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EX-32.2 - CERTIFICATION - Helix Technologies, Inc.f10k2019ex32-2_helixtcs.htm
EX-32.1 - CERTIFICATION - Helix Technologies, Inc.f10k2019ex32-1_helixtcs.htm
EX-31.2 - CERTIFICATION - Helix Technologies, Inc.f10k2019ex31-2_helixtcs.htm
EX-31.1 - CERTIFICATION - Helix Technologies, Inc.f10k2019ex31-1_helixtcs.htm
EX-21.1 - SUBSIDIARIES OF THE COMPANY - Helix Technologies, Inc.f10k2019ex21-1_helixtcs.htm
EX-4.5 - DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES - Helix Technologies, Inc.f10k2019ex4-5_helixtcs.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, DC 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

 

or

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

  

Commission file number: 000-55722

 

HELIX TCS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   81-4046024

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(IRS Employer

Identification No.)

 

5300 DTC Parkway, Suite 300

Greenwood Village, CO 80111

(Address of Principal Executive Offices) (Zip Code)

 

Telephone: (720) 328-5372

(Registrant’s telephone number)

 

Securities registered under Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act: None

 

Securities registered under Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act: Common Stock, par value $0.001 per share

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☐   No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐   No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such report(s)), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒   No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☒   No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:

 

  Large accelerated filer   Accelerated filer
  Non-accelerated filer   Smaller reporting company
        Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐   No ☒

 

As of June 30, 2019, the last business day of the registrant’s last completed second quarter, the aggregate market value of the common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $18,528,165 based on the closing price of the registrant’s common stock, on June 30, 2019, as reported by OTC Markets, Inc. For the purposes of this disclosure, shares of common stock held by each executive officer, director and stockholder known by the registrant to be affiliated with such individuals based on public filings and other information known to the registrant have been excluded since such persons may be deemed affiliates. This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily a conclusive determination for other purposes.

 

As of March 24, 2020 the registrant had 95,279,713 shares of its common stock, par value $0.001 per share, outstanding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

        PAGE
         
PART I       1
Item 1.   Business.   1
Item 1A.   Risk Factors.   8
Item 1B.   Unresolved Staff Comments.   15
Item 2.   Properties.   15
Item 3.   Legal Proceedings.   15
Item 4.   Mine Safety Disclosures.   15
         
PART II       16
Item 5.   Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.   16
Item 6.   Selected Financial Data.   17
Item 7.   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.   18
Item 7A.   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.   25
Item 8.   Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.   26
Item 9.   Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.   26
Item 9A.   Controls and Procedures.   26
Item 9B.   Other Information.   27
         
PART III       28
Item 10.   Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.   28
Item 11.   Executive Compensation.   32
Item 12.   Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.   32
Item 13.   Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.   34
Item 14.   Principal Accountant Fees and Services.   36
         
PART IV       37
Item 15.   Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules.   37
    Signatures   43

 

i

 

 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

  

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (this “Report”) contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Forward-looking statements discuss matters that are not historical facts. Because they discuss future events or conditions, forward-looking statements may include words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “intend,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “may,” “seek,” “plan,” “might,” “will,” “expect,” “predict,” “project,” “forecast,” “potential,” or similar expressions. These forward-looking statements are found at various places throughout this Report and include information concerning possible or assumed future results of our operations; business strategies; future cash flows; financing plans; plans and objectives of management; any other statements regarding future operations, future cash needs, business plans and future financial results, and any other statements that are not historical facts.

 

Forward-looking statements include, without limitation, statements about our market opportunities, our business and growth strategies, our projected revenue and expense levels, possible future consolidated results of operations, the adequacy of our available cash resources, our financing plans, our competitive position and the effects of competition and the projected growth of the industries in which we operate, as well as the following statements:

 

We operate in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment. New risks emerge from time to time. It is not possible for us to predict all of those risks, nor can we assess the impact of all of those risks on our business or the extent to which any factor may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statement. The forward-looking statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are based on assumptions management believes are reasonable. However, due to the uncertainties associated with forward-looking statements, you should not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements. Further, forward- looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, and unless required by law, we expressly disclaim any obligation or undertaking to publicly update any of them in light of new information, future events, or otherwise.

 

From time to time, forward-looking statements also are included in our other periodic reports on Forms 10-Q and 8-K, in our press releases, in our presentations, on our website and in other materials released to the public. Any or all of the forward-looking statements included in this Report and in any other reports or public statements made by us are not guarantees of future performance and may turn out to be inaccurate. These forward-looking statements represent our intentions, plans, expectations, assumptions and beliefs about future events and are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors. Many of those factors are outside of our control and could cause actual results to differ materially from the results expressed or implied by those forward-looking statements. In light of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions, the events described in the forward-looking statements might not occur or might occur to a different extent or at a different time than we have described. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this Report. All subsequent written and oral forward-looking statements concerning other matters addressed in this Report and attributable to us or any person acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements contained or referred to in this Report.

 

We assume no obligation to revise or publicly release the results of any revision to these forward-looking statements, except as required by law. Given these risks and uncertainties, readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements.

 

Unless expressly indicated or the context requires otherwise, the terms “Helix,” the “Company,” “we,” “us,” and “our” refer to Helix TCS, Inc., a Delaware corporation, and, where appropriate, its wholly owned subsidiaries.

 

ii

 

 

PART I

  

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

Company History

 

Helix TCS, Inc. was incorporated in Delaware on March 13, 2014. Pursuant to the acquisition of the assets of Helix TCS, LLC, as discussed below, we changed our name from Jubilee4 Gold, Inc. to Helix TCS, Inc. effective October 25, 2015.

 

Effective October 25, 2015, we entered into an acquisition and exchange agreement (the “Acquisition Agreement”) with Helix TCS LLC (the “LLC”). We closed the transaction contemplated under the Acquisition Agreement (the “Acquisition”) on December 23, 2015 and Helix TCS, LLC was merged into and with Helix.

