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EX-32.2 - EX-32.2 - TransMontaigne Partners LLCtlp-20201231ex32261a21c.htm
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EX-31.2 - EX-31.2 - TransMontaigne Partners LLCtlp-20201231ex312efccd0.htm
EX-31.1 - EX-31.1 - TransMontaigne Partners LLCtlp-20201231ex311a32489.htm
EX-21.1 - EX-21.1 - TransMontaigne Partners LLCtlp-20201231ex21189fcd0.htm

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549


FORM 10-K

(Mark One)

Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020

OR

Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the transition period to

Commission File Number 001-32505


TRANSMONTAIGNE PARTNERS LLC

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

34-2037221
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

Suite 3100, 1670 Broadway

Denver, Colorado 80202

(Address, including zip code, of principal executive offices)

(303) 626-8200

(Telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: NONE

Title of Each Class

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: NONE


Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes  No 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes  No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes  No 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act) Yes  No 

The aggregate market value of common units held by non-affiliates of the registrant on June 30, 2020 was $nil.

As of the date of this filing, the registrant has no common units outstanding.

* The registrant is a voluntary filer of reports required to be filed by certain companies under Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and has filed all reports that would have been required to have been filed by the registrant during the preceding 12 months had it been subject to such filing requirements during the entirety of such period.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

None.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Item

    

    

    

Page No.

 

Part I

1 and 2.

Business and Properties

1A.

Risk Factors

20 

1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

31 

3.

Legal Proceedings

31 

4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

31 

Part II

5.

Market for the Registrant’s Common Units, Related Unitholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

31 

6.

Selected Financial Data

32 

7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

33 

7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risks

47 

8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

48 

9.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

77 

9A.

Controls and Procedures

77 

9B.

Other Information

78 

Part III

10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

78 

11.

Executive Compensation

80 

12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Unitholder Matters

82 

13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

82 

14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

83 

Part IV

15.

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

84 

 

16.

Form 10-K Summary

104 

 

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CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (this “Annual Report”) contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of federal securities laws. Forward-looking statements give our current expectations, contain projections of results of operations or of financial condition, or forecasts of future events. When used in this Annual Report, the words “could,” “may,” “should,” “will,” “seek,” “believe,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “continue,” “estimate,” “plan,” “target,” “predict,” “project,” “attempt,” “is scheduled,” “likely,” “forecast,” the negatives thereof and other similar expressions are used to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain such identifying words. These forward-looking statements are based on our current expectations and assumptions about future events and are based on currently available information as to the outcome and timing of future events. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements. When considering forward-looking statements, you should keep in mind the risk factors and other cautionary statements described under the heading “Item 1A. Risk Factors” included in this Annual Report. You should also understand that it is not possible to predict or identify all such factors and should not consider the following list to be a complete statement of all potential risks and uncertainties. Factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from the results contemplated by such forward-looking statements include:

our ability to successfully implement our business strategy;
competitive conditions in our industry;
actions taken by third-party customers, producers, operators, processors and transporters;
pending legal or environmental matters;
costs of conducting our operations;
our ability to complete internal growth projects on time and on budget;
general economic conditions;
the price of oil, natural gas, natural gas liquids and other commodities in the energy industry;
the price and availability of financing;
large customer defaults;
interest rates;
operating hazards, global health epidemics, natural disasters, weather-related delays, casualty losses and other matters beyond our control;
uncertainty regarding our future operating results;
effects of existing and future laws and governmental regulations;
the effects of future litigation;
plans, objectives, expectations and intentions contained in this Annual Report that are not historical; and
the ongoing pandemic involving COVID-19.

All forward-looking statements, expressed or implied, included in this Annual Report are expressly qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement. This cautionary statement should also be considered in connection with any subsequent written or oral forward-looking statements that we or persons acting on our behalf may issue.

Except as otherwise required by applicable law, we disclaim any duty to update any forward-looking statements, all of which are expressly qualified by the statements in this section, to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this Annual Report.

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Part I

As used in this Annual Report, unless the context requires otherwise, references to “we,” “us,” “our,” “TransMontaigne Partners,” “the Partnership,” or “the Company” are intended to mean, prior to the Take-Private Transaction (defined below), TransMontaigne Partners L.P., and following the Take-Private Transaction, TransMontaigne Partners LLC, and our wholly owned and controlled operating subsidiaries. References to ‘‘TransMontaigne GP’’ or ‘‘our general partner’’ are intended, prior to the Take-Private Transaction, to mean TransMontaigne GP L.L.C., our general partner prior to the Take-Private Transaction. References to ‘‘ArcLight’’ are intended to mean ArcLight Energy Partners Fund VI, L.P., its affiliates and subsidiaries other than TransMontaigne GP, us and our subsidiaries.

ITEMS 1 AND 2. BUSINESS AND PROPERTIES

On February 26, 2019, an affiliate of ArcLight completed its previously announced acquisition of all of the Partnership’s outstanding publicly traded common units not already held by ArcLight and its affiliates by way of our merger (the “Merger”) with a wholly owned subsidiary of TLP Finance Holdings, LLC (“TLP Finance”), an indirect controlled subsidiary of Arclight. At the effective time of the Merger, each of the Partnership’s general partner units issued and outstanding immediately prior to the acquisition effective time was converted into (i)(a) one Partnership common unit, and (i)(b) in aggregate, a non-economic general partner interest in the Partnership, (ii) each of the Partnership’s incentive distribution rights issued and outstanding immediately prior to the acquisition effective time was converted into 100 Partnership common units, (iii) our general partner distributed its common units in the Partnership (the “Transferred GP Units”) to TLP Acquisition Holdings, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“TLP Holdings”), and TLP Holdings contributed the Transferred GP Units to TLP Finance, (iv) the Partnership converted into the Company (a Delaware limited liability company) pursuant to Section 17-219 of the Delaware Limited Partnership Act and changed its name to “TransMontaigne Partners LLC”, and all of our common units owned by TLP Finance were converted into limited liability company interests, (v) the non-economic interest in the Company owned by our general partner was automatically cancelled and ceased to exist and our general partner merged with and into the Company with the Company surviving, and (vi) the Company became 100% owned by TLP Finance (the transactions described in the foregoing clauses (i) through (vi), collectively with the Merger, the “Take-Private Transaction”).

As a result of the Take-Private Transaction, our common units ceased to be publicly traded, and our common units are no longer listed on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”). Our currently outstanding 6.125% senior unsecured notes due in 2026 remain outstanding, and the Company is voluntarily filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to the covenants contained in those notes.

Effective June 1, 2019, TLP Finance contributed all of the issued and outstanding equity of its wholly-owned subsidiary, TLP Management Services LLC (“TMS” and such interest, the “TMS Interest”) to the Company, and the Company immediately contributed the TMS Interest to its 100% owned operating company subsidiary TransMontaigne Operating Company L.P. (the “TMS Contribution”). Prior to the TMS Contribution, we had no employees and all of our management and operational activities were provided by TMS. Further, TMS provided all payroll programs and maintained all employee benefits programs on behalf of our company with respect to applicable TMS employees (as well as on behalf of certain other Arclight affiliates). As a result of the TMS Contribution, we have assumed the employees and operational activities previously provided by TMS, except for our executive officers as further described below. The TMS Contribution has been recorded at carryover basis as a reorganization of entities under common control. As such, prior periods include the assets, liabilities, and results of operations of TMS for all periods presented.

As a result of the TMS Contribution, the omnibus agreement in place in various forms since the inception of the Partnership, and immediately prior to the TMS Contribution between TMS and us, which, among other things, governed the provision of management and operational services provided for us by TMS, is no longer relevant and was terminated.

Following the TMS Contribution, our executive officers who provide services to the Company are employed by TransMontaigne Management Company, LLC (“TMC”), a wholly owned subsidiary of ArcLight, which also provides services to certain other ArcLight affiliates. As a result, we do not directly employ any of the persons responsible for the

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executive management of our business. Nonetheless, TMS continues to provide certain payroll functions and maintains all employee benefits programs on behalf of TMC pursuant to a services agreement between TMC and TMS.

Overview

We are a terminaling and transportation company with assets and operations in the United States along the Gulf Coast, in the Midwest, in Houston and Brownsville, Texas, along the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, in the Southeast and along the West Coast. We provide integrated terminaling, storage, transportation and related services for customers engaged in the distribution and marketing of light refined petroleum products, heavy refined petroleum products, renewable products, crude oil, chemicals, fertilizers and other liquid products. Light refined products include gasolines, diesel fuels, heating oil and jet fuels. Heavy refined products include residual fuel oils and asphalt. Renewable products include ethanol, biodiesel, renewable diesel and relevant feedstocks. We do not purchase or market products that we handle or transport. Therefore, we do not have direct exposure to changes in commodity prices, except for the value of product gains and losses arising from terminaling services agreements with certain customers, which accounts for a small portion of our revenue.

We use our owned and operated terminaling facilities to, among other things: receive refined products and renewable products from the pipeline, ship, barge or railcar making delivery on behalf of our customers and transfer those products to the tanks located at our terminals; store the products in our tanks for our customers; monitor the volume of the products stored in our tanks; distribute the products out of our terminals in vessels, railcars or truckloads using truck racks and other distribution equipment located at our terminals, including pipelines; and heat residual fuel oils and asphalt stored in our tanks. We also continue to provide ethanol logistics services and other services to the growing renewable products market, as well as to engage in blending activities related to the throughput process.

Recent Developments

COVID-19. The ongoing pandemic involving COVID-19, a highly transmissible and pathogenic coronavirus, has resulted in restrictions on, and a public response with respect to, travel and economic activity that have reduced demand and pricing for crude oil, refined petroleum products, renewable products, and other products that we handle. The reduction in commodity price in 2020 and demand for products that we handle has, for the time being, resulted in a strong demand for storage capacity. For example, in late March 2020, we contracted approximately 1,000,000 barrels of capacity at our Cushing, Oklahoma terminal and approximately 705,000 barrels of available capacity at our Collins, Mississippi terminal that had recently become available. Currently, approximately 83% of our terminaling services revenue is derived from firm commitments pursuant to our multi-year agreements that require our customers to make minimum payments based on minimum volumes of throughput of the customer’s product or the volume of storage capacity available to the customer under the agreement. Further, the majority of our terminaling services agreements have a remaining term in excess of one year. As a result, we expect the negative impacts to our business to continue to be primarily limited to delays in our capital expansion projects, which may be occurring, in part, due to state and local government responses to COVID-19.

We have taken proactive and sustained measures to deliver our services safely and reliably during the COVID-19 pandemic. At the outset of the pandemic, we activated an Incident Support Team to execute our Infectious Disease Control Policy, and to focus on a number of priorities, including: (i) implement basic infection prevention techniques and other workplace protections in our business operations; (ii) identify and isolate individuals suspected of being infected by COVID-19; (iii) identify risk factors in our workforce that may increase the possibility of exposure to COVID-19; and (iv) develop a contingency plan for the possibility that a serious outbreak does occur in the area of any of our terminals. We are following recommendations from public health authorities and have taken steps to help prevent our employees’ exposure to the spread of COVID-19, including, where practical, work-at-home plans enacted in March 2020 and the implementation of business continuity plans to enable the integrity of our operations and protect the health of our employees.

To date, our operations and employees have not been materially impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, including the recent rise in caseload in the majority of the country; thereby allowing our customers continued access and utilization of our strategic terminal network. We continue to employ all safety processes and procedures in the normal

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course. We provide an essential service across our markets, which has been recognized in most relevant regulatory guidance regarding COVID-19. Further, we have not experienced any material instance of our customers failing to meet their contractual commitments to us as a result of these recent developments. There continue to be too many variables and uncertainties regarding COVID-19 — including the continued spread of the virus, the duration and severity of the

outbreak and the extent of travel restrictions and business closures, and medical advancements in treating and vaccinating against the disease and the availability and the resulting economic impact of any such advancements or vaccinations — to reasonably predict the potential longer-term impact of COVID-19 on our business and operations. We continue to monitor the situation, have actively implemented policies and practices to address the situation and actively protect our employees, and may adjust our current policies and practices as more information and guidance become available.

Expansion of Assets

Expansion of our Brownsville operations.  Our Brownsville expansion project, which is underpinned by new long-term agreements, includes the construction of approximately 805,000 barrels of additional liquids storage capacity, the construction of gasoline railcar loading capabilities and the conversion of our Diamondback pipeline to transport diesel and gasoline across the U.S./Mexico border. The Diamondback pipeline is comprised of an 8” pipeline that previously transported propane, as well as a 6” pipeline, which runs parallel to the 8” pipeline, that has been idle and both can be used to transport refined products to Matamoros, Mexico. The majority of the additional liquids storage capacity was placed into commercial service during the first three quarters of 2019 with a remaining 175,000 barrels of capacity to be completed in the first quarter of 2021. We expect to recommission the Diamondback pipeline and resume operations on both the 8” pipeline and the previously idle 6” pipeline in the second quarter of 2021. We expect the construction of the gasoline railcar loading capabilities to be completed in the first quarter 2021. The anticipated aggregate cost of these expansion efforts is estimated to be approximately $75 million.

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Assets and Operations

Our terminals are located in six geographic regions, which we refer to as our Gulf Coast, Midwest, Brownsville, River, Southeast and West Coast terminals. In addition, we have unconsolidated investments in Frontera and BOSTCO (each defined below). The locations and approximate aggregate active storage capacity at our owned and joint venture terminal facilities as of December 31, 2020 are as follows:

    

Active storage

 

capacity (1)

 

(shell bbls)

 

Our Terminals by Region:

Gulf Coast Terminals:

Port Everglades North (Fort Lauderdale), FL

 

2,487,000

Port Everglades South (Fort Lauderdale), FL (2)

 

376,000

Jacksonville, FL

 

271,000

Cape Canaveral, FL

 

724,000

Port Manatee, FL

 

1,293,000

Pensacola, FL

 

270,000

Fisher Island (Miami), FL

 

673,000

Tampa, FL

 

760,000

Gulf Coast Total

 

6,854,000

Midwest Terminals:

Rogers, AR and Mount Vernon, MO (aggregate amounts)

 

419,000

Cushing, OK

 

1,005,000

Oklahoma City, OK

 

158,000

Midwest Total

 

1,582,000

Brownsville Terminal

 

1,471,000

River Terminals:

Evansville, IN

 

245,000

New Albany, IN

 

201,000

Greater Cincinnati, KY

 

199,000

Henderson, KY

 

170,000

Louisville, KY

 

183,000

Owensboro, KY

 

154,000

Paducah, KY

 

322,000

Baton Rouge, LA (Dock)

 

Greenville, MS

 

406,000

Cape Girardeau, MO

 

140,000

East Liverpool, OH

 

228,000

River Total

 

2,248,000

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Active storage

capacity (1)

(shell bbls)

Southeast Terminals:

Albany, GA

 

203,000

Americus, GA

 

98,000

Athens, GA

 

203,000

Bainbridge, GA

 

367,000

Birmingham, AL

 

178,000

Charlotte, NC

 

121,000

Collins/Purvis, MS (Collins terminal)

 

6,280,000

Collins, MS (Collins rack)

 

200,000

Doraville, GA

 

438,000

Fairfax, VA

 

507,000

Greensboro, NC

 

479,000

Griffin, GA

 

107,000

Lookout Mountain, GA

 

219,000

Macon, GA

 

174,000

Meridian, MS

 

139,000

Norfolk, VA

 

1,336,000

Richmond, VA

 

448,000

Rome, GA

 

152,000

Selma, NC

 

529,000

Spartanburg, SC

 

166,000

Southeast Total

 

12,344,000

West Coast Terminals:

Martinez, CA

4,754,000

Richmond, CA

642,000

West Coast Total

 

5,396,000

Our Joint Ventures Terminals:

Frontera Joint Venture Terminal (3)

 

1,656,000

BOSTCO Joint Venture Terminal (4)

 

7,080,000

TOTAL CAPACITY

 

38,631,000


(1)Active storage capacity includes terminals which do not need capital investment to contract available storage capacity.
(2)Reflects our ownership interest net of a major oil company’s ownership interest in certain tank capacity.
(3)Reflects the total active storage capacity of Frontera Brownsville LLC (“Frontera”), of which we have a 50% ownership interest.
(4)Reflects the total active storage capacity of Battleground Oil Specialty Terminal Company LLC (“BOSTCO”), of which we have a 42.5%, general voting, Class A Member interest.

Gulf Coast Operations. Our Gulf Coast terminals consist of eight active product terminals and comprise the largest terminal network in Florida. These terminals have approximately 6.9 million barrels of aggregate active storage capacity in ports including Port Everglades, Miami and Cape Canaveral, which are among the busiest cruise ship ports in the nation. At our Gulf Coast terminals, we handle refined and renewable products and crude oil on behalf of, and provide integrated terminaling services to, customers engaged in the distribution and marketing of products and crude oil. Our Gulf Coast terminals receive products from vessels on behalf of our customers. In addition, our Jacksonville terminal also receives asphalt by rail, and our Port Everglades (North) terminal also receives product by truck. We distribute by truck or barge at all of our Gulf Coast terminals. In addition, we distribute products by pipeline at our Port Everglades and Tampa terminals. A major oil company retains an ownership interest, ranging from 25% to 50%, in specific tank capacity at our Port Everglades (South) terminal. We manage and operate the Port Everglades (South)

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terminal, and we are reimbursed by the major oil company for its proportionate share of our operating and maintenance costs.

