,264       9,157       195       23,536       76  
Residential Property
    2,014       2,091       1,651       362       39       2,068       10  
 
                                                       
Commercial and Industrial Loans:
                                                       
Commercial Term
                                                       
Unsecured
    12,785       13,339       2,149       10,636       9,057       13,229       145  
Secured by Real Estate
    82,068       83,757       26,833       55,235       15,853       83,745       1,136  
Commercial Lines of Credit
    3,428       3,483       1,549       1,879       826       3,469       23  
SBA
    18,038       19,503       9,176       8,862       1,740       18,712       290  
International
    123       139             124       123       135       2  
 
                                                       
Consumer Loans
    903       921       654       249       81       915       10  
 
                                         
Total
  $ 192,500     $ 197,103     $ 89,473     $ 103,027     $ 31,535     $ 197,863     $ 1,894  
 
                                         
 
                                                       
December 31, 2010:
                                                       
Real Estate Loans:
                                                       
Commercial Property
                                                       
Retail
  $ 17,606     $ 18,050     $ 6,336     $ 11,270     $ 1,543     $ 21,190     $ 30  
Land
    35,207       35,295       5,482       29,725       1,485       40,858        
Other
    11,357       11,476       10,210       1,147       33       15,342       42  
Construction
    17,691       17,831       13,992       3,699       280       12,311        
Residential Property
    1,926       1,990       1,926                   2,383       19  
 
                                                       
Commercial and Industrial Loans:
                                                       
Commercial Term
                                                       
Unsecured
    17,847       18,799       6,465       11,382       10,313       18,460       198  
Secured by Real Estate
    80,213       81,395       35,154       45,059       11,831       101,617       318  
Commercial Lines of Credit
    4,067       4,116       1,422       2,645       1,321       4,988       15  
SBA
    17,715       18,544       7,112       10,603       2,122       23,213       301  
International
    127       141             127       127       397       3  
 
                                                       
Consumer Loans
    934       951       393       541       393       639       6  
 
                                         
Total
  $ 204,690     $ 208,588     $ 88,492     $ 116,198     $ 29,448     $ 241,398     $ 932  
 
                                         
 
(1)   Represents interest income recognized on impaired loans subsequent to classification as impaired.

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     The following is a summary of interest foregone on impaired loans for the periods indicated:
                 
    Three Months Ended March 31,  
    2011     2010  
    (In Thousands)  
Interest Income That Would Have Been Recognized Had Impaired Loans Performed in Accordance With Their Original Terms
  $ 4,429     $ 5,569  
Less: Interest Income Recognized on Impaired Loans
    (2,485 )     (2,771 )
 
           
 