 

Pursuant to the terms and conditions of the Acquisition Agreement, the owner of 100% of the issued and outstanding units of the LLC immediately prior to the closing of the Acquisition, exchanged their units for an aggregate of 22,225,000 shares of our common stock (post-reverse split) and all of our issued Class A Preferred Stock.

 

Effective April 11, 2016, we acquired the assets of Revolutionary Software, LLC (“Revolutionary”). The acquisition occurred through two transactions, the first occurred on March 14, 2016 and the second occurred on April 11, 2016. The total consideration for the acquisition included payment in the form of $650,000 in cash and 2,395,000 shares of restricted common stock of the Company. A portion of the cash consideration was paid at each transaction closing and a portion was paid over time.

 

On June 2, 2017, the Company entered into a Membership Interest Purchase Agreement (the “Agreement”) in which the Company purchased all issued and outstanding Units of Security Grade Protective Services, Ltd. (“Security Grade”), which was comprised of 800,000 Class A Units and 200,000 Class B Units. At closing, the Company delivered $800,000 in cash and 207,427 non-qualified stock options (the “Initial Stock Options”). Furthermore, provided that, within the first 60 days following the closing, no material customer identified in the Agreement terminates its contractual relationship with the Company and that all contracts with such material customers are in full force and effect without default or cancellation as of the 60th day following the closing, on the 61st day following the closing, the Company shall issue 207,427 additional stock options (the “Additional Stock Options”). The Company subsequently issued the 207,427 additional stock options on August 1, 2017 as well as a second cash payment of $800,000 pursuant to the original terms of the Agreement.

 

On March 3, 2018, Helix TCS, Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiary, Helix Acquisition Sub, Inc. (“BioTrackTHC Merger Sub”), entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger (the “BioTrackTHC Merger Agreement”) with Bio-Tech Medical Software, Inc. (“BioTrackTHC”) and Terence J. Ferraro, as the representative of the BioTrackTHC stockholders, pursuant to which BioTrackTHC Merger Sub merged with and into BioTrackTHC (the “BioTrackTHC Merger”).

 

On June 1, 2018 (the “BioTrackTHC Closing Date”), in connection with closing the BioTrackTHC Merger, the Company issued 38,184,985 unregistered shares of its common stock to BioTrackTHC stockholders, of which 1,852,677 shares were held back to satisfy indemnification obligations in the BioTrackTHC Merger Agreement, if necessary. The Company also assumed the Bio-Tech Medical Software, Inc. 2014 Stock Incentive Plan (“BioTrackTHC Stock Plan”), pursuant to which options exercisable in the amount of 8,132,410 shares of common stock are outstanding. As a result, BioTrackTHC stockholders owned approximately 48% of the Company on a fully diluted basis as of the BioTrackTHC Closing Date.

 

On August 3, 2018 (the “Engeni Closing Date”), the Company and its wholly owned subsidiary, Engeni Merger Sub, LLC (“Engeni Merger Sub”), entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger (the “Engeni Merger Agreement”) with Engeni LLC (“Engeni US”), Engeni S.A (“Engeni SA”), Scott Zienkewicz, Nicolas Heller and Alberto Pardo Saleme (the “Engeni US members”), and Scott Zienkewicz, as the representative of the Engeni US members. Pursuant to the Engeni Merger Agreement, Engeni Merger Sub merged with and into Engeni US, with Engeni US surviving the merger as a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company (the “Engeni Merger”).

 

1

 

 

On the Engeni Closing Date, in connection with closing the Engeni Merger Agreement, the Company issued 366,700 shares of Company common stock to Engeni US members. Furthermore, the Company subsequently issued Engeni US members 733,300 shares of Company common stock on April 2, 2019.

 

On April 1, 2019 (“Tan Security Closing Date”), the Company entered into a Membership Interest and Stock Purchase Agreement (the “Tan Security Acquisition Agreement”) with Tan’s International Security and Tan’s International LLC (collectively, “Tan Security”). Pursuant to the Tan Security Acquisition Agreement, the Company purchased all membership interests and capital stock of Tan Security and collectively holds 100% of the interests of Tan Security (the “Tan Security Acquisition”).

 

On February 5, 2019, the Company and its wholly owned subsidiary, Merger Sub, entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger (the “Amercanex Merger Agreement”) with Green Tree International, Inc. (“GTI”) and Steve Janjic, as the representative of the GTI shareholders, pursuant to which Merger Sub merged with and into GTI (the “GTI Merger”).

 

On September 10, 2019, the Company closed the GTI Merger and entered into an Addendum No. 1 to the Amercanex Merger Agreement acknowledging and approving certain events that occurred since signing as well as implementing various related amendments to the Amercanex Merger Agreement. In connection with closing the GTI Merger, the Company issued 16,765,727 unregistered shares of Company common stock to GTI shareholders, of which 4,140,274 shares were held back to satisfy indemnification obligations in the Americanex Merger Agreement, if necessary.

  

Overview

 

Helix TCS, Inc. provides critical infrastructure solutions to the legal cannabis industry. Our mission is to provide clients with the best-in-class critical infrastructure services through a single integrated platform which enables them to run their businesses more safely, efficiently, and profitably. As we increase our platform’s scale and scope, clients will be able to realize greater cost savings and operating advantages through our integrated end-to-end business solutions.

  

2

 

 

Commercial Services

 

Technology Services

 

Helix BioTrack

 

Helix BioTrack (formerly BioTrackTHC) has been rated as the largest retail seed-to-sale compliance software provider by market share, and continued to grow in 2019. The business has tracked over $18bn of legal cannabis transactions, and has expanded into Europe and Latin America, in addition to its 2,000+ client locations stateside, and 9 government contracts. BioTrack’s transactional and technological capabilities form the backbone of an integrated services platform that we have built over the last 48 months, and will continue to build and deploy in 2020. In any version of full legalization in the United States, seed-to-sale tracking in commercial locations will be the key compliance tool used by governments to regulate the extensive legal cannabis market.