Midwest Terminals. In Missouri and Arkansas, we own and operate the Razorback pipeline and terminals in Mount Vernon, Missouri, at the origin of the pipeline and in Rogers, Arkansas, at the terminus of the pipeline. We refer to these two terminals collectively as the Razorback terminals. The Razorback pipeline is a 67-mile, 8-inch diameter interstate common carrier pipeline that transports light refined product from our terminal at Mount Vernon, where it is interconnected with a pipeline system owned by a third party, to our terminal at Rogers. The Razorback pipeline has a capacity of approximately 30,000 barrels per day. The Razorback terminals have approximately 0.4 million barrels of aggregate active storage capacity. Effective January 1, 2021, a third party leases the capacity, and will take operatorship, of the Razorback pipeline and the terminals in Mount Vernon, Missouri and in Rogers, Arkansas. Our Rogers facility is the only products terminal located in Northwest Arkansas.

We lease land in Cushing, Oklahoma and constructed storage tanks and associated infrastructure on the property for the receipt of crude oil by truck and pipeline, the blending of crude oil and the storage of approximately 1.0 million barrels of crude oil.

We also own and operate a terminal facility in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma with approximately 0.2 million barrels of aggregate active storage capacity. Our Oklahoma City terminal receives gasolines and diesel fuels from a pipeline system owned by a third party for delivery via our truck rack for redistribution to locations throughout the Oklahoma City region.

Brownsville, Texas Operations. We own and operate a product terminal with approximately 1.5 million barrels of aggregate active storage capacity and related ancillary facilities in Brownsville independent of the Frontera joint venture, as well as the Diamondback pipeline which handles liquid product movements between south Texas and Mexico. At our Brownsville terminal we handle refined petroleum products, chemicals, vegetable oils, naphtha, wax and propane on behalf of, and provide integrated terminaling services to, customers engaged in the distribution and marketing of products and natural gas liquids. Our Brownsville facilities receive products on behalf of our customers from vessels, by truck or railcar.

The Diamondback pipeline consists of an 8” pipeline that previously transported propane approximately 16 miles from our Brownsville facilities to the U.S./Mexico border and a 6” pipeline, which runs parallel to the 8” pipeline that can be used by us in the future to transport additional refined products to Matamoros, Mexico. Operations on the Diamondback pipeline were shut down in the first quarter of 2018; however, we expect to recommission the Diamondback Pipeline and resume operations on both the 8” pipeline, providing gasoline service thereon, and the previously idle 6” pipeline, providing diesel service thereon, in the second quarter 2021, and have previously filed revised tariffs with the FERC to support such activities.

River Operations. Our River terminals are composed of 11 active product terminals located along the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers with approximately 2.2 million barrels of aggregate active storage capacity. Our River operations also include a dock facility in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, which is the only direct waterborne connection between the Colonial pipeline and Mississippi River waterborne transportation. At our River terminals, we handle gasolines, diesel fuels, heating oil, chemicals and fertilizers on behalf of, and provide integrated terminaling services to, customers engaged in the distribution and marketing of products and industrial and commercial end-users. Our River terminals receive products from vessels and barges on behalf of our customers and distribute products primarily to trucks and barges.

Southeast Operations. Our Southeast terminals consist of 20 active product terminals located along the Colonial and Plantation pipelines in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia with an aggregate active storage capacity of approximately 12.3 million barrels. At our Southeast terminals, we handle gasolines, diesel fuels, ethanol, biodiesel, jet fuel and heating oil on behalf of, and provide integrated terminaling services to, customers engaged in the distribution and marketing of refined products. Our Southeast terminals primarily receive products from the Plantation and Colonial pipelines on behalf of our customers and distribute products primarily to

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trucks with the exception of the Collins terminal. The Collins terminal is the only independent terminal capable of storing and redelivering product to, from and between the Colonial and Plantation pipelines.

West Coast Operations. Our West Coast terminals consist of two active product terminals with approximately 5.4 million barrels of aggregate active storage capacity. The terminals are well positioned with pipeline connections to three of the five local refineries and marine access to all five in the San Francisco Bay area and direct connection to the Northern California products pipeline distribution system. At our West Coast terminals, we handle crude oil, gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, gasoline blend stocks, fuel oil, Avgas and ethanol and other renewable products on behalf of, and provide integrated terminaling services to, customers engaged in the distribution and marketing of products. Our West Coast terminals primarily receive products from vessels, pipeline and rail facilities on behalf of our customers and distribute products primarily via vessel, pipeline, truck and rail facilities.

Investment in Frontera. On April 1, 2011, we contributed approximately 1.5 million barrels of light petroleum product storage capacity, as well as related ancillary facilities, to the Frontera joint venture, in exchange for a cash payment of approximately $25.6 million and a 50% ownership interest in the Frontera joint venture. An affiliate of PEMEX, Mexico’s state owned petroleum company, acquired the remaining 50% ownership interest in Frontera for a cash payment of approximately $25.6 million. We operate the Frontera assets under an operations and reimbursement agreement between us and Frontera. Frontera has approximately 1.7 million barrels of aggregate active storage capacity. Our 50% ownership interest does not allow us to control Frontera, but does allow us to exercise significant influence over its operations. Accordingly, we account for our investment in Frontera under the equity method of accounting.

Investment in BOSTCO. On December 20, 2012, we acquired a 42.5% Class A ownership interest in BOSTCO from Kinder Morgan Battleground Oil, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Kinder Morgan. BOSTCO is a terminal facility on the Houston Ship Channel designed to handle residual fuel, feedstocks, distillates and other black oils. BOSTCO currently has fully subscribed capacity of approximately 7.1 million barrels. Our investment in BOSTCO entitles us to appoint a member to the Board of Managers of BOSTCO, to vote our proportionate ownership share on general governance matters and to certain rights of approval over significant changes in, or expansion of, BOSTCO’s business. Kinder Morgan is responsible for managing BOSTCO’s day-to-day operations. Our 42.5% Class A ownership interest does not allow us to control BOSTCO, but does allow us to exercise significant influence over its operations. Accordingly, we account for our investment in BOSTCO under the equity method of accounting.

Our Services and Revenue Streams

We derive revenue from our terminal and pipeline transportation operations by charging fees for providing integrated terminaling, transportation and related services. The fees we charge and our other sources of revenue are composed of:

Terminaling services fees. Our terminaling services agreements are structured as either throughput agreements or storage agreements. Our throughput agreements contain provisions that require our customers to make minimum payments, which are based on contractually established minimum volume of throughput of the customer’s product at our facilities over a stipulated period of time. Due to this minimum payment arrangement, we recognize a fixed amount of revenue from the customer over a certain period of time, even if the customer throughputs less than the minimum volume of product during that period. In addition, if a customer throughputs a volume of product exceeding the minimum volume, we would recognize additional revenue on this incremental volume. Our storage agreements require our customers to make minimum payments based on the volume of storage capacity available to the customer under the agreement, which results in a fixed amount of recognized revenue. We refer to the fixed amount of revenue recognized pursuant to our terminaling services agreements as being “firm commitments.” Revenue recognized in excess of firm commitments and revenue recognized based solely on the volume of product distributed or injected are referred to as “ancillary.” In addition, ancillary revenue also includes fees received from ancillary services including heating and mixing of stored products, product transfer, railcar handling, butane blending, proceeds from the sale of product gains, wharfage and vapor recovery.

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Pipeline transportation fees. We earned pipeline transportation fees at our Diamondback pipeline under a capacity reservation agreement. Revenue associated with the capacity reservation agreement is recognized ratably over the respective term, regardless of whether the capacity is actually utilized. Once our Brownsville terminal expansion efforts are complete, including the conversion of our Diamondback pipeline to transport diesel and gasoline, we then expect to earn pipeline transportation fees at our Diamondback pipeline based on the volume of product transported subject to minimum volume commitments. We earn pipeline transportation fees at our Razorback pipeline based on an allocation of the aggregate fees charged under the capacity agreement with our customer who has contracted for 100% of our Razorback system.
Management fees. We manage and operate certain tank capacity at our Port Everglades South terminal for a major oil company and receive a reimbursement of its proportionate share of operating and maintenance costs. We manage and operate the Frontera joint venture and receive a management fee based on our costs incurred. We lease land under operating leases as the lessor or sublessor with third parties and affiliates. We also managed and operated for an affiliate of PEMEX, Mexico’s state-owned petroleum company, a products pipeline connected to our Brownsville terminal facility and received a management fee through August 23, 2018. We manage and operate rail sites at certain Southeast terminals on behalf of a major oil company and receive reimbursement for operating and maintenance costs. We manage and operate terminals that are owned by affiliates of ArcLight, including for SeaPort Midstream Partners, LLC in Seattle, Washington and Portland, Oregon and another terminal for SeaPort Sound Terminal, LLC (“SeaPort Sound”) in Tacoma, Washington and receive a management fee based on our costs incurred. We also manage additional terminal facilities that are owned by affiliates of ArcLight, including Lucknow-Highspire Terminals, LLC, which operates terminals throughout Pennsylvania encompassing approximately 9.9 million barrels of storage capacity, and prior to July 1, 2019, a terminal in Baltimore, Maryland for Pike Baltimore Terminals, LLC (the “Baltimore Terminal”), and receive a management fee based on our costs incurred. Our management of the Baltimore Terminal ended on July 1, 2019.

Further detail regarding our financial information can be found under Item 8. “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report.

Business Strategies

Generate stable cash flows through the use of long-term contracts with our customers. We intend to continue to generate stable and predictable cash flows by capitalizing on our high quality, well positioned and geographically diverse asset base, which is critical infrastructure for our customers. In addition, we seek to continue to enhance the stability of our business by focusing on our highly contracted assets, long-term relationships with high quality customers, fee-based cash flows and multi-year minimum revenue commitments. We generate revenue from customers who pay us fees based on the volume of terminal capacity contracted for, volume of products throughput at our terminals or volume of products transported in our pipelines.

Attract additional volumes and products to our systems. We intend to attract new volumes of refined products, crude oil, renewable products, and specialty chemicals to our systems and terminals from existing and new customers by leveraging our asset base, continuing to provide superior customer service and through aggressively marketing our services to additional customers in our areas of operation. We have available capacity at certain terminal locations and our terminal facilities that have traditionally handled refined products are also well-positioned to service other products, including renewable products; as a result, we can accommodate additional volumes and varying products at a minimal incremental cost.

Capitalize on organic growth opportunities associated with our existing assets. We continually seek to identify and evaluate economically attractive organic expansion and asset enhancement opportunities that leverage our existing asset footprint and strategic relationships with our customers. We intend to focus on projects that can be completed at a relatively low cost, that have potential for attractive returns, and that are responsive to changes in customer demand, including as it may relate to an increased demand for renewable products storage capacity and terminaling services. For example at our Collins terminal, we implemented the design and construction of 870,000

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barrels of new refined and renewable products storage capacity supported by the execution of a new long-term, fee-based terminaling services agreement with a third party customer, which constituted the beginning of a Phase II expansion. During the first quarter of 2019, 870,000 barrels were placed into service. To facilitate our further expansion of tankage at Collins, we also entered into an agreement with Colonial Pipeline Company for significant improvements to the Colonial Pipeline receipt and delivery manifolds and our related receipt and delivery facilities. The improvements will result in significant increased flexibility for our Collins customers including the simultaneous receipt and delivery of gasoline from and to Colonial’s Line 1 at full line rates including the ability to receive and deliver segregated batches at these rates; a dedicated and segregated line for the receipt and delivery of distillates from and to Colonial’s Line 2; and a dedicated and segregated line for the receipt and delivery of jet fuel from and to Colonial’s Line 2. The improvements were completed in the fourth quarter of 2019. The cost of the approximately 870,000 barrels of new storage capacity and our share of the improvements to the pipeline connections was approximately $60 million, with expected annual cash returns in the low-teens.

In addition, our Brownsville expansion project, which is underpinned by new long-term agreements, includes the construction of approximately 805,000 barrels of additional refined and renewable products storage capacity, the construction of gasoline railcar loading capabilities and the conversion of our Diamondback pipeline to transport diesel and gasoline to the U.S./Mexico border. The Diamondback pipeline is comprised of an 8” pipeline that previously transported propane approximately 16 miles from our Brownsville facilities to the U.S./Mexico border, as well as a 6” pipeline, which runs parallel to the 8” pipeline, that has been idle and can be used to transport additional refined products. The majority of the additional storage capacity was placed into commercial service during the first three quarters of 2019 with a remaining 175,000 barrels of capacity to be completed in the first quarter 2021. We expect to recommission the Diamondback pipeline and resume operations on both the 8” pipeline and the previously idle 6” pipeline in the second quarter 2021. We expect the construction of the gasoline railcar loading capabilities to be completed in the first quarter 2021. The anticipated aggregate cost of these expansion efforts is estimated to be approximately $75 million.

Pursue strategic and accretive acquisitions. We plan to pursue accretive acquisitions of high quality, critical energy infrastructure assets that are complementary to our existing asset base or that provide attractive returns in new operating regions or business lines. We will pursue acquisitions in our areas of operation that we believe will allow us to realize operational efficiencies by capitalizing on our existing infrastructure, personnel and customer relationships. We will also seek acquisitions in new geographic areas or new but related business lines to the extent that we believe we can utilize our operational expertise to enhance our business with these acquisitions.

Maintain a disciplined financial policy. We will continue to pursue a disciplined financial policy by maintaining a prudent capital structure, managing our exposure to interest rate risk and conservatively managing our cash reserves. We believe this conservative capital structure will allow us to consider attractive growth projects and acquisitions even in challenging commodity price or capital market environments.

Competitive Conditions

We face competition from other terminals and pipelines that may be able to supply our customers with integrated terminaling and transportation services on a more competitive basis. We compete with national, regional and local terminal and transportation companies, including the major integrated oil companies, of widely varying sizes, financial resources and levels of experience. These competitors include BP p.l.c., Buckeye Partners, L.P., Chevron U.S.A. Inc., CITGO Petroleum Corporation, Exxon Mobil Oil Corporation, HollyFrontier Corporation and its affiliate Holly Energy Partners, L.P., Kinder Morgan, Inc., Magellan Midstream Partners, L.P., Marathon Petroleum Corporation and its affiliate MPLX LP, Motiva Enterprises LLC, Murphy Oil Corporation, NuStar Energy L.P., Phillips 66 and its affiliate Phillips 66 Partners LP, Sunoco, Inc. and its affiliate Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P., and terminals in the Caribbean. In particular, our ability to compete could be harmed by factors we cannot control, including:

price competition from terminal and transportation companies, some of which are substantially larger than we are and have greater financial resources, and control substantially greater storage capacity, than we do;
the perception that another company can provide better service; and

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the availability of alternative supply points, or supply points located closer to our customers’ operations.

We also compete with national, regional and local terminal and transportation companies for acquisition and expansion opportunities. Some of these competitors are substantially larger than us and have greater financial resources and lower costs of capital than we do.

Significant Customer Relationships

We generate revenue from our terminal and pipeline transportation operations by charging fees for providing integrated terminaling, transportation and related services. We have several significant customer relationships that made up approximately 79% of the total revenue for the year ended December 31, 2020. These relationships include Pilot Flying J, Freepoint Commodities LLC, RaceTrac Petroleum Inc., Atlantic Trading and Marketing, Tesoro, Musket Corporation, BP, Associated Asphalt, Magellan Pipeline Company, L.P., United States Government, Valero Marketing and Supply Company, PMI Trading Ltd., Exxon Mobil Oil Corporation, World Fuel Services Corporation, Chevron Corporation, Shell, Marathon Petroleum, Gunvor and Vitol.

Terminals and Pipeline Control Operations

The pipelines we own or operate are operated via wireless, radio and frame relay communication systems from a central control room located in Atlanta, Georgia. We also monitor activity at our terminals from this control room.

The control center operates with Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition, or SCADA, systems. Our control center is equipped with computer systems designed to continuously monitor operational data, including product throughput, flow rates and pressures. In addition, the control center monitors alarms and throughput balances. The control center operates remote pumps, motors and valves associated with the receipt of refined products. The computer systems are designed to enhance leak-detection capabilities, sound automatic alarms if operational conditions outside of pre-established parameters occur and provide for remote-controlled shutdown of pump stations on the pipeline. Pump stations and meter-measurement points on the pipeline are linked by high speed communication systems for remote monitoring and control. In addition, our Collins terminal contains full back-up/redundant disaster recovery systems covering all of our SCADA systems.