               
Interest Foregone on Impaired Loans
  $ 1,944     $ 2,798  
 
           
     During the three months ended March 31, 2011, we restructured monthly payments on 43 loans, with a net carrying value of $46.2 million as of March 31, 2011, through temporary payment structure modification from principal and interest due monthly to interest only due monthly for six months or less. For the restructured loans on accrual status, we determined that, based on the financial capabilities of the borrowers at the time of the loan restructuring and the borrowers’ past performance in the payment of debt service under the previous loan terms, we believe that performance and collection under the revised terms is probable. As of March 31, 2011, troubled debt restructurings on accrual status totaled $43.3 million, all of which were temporary interest rate reductions, and a $7.5 million reserve relating to these loans is included in the allowance for loan losses. Troubled debt restructurings on accrual status are comprised of loans that are contractually current and have sustained repayment ability and performance or well secured and in process of collection. As of December 31, 2010, troubled debt restructured loans on accrual status totaled $47.4 million and a $6.4 million reserve relating to these loans is included in the allowance for loan losses.
Allowance for Loan Losses and Allowance for Off-Balance Sheet Items
     The Bank will charge off a loan and declare a loss when its collectability is sufficiently questionable that the Bank can no longer justify showing the loan as an asset on its balance sheet. To determine if a loan should be charged off, all possible sources of repayment are analyzed, including the potential for future cash flow from income or liquidation of other assets, the value of any collateral, and the strength of co-makers or guarantors. When these sources do not provide a reasonable probability that principal can be collected in full, the Bank will fully or partially charge off the loan.
     Provisions to the allowance for loan losses are made quarterly to recognize probable loan losses. The quarterly provision is based on the allowance need, which is determined through analysis involving quantitative calculations based on historic loss rates for general reserves and individual impairment calculations for specific allocations to impaired loans as well as qualitative adjustments.
     To determine general reserve requirements, existing loans are divided into 10 general loan pools of risk-rated loans (commercial real estate, construction, commercial term — unsecured, commercial term — T/D secured, commercial line of credit, SBA, international, consumer installment, consumer line of credit, and miscellaneous loans) as well as 3 homogenous loan pools (residential mortgage, auto loans, and credit card). For risk-rated loans, migration analysis allocates historical losses by loan pool and risk grade (pass, special mention, substandard, and doubtful) to determine risk factors for potential loss inherent in the current outstanding loan portfolio.
     During the first quarter of 2010, to enhance reserve calculations to better reflect the Bank’s current loss profile, the two loan pools of commercial real estate and commercial term — T/D secured were subdivided according to the 21 collateral codes used by the Bank to identify commercial property types (apartment, auto, car wash, casino, church, condominium, gas station, golf course, industrial, land, manufacturing, medical, mixed used, motel, office, retail, school, supermarket, warehouse, wholesale, and others). This further segregation allows the Bank to more specifically allocate reserves within the commercial real estate portfolio according to risks defined by historic loss as well as current loan concentrations of the different collateral types.
     Risk factor calculations were previously based on 12-quarters of historic loss analysis with 1.5 to 1 weighting given to the most recent six quarters. In the first quarter of 2010, the historic loss window was reduced to eight quarters with 1.5 to 1 weighting given to the most recent four quarters. The enhanced window places greater emphasis on losses taken by the Bank within the past year, as recent loss history is more relevant to the Bank’s risks given the rapid changes to asset quality within the current economic conditions.

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     As homogenous loans are bulk graded, the risk grade is not factored into the historical loss analysis; however, as with risk-rated loans, risk factor calculations are based on 8-quarters of historic loss analysis with 1.5 to 1 weighting given to the most recent four quarters.
     The Bank will charge off a loan and declare a loss when its collectability is sufficiently questionable that the Bank can no longer justify showing the loan as an asset on its balance sheet. To determine if a loan should be charged off, all possible sources of repayment are analyzed, including the potential for future cash flow from income or liquidation of other assets, the value of any collateral, and the strength of co-makers or guarantors. When these sources do not provide a reasonable probability that principal can be collected in full, the Bank will fully or partially charge off the loan.
     For purposes of determining the allowance for credit losses, the loan portfolio is subdivided into three portfolio segments: real estate, commercial and industrial, and consumer. The portfolio segment of real estate contains the allowance loan pools of commercial real estate, construction, and residential mortgage. The portfolio segment of commercial and industrial contains the loan pools of commercial term — unsecured, commercial term — T/D secured, commercial line of credit, SBA, international, and miscellaneous. Lastly, the portfolio segment of Consumer contains the loan pools of consumer installment, consumer line of credit, auto, and credit card.
     Real estate loans, which are mostly dependent on rental income from non-owner occupied or investor properties, have been subject to increased losses. Prior to 2009, no historic losses were recorded for loans secured by commercial real estate. However, given the decrease in sales and increase in vacancies due to the current slowed economy, losses in loans secured by office and retail properties have been significant. Loans secured by vacant land have also had significant losses as valuations have decreased and further development has been limited. Also, commercial term — T/D secured loans, which are mostly owner-occupied property loans, have been subject to decreases in collateral value and have had more losses than prior to the current economic condition. Similarly, construction loans have been subject to losses due to unforeseen difficulties in completion of projects. As such, allocations to general reserves for those loan pools have been higher than that of loan pools with lower risk. Residential mortgage loans constitute a limited concentration within the Bank’s entire loan portfolio, and losses as well as supplementary reserves have been minimal.
     Commercial and industrial loans, which are largely subject to changes in business cash flow, have had the most historic losses within the Bank’s entire loan portfolio. The largest loan pool within the commercial and industrial sector is commercial term — T/D secured, which are mostly loans secured by owner-occupied business properties. Loans secured by car washes, gas stations, golf courses, and motels have had the most significant losses, as the hospitality and recreation industries have been negatively affected by the current economy. As such, allocations to general reserve for those loan pools have been increased. Also, commercial term — unsecured and SBA loans have had considerable losses and additional general reserves as decreased business cash flow due to the challenging economic condition has weakened borrowers’ repayment abilities.
     Consumer loans constitute a limited concentration within the Bank’s loan portfolio and are mostly evaluated in bulk for general reserve requirements due to the relatively small volume per loan.
     Specific reserves are allocated for loans deemed “impaired.” FASB ASC 310, “Receivables,” indicates that a loan is “impaired” when it is probable that a creditor will be unable to collect all amounts due, including principal and interest, according to the contractual terms and schedules of the loan agreement. Loans that represent significant concentrations of credit, material non-performing loans, insider loans and other material credit exposures are subject to FASB ASC 310 impairment analysis.
     Loans that are determined to be impaired under FASB ASC 310, are individually analyzed to estimate the Bank’s exposure to loss based on the following factors: the borrower’s character, the current financial condition of the borrower and the guarantor, the borrower’s resources, the borrower’s payment history, repayment ability, debt servicing ability, action plan, the prevailing value of the underlying collateral, the Bank’s lien position, general economic conditions, specific industry conditions, and outlook for the future.
     The loans identified as impaired are measured using one of the three methods of valuations: (1) the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, (2) the fair market value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent, or (3) the loan’s observable market price.