 

Helix Exchange

 

Helix Exchange (formerly Amercanex) is a fully electronic, compliant and transparent exchange and is the technology leader for buying, selling and tracking wholesale cannabis and hemp transactions. The core function of this marketplace is to ensure fair and orderly transactions, as well as efficient dissemination of price information, for products bought and sold on Helix Exchange. Additionally, Helix Exchange seamlessly integrates with state and commercial tracking systems to provide automated end-to-end compliance.

 

Helix Cannalytics

 

Helix Cannalytics is a proprietary business intelligence and data analytics platform that allows users to easily view and dissect key business data points generated from within BioTrack and Helix Exchange. The Cannalytics model focuses on providing solutions for real-time critical business insights via client partnerships and customized data and analytics solutions centered around machine learning algorithms. Helix Cannalytics offers a comprehensive approach to presenting cannabis business data in a logical and easy to use format with fully-customized business intelligence solutions catered to the unique needs of licensed cannabis businesses.

 

Helix Security

 

Helix Security provides effective security solutions to cannabis businesses, including assessments and planning, security system design and implementation, asset protection, transport, and consulting services to help licensees meet state security requirements. All systems and services are guaranteed to meet individual state regulatory requirements and to achieve compliance.

 

Security Systems/Physical Security

 

We provide security system assessment services for our customers and licensed cannabis business operators. Our core existing products and services include the following:

 

IP CCTV systems
   
24/7 virtual monitoring
   
Cloud storage
   
Intrusion alarm systems
   
Perimeter alarm systems
   
Access control
   
Security consulting for license applications

 

In 2015, we commenced offering armed and unarmed guards, as well as armed transport services to the cannabis industry in Colorado. As of 2018, we provide site risk assessments and consulting services as well. We have made significant investments in state security licenses and high-level training programs, which have generated positive results in customer acquisition and retention. We have expanded our market further in 2019 by signing new clients in California and Colorado, and forming strategic partnerships to facilitate the potential for national expansion.

 

3

 

 

Industry and Regulatory Background

 

In the 1930’s, Congress made marijuana illegal on the federal level, and it was scheduled as a narcotic. In the 1960s and 1970s, as the popularity of marijuana use grew, states began to realize that they needed drug policies consistent with the community and consumer use of marijuana. Under the Federal Controlled Substances Act of 1970, marijuana is currently classified as a “Schedule I” controlled substance. The level of enforcement in states varies widely regarding marijuana.

 

In 1996, Oregon and California passed legislation that legalized the possession and consumption of marijuana use for medical purposes. As of December 31, 2019, thirty-three states and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana in one form or another. The Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and Alaska state policies to legalize recreational marijuana were not challenged by federal authorities, which was largely due to the guidance put forth in the August 29, 2013 memorandum from James Cole, the U.S. Deputy Attorney General, titled “Guidance Regarding Marijuana Enforcement” (the “Cole Memo”). This memorandum states that federal enforcement agencies are unlikely to enforce the Controlled Substances Act in states where marijuana has been legalized, and where the regulation and control is functional. As of December 31, 2019, eleven states and the District of Columbia have legalized recreational cannabis use.

 

On the federal level, marijuana has been considered an illegal substance since 1930. This has caused various impediments to the marijuana industry, the most prominent of which is in banking. Although the U.S. Treasury has provided guidance intended to give banks the confidence that they can work with marijuana businesses in legal cannabis states, many banks are still reluctant to do so.

 

According to a recent report, Legal Marijuana Market Size, Share & Trends Analysis Report By Type (Medical Cannabis, Recreational Cannabis), By Product Type, By Medical Application (Cancer, Mental Disorders), And Segment Forecasts, 2019 - 2025, “The global legal marijuana market size was estimated at USD 13.8 billion in 2018 and is projected to expand at a CAGR of 23.9% by 2025. Growing legalization in various countries is primarily driving the market. Furthermore, rising adoption of cannabis as a medical product for treating conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease, cancer, arthritis, and neurological disorders is also expected to fuel revenue growth in the forthcoming years.”

 

Furthering the growth of the legal cannabis industry, The House Judiciary Committee has approved a bill that would decriminalize marijuana at the federal level. The Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act of 2019, or MORE Act, passed 24-10. The bill is now awaiting to be heard by the full House of Representatives.

 

Upon successful legalization at a federal level, cannabis and hemp will be further scrutinized with additional complex regulatory compliance as markets emerge and interstate/international commerce become prevalent.

 

Government Regulation

 

Marijuana is categorized as a “Schedule I” controlled substance by the Drug Enforcement Agency and the United States Department of Justice. It is currently illegal to grow, possess, sell, purchase, and/or consume cannabis under Federal law. A Schedule I controlled substance is defined as a substance that has no currently accepted medicinal use in the United States, a lack of safety for use under medical supervision and a high potential for abuse. The Department of Justice also characterizes Schedule I controlled substances as the most dangerous drugs of all the drug schedules with potentially severe psychological and/or physical dependence.

 

4

 

  

Despite this, thirty-three states and the District of Columbia have passed state laws that permit doctors to prescribe cannabis for medicinal use. Additionally, eleven states, and the District of Columbia, have enacted laws that allow recreational adult use of cannabis. As a result of the foregoing, an unpredictable business environment has been created for cannabis companies that can legally operate under state laws but are nonetheless openly in violation of Federal laws. On August 29, 2013, United States Deputy Attorney General James Cole issued the Cole Memo to United States Attorneys guiding them to prioritize enforcement of Federal law away from the cannabis industry operating as permitted under state law, so long as:

 

  cannabis is not being distributed to minors and dispensaries are not located around schools and public buildings;

 

  the proceeds from sales are not going to gangs, cartels or criminal enterprises;

 

  cannabis grown in states where it is legal is not being diverted to other states;

 

  cannabis-related businesses are not being used as a cover for sales of other illegal drugs or illegal activity;

 

  there is not any violence or use of fire-arms in the cultivation and sale of marijuana;

 

  there is strict enforcement of drugged-driving laws and adequate prevention of adverse health consequences; and

 

  cannabis is not grown, used, or possessed on Federal properties.