Government Regulation and Environmental Matters

Our business is subject to a myriad of federal, state, and local laws and regulations, including relating to protection of the environment. We are committed to complying with these laws and regulations. To date, such compliance has not had a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations, liquidity, or competitive position.

Regulation. We are subject to regulation by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) under the Pipeline Inspection, Protection, Enforcement and Safety Act of 2006, or PIPES, and comparable state statutes relating to the design, installation, testing, construction, operation, replacement and management of the pipeline facilities we operate or own. PIPES covers petroleum and petroleum products pipelines and requires any entity that owns or operates such pipeline facilities to comply with certain regulations, to permit access to and copying of records, and to make certain reports and provide information as required by the Secretary of Transportation. We believe that we are in material compliance with PIPES and the regulations promulgated thereunder.

The DOT Office of Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, or PHMSA, has promulgated regulations that require qualification of pipeline personnel. These regulations require pipeline operators to develop and maintain a written qualification program for individuals performing covered tasks on pipeline facilities. The intent of these regulations is to ensure a qualified work force and to reduce the probability and consequence of incidents caused by human error. The regulations establish qualification requirements for individuals performing covered tasks, and amend certain training requirements in existing regulations. We believe that we are in material compliance with these PHMSA regulations.

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We also are subject to PHMSA regulations applicable to High Consequence Areas, or HCAs, for Category 2 pipeline systems (companies operating less than 500 miles of jurisdictional pipeline). These regulations specify how to assess, evaluate, repair and validate the integrity of pipeline segments that could impact populated areas, areas unusually sensitive to environmental damage and commercially navigable waterways, in the event of a release. The pipelines we own or manage are subject to these requirements. The regulations require an integrity management program that utilizes internal pipeline inspection, pressure testing, or other equally effective means to assess the integrity of pipeline segments in HCAs. The program requires periodic review of pipeline segments in HCAs to ensure adequate preventative and mitigating measures exist. Through this program, we evaluated a range of threats to each pipeline segment’s integrity by analyzing available information about the pipeline segment and consequences of a failure in an HCA. The regulations require prompt action to address integrity issues raised by the assessment and analysis. We have completed baseline assessments for all segments and believe that we are in material compliance with these PHMSA regulations. In October 2019, PHMSA submitted three major rules to the Federal Register, including rules focused on the safety of hazardous liquid pipelines and enhanced emergency order procedures. The safety of hazardous liquid pipelines rule extended leak detection requirements to all non-gathering hazardous liquid pipelines and requires operators to inspect affected pipelines following extreme weather events or natural disasters to address any resulting damage. This rule took effect on July 1, 2020. The enhanced emergency procedures rule focuses on increased emergency safety measures. In particular, this rule increases the authority of PHMSA to issue an emergency order that addresses unsafe conditions or hazards that pose an imminent threat to pipeline safety. This rule took effect on December 2, 2019.

Our terminals also are subject to various state regulations regarding our storage of product in aboveground storage tanks. These regulations require, among other things, registration of tanks, financial assurances and inspection and testing, consistent with the standards established by the American Petroleum Institute. We have completed baseline assessments for all of the segments and believe that we are in material compliance with these aboveground storage tank regulations.

We also are subject to the requirements of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act, or OSHA, and comparable state statutes that regulate the protection of the health and safety of workers. In addition, the OSHA hazard communication standard, the Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA, community right-to-know regulations under Title III of the Federal Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act, and comparable state statutes require us to organize and disclose information about the hazardous materials used in our operations. Certain parts of this information must be reported to employees, state and local governmental authorities and local citizens upon request. We believe that we are in material compliance with OSHA and state requirements, including general industry standards, record keeping requirements and monitoring of occupational exposures.

In general, we expect to increase our expenditures during the next decade to comply with higher industry and regulatory safety standards such as those described above. Although we cannot estimate the magnitude of such expenditures at this time, we do not believe that they will have a material adverse impact on our results of operations.

Environmental Matters. Our operations are subject to stringent and complex laws and regulations pertaining to health, safety and the environment. As an owner or operator of product terminals and pipelines, we must comply with these laws and regulations at federal, state and local levels. These laws and regulations can restrict or impact our business activities in many ways, such as:

requiring remedial action to mitigate releases of hydrocarbons, hazardous substances or wastes caused by our operations or attributable to former operators;
requiring capital expenditures to comply with environmental control requirements; and
enjoining the operations of facilities deemed in non-compliance with permits issued pursuant to such environmental laws and regulations.

Failure to comply with these laws and regulations may trigger a variety of administrative, civil and criminal enforcement measures, including the assessment of monetary penalties, the imposition of remedial requirements, and the issuance of orders enjoining future operations. Certain environmental statutes impose strict, joint and several liability for costs required to cleanup and restore sites where hydrocarbons, hazardous substances or wastes have been released or

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disposed of. Moreover, it is not uncommon for neighboring landowners and other third parties to file claims for personal injury and property damage allegedly caused by the release of hydrocarbons, hazardous substances or other wastes into the environment.

The trend in environmental regulation is to place more restrictions and limitations on activities that may affect the environment. As a result, there can be no assurance as to the amount or timing of future expenditures that may be required for environmental compliance or remediation, and actual future expenditures may be different from the amounts we currently anticipate. We try to anticipate future regulatory requirements that may affect our operations and to plan accordingly to comply with and minimize the costs of such requirements.

We believe that the various environmental activities in which we are presently engaged are not expected to materially interrupt or diminish our operational ability. We cannot assure, however, that future events, such as changes in existing laws, the promulgation of new laws, or the development or discovery of new facts or conditions will not cause us to incur significant costs. The following is a discussion of certain potential material environmental concerns that relate to our business.

Water. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972, renamed and amended as the Clean Water Act or CWA, imposes strict controls against the discharge of pollutants, including oil and its derivatives into navigable waters. The discharge of pollutants into regulated waters is prohibited except in accordance with the regulations issued by the EPA or the state. We are subject to various types of storm water discharge requirements at our terminals. The EPA and a number of states have adopted regulations that require us to obtain permits to discharge storm water run-off from our facilities. Such permits may require us to monitor and sample the effluent from our operations. The cost involved in obtaining and renewing these storm water permits is not material. We believe that we are in material compliance with effluent limitations at our facilities and with the CWA generally.

The CWA provides penalties for any discharges of petroleum products in reportable quantities and imposes substantial potential liability for the costs of removing an oil or hazardous substance spill. State laws for the control of water pollution also provide for various civil and criminal penalties and liabilities in the event of a release of petroleum or its derivatives in surface waters or into the groundwater. Spill prevention control and countermeasure requirements of federal laws require, among other things, appropriate containment be constructed around product storage tanks to help prevent the contamination of navigable waters in the event of a product tank spill, rupture or leak.

The primary federal law for oil spill liability is the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, as amended, or OPA, which addresses three principal areas of oil pollution—prevention, containment and cleanup. It applies to vessels, offshore platforms, and onshore facilities, including terminals, pipelines and transfer facilities. In order to handle, store or transport oil, facilities are required to file oil spill response plans with the United States Coast Guard, the Office of Pipeline Safety or the EPA. Numerous states have enacted laws similar to OPA. Under OPA and similar state laws, responsible parties for a regulated facility from which oil is discharged may be liable for removal costs and natural resources damages. We believe that we are in material compliance with regulations pursuant to OPA and similar state laws.

Contamination resulting from spills or releases of products is an inherent risk in the petroleum terminal and pipeline industry. To the extent that groundwater contamination requiring remediation exists around the facilities we own as a result of past operations, we believe any such contamination is being controlled or remedied without having a material adverse effect on our financial condition. However, such costs can be unpredictable and are site specific and, therefore, the effect may be material in the aggregate.

Air Emissions. Our operations are subject to the federal Clean Air Act, or CAA, and comparable state and local statutes. The CAA requires most industrial operations in the United States to incur ongoing expenditures to meet the air emission control standards that are developed and implemented by the EPA and state environmental agencies. These laws and regulations regulate emissions of air pollutants from various industrial sources, including our operations, and also impose various monitoring and reporting requirements. Such laws and regulations may require a facility to obtain pre-approval for the construction or modification of certain projects or facilities expected to produce air emissions or result in the increase of existing air emissions and obtain and strictly comply with air permits containing requirements.

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Most of our terminaling operations require air permits. These operations generally include volatile organic compound emissions (primarily hydrocarbons) associated with truck loading activities and tank working and breathing losses. The sources of these emissions are strictly regulated through the permitting process. Such regulation includes stringent control technology and extensive permit review and periodic renewal. The cost involved in obtaining and renewing these permits is not material.

Moreover, any of our facilities that emit volatile organic compounds or nitrogen oxides and are located in ozone non-attainment areas face increasingly stringent regulations, including requirements to install various levels of control technology on sources of pollutants. We believe that we are in material compliance with existing standards and regulations pursuant to the CAA and similar state and local laws, and we do not anticipate that implementation of additional regulations will have a material adverse effect on us.

Congress and numerous states are currently considering proposed legislation directed at reducing “greenhouse gas emissions.” It is not possible at this time to predict how future legislation that may be enacted to address greenhouse gas emissions would impact our operations. We believe we are in compliance with existing federal and state greenhouse gas reporting regulations. Although future laws and regulations could result in increased compliance costs or additional operating restrictions, they are not expected to have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Hazardous and Solid Waste. Our operations are subject to the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, or RCRA, and comparable state laws, which impose detailed requirements for the handling, storage, treatment, and disposal of hazardous and solid waste. All of our terminal facilities are classified by the EPA as Very Small Quantity Generators. Our terminals do not generate hazardous waste except in isolated and infrequent cases. At such times, only third party disposal sites which have been audited and approved by us are used. Our operations also generate solid wastes that are regulated under state law or the less stringent solid waste requirements of RCRA. We believe that we are in substantial compliance with the existing requirements of RCRA and similar state and local laws, and the cost involved in complying with these requirements is not material.

Site Remediation. The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, or CERCLA, also known as the “Superfund” law, and comparable state laws impose liability without regard to fault or the legality of the original conduct, on certain classes of persons responsible for the release of hazardous substances into the environment. Such classes of persons include the current and past owners or operators of sites where a hazardous substance was released, and companies that disposed or arranged for disposal of hazardous substances at offsite locations such as landfills. In the course of our operations we will generate wastes or handle substances that may fall within the definition of a “hazardous substance.” CERCLA authorizes the EPA and, in some cases, third parties to take actions in response to threats to the public health or the environment and to seek to recover from the responsible classes of persons the costs they incur. Under CERCLA, we could be subject to joint and several liability for the costs of cleaning up and restoring sites where hazardous substances have been released, for damages to natural resources and for the costs of certain health studies. We believe that we are in material compliance with the existing requirements of CERCLA.

We currently own, lease, or operate numerous properties and facilities that for many years have been used for industrial activities, including product terminaling operations. Hazardous substances, wastes, or hydrocarbons may have been released on or under the properties owned or leased by us, or on or under other locations where such substances have been taken for disposal. In addition, some of these properties have been operated by third parties or by previous owners whose treatment and disposal or release of hazardous substances, wastes, or hydrocarbons, was not under our control. These properties and the substances disposed or released on them may be subject to CERCLA, RCRA and analogous state laws. Under such laws, we could be required to remove previously disposed substances and wastes (including substances disposed of or released by prior owners or operators) or remediate contaminated property (including groundwater contamination, whether from prior owners or operators or other historic activities or spills).

In connection with our acquisition of the Florida (other than Pensacola), Midwest, Brownsville, Texas, River, Southeast, and Pensacola, Florida terminal and facilities, a third party agreed to indemnify us against certain potential environmental claims, losses and expenses. Based on our current knowledge, we expect that the active remediation

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projects subject to the benefit of this indemnification obligation are winding down and will not involve material additional claims, losses, and expenses. Nonetheless, the forgoing environmental indemnification obligations of a third party to us remain in place and were not affected by the Take-Private Transaction.

Endangered Species Act. The Endangered Species Act restricts activities that may affect endangered or threatened species or their habitats. While some of our facilities are in areas that may be designated as habitat for endangered or threatened species, we believe that we are in substantial compliance with the Endangered Species Act. However, the discovery of previously unidentified endangered or threatened species could cause us to incur additional costs or become subject to operating restrictions or bans in the affected area.

Operational Hazards and Insurance. Our terminal and pipeline facilities may experience damage as a result of an accident or natural disaster. These hazards can cause personal injury and loss of life, severe damage to and destruction of property and equipment, pollution or environmental damage and suspension of operations. We maintain insurance of various types that we consider adequate to cover our operations, properties and loss of income at specified locations. Coverage for domestic acts of terrorism as defined in Terrorism Risk Insurance Program Reauthorization Act 2007 are covered under certain of our casualty insurance policies.

The insurance covers all of our facilities in amounts that we consider to be reasonable. The insurance policies are subject to deductibles that we consider reasonable and not excessive. Our insurance does not cover every potential risk associated with operating terminals, pipelines and other facilities. Consistent with insurance coverage generally available to the industry, our insurance policies provide limited coverage for losses or liabilities relating to pollution, with broader coverage for sudden and accidental occurrences.

Tariff Regulation. The Razorback pipeline, which runs between Mount Vernon, Missouri and Rogers, Arkansas and the Diamondback pipeline, which runs between Brownsville, Texas and the U.S./Mexico border, transport petroleum products subject to regulation by the FERC under the Interstate Commerce Act and the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and rules and orders promulgated under those statutes. We expect to recommission the Diamondback Pipeline and resume operations on both the 8” pipeline, providing gasoline service thereon, and the previously idle 6” pipeline, providing diesel service thereon, by the end of the second quarter of 2021, and have previously filed revised tariffs with the FERC to support such activities. FERC regulation requires that the rates of pipelines providing interstate service, such as the Razorback and Diamondback pipelines, be filed at FERC and posted publicly, and that these rates be “just and reasonable” and nondiscriminatory. Rates are currently regulated by the FERC primarily through an index methodology, whereby a pipeline is allowed to change its rates based on the change from year to year in the Producer Price Index for Finished Goods (PPI-FG), plus a 1.23 percent adjustment for the five-year period beginning July 1, 2016. In the alternative, interstate pipeline companies may elect to support rate filings by using a cost-of-service methodology, competitive market showings, or actual agreements (that is, negotiated rates agreements) between shippers and the oil pipeline company.

Negotiated Rates. The current rates charged by the Razorback pipeline and, upon recommencement of service, the Diamondback pipeline, are negotiated rates that were established via agreement with non-affiliated shippers and are not index rates or cost-of-service rates. Therefore, while we continue to monitor FERC’s policy changes with respect to index rates and cost-of-service rates, we do not expect such changes to have an adverse impact on the rates charged by the Razorback and Diamondback pipelines and do not discuss such changes here.

The FERC generally has not investigated interstate oil pipeline rates on its own initiative when those rates have not been the subject of a protest or a complaint by a shipper. A shipper or other party having a substantial economic interest in our rates could, however, challenge our rates. In response to such challenges, the FERC could investigate our rates and require us to modify the amounts charged. In the absence of a challenge to our rates, given our ability to utilize either filed rates as annually indexed or to utilize rates tied to cost of service methodology, competitive market showing, or actual agreements between shippers and us, we do not believe that FERC’s regulations governing oil pipeline ratemaking would have any negative material monetary impact on us unless the regulations were substantially modified in such a manner so as to effectively prevent a pipeline company’s ability to earn a fair return for the shipment of petroleum products utilizing its transportation system, which we believe to be an unlikely scenario.

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In addition to being regulated by the FERC, we are required to maintain a Presidential Permit from the United States Department of State to operate and maintain the Diamondback pipeline, because the pipeline transports petroleum products across the international boundary line between the United States and Mexico. The Department of State’s regulations do not affect our rates but do require the agency’s approval for the international crossing. We do not believe that these regulations would have any negative material monetary impact on us unless the regulations were substantially modified, which we believe to be an unlikely scenario.

Safety and Maintenance. We perform preventive and normal maintenance on the pipeline and terminal systems we operate or own and make repairs and replacements when necessary or appropriate. We also conduct routine and required inspections of the pipeline and terminal tanks we operate or own as required by code or regulation. External coatings and impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to protect against external corrosion. We conduct all cathodic protection work in accordance with National Association of Corrosion Engineers standards. We continually monitor, test, and record the effectiveness of these corrosion-inhibiting systems.

We monitor or require the monitoring of the structural integrity of all of our Department of Transportation, or DOT, regulated pipeline systems. These pipeline systems include the 67-mile Razorback pipeline; a 37-mile pipeline, known as the “Pinebelt pipeline,” located in Covington County, Mississippi that transports refined petroleum liquids between our Collins and Purvis bulk storage terminal facilities; approximately 5 miles of various diameter petroleum pipeline in and around Martinez, California; the Diamondback pipeline; and, until August 23, 2018, an approximately 18-mile, refined petroleum liquids pipeline in Texas, known as the “MB pipeline,” that we operated and maintained on behalf of PMI Services North America, Inc., an affiliate of PEMEX, which a third party has since taken operatorship. The maintenance of structural integrity includes a program of integrity management by us or required by us that conforms to Federal and State regulations and follows industry periodic inspection and testing guidelines. Beginning in 2002, the DOT required internal inspections or other integrity testing of all DOT-regulated crude oil and refined product pipelines that affect or could affect high consequence areas, or HCA’s. We believe that the pipelines we own and manage meet or exceed all DOT inspection requirements for pipelines located in the United States.