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     When determining the appropriate level for allowance for loan losses, the management considers qualitative adjustments for any factors that are likely to cause estimated credit losses associated with the Bank’s current portfolio to differ from historical loss experience, including but not limited to:
    changes in lending policies and procedures, including underwriting standards and collection, charge-offs, and recovery practice;
 
    changes in national and local economic and business conditions and developments, including the condition of various market segments;
 
    changes in the nature and volume of the portfolio;
 
    changes in the trend of the volume and severity of past due and classified loans, and trends in the volume of non-accrual loans, troubled debt restructurings, charge-offs and other loan modifications;
 
    changes in the quality of the Bank’s loan review system and the degree of oversight by the Board of Directors;
 
    the existence and effect of any concentrations of credit, and changes in the level of such concentrations;
 
    transfer risk on cross-border lending activities; and
 
    the effect of external factors such as competition and legal and regulatory requirements as well as declining collateral values on the level of estimated credit losses in the Bank’s current portfolio.
     In order to systematically quantify the credit risk impact of trends and changes within the loan portfolio, a credit risk matrix is utilized. The above factors are considered on a loan pool by loan pool basis subsequent to, and in conjunction with, a loss migration analysis. The credit risk matrix provides various scenarios with positive or negative impact on the asset portfolio along with corresponding basis points for qualitative adjustments.
The following table reflects our allocation of allowance for loan and lease losses by loan category as well as the loans receivable for each loan type:
                                 
    March 31, 2011     December 31, 2010  
    Allowance     Loans     Allowance     Loans  
Allowance for Loan Losses Applicable To   Amount     Receivable     Amount     Receivable  
            (Dollars in Thousands)          
Real Estate Loans:
                               
Commercial Property (1)
  $ 21,693     $ 695,357     $ 26,248     $ 729,222  
Construction
    3,454       56,707       5,606       60,995  
Residential Property
    737       60,352       911       62,645  
 
                       
 
                               
Total Real Estate Loans
    25,884       812,416       32,765       852,862  
 
                       
Commercial and Industrial Loans: (1)
    93,878       1,265,507       108,986       1,327,920  
 
                               
Consumer Loans
    1,732       48,120       2,077       50,300  
Unallocated
    4,286             2,231        
 
                       
Total
  $ 125,780     $ 2,126,043     $ 146,059     $ 2,231,072  
 
                       
 
(1)   Excludes Loans held for sale.