   

In January 2018, the Trump administration rescinded the Obama-era directive of easing federal enforcement on legalized marijuana usage. The subsequent departure of Jeff Sessions as Attorney General has signaled to the industry a potential softening of the federal government’s stance, and the recent introduction of a banking bill that would allow the cannabis industry to obtain banking services if enacted into law would also be a positive step.

 

The Market

 

The market for Helix’ full suite of critical infrastructure services encompasses all licensed cannabis operators in locations where medical or recreational cannabis (both high potency THC strains of marijuana and hemp) has been legalized. As more states and countries begin the decriminalization and legalization process, new markets continue to emerge resulting in a natural expansion of our global reach.

 

As with any emerging market, several companies within the industry achieve a higher level of success faster and are able to scale more rapidly than others. In the cannabis space, a handful of companies hold licenses and operate throughout multiple legal markets and are referred to as Multi-State Operators (MSOs).

 

Within newly formed markets, MSOs apply for and are granted licenses allowing these companies to penetrate states that are initially rolling out their cannabis legalization plans.

 

Another tactic used by MSOs to drive consolidation in the cannabis space is to purchase active licenses from established businesses or acquire the business itself (in some cases other MSOs). Mergers and acquisitions inside the cannabis industry are commonplace and show no signs of slowing in the near future.

 

As more states continue towards the path of legalization, the next logical step in the expansion of the market lies in federal legalization. The conversation around this topic has been prominent in the current political conversations in Washington D.C. and several measures have already been passed lowering the threshold of federal government regulation on the industry.

 

Once legalization does occur at the federal level, this will in turn create an opportunity for the U.S. market to expand globally in much the same way it has domestically but with the added benefits of both interstate and international trade.

 

Helix currently operates in six other countries around the world including Canada, Jamaica, Colombia, New Zealand, Australia and the United Kingdom.

 

Sales and Marketing Strategy

 

As a leading provider of technology in the cannabis space it is imperative that Helix continue to develop and improve its service platforms to meet the ever-changing needs of the industry. While the legacy version of Helix BioTrack continues to be a highly sought-after business solution, Helix Technologies has been working diligently to develop a new and greatly enhanced version of the seed-to-sale tracking and dispensary point-of-sale platform.

 

5

 

 

To compliment both the legacy Helix BioTrack software as well as the new version, in the summer of 2019 Helix undertook the process of creating an in-depth data analytics and business intelligence platform, Helix Cannalytics. This platform puts the power of data to use for operators to gain more valued insights into their businesses resulting in the ability to make better informed decisions.

 

Along with creating new products internally, Helix currently provides infrastructure solutions for multiple MSOs and as a result their expansion in new and existing markets. Through both organic and M&A avenues, Helix continues to see growth with little additional resources expended.

 

With focusing our efforts on key organic growth strategies, Helix remains ready to expand its services should the opportunity arise. This is highlighted by the acquisition of the online wholesale cannabis exchange, Amercanex, in the fall of 2019, a little more than one year after acquiring BioTrackTHC.

 

Helix’ multifaceted growth strategy has put the company in a prime position to continue to take, and take back, market share from our competition. According to the 2019 Mid-Year Report: Point of Sale Software in the Cannabis Industry by Cannabiz Media, “At the end of 2018, five vendors accounted for 80% of the cannabis market…” and of the five vendors, Helix BioTrack was ranked at the top, accounting for 24% of the total market share.

 

In addition to expansion of both our customer base and market share, Helix has taken a concerted effort to focus on a lean, efficient growth and operations strategy. This includes the reorganization of our support department, realignment of key organizational management, and a planned company-wide rebrand to drive succinct marketing across all business lines by leveraging unified and synergistic brand messaging.

 

By harnessing the industry reputation that Helix BioTrack has built since 2010, Helix will continue to target nascent and emerging state markets as the primary focus of our sales and marketing strategy in the legal marijuana sector for the immediate future. Additionally, the company will continue to sell and market our SaaS products to an emerging nationwide hemp program.

 

In anticipation of federal cannabis legalization in the United States, Helix has undertaken preparations to position itself for the scale in both technology and operations that will be necessary to facilitate a global marketplace as well as an interstate and international exchange of goods. 

 

Business Acquisitions

 

During the second quarter of 2017, we greatly enhanced our core operations with the acquisition of Security Grade. Security Grade is a market leader in the security profession and provides a broad range of services, from security consulting to installation of surveillance technology. Consistent with our team of professionals, Security Grade employs specialists with extensive experience and exposure to all areas of security related services. This strategic acquisition will help field the growing demand in the Legal Cannabis Industry.

 

On March 3, 2018, Helix TCS, Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiary, BioTrackTHC Merger Sub, entered into the BioTrackTHC Merger Agreement with BioTrackTHC and Terence J. Ferraro, as the representative of the BioTrackTHC stockholders, pursuant to which BioTrackTHC Merger Sub merged with and into BioTrackTHC.

 

On August 3, 2018, the Company and its wholly owned subsidiary, Engeni Merger Sub, entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger with Engeni US, Engeni SA, the Engeni US members, and Scott Zienkewicz, as the representative of the Engeni US members. Pursuant to the Engeni Merger Agreement, Engeni Merger Sub merged with and into Engeni US, with Engeni US surviving the merger as a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company.

 

On April 1, 2019, the Company entered into the Tan Security Acquisition Agreement with Tan Security. Pursuant to the Tan Security Acquisition Agreement, the Company purchased all membership interests and capital stock of Tan Security and collectively holds 100% of the interests of the Tan Security Acquisition.

 

6

 

 

On February 5, 2019, the Company and its wholly owned subsidiary, Merger Sub, entered into an the Amercanex Merger Agreement with GTI and Steve Janjic, as the representative of the GTI shareholders, pursuant to which Merger Sub merged with and into GTI (the “GTI Merger”).

 

On September 10, 2019, the Company closed the GTI Merger and entered into an Addendum No. 1 to the Amercanex Merger Agreement acknowledging and approving certain events that occurred since signing as well as implementing various related amendments to the Amercanex Merger Agreement.