Maintenance facilities containing equipment for pipe repairs, spare parts, and trained response personnel are located along all of these pipelines. Employees participate in simulated spill deployment exercises on a regular basis. They also participate in actual spill response boom deployment exercises in planned spill scenarios in accordance with Oil Pollution Act of 1990 requirements. We believe that the pipelines we own and manage have been constructed and are maintained or are required to be maintained in all material respects in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local laws and the regulations and standards prescribed by the American Petroleum Institute, the DOT, and accepted industry practice.

At our terminals, tanks designed for gasoline storage are equipped with internal or external floating roofs or alternative vapor control devices designed to minimize emissions and prevent potentially flammable vapor accumulation between fluid levels and the roof of the tank. Our terminal facilities have all required facility response plans, spill prevention and control plans and other plans and programs to respond to emergencies.

Many of our terminal loading racks are protected with fire protection systems activated by either heat sensors or an emergency switch. Several of our terminals also are protected by foam systems that are activated in case of fire.

Title to Properties

The Razorback and Diamondback pipelines are generally constructed on easements and rights-of-way granted by the apparent record owners of the property and in some instances these grants are revocable at the election of the grantor. Several rights-of-way for the Razorback pipeline and other real property assets are shared with other pipelines and other assets owned by third parties. In many instances, lands over which rights-of-way have been obtained are subject to prior liens that have not been subordinated to the right-of-way grants. We have obtained permits from public authorities to cross over or under, or to lay facilities in or along, watercourses, county roads, municipal streets, and state highways and, in some instances, these permits are revocable at the election of the grantor. We have also obtained permits from railroad companies to cross over or under lands or rights-of-way, many of which are also revocable at the grantor’s election. In some cases, property for pipeline purposes was purchased in fee.

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Some of the leases, easements, rights-of-way, permits, licenses and franchise ordinances transferred to us will require the consent of the grantor to transfer these rights, which in some instances is a governmental entity. We have obtained sufficient third-party consents, permits, and authorizations for the transfer of the facilities necessary for us to operate our business in all material respects as described in this Annual Report. With respect to any consents, permits, or authorizations that have not been obtained, we believe that these consents, permits, or authorizations will be obtained, or that the failure to obtain these consents, permits, or authorizations would not have a material adverse effect on the operation of our business.

We believe that we have satisfactory title to all of our assets. Although title to these properties is subject to encumbrances in some cases, such as customary interests generally retained in connection with acquisition of real property, liens that can be imposed in some jurisdictions for government-initiated action to cleanup environmental contamination, liens for current taxes and other burdens, and easements, restrictions and other encumbrances to which the underlying properties were subject at the time of our acquisition, we believe that none of these burdens should materially detract from the value of these properties or from our interest in these properties or should materially interfere with their use in the operation of our business.

Human Capital Management

Employees. As a result of the TMS Contribution, we have assumed the employees and operational activities previously provided by TMS, except for our executive officers. Following the TMS Contribution, our executive officers who provide services to the Company are employed by TMC, a wholly owned subsidiary of ArcLight, which also provides services to certain other ArcLight affiliates. Nonetheless, TMS continues to provide certain payroll functions and maintains all employee benefits programs on behalf of TMC pursuant to a services agreement between TMC and TMS.

As of March 5, 2021, we had approximately 540 employees. As of March 5, 2021, none of our employees or any TMC employees (and our officers) who provide services directly to us were covered by a collective bargaining agreement.

Attracting, Retaining and Developing Personnel. We face a competitive talent environment, including having an aging workforce. Maintaining appropriate headcount levels is critical to the operation of our terminals and other assets.

To attract and retain a successful workforce, we study market trends, benchmarking the attractiveness of our employee value proposition, and analyzing retention data. We also focus on driving employee engagement, which is key to increasing employee productivity, retention, and safety. We take a data-centric approach, including the use of quarterly surveys among management employees, to identify new initiatives that will help boost engagement and drive business results.

Employee Safety and Training. Employee health and safety and community safety are at the core of our operating principles. We are continuously monitoring and seeking to improve our safety performance. We measure this performance by tracking internal metrics such as incident rates. Our internal safety-audit program incorporates a risk based, terminal specific design that helps to ensure our continuous compliance with safety regulations and industry standards. We provide terminal personnel with ongoing safety compliance training, and we recognize our terminal employees with annual safety awards. All accident, incident, injury/lost-time and near-miss events are investigated and reviewed by our dedicated safety and health department and reported to executive management and, as applicable, to terminal managers, vendors, and employees. We use this investigation, review and reporting to translate events into safety/operational enhancements, policy changes, training, or discipline, in each case as appropriate, to mitigate the potential for recurrence. We have been recognized by the International Liquids Terminals Association (ILTA) multiple times for safety excellence.

Employee Development and Retention. We also emphasize developing personnel in connection with employee attraction and retainage efforts, as well as in connection with the efficient operation of our business. We provide a range of developmental programs, opportunities, skills, and resources for our employees to work safely and

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be successful in their careers. For example, we have a formalized terminal manager training and career advancement process to develop and promote talent from within. We provide hands-on training and simulation training designed to improve training effectiveness and safety outcomes. We also use modern learning and performance technologies to offer robust professional growth opportunities. Through on-demand digital course offerings, custom-built learning paths, and performance-management tools, our platforms deliver a contemporary, convenient, and inclusive approach to professional development.

Finally, we are committed to recruiting the most qualified, talented, and diverse people. We strive to create a diverse, equitable, and inclusive workplace where a wide range of perspectives and experiences are represented, valued, and empowered to thrive. While our current workforce reflects a broad range of backgrounds and experiences, we continue to focus on building an even more diverse workforce.

Available Information

We file annual, quarterly, and current reports, and other documents with the SEC under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The SEC maintains an Internet website that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. The public can obtain any documents that we file at http://www.sec.gov.

In addition, our annual reports on Form 10-K, as well as our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and any amendments to all of the foregoing reports, are made available free of charge on or through the “Investor” section of our website at www.transmontaignepartners.com as soon as reasonably practicable after such reports are electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

Our business, operations and financial condition are subject to various risks. You should carefully consider the following risk factors together with all of the other information set forth in this Annual Report, including the matters addressed under “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements,” in connection with any investment in our securities. If any of the following risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flows could be materially adversely affected, which could result in investors in our securities losing all or part of their investment.

Risks Inherent in Our Business

We depend upon a relatively small number of customers for a substantial majority of our revenue. A substantial reduction of revenue from one or more of these customers would have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

We expect to derive a substantial majority of our revenue from several significant customers for the foreseeable future. Events that adversely affect the business operations of any one or more of our significant customers may adversely affect our financial condition or results of operations. Therefore, we are indirectly subject to the business risks of our significant customers, many of which are similar to the business risks we face. For example, a material decline in refined petroleum product supplies available to our customers, or a significant decrease in our customers’ ability to negotiate marketing contracts on favorable terms, could result in a material decline in the use of our tank capacity or throughput of product at our terminal facilities, which would likely cause our revenue and results of operations to decline. In addition, if any of our significant customers were unable to meet their contractual commitments to us for any reason, then our revenue and cash flow would decline.

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We are exposed to the credit risks of our significant customers which could affect our creditworthiness. Any material nonpayment or nonperformance by such customers could also adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

We have various credit terms with virtually all of our customers, and our customers have varying degrees of creditworthiness. Although we evaluate the creditworthiness of each of our customers, we may not always be able to fully anticipate or detect deterioration in their creditworthiness and overall financial condition, which could expose us to risks of loss resulting from nonpayment or nonperformance by our significant customers. Some of our significant customers may be highly leveraged and subject to their own operating and regulatory risks. Any material nonpayment or nonperformance by our significant customers could require us to pursue substitute customers for our affected assets or provide alternative services. There can be no assurance that any such efforts would be successful or would provide similar revenue. These events could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Our continued expansion programs may require access to additional capital. Tightened capital markets or more expensive capital could impair our ability to maintain or grow our operations.

Our primary liquidity needs are to fund our approved capital projects and future expansion. Our revolving credit facility provides for a maximum borrowing line of credit equal to $850 million. At December 31, 2020, our outstanding borrowings were $350.4 million. At December 31, 2020, the capital expenditures to complete the approved additional investments and expansion capital projects are estimated to be approximately $40 million. We expect to fund our future investments and expansion capital expenditures with additional borrowings under our revolving credit facility. If we cannot obtain adequate financing to complete the approved investments and capital projects while maintaining our current operations, we may not be able to continue to operate our business as it is currently conducted.

Moreover, our long term business strategies include acquiring additional energy-related terminaling and transportation facilities and further expansion of our existing terminal capacity. We will need to raise additional funds to grow our business and implement these strategies. We anticipate that such additional funds may be raised through equity contributions from ArcLight or debt financings depending on the circumstances. Any equity contributions or debt financing, if available at all, may not be on terms that are favorable to us. Limitations on our access to capital could result from events or causes beyond our control, and could include, among other factors, significant increases in interest rates, increases in the risk premium required by investors, generally or for investments in energy-related companies, decreases in the availability of credit or the tightening of terms required by lenders. If we cannot obtain adequate financing, we may not be able to fully implement our business strategies, and our business, results of operations and financial condition would be adversely affected.

Our debt levels may limit our flexibility in obtaining additional financing and in pursuing other business opportunities.

As of December 31, 2020, we had total long-term debt of $644.7 million and we had an unused borrowing base availability of $499.6 million under our revolving credit facility. Our level of debt could have important consequences to us. For example our level of debt could:

impair our ability to obtain additional financing, if necessary, for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions or other purposes;
require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow to make principal and interest payments on our debt, reducing the funds that would otherwise be available for operations and future business opportunities;
make us more vulnerable to competitive pressures, changes in interest rates or a downturn in our business or the economy generally; or
limit our flexibility in responding to changing business and economic conditions.

If our operating results are not sufficient to service our current or future indebtedness, we will be forced to take actions such as reducing or delaying our business activities, acquisitions, investments or capital expenditures, selling

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assets, restructuring or refinancing our debt or seeking additional equity capital. We may not be able to affect any of these actions on satisfactory terms, or at all.

Restrictive covenants in our revolving credit facility, the indenture governing our senior notes and future debt instruments may limit our ability to respond to changes in market conditions or pursue business opportunities.

Our revolving credit facility and the indenture governing our senior notes contain, and the terms of any future indebtedness may contain, restrictive covenants that limit our ability to, among other things:

incur or guarantee additional debt;
make distributions under certain circumstances;
make certain investments and acquisitions;
incur certain liens or permit them to exist;
enter into certain types of transactions with affiliates;
merge or consolidate with another company or undergo a change in control; and
transfer, sell or otherwise dispose of assets.

Our revolving credit facility also contains covenants requiring us to maintain certain financial ratios and tests. Our ability to meet those financial ratios and tests can be affected by events beyond our control, and there is no assurance that that we will meet any such ratios and tests.

The provisions of our revolving credit facility may affect our ability to obtain future financing and pursue attractive business opportunities and our flexibility in planning for, and reacting to, changes in business conditions. In addition, a failure to comply with the provisions of our revolving credit facility could result in a default or an event of default that could enable our lenders to declare the outstanding principal of that debt, together with accrued and unpaid interest, to be immediately due and payable. If the payment of our debt is accelerated, our assets may be insufficient to repay such debt in full, and our security-holders could experience a partial or total loss of their investment. Please read “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources.”

In the event we are required to refinance our existing debt in unfavorable market conditions, we may have to pay higher interest rates and be subject to more stringent financial covenants, which could adversely affect our results of operations.

Our revolving credit facility matures in March 2022, and our senior notes mature in February 2026. At December 31, 2020, we had outstanding borrowings under our revolving credit facility of $350.4 million and outstanding senior notes of $299.9 million, respectively. Our revolving credit facility provides that we pay interest on outstanding balances at interest rates based on market rates plus specified margins, ranging from 1.75% to 2.75% depending on the total leverage ratio in the case of loans with interest rates based on LIBOR, or ranging from 0.75% to 1.75% depending on the total leverage ratio in the case of loans with interest rates based on the base rate. We pay a fixed 6.125% interest rate on our senior notes. In the event we are required to refinance our revolving credit facility or our senior notes in unfavorable market conditions, we may have to pay interest at higher rates and may be subject to more stringent financial covenants than we have today, which could adversely affect our results of operations.

Additionally, on July 27, 2017, the U.K. Financial Conduct Authority (the authority that regulates LIBOR) announced that it would no longer persuade or compel contributing banks to submit rates for the calculation of LIBOR after 2021. It is unclear whether new methods of calculating LIBOR will be established such that it continues to exist after 2021. If the agent under our revolving credit facility, Wells Fargo, determines (among other things) that LIBOR may no longer be available or may no longer be an appropriate reference rate upon which to determine the interest rates under our credit facility, loans otherwise or previously relying on LIBOR to calculate interest may be converted to loans computing interest rates based on the base rate (as adjusted, per the above), or some other replacement rate in the event

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that, among other reasons, the inability to use LIBOR is unlikely to be temporary or an applicable interest rate used in the credit facility is no longer a widely recognized benchmark rate for newly originated loans in the syndicated loan market in the applicable currency. The U.S. Federal Reserve, in conjunction with the Alternative Reference Rates Committee, is considering replacing U.S. dollar LIBOR with a newly created index. Changes in the method of calculating LIBOR, or the replacement of LIBOR with an alternative rate or benchmark, including with the base rate under our credit facility, may adversely affect interest rates and result in higher borrowing costs. This could materially and adversely affect the Company's results of operations, cash flows and liquidity. It is not possible to predict the effect of these changes, other reforms or the establishment of alternative reference rates in the United States or elsewhere.

We may incur substantial additional indebtedness, which could further exacerbate the risks that we may face.

Subject to the restrictions in the instruments governing our outstanding indebtedness (including our revolving credit facility and senior notes), we may incur substantial additional indebtedness (including secured indebtedness) in the future. Although the instruments governing our outstanding indebtedness do contain restrictions on the incurrence of additional indebtedness, these restrictions will be subject to waiver and a number of significant qualifications and exceptions, and indebtedness incurred in compliance with these restrictions could be substantial. As of December 31, 2020, we had additional borrowing capacity of $499.6 million under our revolving credit facility, all of which would be secured if borrowed.

Any increase in our level of indebtedness will have several important effects on our future operations, including, without limitation:

we will have additional cash requirements in order to support the payment of interest on our outstanding indebtedness;
increases in our outstanding indebtedness and leverage will increase our vulnerability to adverse changes in general economic and industry conditions, as well as to competitive pressure; and
depending on the levels of our outstanding indebtedness, our ability to obtain additional financing for working capital, capital expenditures and general company purposes may be limited.

The obligations of our customers under their terminaling services agreements may be reduced or suspended in some circumstances, which would adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Our agreements with our customers provide that, if any of a number of events occur, which we refer to as events of force majeure, and the event renders performance impossible with respect to a facility, usually for a specified minimum period of days, our customer’s obligations would be temporarily suspended with respect to that facility. Force majeure events include, but are not limited to, wars, acts of enemies, embargoes, import or export restrictions, strikes, lockouts, acts of nature, including fires, storms, floods, hurricanes, explosions and mechanical or physical failures of our equipment or facilities or those of third parties. In the event of a force majeure, a significant customer’s minimum revenue commitment may be reduced or the contract may be subject to termination. As a result, our revenue and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

A significant portion of our operations are conducted through joint ventures, over which we do not maintain full control and which have unique risks.

A significant portion of our operations are conducted through joint ventures. We are entitled to appoint a member to the BOSTCO board of managers and maintain certain rights of approval over significant changes to, or expansion of, BOSTCO’s business, however Kinder Morgan serves as the operator of BOSTCO and is responsible for its day-to-day operations. Although we serve as the operator of Frontera, there are restrictions and limitations on our authority to take certain material actions absent the consent of our joint venture partner. With respect to our existing joint ventures, we share ownership with partners that may not always share our goals and objectives. Differences in views among the partners may result in delayed decisions or failures to agree on major matters, such as large expenditures or contractual commitments, the construction of assets or borrowing money, among others. Delay or failure to agree may

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prevent action with respect to such matters, even though such action may not serve our best interest or that of the joint venture. Accordingly, delayed decisions and disagreements could adversely affect the business and operations of the joint ventures and, in turn, our business and operations. From time to time, our joint ventures may be involved in disputes or legal proceedings which may negatively affect our investments. Accordingly, any such occurrences could adversely affect our financial condition, operating results and cash flows.