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     The following table sets forth certain information regarding our allowance for loan losses and allowance for off-balance sheet items for the periods presented. Allowance for off-balance sheet items is determined by applying reserve factors according to loan pool and grade as well as actual current commitment usage figures by loan type to existing contingent liabilities.
                         
    As of and for the Three Months Ended  
    March 31,     December 31,     March 31,  
    2011     2010     2010  
            (Dollars in Thousands)          
Allowance for Loan Losses:
                       
Balance at Beginning of Period
  $ 146,059     $ 176,063     $ 144,996  
Actual Charge-Offs
    (25,181 )     (37,787 )     (30,114 )
Recoveries on Loans Previously Charged Off
    3,626       2,538       3,721  
 
                 
Net Loan Charge-Offs
    (21,555 )     (35,249 )     (26,393 )
 
                 
Provision Charged to Operating Expenses
    1,276       5,245       59,217  
 
                 
Balance at End of Period
  $ 125,780     $ 146,059     $ 177,820  
 
                 
 
                       
Allowance for Off-Balance Sheet Items:
                       
Balance at Beginning of Period
  $ 3,417     $ 3,662     $ 3,876  
Provision Charged to Operating Expenses
    (1,276 )     (245 )     (1,221 )
 
                 
Balance at End of Period
  $ 2,141     $ 3,417     $ 2,655  
 
                 
 
                       
Ratios:
                       
Net Loan Charge-Offs to Average Total Gross Loans (1)
    3.91 %     5.95 %     3.87 %
Net Loan Charge-Offs to Total Gross Loans (1)
    4.02 %     6.17 %     3.99 %
Allowance for Loan Losses to Average Total Gross Loans
    5.63 %     6.21 %     6.43 %
Allowance for Loan Losses to Total Gross Loans
    5.79 %     6.44 %     6.63 %
Net Loan Charge-Offs to Allowance for Loan Losses (1)
    69.50 %     95.75 %     60.20 %
Net Loan Charge-Offs to Provision Charged to Operating Expenses
    1,689.26 %     672.05 %     44.57 %
Allowance for Loan Losses to Non-Performing Loans
    82.90 %     86.41 %     67.81 %
 
                       
Balances:
                       
Average Total Gross Loans Outstanding During Period
  $ 2,234,570     $ 2,350,425     $ 2,766,965  
Total Gross Loans Outstanding at End of Period
  $ 2,173,692     $ 2,267,692     $ 2,683,853  
Non-Performing Loans at End of Period
  $ 151,730     $ 169,028     $ 262,232  
 
(1)   Net loan charge-offs are annualized to calculate the ratios.
     The allowance for loan losses decreased by $20.3 million, or 13.9 percent, to $125.8 million as of March 31, 2011 as compared to $146.1 million as of December 31, 2010. The allowance for loan losses as a percentage of total gross loans decreased to 5.79 percent as of March 31, 2011 from 6.44 percent as of December 31, 2010. The provision for credit losses decreased by $5.0 million to $0 as of March 31, 2011 from $5.0 million as of December 31, 2010. The $1.3 million provision for loan loans were offset by the $1.3 million reversal in provision for off-balance items, resulting in the $0 total provision for credit losses as of March 31, 2011.
     The decrease in the allowance for loan losses as of March 31, 2011 was due primarily to subsequent decreases in historical loss rates, classified assets, and overall gross loans. Due to these factors, general reserves decreased $23.1 million, or 26.0 percent, to $65.6 million as of March 31, 2011 as compared to $88.7 million at December 31, 2010. In addition, total qualitative reserves decreased $1.2 million, or 4.7 percent, to $24.3 million as of March 31, 2011 as compared to $25.5 million as of December 31, 2010. This was a direct result of the decrease in overall loan volume of $105.0 million, or 4.7 percent, to $2.13 billion at March 31, 2011 as compared to $2.23 billion at December 31, 2010. Improvements in metrics related to credit quality as well as decreases in overall gross loan balances have directly resulted in subsequent decreases in allowance and provision for loan losses as of March 31, 2011.
     Total impaired loans, excluding loans held for sale, decreased $12.2 million, or 6.0 percent, to $192.5 million as of March 31, 2011 as compared to $204.7 million at December 31, 2010. However, specific reserve allocations associated with impaired loans increased $2.1 million, or 7.1 percent, to $31.5 million as of March 31, 2011 as compared to $29.4 million as of December 31, 2010. The increase in impairment reserves was mostly due to more conservative discounts taken by the Bank on out-dated valuations and out-of-state collaterals as a measure of prudence against potential losses.