 

Asset Acquisition

 

During March and April 2016, we acquired the assets of Revolutionary. Revolutionary was the founder and operator of Cannabase which aspired to be a wholesale marketplace for the legal cannabis industry. The assets acquired were development stage software, web addresses, and certain trademarks. We have transformed certain intangible assets into business lines that were not explored by Revolutionary prior to the transaction. Revolutionary’s revenue was generated primarily from wholesale brokerage commissions from transactions that were facilitated by the Cannabase platform.

 

Cannabase was a tradename used for an attempt to build an online community. There was virtually no revenue created prior to our acquisition of Revolutionary assets. The Company has and will continue to spend significant capital to attempt to develop this online community. The Company intends to do this by writing new software code, hiring salespeople, and opening into other states. Revolutionary was not scalable on a multi-regional basis due to it being limited to the legal cannabis industry which is operational in certain states. The revenues generated since the asset acquisition have been generated from an advertising business model that was not in effect at Revolutionary. Since only nominal revenues had been generated previous to the acquisition, the Company has had to, and will continue to, invest substantial capital to transform the software assets acquired for use in a new business model.

 

We are currently in the process of developing advertising, consumer-focused, and data-related business lines using the intellectual property acquired. To achieve the new business plan, we expect it will continue to take significant management time, as well as substantial financial resources in software development, marketing, sales personnel, and technology expenditures.

  

Competition

 

Helix BioTrack has multiple competitors. Some are focused solely on government traceability systems. Some are focused solely on point-of-sale software. Some provide all aspects of commercial software. And one company competes with BioTrack in all verticals. As the industry continues to grow, and as more geographies legalize cannabis, we expect more competitors will emerge, while some of the smaller ones will likely cease doing business or be acquired.

 

We have positioned ourselves as an innovative security firm with a recognizable brand that offers effective and consistent services. Our competition in the security services sector of the cannabis industry primarily includes a variety of smaller, local security companies. Many of our larger competitors have ceased operations in the past 18 months. We believe that Helix Security has the largest cannabis-focused security business in the state of Colorado. We believe that we can continue to compete successfully with these companies based on our favorable reputation for outstanding reliability, customer service, and value added. There is no assurance, however, that our ability to deliver services successfully will not be impacted by competition that currently exists or may arise in the future.

 

Employees

 

As of December 31, 2019, we employed 216 full time employees and 31 part time employees. We believe that the employer-employee relationships in our Company are positive. We have no labor union contracts.

 

Available Information

 

Our website address is https://helixtechnologies.com/. We do not intend our website address to be an active link or to otherwise incorporate by reference the contents of the website into this Report. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) maintains an Internet website (http://www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. 

 

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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

You should carefully consider the risks described below as well as other information provided to you in this document, including information in the section of this document entitled “Forward Looking Statements.” The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we are facing. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently believe are immaterial may also impair our business operations. If any of the following risks actually occur, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected and our shareholders may lose all or part of their investment in our company.

 

The business, financial condition, and operating results of Helix can be affected by several factors, whether currently known or unknown, including, but not limited to, those described below. Any one or more of these factors could directly or indirectly cause our actual results of operations and financial condition to vary materially from past or anticipated future results of operations and financial condition. Any of these factors, in whole or in part, could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and stock price.

 

Because of the following factors, as well as other factors affecting our financial condition and operating results, past financial performance should not be considered to be a reliable indicator of future performance, and investors should not use historical trends to anticipate results or trends in future periods.

 

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry 

 

Our business is heavily dependent on state laws pertaining to the cannabis industry. 

 

Currently, thirty-three states, the District of Columbia and the United States territories of Guam and Puerto Rico allow individuals to use medicinal cannabis legally. Furthermore, ten states, and the District of Columbia have enacted laws that allow recreational adult use of cannabis. Continued growth and innovation in the cannabis industry is dependent upon continued legislative acceptance and approval of cannabis use at the state level. Any number of factors could slow or halt progress in this area. Further, progress in the cannabis industry, while encouraging, is not assured. While there may be ample public support for legislative action, numerous factors impact the legislative process. Any one of these factors could slow or halt the use or sale of cannabis, which would negatively impact our business.

 

Cannabis remains illegal under Federal law. 

 

Despite the emergence of a cannabis industry legal under state laws, state laws legalizing medicinal and adult cannabis use are in conflict with the Federal Controlled Substances Act, which classifies cannabis as a Schedule I controlled substance and makes cannabis use and possession illegal on the Federal level. The United States Supreme Court has ruled that it is the Federal government that has the right to regulate and criminalize cannabis, even for medicinal purposes, and thus, Federal law criminalizing the use of cannabis preempts state laws that legalize its use. The Obama administration effectively stated that it is not an efficient use of resources to direct federal law enforcement agencies to prosecute those lawfully abiding by state-designated laws allowing the use and distribution of medical marijuana. However, the Trump administration has made statements implying that it could change this policy and decide to enforce the federal laws strongly, though no specific measures have yet been implemented other than revocation of the Cole Memo and two others. Any negative material change in the Federal government’s policy on enforcement of these laws could potentially cause significant financial damage to us and our shareholders.

  

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Laws and regulations affecting the cannabis industry are constantly changing, which could potentially have a detrimental effect on our business. We cannot predict the impact that future regulation may have on us. 

 

Local, state, and federal cannabis laws and regulations are constantly changing and they are subject to evolving interpretations, which could require us to incur substantial costs associated with compliance or to alter one or more of our service offerings. In addition, violations of these laws, or allegations of such violations, could disrupt our business and result in a material adverse effect on our revenues, profitability, and financial condition.

 

We cannot predict the nature of any future laws, rules, regulations, interpretations, or applications, nor can we predict or determine what effect additional governmental regulations or administrative policies and procedures, when and if promulgated, could have on our business. Changes in laws or interpretation of laws could potentially have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. It is possible that we could be forced to alter our service offerings for various reasons.

 

As possession and use of cannabis are illegal under the Federal Controlled Substances Act, we may be deemed to be aiding and abetting illegal activities through the services that we provide to users. As a result, we may be subject to enforcement actions by law enforcement authorities, which would materially and adversely affect our business. 