Competition from other terminals and pipelines that are able to supply our customers with storage capacity at a lower price could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

We face competition from other terminals and pipelines that may be able to supply our customers with integrated terminaling services on a more competitive basis. We compete with national, regional and local terminal and pipeline companies, including the major integrated oil companies, of widely varying sizes, financial resources and experience. Our ability to compete could be harmed by factors we cannot control, including:

price competition from terminal and transportation companies, some of which are substantially larger than us and have greater financial resources and control substantially greater product storage capacity, than we do;
the perception that another company may provide better service; and
the availability of alternative supply points or supply points located closer to our customers’ operations.

In addition, our affiliates, including ArcLight, may engage in competition with us. If we are unable to compete with services offered by our competitors, including ArcLight and its affiliates, it could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Many of our terminal facilities are connected to, and rely on, pipelines owned and operated by third parties for the receipt and distribution of refined petroleum products, and such pipeline operators may compete with us, make changes to their transportation service offerings or their pipeline tariffs, or suffer outages or reduced product transportation, which in each case would adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. 

Our Southeast facilities include 20 active product terminals located along the Plantation and Colonial pipeline systems and primarily receive refined products from Plantation and Colonial on behalf of our customers. In addition, the Collins terminal receives from, delivers to, and transfers refined petroleum products between the Colonial and Plantation pipeline systems. In these instances, we depend on our terminals’ connections to such petroleum pipelines owned and operated by third parties to supply our terminal facilities. Our ability to compete in a particular terminal market could be harmed by factors we cannot control, including changes in pipeline service offerings at one or more of our terminals or changes in pipeline tariffs that make alternative third party terminal locations or different transportation options more attractive to our current or prospective customers.  

The FERC regulates the rates the pipeline operators can charge, and the terms and conditions they can offer, for interstate transportation service on refined products pipelines that connect to our terminals. Generally, petroleum products pipelines may change their rates within prescribed levels, which could lead our current or prospective customers to seek alternative delivery methods or destinations. Moreover, we cannot control or predict the amount of refined petroleum products that our customers are able to transport on the third party pipelines connecting into our terminals. The level of throughput on these pipelines can be impacted by a number of factors, including the quality or quantity of refined product produced, pipeline outages or interruptions due to weather-related or other natural causes, competitive forces, testing, line repair, damage, reduced operating pressures or other causes any of which could negatively impact our customers’ shipments to our terminals. As a result our revenue, results of operations and cash flows could be materially adversely affected.

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Expanding our business by constructing new facilities subjects us to risks that the project may not be completed on schedule and that the costs associated with the project may exceed our estimates or budgeted costs, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

The construction of additions or modifications to our existing terminal and transportation facilities, and the construction of new terminals and pipelines, involves numerous regulatory, environmental, political, legal and operational uncertainties beyond our control and requires the expenditure of significant amounts of capital. If we undertake these projects, they may not be completed on schedule or at all and may exceed the budgeted cost. If we experience material cost overruns, we would have to finance these overruns using cash from operations, delaying other planned projects, incurring additional indebtedness or obtaining additional equity. Any or all of these methods may not be available when needed or may adversely affect our future results of operations and cash flows. Moreover, our revenue may not increase immediately upon the expenditure of funds on a particular project. For instance, if we construct additional storage capacity, the construction may occur over an extended period of time, and we will not receive any material increases in revenue until the project is completed. Moreover, we may construct additional storage capacity to capture anticipated future growth in consumption of products in a market in which such growth does not materialize.

Adverse economic conditions periodically result in weakness and volatility in the capital markets, that may limit, temporarily or for extended periods, the ability of one or more of our significant customers to secure financing arrangements adequate to purchase their desired volume of product, which could reduce use of our tank capacity and throughput volumes at our terminal facilities and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Domestic and international economic conditions affect the functioning of capital markets and the availability of credit. Adverse economic conditions periodically result in weakness and volatility in the capital markets, which in turn can limit, temporarily or for extended periods, the credit available to various enterprises, including those involved in the supply and marketing of products. As a result of these conditions, some of our customers may suffer short or long-term reductions in their ability to finance their supply and marketing activities, or may voluntarily elect to reduce their supply and marketing activities in order to preserve working capital. A significant decrease in our customers’ ability to secure financing arrangements adequate to support their historic product throughput volumes could result in a material decline in the use of our tank capacity or the throughput of product at our terminal facilities. We may not be able to generate sufficient additional revenue from third parties to replace any shortfall in revenue from our current customers, which would likely cause our revenue, results of operations and cash flows to decline.

Our business involves many hazards and operational risks, including adverse weather conditions, which could cause us to incur substantial liabilities and increased operating costs.

Our operations are subject to the many hazards inherent in the terminaling and transportation of products, including:

leaks or accidental releases of products or other materials into the environment, whether as a result of human error or otherwise;
extreme weather conditions, such as hurricanes, tropical storms and rough seas, which are common along the Gulf Coast, and earthquakes, which are common along the West Coast;
explosions, fires, accidents, mechanical malfunctions, faulty measurement and other operating errors;
epidemic or pandemic diseases; or
acts of terrorism or vandalism.

If any of these events were to occur, we could suffer substantial losses because of personal injury or loss of life, severe damage to and destruction of storage tanks, pipelines and related property and equipment, and pollution or other environmental damage resulting in curtailment or suspension of our related operations and potentially substantial unanticipated costs for the repair or replacement of property and environmental cleanup. In addition, if we suffer accidental releases or spills of products at our terminals or pipelines, we could be faced with material third-party costs and liabilities, including those relating to claims for damages to property and persons and governmental claims for

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natural resource damages or fines or penalties for related violations of environmental laws or regulations. We are not fully insured against all risks to our business and if losses in excess of our insurance coverage were to occur, they could have a material adverse effect on our operations. Furthermore, events like hurricanes can affect large geographical areas which can cause us to suffer additional costs and delays in connection with subsequent repairs and operations because contractors and other resources are not available, or are only available at substantially increased costs following widespread catastrophes.

We are not fully insured against all risks incident to our business, and could incur substantial liabilities as a result.

We may not be able to maintain or obtain insurance of the type and amount we desire at reasonable rates. As a result of market conditions, premiums and deductibles for certain of our insurance policies have increased substantially, and could escalate further. In some instances, certain insurance could become unavailable or available only for reduced amounts of coverage. For example, our insurance carriers require broad exclusions for losses due to terrorist acts. If we were to incur a significant liability for which we were not fully insured, it could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition. In accordance with typical industry practice, we do not have any property or title insurance on the Razorback and Diamondback pipelines.

Our insurance policies each contain caps on the insurer’s maximum liability under the policy, and claims made by us are applied against the caps. In the event we reach the cap, we would seek to acquire additional insurance in the marketplace; however, we can provide no assurance that such insurance would be available or if available, at a reasonable cost.

A significant decrease in demand for refined products due to alternative fuel sources, new technologies or adverse economic conditions may cause one or more of our significant customers to reduce their use of our tank capacity and throughput volumes at our terminal facilities, which would adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Market uncertainties, adverse economic conditions or lack of consumer confidence, in each case, including as may result from the COVD-19 pandemic, may result in lower consumer spending on gasolines, distillates and travel, and high prices of refined products could cause a reduction in demand for refined products, which could result in a material decline in the use of our tank capacity or throughput of product at our terminal facilities. Additionally, the volatility in the price of refined products may render our customers’ hedging activities ineffective, which could cause one or more of our significant customers to decrease their supply and marketing activities in order to reduce their exposure to price fluctuations.

Additional factors that could lead to a decrease in market demand for refined products include:

an increase in the market price of crude oil that leads to higher refined product prices;
higher fuel taxes or other governmental or other regulatory actions that increase, directly or indirectly, the cost of gasolines or other refined products;
a shift by consumers to more fuel-efficient or alternative fuel vehicles or an increase in fuel economy, whether as a result of technological advances by manufacturers, pending legislation proposing to mandate higher fuel economy or otherwise;
an increase in the use of alternative fuel sources, such as ethanol, biodiesel, fuel cells and solar, electric and battery-powered engines (although, we do handle or would be capable of handling many renewable products at most of our terminal facilities); or
events that impact global market demand in a way that is not presently possible to predict, including impacts from global health epidemics and concerns, such as the coronavirus (COVID-19).

Mergers between our existing customers and our competitors could provide strong economic incentives for the combined entities to utilize their existing systems instead of ours in those markets where the systems compete. As a

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result, we could lose some or all of the volumes and associated revenues from these customers and we could experience difficulty in replacing those lost volumes and revenues.

Because most of our operating costs are fixed, any decrease in throughput volumes at our terminal facilities, would likely result not only in a decrease in our revenue, but also a decline in cash flow of a similar magnitude, which would adversely affect our results of operations, financial position and cash flows.

Cyber-attacks that circumvent our security measures and other breaches of our information technology systems could disrupt our operations and result in increased costs.

We utilize information technology systems to operate our assets and manage our businesses. A cyber-attack or other security breach of our information technology systems could result in a breach of critical operational or financial controls and lead to a disruption of our operations, commercial activities or financial processes, including as a result of attempts to seek ransom from the Company. Additionally, we rely on third-party systems that could also be subject to cyber-attacks or security breaches, and the failure of which could have a significant adverse effect on the operation of our assets. We and the operators of the third-party systems on which we depend may not have the resources or technical sophistication to anticipate or prevent every emerging type of cyber-attack, and such an attack, or the additional security measures undertaken to prevent such an attack, could adversely affect our results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

In addition, we collect and store sensitive data, including our proprietary business information and information about our customers, suppliers and other counterparties, and personally identifiable information of our employees and of employees of TMC, on our information technology networks. Despite our security measures, our information technology and infrastructure may be vulnerable to cyber-attacks or breached due to employee error, malfeasance or other disruptions. Any such breach could compromise our networks and the information stored therein could be accessed, publicly disseminated, lost or stolen. Any such access, dissemination or other loss of information could result in legal claims or proceedings, liability under laws that protect the privacy of personal information, regulatory penalties or could disrupt our operations, any of which could adversely affect our results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

We could also face attempts to obtain unauthorized access to our information technology systems, proprietary business information, and information about our customers by targeting acts of deception against individuals with legitimate access to physical locations or information. We regularly remind our officers and the employees providing services to the Company of these risks, and we annually update our executive team as to current and evolving risks relating to a variety of cyber-attacks; however, these efforts are not guaranteed to prevent the effectiveness of these cyber-attacks or any losses that may arise as a result thereof.

Because of our lack of asset diversification, adverse developments in our terminals or pipeline operations could adversely affect our revenue and cash flows.

We rely exclusively on the revenue generated from our terminals and pipeline operations. Because of our lack of diversification in asset type, an adverse development in these businesses would have a significantly greater impact on our financial condition and results of operations than if we maintained more diverse assets.

Our operations are subject to governmental laws and regulations relating to the protection of the environment that may expose us to significant costs and liabilities.

Our business is subject to the jurisdiction of numerous governmental agencies that enforce complex and stringent laws and regulations with respect to a wide range of environmental, safety and other regulatory matters. We could be adversely affected by increased costs resulting from stricter pollution control requirements or liabilities resulting from non-compliance with required operating or other regulatory permits. New environmental laws and regulations might adversely impact our activities, including the transportation, storage and distribution of petroleum products. Federal, state and local agencies also could impose additional safety requirements, any of which could affect our profitability. Furthermore, our failure to comply with environmental or safety related laws and regulations also could

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result in the assessment of administrative, civil and criminal penalties, the imposition of investigatory and remedial obligations and even the issuance of injunctions that restrict or prohibit the performance of our operations.

Federal, state and local agencies also have the authority to prescribe specific product quality specifications of refined products. Changes in product quality specifications or blending requirements could reduce our throughput volume, require us to incur additional handling costs or require capital expenditures. For example, different product specifications for different markets impact the fungibility of the products in our system and could require the construction of additional storage. If we are unable to recover these costs through increased revenues, our cash flows could be adversely affected.

Terrorist attacks, and the threat of terrorist attacks, have resulted in increased costs to our business. Continued hostilities in the Middle East or other sustained military campaigns may adversely impact our cash flows.

The long-term impact of terrorist attacks, such as the attacks that occurred on September 11, 2001, and the threat of future terrorist attacks, on the energy transportation industry in general, and on us in particular, is impossible to predict. Increased security measures that we have taken as a precaution against possible terrorist attacks have resulted in increased costs to our business. Uncertainty surrounding continued hostilities in the Middle East or other sustained military campaigns may affect our operations in unpredictable ways, including the possibility that infrastructure facilities could be direct targets of, or indirect casualties of, an act of terrorism.

Many of our storage tanks and portions of our pipeline system have been in service for several decades that could result in increased maintenance or remediation expenditures, which could adversely affect our results of operations and our cash flows.

Our pipeline and storage assets are generally long-lived assets. As a result, some of those assets have been in service for many decades. The age and condition of these assets could result in increased maintenance or remediation expenditures. Any significant increase in these expenditures could adversely affect our results of operations, financial position and cash flows.

Climate change legislation or regulations restricting emissions of “greenhouse gases” or setting fuel economy or air quality standards could result in increased operating costs or reduced demand for the refined petroleum products that we transport, store or otherwise handle in connection with our business.

In response to findings that emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gases present an endangerment to human health and the environment, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) has adopted regulations under existing provisions of the federal Clean Air Act that, among other things, establish pre-construction and operating permit requirements for certain large stationary sources.  The EPA has also adopted rules requiring the monitoring and reporting of greenhouse gas emissions from specified onshore and offshore natural gas and oil sources in the United States on an annual basis.  

Although Congress has from time to time considered legislation to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, there has not been significant activity in the form of adopted legislation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at the federal level in recent years.  In the absence of such federal climate change legislation, a number of states, including states in which we operate, have enacted or passed measures to track and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, primarily through the planned development of greenhouse gas emission inventories and regional greenhouse gas cap-and-trade programs.  Most of these cap-and-trade programs require major sources of emissions or major producers of fuels to acquire and surrender emission allowances, with the number of allowances available for purchase reduced each year until the overall greenhouse gas emission reduction goal is achieved.  

In addition, in December 2015, over 190 countries, including the United States, reached an agreement to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions (the “Paris Agreement”). The Paris Agreement entered into force in November 2016 after more than 170 nations, including the United States, ratified or otherwise indicated their intent to be bound by the agreement. In June 2017, former President Trump announced that the United States intended to withdraw from the Paris Agreement and to seek negotiations either to reenter the Paris Agreement on different terms or a separate agreement. In

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August 2017, the U.S. Department of State officially informed the United Nations of the United States’ intent to withdraw from the Paris Agreement. In November 2019, the United States formally initiated the withdrawal process. However, on January 20, 2021, President Biden announced that the United States would rejoin the Paris Agreement. To the extent that the United States and other countries implement this agreement or impose other climate change regulations on the oil and natural gas industry, it could have an adverse effect on our business.

In particular, the adoption and implementation of regulations that require the reporting of greenhouse gases or otherwise limit emissions of greenhouse gases from our equipment and operations could require us to incur costs to monitor and report on greenhouse gas emissions or install new equipment to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases associated with our operations. In addition, these regulatory initiatives could drive down demand for the refined petroleum products, natural gas and other hydrocarbon products we transport, store or otherwise handle in connection with our business by stimulating demand for alternative forms of energy that do not rely on the combustion of fossil fuels. Such decreased demand could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.  

In addition, some scientists have concluded that increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the earth’s atmosphere may produce climate changes that have significant physical effects, such as increased frequency and severity of storms, droughts, floods and other climate events.  If any such effects were to occur, they could have an adverse effect on our assets and operations.

Risks Inherent in an Investment in Us

ArcLight indirectly controls the conduct of our business and the management of our operations. ArcLight has conflicts of interest with and limited fiduciary duties to us, which may permit them to favor their own interests to our detriment.

ArcLight is our sole equity-holder. Therefore, conflicts of interest may arise between ArcLight and its affiliates and subsidiaries, on the one hand, and us, on the other hand. In resolving those conflicts of interest, ArcLight may favor its own interests and the interests of its affiliates over the interests of the Company.

These conflicts include, among others, the following potential conflicts of interest:

ArcLight and its affiliates may engage in competition with us under certain circumstances;
Neither our operating agreement nor any other agreement requires ArcLight or its affiliates to pursue a business strategy that favors us. This entitles ArcLight to consider only the interests and factors that it desires, and it has no duty or obligation to give any consideration to any interest of, or factors affecting, us, our affiliates or any other security-holder. ArcLight’s directors and officers have fiduciary duties to make decisions in the best interests of ArcLight, which may be contrary to our interests or the interests of our customers;
Our operating agreement does not restrict ArcLight from causing us to pay it or its affiliates for any services rendered to us or entering into additional contractual arrangements with any of these entities on our behalf;
ArcLight is allowed to take into account the interests of parties other than us, such as ArcLight, or its affiliates, in resolving conflicts of interest. Specifically, in determining whether a transaction or resolution is “fair and reasonable,” ArcLight may consider the totality of the relationships between the parties involved, including other transactions that may be particularly advantageous or beneficial to us;
Our officers are officers of affiliates of Arclight, and we are managed by TLP Finance, our direct parent and a controlled subsidiary of ArcLight, and also devote significant time to the business of these entities and are compensated accordingly;
ArcLight has limited its liability and reduced its fiduciary duties, and also has restricted the remedies available to any party for actions that, without the limitations, might constitute breaches of fiduciary duty.