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     The following table presents a summary of charge-offs by the loan portfolio.
                         
    For the Three Months Ended  
    March 31,     December 31,     March 31,  
    2011     2010     2010  
            (Dollars in Thousands)          
Charge-offs:
                       
Real Estate Loans
  $ 7,053     $ 10,847     $ 5,404  
Commercial Term Loans
    14,348       22,435       20,855  
SBA Loans
    3,154       3,593       2,980  
Commercial Lines of Credit
    451       427       251  
International Loans
          410        
Consumer Loans
    175       75       624  
 
                 
Total Charge-offs
  $ 25,181     $ 37,787     $ 30,114  
 
                       
Recoveries:
                       
Real Estate Loans
  $ 521     $ 98     $ 1,703  
Commercial Term Loans
    2,928       1,823       1,581  
SBA Loans
    110       215       351  
Commercial Lines of Credit
    52       20       44  
International Loans
    6       364       1  
Consumer Loans
    9       18       41  
 
                 
Total Recoveries
  $ 3,626     $ 2,538     $ 3,721  
 
                 
 
                       
Net Charge-offs
  $ 21,555     $ 35,249     $ 26,393  
 
                 
     For the three months ended March 31, 2011, total charge-offs were $25.2 million, compared to $37.8 million for the three months ended December 31, 2010. Charge-offs in commercial term (T/D secured and unsecured) loans decreased $8.1 million to $14.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2011 as compared to $22.4 million for the three months ended December 31, 2010. There was no charge-off for construction loans for the three months ended March 31, 2011 as compared to $4.0 million for the three months ended December 31, 2010. Charge-offs in SBA and international loans decreased $440,000 and $410,000 to $3.2 million and $0, respectively for the three months ended March 31, 2011, compared to $3.6 million and $410,000, respectively, for the three months ended December 31, 2010. However, charge-offs for commercial real estate loans increased slightly by $199,000 to $7.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2011 as compared to $6.9 million for the three months ended December 31, 2010.
     The Bank recorded in other liabilities an allowance for off-balance sheet exposure, primarily unfunded loan commitments, of $2.1 million and $3.4 million as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively. The decrease was primarily due to lower reserve factors based on historical loss rates as well as decreases in total off-balance items. The Bank closely monitors the borrower’s repayment capabilities while funding existing commitments to ensure losses are minimized. Based on management’s evaluation and analysis of portfolio credit quality and prevailing economic conditions, we believe these reserves are adequate for losses inherent in the loan portfolio and off-balance sheet exposure as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010.
Deposits
     The following table shows the composition of deposits by type as of the dates indicated.
                                 
    March 31,     December 31,     Increase (Decrease)  
    2011     2010     Amount     Percentage  
            (Dollars in Thousands)          
Demand — Noninterest-Bearing
  $ 576,733     $ 546,815     $ 29,918       5.5 %
Interest-Bearing:
                               
Savings
    113,513       113,968       (455 )     (0.4 %)
Money Market Checking and NOW Accounts
    469,377       402,481       66,896       16.6 %
Time Deposits of $100,000 or More
    977,738       1,118,621       (140,883 )     (12.6 %)
Other Time Deposits
    293,579       284,836       8,743       3.1 %
 
                       
 
                               
Total Deposits
  $ 2,430,940     $ 2,466,721     $ (35,781 )     (1.5 %)
 
                       
     Total deposits decreased $35.8 million, or 1.5 percent, to $2.43 billion as of March 31, 2011 from $2.47 billion as of December 31, 2010. Total time deposits outstanding decreased $132.1 million, or 9.4 percent, to $1.27 billion as of March 31, 2011 from $1.40 billion as of December 31, 2010, representing 52.3 percent and 56.9 percent respectively, of total deposits. The decreases in total deposits were the direct results of strategic plans aiming to increase core deposits while reducing the reliance on volatile wholesale funds and rate-sensitive time deposits.