 

Under Federal law, and more specifically the Federal Controlled Substances Act, the possession, use, cultivation, and transfer of cannabis is illegal. Our business provides services to customers that are engaged in the business of possession, use, cultivation, and/or transfer of cannabis. As a result, law enforcement authorities, in their attempt to regulate the illegal use of cannabis, may seek to bring an action or actions against us, including, but not limited, to a claim of aiding and abetting another’s criminal activities. The Federal aiding and abetting statute provides that anyone who “commits an offense against the United States or aids, abets, counsels, commands, induces or procures its commission, is punishable as a principal.” 18 U.S.C. §2(a). As a result of such an action, we may be forced to cease operations and our investors could lose their entire investment. Such an action would have a material negative effect on our business and operations.

 

Federal enforcement practices could change with respect to service providers to participants in the cannabis industry, which could adversely impact us. If the federal government were to change its practices, or were to expand its resources attacking providers in the cannabis industry, such action could have a materially adverse effect on our operations, our customers, or the sales of our products. 

 

It is possible that additional Federal or state legislation could be enacted in the future that would prohibit our customers from selling cannabis. If such legislation were enacted, our customers may discontinue the use of our services and our potential source of customers would be reduced, causing revenues to decline. Further, additional government disruption in the cannabis industry could cause potential customers and users to be reluctant to use our services, which would be detrimental to the Company. We cannot predict the nature of any future laws, regulations, interpretations or applications, nor can we determine what effect additional governmental regulations or administrative policies and procedures, when and if promulgated, could have on our business.

 

Expansion by well-established security companies into the cannabis industry could prevent us from realizing anticipated growth in customers and revenues. 

 

Traditional security companies may expand their businesses into cannabis security services. If they decide to expand into cannabis security services, this could hurt the growth of our business and cause our revenues to be lower than we expect.

  

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Due to our involvement in the cannabis industry, we may have a difficult time obtaining the insurance coverage that is desired to operate our business, which may expose us to additional risk and financial liabilities. 

 

Insurance that is otherwise readily available, such as worker’s compensation, general liability, and directors’ and officers’ insurance, is more difficult for us to find, and more expensive, because we are service providers to companies in the cannabis industry. There are no guarantees that we will be able to find such insurance in the future, or that the cost will be affordable to us. If we are forced to go without such insurance, it may prevent us from entering into certain business sectors, may inhibit our growth, and may expose us to additional risk and financial liabilities.

 

Participants in the cannabis industry may have difficulty accessing the service of banks, which may make it difficult for us to operate. 

 

Despite recent rules issued by the United States Department of the Treasury mitigating the risk to banks who do business with cannabis companies permitted under state law, as well as recent guidance from the United States Department of Justice, banks remain wary to accept funds from businesses in the cannabis industry. Since the use of cannabis remains illegal under Federal law, there remains a compelling argument that banks may be in violation of Federal law when accepting for deposit funds derived from the sale or distribution of cannabis. Consequently, businesses involved in the cannabis industry continue to have trouble establishing banking relationships. An inability to open bank accounts may make it difficult for us, or some of our customers, to do business.

 

We have a limited operating history and if we are not successful in continuing to grow our business, then we may have to scale back or even cease our ongoing business operations. 

 

We have a limited operating history. Our operations will be subject to all the risks inherent in the establishment of a developing enterprise and the uncertainties arising from the absence of a significant operating history. We have not generated positive earnings and there can be no assurance that we will achieve profitable operations. If our business plan is not successful, and we are not able to operate profitably, investors may lose some or all of their investment in our company.

 

We will need additional capital to fund our operations. 

 

We will require additional capital to fund our current operations and anticipated expansion of our business and to pursue targeted revenue opportunities. We cannot assure you that we will be able to raise additional capital. If we are able to raise additional capital, we do not know what the terms of any such capital raising would be, and whether they will be on terms acceptable to us. In addition, any future sale of our equity securities would dilute the ownership and control of our current shareholders and could be at prices substantially below prices at which our shares currently trade. Our inability to raise capital could require us to significantly curtail or terminate our operations.

 

Our failure to manage growth effectively could impair our business. 

 

Our business strategy envisions a period of rapid growth that may put a strain on our administrative and operational resources, and funding requirements. Our ability to effectively manage growth will require us to continue to expand the capabilities of our operational and management systems and to attract, train, manage and retain qualified personnel. There can be no assurance that we will be able to do so, particularly if losses continue and we are unable to obtain sufficient financing. If we are unable to successfully manage growth, our business, prospects, financial condition, and results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

Our plans are dependent upon key individuals and the ability to attract qualified personnel. 

 

In order to execute our business plan, we will be dependent on Zachary Venegas, our Chief Executive Officer and Director. The loss of Mr. Venegas could have a material adverse effect upon our business prospects. Moreover, our success continues to depend to a significant extent on our ability to identify, attract, hire, train and retain qualified professional, creative, technical and managerial personnel.

 

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Competition for such personnel is intense, and there can be no assurance that we will be successful in identifying, attracting, hiring, training, and retaining such personnel in the future. If we are unable to hire, assimilate and retain qualified personnel in the future, our business, operating results, and financial condition could be materially adversely effected. We may also depend on third party contractors and other partners, to assist with the execution of our business plan. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in either attracting and retaining qualified personnel, or creating arrangements with such third parties. The failure to succeed in these endeavors would have a material adverse effect on our ability to consummate our business plans.

 

We have taken various steps to address our ability to retain our key employees, including nondisclosure and non-compete agreements with all our employees.

 

Our lack of patent and/or copyright protection and any unauthorized use of our proprietary information and technology, may adversely affect our business. Information technology, network and data security risks could harm our business. 