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ArcLight will not have any liability to us for decisions made in its capacity as our sole equity-holder so long as it acted in good faith, meaning it believed that its decision was in the best interests of our company;
ArcLight determines the amount and timing of acquisitions and dispositions, capital expenditures, borrowings, issuance of additional securities, and reserves, each of which can affect our cash flows;
ArcLight determines the amount and timing of any capital expenditures by our company and whether a capital expenditure is a maintenance capital expenditure, which reduces operating surplus, or an expansion capital expenditure, which does not reduce operating surplus, which can affect our cash flows;
ArcLight and its officers and directors will not be liable for monetary damages to us, our security-holders or assignees for any acts or omissions unless there has been a final and non-appealable judgment entered by a court of competent jurisdiction determining that ArcLight or those other persons acted in bad faith or engaged in fraud or willful misconduct; or
ArcLight decides whether to retain separate counsel, accountants or others to perform services on our behalf.

ArcLight and its affiliates may compete with us and do not have any obligation to present business opportunities to us.

Neither our operating agreement nor any other agreement will prohibit ArcLight or its affiliates from owning assets or engaging in businesses that compete directly or indirectly with us. In addition, ArcLight and its affiliates may acquire, construct or dispose of midstream assets or other assets in the future without any obligation to offer us the opportunity to purchase any of those assets. ArcLight and its affiliates are large, established participants in the energy industry and may have greater resources than we have, which may make it more difficult for us to compete with these entities with respect to commercial activities as well as for acquisition opportunities. As a result, competition from ArcLight and its affiliates could materially adversely impact our results of operations and cash flows.

General Risks

We could be negatively impacted by the recent outbreak of coronavirus (COVID-19).

In light of the uncertain and rapidly evolving situation relating to the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), this public health concern could pose a risk to our employees, our customers, our vendors and the communities in which we operate, which could negatively impact our business. The extent to which the coronavirus (COVID-19) may impact our business will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted at this time. We may experience, among other impacts, (a) customer shutdowns to prevent spread of the virus, which could, among other things, have an impact on any excess throughput or ancillary services we might otherwise provide for our customers, and (b) limitations on our ability to execute on our business plan, including as a result of employee impacts from illness or school closures and other community response measures, all of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. We continue to monitor the situation, have actively implanted policies and practices to address the situation, and may adjust our current policies and practices as more information and guidance become available.

Any acquisitions we make are subject to substantial risks, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Any acquisition involves potential risks, including risks that we may:

fail to realize anticipated benefits, such as cost-savings or cash flow enhancements;
decrease our liquidity by using a significant portion of our available cash or borrowing capacity to finance acquisitions;

30


significantly increase our interest expense or financial leverage if we incur additional debt to finance acquisitions;
encounter difficulties operating in new geographic areas or new lines of business;
be unable to secure adequate customer commitments to use the acquired systems or facilities;
incur or assume unanticipated liabilities, losses or costs associated with the business or assets acquired for which we are not indemnified or for which the indemnity is inadequate;
be unable to hire, train or retain qualified personnel to manage and operate our growing business and assets;
be unable to successfully integrate the assets or businesses we acquire;
less effectively manage our historical assets because of the diversion of management’s attention; or
incur other significant charges, such as impairment of goodwill or other intangible assets, asset devaluation or restructuring charges.

If any acquisitions we ultimately consummate result in one or more of these outcomes, our financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected.

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

We are party to various legal, regulatory and other matters arising from the day-to-day operations of our business that may result in claims against us. While the ultimate impact of any proceedings cannot be predicted with certainty, our management believes that the resolution of any of our pending legal proceedings will not have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

Part II

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON UNITS, RELATED UNITHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

MARKET FOR COMMON UNITS

As a result of the Take-Private Transaction, TransMontaigne Partners common units ceased to be publicly traded, and the TransMontaigne Partner’s common units are no longer listed on the NYSE.

31


ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following table sets forth our selected historical consolidated financial data for the periods and as of the dates indicated. The following selected financial data for each of the years in the five-year period ended December 31, 2020, has been derived from our consolidated financial statements. You should not expect the results for any prior periods to be indicative of the results that may be achieved in future periods. You should read the following information together with our historical consolidated financial statements and related notes and with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

Years ended December 31,

 

2020 (1) (2)

2019 (1) (2)

2018 (1) (2)

2017 (1) (2)

2016 (2)

 

(in thousands)

 

Operations Data:

Revenue

$

277,093

    

$

263,042

    

$

232,297

    

$

184,447

    

$

164,943

Operating costs and expenses

 

(102,611)

 

(103,022)

 

(98,977)

(81,327)

(83,281)

General and administrative expenses

 

(21,657)

 

(23,660)

 

(23,707)

(23,692)

(18,571)

Insurance expenses

 

(4,973)

 

(4,995)

 

(4,976)

(4,064)

(4,081)

Deferred compensation expense

 

(1,834)

 

(2,308)

 

(3,478)

(2,999)

(3,263)

Depreciation and amortization

 

(57,400)

 

(52,535)

 

(49,793)

(36,188)

(32,383)

Earnings from unconsolidated affiliates

 

6,498

 

4,894

 

8,852

7,071

10,029

Gain from insurance proceeds

3,351

Loss on disposition of assets

 

 

 

(901)

Operating income

 

95,116

 

84,767

 

59,317

43,248

33,393

Other expenses:

Interest expense

 

(31,194)

 

(36,196)

 

(31,900)

(10,473)

(7,787)

Amortization of deferred debt issuance costs

 

(2,574)

 

(2,657)

 

(3,037)

(1,221)

(818)

Net earnings

$

61,348

$

45,914

$

24,380

$

31,554

$

24,788

Other Financial Data:

Net cash provided by operating activities

$

130,041

$

100,589

$

103,210

$

86,037

$

63,414

Net cash used in investing activities

$

(79,994)

$

(90,967)

$

(56,869)

$

(336,955)

$

(69,089)

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

$

(50,542)

$

(9,558)

$

(46,284)

$

250,875

$

(10,106)

Balance Sheet Data (at period end):

Property, plant and equipment, net

$

737,501

$

727,220

$

689,170

$

656,092

$

418,130

Investments in unconsolidated affiliates

$

225,948

$

225,425

$

227,031

$

233,181

$

241,093

Total assets

$

1,069,206

$

1,072,053

$

1,002,008

$

988,082

$

691,858

Long-term debt

$

644,659

$

644,162

$

598,622

$

593,200

$

291,800

Equity

$

335,293

$

324,087

$

338,585

$

361,940

$

368,607


(1)On December 15, 2017, we acquired the West Coast terminals from a third party for a total purchase price of $276.8 million. The West Coast terminals represent two waterborne refined product and crude oil terminals located in the San Francisco Bay Area refining complex with a total of 63 storage tanks with approximately 5.4 million barrels of active storage capacity. The West Coast terminals have access to domestic and international crude oil and refined products markets through marine, pipeline, truck and rail logistics capabilities. The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the assets, liabilities and results of operations of the West Coast terminals from December 15, 2017.
(2)The June 1, 2019 TMS Contribution has been recorded at carryover basis as a reorganization of entities under common control. As such, prior periods include the assets, liabilities, and results of operations of TMS as of and for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017 and eleven months ended 2016. For comparability, an estimate of the results of operations of TMS is included for January 2016.

32


ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion and analysis of the results of operations and financial condition should be read in conjunction with the accompanying consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

OVERVIEW

We are a terminaling and transportation company with assets and operations in the United States along the Gulf Coast, in the Midwest, in Houston and Brownsville, Texas, along the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, in the Southeast and along the West Coast. We provide integrated terminaling, storage, transportation and related services for customers engaged in the distribution and marketing of light refined petroleum products, heavy refined petroleum products, renewable products, crude oil, chemicals, fertilizers and other liquid products. Light refined products include gasolines, diesel fuels, heating oil and jet fuels. Heavy refined products include residual fuel oils and asphalt. Renewable products include ethanol, biodiesel, renewable diesel and relevant feedstocks. We do not purchase or market products that we handle or transport. Therefore, we do not have direct exposure to changes in commodity prices, except for the value of product gains and losses arising from terminaling services agreements with certain customers, which accounts for a small portion of our revenue.

We use our owned and operated terminaling facilities to, among other things: receive refined products and renewable products from the pipeline, ship, barge or railcar making delivery on behalf of our customers and transfer those products to the tanks located at our terminals; store the products in our tanks for our customers; monitor the volume of the products stored in our tanks; distribute the products out of our terminals in vessels, railcars or truckloads using truck racks and other distribution equipment located at our terminals, including pipelines; and heat residual fuel oils and asphalt stored in our tanks. We also continue to provide ethanol logistics services and other services to the growing renewable products market, as well as to engage in blending activities related to the throughput process.

Following the consummation of our Take-Private Transaction in February of 2019, we are wholly owned by TLP Finance Holdings, LLC, an indirect controlled subsidiary of ArcLight Energy Partners Fund VI, L.P.

NATURE OF ASSETS

Gulf Coast Operations. Our Gulf Coast terminals consist of eight active product terminals and comprise the largest terminal network in Florida. These terminals have approximately 6.9 million barrels of aggregate active storage capacity in ports including Port Everglades, Miami and Cape Canaveral, which are among the busiest cruise ship ports in the nation. At our Gulf Coast terminals, we handle refined and renewable products and crude oil on behalf of, and provide integrated terminaling services to, customers engaged in the distribution and marketing of products and crude oil. Our Gulf Coast terminals receive products from vessels on behalf of our customers. In addition, our Jacksonville terminal also receives asphalt by rail, and our Port Everglades (North) terminal also receives product by truck. We distribute by truck or barge at all of our Gulf Coast terminals. In addition, we distribute products by pipeline at our Port Everglades and Tampa terminals. A major oil company retains an ownership interest, ranging from 25% to 50%, in specific tank capacity at our Port Everglades (South) terminal. We manage and operate the Port Everglades (South) terminal, and we are reimbursed by the major oil company for its proportionate share of our operating and maintenance costs.

Midwest Terminals. In Missouri and Arkansas, we own and operate the Razorback pipeline and terminals in Mount Vernon, Missouri, at the origin of the pipeline and in Rogers, Arkansas, at the terminus of the pipeline. We refer to these two terminals collectively as the Razorback terminals. The Razorback pipeline is a 67-mile, 8-inch diameter interstate common carrier pipeline that transports light refined product from our terminal at Mount Vernon, where it is interconnected with a pipeline system owned by a third party, to our terminal at Rogers. The Razorback pipeline has a capacity of approximately 30,000 barrels per day. The Razorback terminals have approximately 0.4 million barrels of aggregate active storage capacity. Effective January 1, 2021, a third party leases the capacity, and will take operatorship, of the Razorback pipeline and the terminals in Mount Vernon, Missouri and in Rogers, Arkansas. Our Rogers facility is the only products terminal located in Northwest Arkansas.

33


We lease land in Cushing, Oklahoma and constructed storage tanks and associated infrastructure on the property for the receipt of crude oil by truck and pipeline, the blending of crude oil and the storage of approximately 1.0 million barrels of crude oil.

We also own and operate a terminal facility in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma with approximately 0.2 million barrels of aggregate active storage capacity. Our Oklahoma City terminal receives gasolines and diesel fuels from a pipeline system owned by a third party for delivery via our truck rack for redistribution to locations throughout the Oklahoma City region.

Brownsville, Texas Operations. We own and operate a product terminal with approximately 1.5 million barrels of aggregate active storage capacity and related ancillary facilities in Brownsville independent of the Frontera joint venture, as well as the Diamondback pipeline which handles liquid product movements between south Texas and Mexico. At our Brownsville terminal we handle refined petroleum products, chemicals, vegetable oils, naphtha, wax and propane on behalf of, and provide integrated terminaling services to, customers engaged in the distribution and marketing of products and natural gas liquids. Our Brownsville facilities receive products on behalf of our customers from vessels, by truck or railcar.

The Diamondback pipeline consists of an 8” pipeline that previously transported propane approximately 16 miles from our Brownsville facilities to the U.S./Mexico border and a 6” pipeline, which runs parallel to the 8” pipeline that can be used by us in the future to transport additional refined products to Matamoros, Mexico. Operations on the Diamondback pipeline were shut down in the first quarter of 2018; however, we expect to recommission the Diamondback Pipeline and resume operations on both the 8” pipeline, providing gasoline service thereon, and the previously idle 6” pipeline, providing diesel service thereon, in the second quarter 2021, and have previously filed revised tariffs with the FERC to support such activities.

River Operations. Our River terminals are composed of 11 active product terminals located along the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers with approximately 2.2 million barrels of aggregate active storage capacity. Our River operations also include a dock facility in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, which is the only direct waterborne connection between the Colonial pipeline and Mississippi River waterborne transportation. At our River terminals, we handle gasolines, diesel fuels, heating oil, chemicals and fertilizers on behalf of, and provide integrated terminaling services to, customers engaged in the distribution and marketing of products and industrial and commercial end-users. Our River terminals receive products from vessels and barges on behalf of our customers and distribute products primarily to trucks and barges.

Southeast Operations. Our Southeast terminals consist of 20 active product terminals located along the Colonial and Plantation pipelines in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia with an aggregate active storage capacity of approximately 12.3 million barrels. At our Southeast terminals, we handle gasolines, diesel fuels, ethanol, biodiesel, jet fuel and heating oil on behalf of, and provide integrated terminaling services to, customers engaged in the distribution and marketing of refined products. Our Southeast terminals primarily receive products from the Plantation and Colonial pipelines on behalf of our customers and distribute products primarily to trucks with the exception of the Collins terminal. The Collins terminal is the only independent terminal capable of storing and redelivering product to, from and between the Colonial and Plantation pipelines.

West Coast Operations. Our West Coast terminals consist of two active product terminals with approximately 5.4 million barrels of aggregate active storage capacity. The terminals are well positioned with pipeline connections to three of the five local refineries and marine access to all five in the San Francisco Bay area and direct connection to the Northern California products pipeline distribution system. At our West Coast terminals, we handle crude oil, gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, gasoline blend stocks, fuel oil, Avgas and ethanol and other renewable products on behalf of, and provide integrated terminaling services to, customers engaged in the distribution and marketing of products. Our West Coast terminals primarily receive products from vessels, pipeline and rail facilities on behalf of our customers and distribute products primarily via vessel, pipeline, truck and rail facilities.

Investment in Frontera. On April 1, 2011, we contributed approximately 1.5 million barrels of light petroleum product storage capacity, as well as related ancillary facilities, to the Frontera joint venture, in exchange for a cash

34


payment of approximately $25.6 million and a 50% ownership interest in the Frontera joint venture. An affiliate of PEMEX, Mexico’s state owned petroleum company, acquired the remaining 50% ownership interest in Frontera for a cash payment of approximately $25.6 million. We operate the Frontera assets under an operations and reimbursement agreement between us and Frontera. Frontera has approximately 1.7 million barrels of aggregate active storage capacity. Our 50% ownership interest does not allow us to control Frontera, but does allow us to exercise significant influence over its operations. Accordingly, we account for our investment in Frontera under the equity method of accounting.

Investment in BOSTCO. On December 20, 2012, we acquired a 42.5% Class A ownership interest in BOSTCO from Kinder Morgan Battleground Oil, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Kinder Morgan. BOSTCO is a terminal facility on the Houston Ship Channel designed to handle residual fuel, feedstocks, distillates and other black oils. BOSTCO currently has fully subscribed capacity of approximately 7.1 million barrels. Our investment in BOSTCO entitles us to appoint a member to the Board of Managers of BOSTCO, to vote our proportionate ownership share on general governance matters and to certain rights of approval over significant changes in, or expansion of, BOSTCO’s business. Kinder Morgan is responsible for managing BOSTCO’s day-to-day operations. Our 42.5% Class A ownership interest does not allow us to control BOSTCO, but does allow us to exercise significant influence over its operations. Accordingly, we account for our investment in BOSTCO under the equity method of accounting.

Central Services. Our Central services segment primarily represents the costs of employees performing operating oversight functions, engineering, health, safety and environmental services to our terminals and terminals that we operate or manage, including for affiliate terminals owned by ArcLight. In addition, Central services represent the cost of employees at affiliate terminals owned by ArcLight that we operate. We receive a fee from these affiliates based on our costs incurred.