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During the quarter ended March 31, 2011, $111.8 million high-cost promotional time deposits and $42.5 million deposits raised from rate listing services matured. Core deposits (defined as demand, savings, money market and NOW) increased by $96.4 million, or 9.1 percent, to $1.16 billion as of March 31, 2011 from $1.06 billion as of December 31, 2010. At March 31, 2011, noninterest-bearing demand deposits represented 23.7 percent of total deposits compared to 22.2 percent at December 31, 2010. We had no brokered deposits as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010. As of March 31, 2011, time deposits of more than $250,000 were $356.4 million.
Federal Home Loan Bank Advances and Other Borrowings
     FHLB advances and other borrowings mostly take the form of advances from the FHLB of San Francisco and overnight federal funds. At March 31, 2011, advances from the FHLB were $153.6 million, a decrease of $85,000, from the December 31, 2010 balance of $153.7 million. As of March 31, 2011, FHLB advances with a remaining maturity of less than one year were $150.0 million, and the weighted-average interest rate thereon was 0.76 percent.
Junior Subordinated Debentures
     During the first half of 2004, we issued two junior subordinated notes bearing interest at the three-month London InterBank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) plus 2.90 percent totaling $61.8 million and one junior subordinated note bearing interest at the three-month LIBOR plus 2.63 percent totaling $20.6 million. The outstanding subordinated debentures related to these offerings, the proceeds of which were used to finance the purchase of Pacific Union Bank, totaled $82.4 million at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010. In October 2008, we committed to the FRB that no interest payments on the junior subordinated debentures would be made without the prior written consent of the FRB. Therefore, in order to preserve its capital position, Hanmi Financial’s Board of Directors has elected to defer quarterly interest payments on its outstanding junior subordinated debentures until further notice, beginning with the interest payment that was due on January 15, 2009. In addition, we are prohibited from making interest payments on our outstanding junior subordinated debentures under the terms of our recently issued regulatory enforcement actions without the prior written consent of the FRB and DFI. Accrued interest payable on junior subordinated debentures amounted to $7.6 million and $6.9 million at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively.

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INTEREST RATE RISK MANAGEMENT
     Interest rate risk indicates our exposure to market interest rate fluctuations. The movement of interest rates directly and inversely affects the economic value of fixed-income assets, which is the present value of future cash flow discounted by the current interest rate; under the same conditions, the higher the current interest rate, the higher the denominator of discounting. Interest rate risk management is intended to decrease or increase the level of our exposure to market interest rates. The level of interest rate risk can be managed through such means as the changing of gap positions and the volume of fixed-income assets. For successful management of interest rate risk, we use various methods to measure existing and future interest rate risk exposures, giving effect to historical attrition rates of core deposits. In addition to regular reports used in business operations, repricing gap analysis, stress testing and simulation modeling are the main measurement techniques used to quantify interest rate risk exposure.
     The following table shows the status of our gap position as of March 31, 2011:
                                                 
            After                          
            Three     After One                    
            Months     Year But                    
    Within     But     Within     After     Non-        
    Three     Within     Five     Five     Interest-        
    Months     One Year     Years     Years     Sensitive     Total  
                    (Dollars in Thousands)                  
ASSETS
                                               
Cash and Due From Banks
  $     $     $     $     $ 67,507     $ 67,507  
Interest-Bearing Deposits in Other Banks
    101,618       1,236                         102,854  
Investment Securities:
                                               
Fixed Rate
    12,499       39,274       237,875       143,021       4,876       437,545  
Floating Rate
    8,787       51,012       36,022       6,333       (505 )     101,649  
Loans:
                                               
Fixed Rate
    109,890       172,039       404,814       10,123             696,866  
Floating Rate
    1,250,062       46,781       29,674       1,257             1,327,774  
Non-Accrual
                            151,730       151,730  
Deferred Loan Fees, Discounts, and Allowance for Loan Losses
                            (128,735 )     (128,735 )
Investment in Federal Home Loan Bank Stock and Federal Reserve Bank Stock
                      33,649