 

We currently rely on a combination of protections by contracts, including confidentiality and nondisclosure agreements, and common law rights, such as trade secrets, to protect our intellectual property which includes business processes. However, we cannot assure you that we will be able to adequately protect our intellectual property from misappropriation in the United States. This risk may be increased due to the lack of any patent and/or copyright protection. Despite our efforts to protect our intellectual property rights, others may independently develop similar marks or duplicate our service offerings. In addition, it is difficult to monitor compliance with, and enforce, our intellectual property rights in the United States in a cost-effective manner. If any of our proprietary rights are misappropriated or we are forced to defend our intellectual property rights, we will incur substantial costs. Such litigation could result in substantial costs and diversion of our resources, including diverting the time and effort of our senior management, and could disrupt our business, as well as have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations. We can provide no assurance that we will have the financial resources to oppose any actual or threatened infringement by any third party.

 

Security breaches and other disruptions could compromise our information and expose us to liability, which could cause our business and reputation to suffer. 

 

Our business faces security risks. Our failure to adequately address these risks could have an adverse effect on our business and reputation. Computer viruses, break-ins, or other security problems could lead to misappropriation of proprietary information and interruptions, delays, or cessation in service to our customers.

 

As a public company, we are required to incur substantial expenses. 

 

We are subject to the periodic reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, which requires, among other things, review, audit, and public reporting of our financial results, business activities, and other matters. SEC regulations, including regulations enacted as a result of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, have also substantially increased the accounting, legal, and other costs related to compliance with SEC reporting obligations. If we do not have current information about our Company available to market makers, they will not be able to trade our stock. The public company costs of preparing and filing annual and quarterly reports, and other information with the SEC causes our expenses to be higher than they would be if we were privately-held. These increased costs may be material and may include the hiring of additional employees and/or the retention of additional advisors and professionals. Our failure to comply with the federal securities laws could result in private or governmental legal action against us and/or our officers and directors, which could have a detrimental effect on our business and finances, the value of our stock, and the ability of stockholders to resell their stock.

  

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The Coronavirus, and/or similar outbreaks, could have a material, adverse impact on us.

 

An outbreak of a highly contagious respiratory illness caused by a new coronavirus named “2019-nCoV” (the “Coronavirus”), which was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China, has resulted in tens of thousands of infections in China and continues to spread, including to the United States. On January 30, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the Coronavirus outbreak a “public health emergency of international concern.” If the Coronavirus worsens in the United States or if the U.S. government’s efforts to contain the Coronavirus continue to restrict the movement of goods and people in the United States, our business activities, including our manufacturing and supply chain related activities could be adversely affected. In addition, if the Coronavirus continues to spread worldwide, our business in general could be adversely affected. If either of the foregoing were to occur in the future, it could materially, adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. 

 

Risks Related to Our Common Stock 

 

Our officers and directors own a large amount of our common stock and are in a position to affect all matters requiring shareholder approval, which may limit minority shareholders’ ability to influence corporate affairs.

 

As of December 31, 2019, the Company’s officers and directors directly or indirectly owned or controlled approximately 44,999,743 shares of our common stock (48%). We have 93,608,619 outstanding shares of common stock as of December 31, 2019. These persons are in a position to significantly affect all matters requiring shareholder approval, including the election of directors. This level of control may also have an adverse impact on the market value of our shares, as the control entity can institute or undertake transactions, policies or programs that result in losses. In addition, they might not take steps to increase visibility and presence in the financial community and/or may sell sufficient numbers of shares to significantly decrease the appropriate price per share.

 

The interests of our officers, directors and their affiliates may differ from the interests of other shareholders with respect to the issuance of shares, business transactions with and/or sales to other companies, selection of officers and directors, and other business decisions. The non-controlling shareholders would be severely limited in their ability to override the decisions of controlling shareholders. This level of control may also have an adverse impact on the market value of our shares because they may institute or undertake transactions, policies or programs that result in losses, may not take steps to increase our visibility in the financial community and/or may sell sufficient numbers of shares to significantly decrease our price per share.

 

Trading in our common stock has been limited, and there is no significant trading market or price discovery available for our common stock. Purchasers of our common stock may be unable to sell their shares. 

 

Our common stock is currently quoted on the OTCQB, however trading to date has been limited. If activity in the market for shares of our common stock does not increase, purchasers of our shares may find it difficult to sell their shares. We currently do not meet the initial listing criteria for any registered securities exchange, including the NASDAQ Stock Market. The OTCQB is a less recognized market than the foregoing exchanges and is often characterized by low trading volume and significant price fluctuations. These and other factors may further impair our stockholders’ ability to sell their shares when they want to and/or could depress our stock price. As a result, stockholders may find it difficult to dispose of, or obtain accurate quotations of the price of our securities because smaller quantities of shares could be bought and sold, transactions could be delayed and security analyst and news coverage of our Company may be limited. These factors could result in lower prices and larger spreads in the bid and ask prices for our shares of common stock.

 

Applicable SEC rules governing the trading of “penny stocks” may limit the trading and liquidity of our common stock which may affect the trading price our common stock. 

 

Our common stock is a “penny stock” as defined under Rule 3a51-1 of the Exchange Act, and is accordingly subject to SEC rules and regulations that impose limitations upon the manner in which our common stock can be publicly traded. Penny stocks generally are equity securities with a per share price of less than $5.00 (other than securities registered on some national securities exchanges or quoted on NASDAQ). The penny stock rules require a broker-dealer, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from the rules, to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document that provides information about penny stocks and the nature and level of risks in the penny stock market.

 

The broker-dealer also must provide the customer with current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction, and, if the broker-dealer is the sole market maker, the broker-dealer must disclose this fact and the broker-dealer’s presumed control over the market, and monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer’s account. In addition, broker-dealers who sell these securities to persons other than established customers and “accredited investors” must make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction. Consequently, these requirements may have the effect of reducing the level of trading activity, if any, of our common stock and reducing the liquidity of an investment in our common stock.

 

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We have outstanding shares of preferred stock with rights and preferences superior to those of our common stock. 

 

The issued and outstanding shares of Class A and Class B Preferred super majority voting stock grant the holders of such preferred stock anti-dilution, voting, dividend and liquidation rights that are superior to those held by the holders of our common stock. The issuance of shares of common stock in the future, issuances or deemed issuances of additional shares of common stock for a price below the applicable preferred stock conversion price, will have the effect of diluting current shareholders.