NATURE OF REVENUE AND EXPENSES

We generate revenue from our terminal and pipeline transportation operations by charging fees for providing integrated terminaling, transportation and related services. We have several significant customer relationships that made up approximately 79% of the total revenue for the year ended December 31, 2020. These relationships include Pilot Flying J, Freepoint Commodities LLC, RaceTrac Petroleum Inc., Atlantic Trading and Marketing, Tesoro, Musket Corporation, BP, Associated Asphalt, Magellan Pipeline Company, L.P., United States Government, Valero Marketing and Supply Company, PMI Trading Ltd., Exxon Mobil Oil Corporation, World Fuel Services Corporation, Chevron Corporation, Shell, Marathon Petroleum, Gunvor and Vitol.

The fees we charge, our other sources of revenue and our direct costs and expenses are described below.

Terminaling services fees. Our terminaling services agreements are structured as either throughput agreements or storage agreements. Our throughput agreements contain provisions that require our customers to make minimum payments, which are based on contractually established minimum volume of throughput of the customer’s product at our facilities over a stipulated period of time. Due to this minimum payment arrangement, we recognize a fixed amount of revenue from the customer over a certain period of time, even if the customer throughputs less than the minimum volume of product during that period. In addition, if a customer throughputs a volume of product exceeding the minimum volume, we would recognize additional revenue on this incremental volume. Our storage agreements require our customers to make minimum payments based on the volume of storage capacity available to the customer under the agreement, which results in a fixed amount of recognized revenue. We refer to the fixed amount of revenue recognized pursuant to our terminaling services agreements as being “firm commitments.” Revenue recognized in excess of firm commitments and revenue recognized based solely on the volume of product distributed or injected are referred to as “ancillary.” In addition, ancillary revenue also includes fees received from ancillary services including heating and mixing of stored products, product transfer, railcar handling, butane blending, proceeds from the sale of product gains, wharfage and vapor recovery.

Pipeline transportation fees. We earned pipeline transportation fees at our Diamondback pipeline under a capacity reservation agreement. Revenue associated with the capacity reservation agreement is recognized ratably over the respective term, regardless of whether the capacity is actually utilized. Once our Brownsville terminal expansion efforts are complete, including the conversion of our Diamondback pipeline to transport diesel and gasoline, we then

35


expect to earn pipeline transportation fees at our Diamondback pipeline based on the volume of product transported subject to minimum volume commitments. We earn pipeline transportation fees at our Razorback pipeline based on an allocation of the aggregate fees charged under the capacity agreement with our customer who has contracted for 100% of our Razorback system.

Management fees. We manage and operate certain tank capacity at our Port Everglades South terminal for a major oil company and receive a reimbursement of its proportionate share of operating and maintenance costs. We manage and operate the Frontera joint venture and receive a management fee based on our costs incurred. We lease land under operating leases as the lessor or sublessor with third parties and affiliates. We also managed and operated for an affiliate of PEMEX, Mexico’s state-owned petroleum company, a products pipeline connected to our Brownsville terminal facility and received a management fee through August 23, 2018. We manage and operate rail sites at certain Southeast terminals on behalf of a major oil company and receive reimbursement for operating and maintenance costs. We manage and operate terminals that are owned by affiliates of ArcLight, including for SeaPort Midstream Partners in Seattle, Washington and Portland, Oregon and another terminal for SeaPort Sound in Tacoma, Washington and receive a management fee based on our costs incurred. We also manage additional terminal facilities that are owned by affiliates of ArcLight, including Lucknow-Highspire Terminals in Pennsylvania, and, prior to July 1, 2019, the Baltimore Terminal.

Operating costs and expenses. The operating costs and expenses of our operations include the wages and employee benefits, utilities, communications, repairs and maintenance, rent, property taxes, vehicle expenses, environmental compliance costs, materials and supplies needed to operate our terminals and pipelines.

General and administrative expenses. General and administrative expenses cover the costs of corporate functions such as legal, accounting, treasury, insurance administration and claims processing, information technology, human resources, credit, payroll, taxes and other corporate services. General and administrative expenses also include third party accounting costs associated with annual and quarterly reports and tax return preparation and distribution, and legal fees.

Insurance expenses. Insurance expenses include charges for insurance premiums to cover costs of insuring activities such as property, casualty, pollution, automobile, directors’ and officers’ liability, and other insurable risks.

SIGNIFICANT DEVELOPMENTS SINCE THE FILING OF OUR PRIOR YEAR FORM 10-K

COVID-19. The ongoing pandemic involving COVID-19, a highly transmissible and pathogenic coronavirus, has resulted in restrictions on, and a public response with respect to, travel and economic activity that have reduced demand and pricing for crude oil, refined petroleum products, renewable products, and other products that we handle. The reduction in commodity price in 2020 and demand for products that we handle has, for the time being, resulted in a strong demand for storage capacity. For example, in late March 2020, we contracted approximately 1,000,000 barrels of capacity at our Cushing, Oklahoma terminal and approximately 705,000 barrels of available capacity at our Collins, Mississippi terminal that had recently become available. Currently, approximately 83% of our terminaling services revenue is derived from firm commitments pursuant to our multi-year agreements that require our customers to make minimum payments based on minimum volumes of throughput of the customer’s product or the volume of storage capacity available to the customer under the agreement. Further, the majority of our terminaling services agreements have a remaining term in excess of one year. As a result, we expect the negative impacts to our business to continue to be primarily limited to delays in our capital expansion projects, which may be occurring, in part, due to state and local government responses to COVID-19.

We have taken proactive and sustained measures to deliver our services safely and reliably during the COVID-19 pandemic. At the outset of the pandemic, we activated an Incident Support Team to execute our Infectious Disease Control Policy, and to focus on a number of priorities, including: (i) implement basic infection prevention techniques and other workplace protections in our business operations; (ii) identify and isolate individuals suspected of being infected by COVID-19; (iii) identify risk factors in our workforce that may increase the possibility of exposure to COVID-19; and (iv) develop a contingency plan for the possibility that a serious outbreak does occur in the area of any of our terminals. We are following recommendations from public health authorities and have taken steps to help prevent

36


our employees’ exposure to the spread of COVID-19, including, where practical, work-at-home plans enacted in March 2020 and the implementation of business continuity plans to enable the integrity of our operations and protect the health of our employees.

To date, our operations and employees have not been materially impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, including the recent rise in caseload in the majority of the country; thereby allowing our customers continued access and utilization of our strategic terminal network. We continue to employ all safety processes and procedures in the normal course. We provide an essential service across our markets, which has been recognized in most relevant regulatory guidance regarding COVID-19. Further, we have not experienced any material instance of our customers failing to meet their contractual commitments to us as a result of these recent developments. There continue to be too many variables and uncertainties regarding COVID-19 — including the continued spread of the virus, the duration and severity of the

outbreak and the extent of travel restrictions and business closures, and medical advancements in treating and vaccinating against the disease and the availability and the resulting economic impact of any such advancements or vaccinations — to reasonably predict the potential longer-term impact of COVID-19 on our business and operations. We continue to monitor the situation, have actively implemented policies and practices to address the situation and actively protect our employees, and may adjust our current policies and practices as more information and guidance become available.

Expansion of Assets

Expansion of our Brownsville operations.  Our Brownsville expansion project, which is underpinned by new long-term agreements, includes the construction of approximately 805,000 barrels of additional liquids storage capacity, the construction of gasoline railcar loading capabilities and the conversion of our Diamondback pipeline to transport diesel and gasoline across the U.S./Mexico border. The Diamondback pipeline is comprised of an 8” pipeline that previously transported propane, as well as a 6” pipeline, which runs parallel to the 8” pipeline, that has been idle and both can be used to transport refined products to Matamoros, Mexico. The majority of the additional liquids storage capacity was placed into commercial service during the first three quarters of 2019 with a remaining 175,000 barrels of capacity to be completed in the first quarter of 2021. We expect to recommission the Diamondback pipeline and resume operations on both the 8” pipeline and the previously idle 6” pipeline in the second quarter of 2021. We expect the construction of the gasoline railcar loading capabilities to be completed in the first quarter 2021. The anticipated aggregate cost of these expansion efforts is estimated to be approximately $75 million.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES

A summary of the significant accounting policies that we have adopted and followed in the preparation of our historical consolidated financial statements is detailed in Note 1 of Notes to consolidated financial statements. Certain of these accounting policies require the use of estimates. The following estimates, in management’s opinion, are subjective in nature, require the exercise of judgment and involve complex analyses: useful lives of our plant and equipment and accrued environmental obligations. These estimates are based on our knowledge and understanding of current conditions and actions we may take in the future. Changes in these estimates will occur as a result of the passage of time and the occurrence of future events. Subsequent changes in these estimates may have a significant impact on our financial condition and results of operations (see Note 1 of Notes to consolidated financial statements).

Useful lives of plant and equipment. We calculate depreciation using the straight-line method, based on estimated useful lives of our assets. These estimates are based on various factors including age (in the case of acquired assets), manufacturing specifications, technological advances and historical data concerning useful lives of similar assets. Uncertainties that impact these estimates include changes in laws and regulations relating to restoration, economic conditions and supply and demand in the area. When assets are put into service, we make estimates with respect to useful lives that we believe to be reasonable. However, subsequent events could cause us to change our estimates, thus impacting the future calculation of depreciation. Estimated useful lives are 15 to 25 years for terminals and pipelines and 3 to 25 years for furniture, fixtures and equipment.

Accrued environmental obligations. At December 31, 2020, we have an accrued liability of approximately $1.0 million representing our best estimate of the undiscounted future payments we expect to pay for environmental

37


costs to remediate existing conditions. Estimates of our environmental obligations are subject to change due to a number of factors and judgments involved in the estimation process, including the early stage of investigation at certain sites, the lengthy time frames required to complete remediation, technology changes affecting remediation methods, alternative remediation methods and strategies and changes in environmental laws and regulations. Changes in our estimates and assumptions may occur as a result of the passage of time and the occurrence of future events.

Costs incurred to remediate existing contamination at the terminals have been, and are expected in the future to be, insignificant. In connection with our acquisition of the Florida (other than Pensacola), Midwest, Brownsville, Texas, River, Southeast, and Pensacola, Florida terminal and facilities, a third party agreed to indemnify us against certain potential environmental claims, losses and expenses. Based on our current knowledge, we expect that the active remediation projects subject to the benefit of this indemnification obligation are winding down and will not involve material additional claims, losses, and expenses. Nonetheless, the forgoing environmental indemnification obligations of a third party to us remain in place and were not affected by the Take-Private Transaction.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS—YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020, 2019 AND 2018

ANALYSIS OF REVENUE

Total revenue. We derive revenue from our terminal and pipeline transportation operations by charging fees for providing integrated terminaling, transportation and related services. Our total revenue by category was as follows (in thousands):

Total Revenue by Business Category

Year ended

Year ended

Year ended

December 31,

December 31,

December 31,

    

2020

    

2019

    

2018

 

Terminaling services fees

$

255,009

$

240,950

$

216,231

Pipeline transportation fees

3,519

3,457

3,295

Management fees

18,565

18,635

12,771

Revenue

$

277,093

$

263,042

$

232,297

See discussion below for a detailed analysis of terminaling services fees, pipeline transportation fees and management fees included in the table above.

We operate our business and report our results of operations in seven principal business segments: (i) Gulf Coast terminals, (ii) Midwest terminals, (iii) Brownsville terminals including management of Frontera, (iv) River terminals, (v) Southeast terminals, (vi) West Coast terminals and (vii) Central services. Our Central services segment primarily represents the costs of employees performing operating oversight functions, engineering, health, safety and environmental services to our terminals and terminals that we operate or manage, including for affiliate terminals owned by ArcLight. In addition, Central services represent the cost of employees at affiliate terminals owned by ArcLight that we operate. We receive a fee from these affiliates based on our costs incurred.

38


Total Revenue by Business Segment

Year ended

Year ended

Year ended

December 31,

December 31,

December 31,

    

2020

    

2019

    

2018

 

Gulf Coast terminals

$

76,907

$

73,416

$

64,622

Midwest terminals

 

10,267

 

11,655

11,899

Brownsville terminals

 

21,969

 

18,953

17,246

River terminals

 

11,700

 

10,233

10,654

Southeast terminals

 

89,520

 

88,777

83,712

West Coast terminals

 

54,470

 

48,196

39,960

Central services

12,260

11,812

4,204

Revenue

$

277,093

$

263,042

$

232,297

Total revenue by business segment is presented and further analyzed below by category of revenue.

Terminaling services fees. Our terminaling services agreements are structured as either throughput agreements or storage agreements. Our throughput agreements contain provisions that require our customers to make minimum payments, which are based on contractually established minimum volume of throughput of the customer’s product at our facilities over a stipulated period of time. Due to this minimum payment arrangement, we recognize a fixed amount of revenue from the customer over a certain period of time, even if the customer throughputs less than the minimum volume of product during that period. In addition, if a customer throughputs a volume of product exceeding the minimum volume, we would recognize additional revenue on this incremental volume. Our storage agreements require our customers to make minimum payments based on the volume of storage capacity available to the customer under the agreement, which results in a fixed amount of recognized revenue.

We refer to the fixed amount of revenue recognized pursuant to our terminaling services agreements as being “firm commitments.” Revenue recognized in excess of firm commitments and revenue recognized based solely on the volume of product distributed or injected are referred to as “ancillary.” In addition, “ancillary” revenue also includes fees received from ancillary services including heating and mixing of stored products, product transfer, railcar handling, butane blending, proceeds from the sale of product gains, wharfage and vapor recovery.

Terminaling Services Fees

by Business Segment

Year ended

Year ended

Year ended

December 31,

December 31,

December 31,

    

2020

    

2019

    

2018

Gulf Coast terminals

$

76,875

$

73,380

$

64,338

Midwest terminals

8,358

9,804

10,127

Brownsville terminals

15,071

11,560

8,339

River terminals

11,700

10,233

10,654

Southeast terminals

88,573

87,813

82,821

West Coast terminals

54,432

48,160

39,952

Central services

Terminaling services fees

$

255,009

$

240,950

$

216,231

The increase in terminaling services fees at our Gulf Coast terminals for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 is primarily a result of recontracting capacity to third-party customers at higher rates. The decrease in terminaling services fees at our Midwest terminals for the year ended December 31, 2020 is primarily a result of our capacity in Cushing, Oklahoma being off-contract in the first quarter of 2020. The increase in terminaling services fees at our Brownsville terminals for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 is primarily a result of placing into service approximately 0.6 million barrels of new tank capacity in various stages throughout 2019. The increase in terminaling services fees at our River terminals for the year ended December 31, 2020 is primarily a result of contracting available capacity to third-party customers. The increase in terminaling services fees at our Southeast terminals for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 is primarily a result of placing into service approximately 0.9 million barrels of new tank capacity at our Collins terminal in the first quarter of 2019. The increase in terminaling services fees at our

39


West Coast terminals for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 is primarily a result of contracting available capacity to third-party customers, re-contracting capacity at higher rates and placing into service approximately 0.1 million barrels of new tank capacity in the first quarter of 2019.

Included in terminaling services fees for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018 are fees charged to affiliates of approximately $11.3 million, $11.2 million and $11.0 million, respectively.

The “firm commitments” and “ancillary” revenue included in terminaling services fees were as follows (in thousands):

 

Firm Commitments and Ancillary Terminaling Services Fees

 

Year ended

    

Year ended

    

Year ended

 

December 31,

December 31,

December 31,

 

2020

2019

2018

Firm commitments

$

212,403

$

192,440

$

171,774

Ancillary

42,606

48,510

44,457

Terminaling services fees

$

255,009

$

240,950

$

216,231

The remaining terms on the terminaling services agreements that generated “firm commitments” for the year ended December 31, 2020 were as follows (in thousands):

Less than 1 year remaining

$

45,038

21%

1 year or more, but less than 3 years remaining

 

69,431

32%

3 years or more, but less than 5 years remaining

 

52,099

25%

5 years or more remaining (1)

 

45,835

22%

Total firm commitments for the year ended December 31, 2020

$

212,403


(1)We have a terminaling services agreement with a third party relating to our Southeast terminals that will continue unless and until the third party provides at least 24 months’ prior notice of its intent to terminate the agreement. Effective at any time from and after July 31, 2040, we have the right to terminate the agreement by providing at least 24 months’ prior notice of our intent to terminate the agreement. We do not believe the third party will terminate the agreement prior to July 31, 2040; therefore we have presented the firm commitments related to this terminaling services agreement in the 5 years or more remaining category in the table above.

Pipeline transportation fees. We earned pipeline transportation fees at our Diamondback pipeline under a capacity reservation agreement. Revenue associated with the capacity reservation agreement is recognized ratably over the respective term, regardless of whether the capacity is actually utilized. Once our Brownsville terminal expansion efforts are complete, including the conversion of our Diamondback pipeline to transport diesel and gasoline, we then expect to earn pipeline transportation fees at our Diamondback pipeline based on the volume of product transported subject to minimum volume commitments. We earn pipeline transportation fees at our Razorback pipeline based on an allocation of the aggregate fees charged under the capacity agreement with our customer who has contracted for 100% of our Razorback system.

40


The pipeline transportation fees by business segments were as follows (in thousands):

 

Pipeline Transportation Fees

 

by Business Segment

Year ended

Year ended

Year ended

 

December 31,

December 31,

December 31,

    

 

2020

    

2019

    

2018

Gulf Coast terminals

$

$

$

Midwest terminals

1,909

1,851

1,772

Brownsville terminals

1,610

1,606

1,523

River terminals

Southeast terminals

West Coast terminals

Central services

Pipeline transportation fees

$

3,519

$

3,457

$

3,295

Included in pipeline transportation fees for each of the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018 are fees charged to affiliates of approximately $nil.

Management fees. We manage and operate certain tank capacity at our Port Everglades South terminal for a major oil company and receive a reimbursement of its proportionate share of operating and maintenance costs. We manage and operate the Frontera joint venture and receive a management fee based on our costs incurred. We lease land under operating leases as the lessor or sublessor with third parties and affiliates. We also managed and operated for an affiliate of PEMEX, Mexico’s state-owned petroleum company, a products pipeline connected to our Brownsville terminal facility and received a management fee through August 23, 2018. We manage and operate rail sites at certain Southeast terminals on behalf of a major oil company and receive reimbursement for operating and maintenance costs. We manage and operate terminals that are owned by affiliates of ArcLight, including for SeaPort Midstream Partners in Seattle, Washington and Portland, Oregon and another terminal for SeaPort Sound in Tacoma, Washington and receive a management fee based on our costs incurred. We also manage additional terminal facilities that are owned by affiliates of ArcLight, including Lucknow-Highspire Terminals in Pennsylvania, and, prior to July 1, 2019, the Baltimore Terminal. The management fees by business segments were as follows (in thousands):

 

Management Fees 

 

by Business Segment

    

 

Year ended

    

Year ended

    

Year ended

 

December 31,

December 31,

December 31,

    

    

2020

2019

2018

Gulf Coast terminals

$

32

$

36

$

284

Midwest terminals

 

 

 

Brownsville terminals

 

5,288

 

5,787

 

7,384

River terminals

 

 

 

Southeast terminals

 

947

 

964

 

891

West Coast terminals

 

38

 

36

 

8

Central services

12,260

11,812

4,204

Management fees

$

18,565

$

18,635

$

12,771

The decrease in Brownsville terminals management fees for the year ended December 31, 2019 is a result of no longer operating and managing for an affiliate of PEMEX, Mexico’s state-owned petroleum company, a products pipeline connected to our Brownsville terminal facility as of August 23, 2018. The increase in Central services management fees for the year ended December 31, 2019 is a result of operating and managing additional terminal facilities that are owned by affiliates of ArcLight including SeaPort Midstream Partners, SeaPort Sound, Lucknow-Highspire Terminals and, prior to July 1, 2019, the Baltimore Terminal. We began to operate SeaPort Midstream Partners in November 2017, SeaPort Sound and the Baltimore Terminal in November 2018, and we began to manage Lucknow-Highspire Terminals starting January 1, 2019. Our management of the Baltimore Terminal ended on July 1, 2019.

41


Included in management fees for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018 are fees charged to affiliates of approximately $17.5 million, $17.6 million and $10.0 million, respectively.

ANALYSIS OF COSTS AND EXPENSES

The operating costs and expenses of our operations include wages and employee benefits, utilities, communications, repairs and maintenance, rent, property taxes, vehicle expenses, environmental compliance costs, materials and supplies needed to operate our terminals and pipelines. Consistent with historical trends across our terminaling and transportation facilities, repairs and maintenance expenses can vary from period to period based on project maintenance schedules and other factors such as weather. The operating costs and expenses of our operations were as follows (in thousands):

 

Operating Costs and Expenses

 

 

Year ended

    

Year ended

    

Year ended

 

 

December 31,

December 31,

December 31,

 

 

2020

2019

2018

 

Wages and employee benefits

$

48,983

$

48,589

$

42,527

Utilities and communication charges

 

9,140

 

10,119

 

10,186

Repairs and maintenance

 

14,849

 

14,205

 

14,624

Office, rentals and property taxes

 

13,933

 

14,193

 

13,091

Vehicles and fuel costs

 

1,082

 

1,113

 

1,096

Environmental compliance costs

 

3,776

 

3,383

 

4,134

Contract services

2,304

2,247

 

3,010

Other

 

8,544

 

9,173

 

10,309

Operating costs and expenses

$

102,611

$

103,022

$

98,977

The operating costs and expenses of our business segments were as follows (in thousands):

 

Operating Costs and Expenses

 

by Business Segment

    

 

Year ended

    

Year ended

    

Year ended

 

December 31,

December 31,

December 31,

    

 

2020

2019

2018

Gulf Coast terminals

$

20,946

$

22,196

$

22,817

Midwest terminals

 

2,942

 

3,443

3,053

Brownsville terminals

 

9,749

 

9,053

7,812

River terminals

 

5,777

 

6,040

6,832

Southeast terminals

 

23,498

 

23,500

26,836

West Coast terminals

 

18,454

 

16,339

14,678

Central services

21,245

22,451

16,949

Operating costs and expenses

$

102,611

$

103,022

$

98,977

The increase in operating costs and expenses for Central services for the year ended December 31, 2019 is a result of operating terminal facilities that are owned by affiliates of ArcLight. We began to operate SeaPort Midstream Partners in November 2017 and SeaPort Sound and the Baltimore Terminal in November 2018. Our management of the Baltimore Terminal ended on July 1, 2019.

General and administrative expenses cover the costs of corporate functions such as legal, accounting, treasury, insurance administration and claims processing, information technology, human resources, credit, payroll, taxes and other corporate services. General and administrative expenses also include third party accounting costs associated with annual and quarterly reports and tax return preparation and distribution, and legal fees. The general and administrative expenses for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018 were approximately $21.7 million, $23.7 million and $23.7 million, respectively. The decrease in general and administrative expenses for the year ended December 31, 2020

42


is primarily attributable to one-time costs associated with the Take-Private Transaction in the prior years.

Insurance expenses include charges for insurance premiums to cover costs of insuring activities such as property, casualty, pollution, automobile, directors’ and officers’ liability, and other insurable risks. For each of the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018, insurance expense was approximately $5.0 million.

Deferred compensation expense includes expense associated with awards granted to certain key officers and employees who provide service to us that vest over future service periods and, prior to the Take-Private Transaction, grants to the independent directors of our general partner under our long-term incentive plan (which was terminated in connection with the Take-Private Transaction). Prior to the Take-Private Transaction, we had the intent and ability to settle the deferred compensation awards in our common units, and accordingly, we accounted for the awards as an equity award; following the Take-Private Transaction, we have the intent and ability to settle the awards in cash. The expenses associated with these deferred compensation awards were approximately $1.8 million, $2.3 million and $3.5 million for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

Depreciation and amortization expenses for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018 were approximately $57.4 million, $52.5 million and $49.8 million, respectively. The increase in depreciation and amortization expense for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 is primarily attributable to placing terminal expansion projects in service.

Interest expense for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018 was approximately $31.2 million, $36.2 million and $31.9 million, respectively. The decrease in interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2020 is primarily attributable to decreases in LIBOR based interest rates. The increase in interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2019 is primarily attributable to financing our growth capital projects with additional debt financing and increases in LIBOR based interest rates.

ANALYSIS OF INVESTMENTS IN UNCONSOLIDATED AFFILIATES

At December 31, 2020 and 2019, our investments in unconsolidated affiliates include a 42.5% Class A ownership interest in BOSTCO and a 50% ownership interest in Frontera. BOSTCO is a terminal facility located on the Houston Ship Channel that encompasses approximately 7.1 million barrels of distillate, residual and other black oil product storage. Class A and Class B ownership interests share in cash distributions on a 96.5% and 3.5% basis, respectively. Class B ownership interests do not have voting rights and are not required to make capital investments. Frontera is a terminal facility located in Brownsville, Texas that encompasses approximately 1.7 million barrels of light petroleum product storage, as well as related ancillary facilities.

The following table summarizes our investments in unconsolidated affiliates:

Percentage of

Carrying value

ownership

(in thousands)

December 31,

December 31,

December 31,

December 31,

    

2020

    

2019

    

2020

    

2019

 

BOSTCO

42.5

%  

42.5

%  

$

201,912

$

201,743

Frontera

50

%  

50

%  

 

24,036

 

23,682

Total investments in unconsolidated affiliates

$

225,948

$

225,425

43


Earnings from investments in unconsolidated affiliates were as follows (in thousands):

    

 

Year ended

    

Year ended

    

Year ended

 

December 31,

December 31,

December 31,

 

2020

2019

2018

BOSTCO

    

$

3,933

$

2,356

$

5,767

Frontera

 

2,565

 

2,538

 

3,085

Total earnings from investments in unconsolidated affiliates

$

6,498

$

4,894

$

8,852

Additional capital investments in unconsolidated affiliates were as follows (in thousands):

    

 

Year ended

    

Year ended

    

Year ended

 

December 31,

December 31,

December 31,

    

 

2020

2019

2018

BOSTCO

$

7,257

$

4,707

$

Frontera

 

 

225

 

1,413

Additional capital investments in unconsolidated affiliates

$

7,257

$

4,932

$

1,413

Cash distributions received from unconsolidated affiliates were as follows (in thousands):

    

 

Year ended

    

Year ended

    

Year ended

 

December 31,

December 31,

December 31,

    

 

2020

2019

2018

BOSTCO

$

11,021

$

8,325

$

12,135

Frontera

 

2,211

 

3,107

 

4,280

Cash distributions received from unconsolidated affiliates

$

13,232

$

11,432

$

16,415

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

Our primary liquidity needs are to fund our debt service obligations, working capital requirements and capital projects, including additional investments and expansion, development and acquisition opportunities. We expect to fund any additional investments, capital projects and future expansion, development and acquisition opportunities with cash flows from operations and additional borrowings under our revolving credit facility.

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities, investing activities and financing activities were as follows (in thousands):

Year ended 

    

Year ended

    

Year ended

December 31,

December 31,

December 31,

2020

2019

2018

Net cash provided by operating activities

$

130,041

$

100,589

$

103,210

Net cash used in investing activities

$

(79,994)

$

(90,967)

$

(56,869)

Net cash used in financing activities

$

(50,542)

$

(9,558)

$

(46,284)

The increase in net cash provided by operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2020 is primarily related to increased revenue from recontracting activity, placing into service new tank capacity at our Brownsville and West Coast terminals and the timing of working capital requirements.

The decrease in net cash provided by operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 is primarily related to the timing of working capital requirements.

The decrease in net cash used in investing activities for the year ended December 31, 2020 is primarily related to less construction spend in 2020. The increase in net cash used in investing activities for the year ended December 31,

44


2019 is primarily related to increased construction spend in 2019. In addition, in 2019 we received an approximately $5.0 million one-time insurance settlement related to a tank at our Gulf Coast terminals that was damaged by fire.

Additional investments and expansion capital projects at our terminals have been approved and currently are, or will be, under construction with estimated completion dates throughout 2021. At December 31, 2020, the remaining expenditures to complete the approved projects are estimated to be approximately $40 million. These expenditures primarily relate to the construction costs associated with our expansion of the Brownsville operations.

The increase in net cash used in financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2020 includes a decrease of approximately $45.0 million in net borrowings under our revolving credit facility primarily due to increased cash flows from operations and less spend on growth capital projects in 2020. The decrease in net cash used in financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 includes an increase of approximately $31.9 million in net borrowings under our revolving credit facility primarily to fund additional growth capital projects and $7.9 million in debt issuance costs related to issuing senior notes in February 2018.

Third amended and restated senior secured credit facility. Our revolving credit facility provides for a maximum borrowing line of credit of up to $850 million. At our request, the maximum borrowing line of credit may be increased by an additional $250 million, subject to the approval of the administrative agent and the receipt of additional commitments from one or more lenders. The terms of our revolving credit facility include covenants that restrict our ability to make cash distributions, acquisitions and investments, including investments in joint ventures. We may make distributions of cash to the extent of our “available cash” as defined in our LLC agreement. We may make acquisitions and investments that meet the definition of “permitted acquisitions”; “other investments” which may not exceed 5% of “consolidated net tangible assets”; and additional future “permitted JV investments” up to $175 million, which may include additional investments in BOSTCO. The principal balance of loans and any accrued and unpaid interest are due and payable in full on the maturity date, March 13, 2022.

We may elect to have loans under our revolving credit facility bear interest either (i) at a rate of LIBOR plus a margin ranging from 1.75% to 2.75% depending on the total leverage ratio then in effect, or (ii) at the base rate plus a margin ranging from 0.75% to 1.75% depending on the total leverage ratio then in effect. We also pay a commitment fee on the unused amount of commitments, ranging from 0.375% to 0.5% per annum, depending on the total leverage ratio then in effect. Our obligations under our revolving credit facility are secured by a first priority security interest in favor of the lenders in the majority of our assets, including our investments in unconsolidated affiliates. At December 31, 2020, our outstanding borrowings under our revolving credit facility were $350.4 million.

Our revolving credit facility also contains customary representations and warranties (including those relating to organization and authorization, compliance with laws, absence of defaults, material agreements and litigation) and customary events of default (including those relating to monetary defaults, covenant defaults, cross defaults, changes in our control, and bankruptcy events). The primary financial covenants contained in our revolving credit facility are (i) a total leverage ratio test (not to exceed 5.25 to 1.0), (ii) a senior secured leverage ratio test (not to exceed 3.75 to 1.0), and (iii) a minimum interest coverage ratio test (not less than 2.75 to 1.0). These financial covenants are based on a non-GAAP, defined financial performance measure within our revolving credit facility known as “Consolidated EBITDA.” We were in compliance with all financial covenants as of December 31, 2020.  

If we were to fail a financial performance covenant, or any other covenant contained in our revolving credit facility, we would seek a waiver from our lenders under such facility. If we were unable to obtain a waiver from our lenders and the default remained uncured after any applicable grace period, we would be in breach of our revolving credit facility, and the lenders would be entitled to declare all outstanding borrowings immediately due and payable.

45


Three months ended

Twelve months ended

    

March 31,

    

June 30,

    

September 30,

    

December 31,

    

December 31,

2020

2020

2020

2020

2020

Financial performance covenant tests:

    

Consolidated EBITDA (1)

$

35,659

$

40,275

$

41,340

$

41,976

$

159,250

Consolidated interest expense (1) (2)

$

8,942

$

7,956

$

7,435

$

7,341

$

31,674

Revolving credit facility debt

$

350,400

6.125% senior notes due in 2026

299,900

Consolidated funded indebtedness

$

650,300

Senior secured leverage ratio

2.20

Total leverage ratio

4.08

Interest coverage ratio

 

5.03

Reconciliation of consolidated EBITDA to cash flows provided by operating activities:

Consolidated EBITDA for the total leverage ratio (1)

$

35,659

$

40,275

$

41,340

$

41,976

$

159,250

Interest expense

 

(9,214)

 

(7,204)

 

(7,435)

 

(7,341)

 

(31,194)

Unrealized (gain) loss on derivative instruments

272

(752)

(480)

Amortization of deferred revenue

 

(33)

 

1,228

 

239

 

(391)

 

1,043

Change in operating assets and liabilities

 

(7,872)

 

7,497

 

741

 

1,056

 

1,422

Cash flows provided by operating activities

$

18,812

$

41,044

$

34,885

$

35,300

$

130,041


(1)Reflects the calculation of Consolidated EBITDA and Consolidated interest expense in accordance with the definition for such financial metrics in our revolving credit facility.
(2)Consolidated interest expense, used in the calculation of the interest coverage ratio, excludes unrealized gains and losses recognized on our derivative instruments.

Termination of shelf registration. On September 2, 2016, the SEC declared effective a universal shelf registration statement, which replaced our prior shelf registration statement that previously expired. Prior to the Take-Private Transaction, the shelf registration statement allowed us to issue common units and debt securities. In February 2018, we used the shelf registration statement to issue senior notes. In connection with the Take-Private Transaction, the Company prepared and filed a post-effective amendment to its Form S-3 registration statement in effect to deregister all securities of the Partnership unissued but issuable thereunder. The senior notes remain outstanding and the Company is voluntarily filing with the Security and Exchange Commission pursuant to the covenants contained in the senior notes. The senior notes contain customary covenants (including those relating to our voluntary filing of this report and certain restrictions and obligations with respect to types of payments we may make, indebtedness we may incur, transactions we may pursue, or changes in our control) and customary events of default (including those relating to monetary defaults, covenant defaults, cross defaults and bankruptcy events).

46


Contractual obligations and contingencies. We have contractual obligations that are required to be settled in cash. The amounts of our contractual obligations at December 31, 2020 are as follows (in thousands):

Years ending December 31,

 

    

2021

    

2022

    

2023