 

If we fail to establish and maintain an effective system of internal controls, we may not be able to report our financial results accurately or prevent fraud. Any inability to report and file our financial results accurately and timely could harm our reputation and adversely impact the trading price of our common stock.

 

Effective internal control is necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and prevent fraud. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, we may not be able to manage our business as effectively as we would if an effective control environment existed, and our business and reputation with investors may be harmed. As a result, our small size and any current internal control deficiencies may adversely affect our financial condition, results of operation and access to capital. We have not performed an in-depth analysis to determine if historical un-discovered failures of internal controls exist, and may in the future discover areas of our internal control that need improvement.

 

Public company compliance may make it more difficult to attract and retain officers and directors.

 

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act and rules implemented by the SEC have required changes in corporate governance practices of public companies. As a public company, these rules and regulations increase our compliance costs and make certain activities more time consuming and costly. As a public company, these rules and regulations also may make it more difficult and expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance and we may at times be required to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain the same or similar coverage. Thus, it may be more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified persons to serve on our Board of Directors or as executive officers, and to maintain insurance at reasonable rates, or at all.

  

Our operating results may fluctuate causing volatility in our stock price.

 

Our operating results may fluctuate as a result of a number of factors, many of which are outside of our control. The following factors may affect our operating results, causing volatility in our stock price:

 

  ●  Our ability to execute our business plan; 
     
  ●  Our ability to compete effectively; 
     
  ●  Our ability to continue to attract customers; 
     
  ●  The amount and timing of operating costs and capital expenditures related to the maintenance and expansion of our business, operations, and infrastructure; 
     
  ●  General economic conditions and those economic conditions specific to the cannabis industry; and 
     
  ●  Our ability to attract, motivate and retain high quality employees. 

 

Our stock price may be volatile. 

 

The market price of our common stock is highly volatile and subject to wide fluctuations in price in response to various factors, some of which are beyond our control. These factors include:

 

  ●  Changes in our industry; 
     
  ●  Competitive pricing pressure; 

 

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  ●  Our ability to obtain working capital financing; 
     
  ●  Quarterly variations in our results of operations; 
     
  ●  Changes in estimates of our financial results; 
     
  ●  Investors’ general perception of the Company; 
     
  ●  Disruption to our operations; 
     
  ●  The emergence of new sales channels in which we are unable to compete effectively; 
     
  ●  Commencement of, or our involvement in, litigation; 
     
  ●  Any major change in our Board of Directors or management; and 
     
  ●  Changes in governmental regulations or in the status of our regulatory approvals. 

 

Our shares of common stock are thinly traded, and therefore the price may not accurately reflect our value. There can be no assurance that there will be an active market for our shares of common stock either now or in the future. 

 

Our shares of common stock are thinly traded. Only a small percentage of our common stock is available to be traded, and is held by a small number of holders and the price, if traded, may not reflect our actual or perceived value. There can be no assurance that there will be an active market for our shares of common stock either now or in the future. The market liquidity will be dependent on the perception of our operating business, among other things. We will take certain steps including utilizing investor awareness campaigns, press releases, road shows and conferences to increase awareness of our business and any steps that we might take to bring us to the awareness of investors may require that we compensate consultants with cash and/or stock.

  

There can be no assurance that there will be any awareness generated or the results of any efforts will result in any impact on our trading volume. Consequently, investors may not be able to liquidate their investment or liquidate it at a price that reflects the value of the business and trading may be at an inflated price relative to the performance of our company due to, among other things, availability of sellers of our shares. If a market should develop, the price may be highly volatile. Because there may be a low price for our shares of common stock, many brokerage firms or clearing firms may not be willing to effect transactions in the securities or accept our shares for deposit in an account. Even if an investor finds a broker willing to affect a transaction in the shares of our common stock, the combination of brokerage commissions, transfer fees, taxes, if any, and any other selling costs may exceed the selling price. Further, many lending institutions will not permit the use of low-priced shares of common stock as collateral for any loans.

 

Offers or availability for sale of a substantial number of shares of our common stock may cause the price of our common stock to decline. 

 

If our stockholders sell substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market, including shares issued in private placements upon the effectiveness of the registration statement required to be filed, or upon the expiration of any statutory holding period under Rule 144, it could create a circumstance commonly referred to as an “overhang” and in anticipation of which, the market price of our common stock could fall. The existence of an overhang, whether or not sales have occurred or are occurring, also could make more difficult our ability to raise additional financing through the sale of equity or equity-related securities in the future at a time and price that we deem reasonable or appropriate.

 

We do not pay dividends on our common stock. 

 

We have not paid any dividends on our common stock and do not anticipate paying dividends in the foreseeable future. We plan to retain earnings, if any, to finance the development and expansion of our business.

 

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ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.

 

None.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES.

 

The table below represents the facilities in which we lease office space:

 

Location  Monthly Rent  Lease Term  Expiration Date
10200 E. Girard Avenue, Denver, CO 80231  $3,572 to $3,704  25 months  6/30/2020
5300 DTC Parkway, Suite 300, Greenwood Village, CO 80111  $6,011 to $6,718  5 years  2/28/2021
6750 North Andrews Avenue, Suite 325, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309  $19,380 to $20,560  34 months  11/30/2021
6750 North Andrews Avenue, Suite 325, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309  $15,200 to $16,127  3 years  12/31/2024
921 Lakeridge Way, Suite 301, Olympia, WA 98502  $3,500 to $3,713  3 years  2/28/2021
1136 Union Mall, Honolulu, HI 96813  $1,106 to $1,142  37 months  5/31/2020

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.

 

Occasionally, we may be involved in claims and legal proceedings arising from the ordinary course of our business. We record a provision for a liability when we believe that it is both probable that a liability has been incurred, and the amount can be reasonably estimated. If these estimates and assumptions change or prove to be incorrect, it could have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements. Contingencies are inherently unpredictable and the assessments of the value can involve a series of complex judgments about future events and can rely heavily on estimates and assumptions. 

 

There is currently no action, suit, proceeding, inquiry or investigation before or by any court, public board, government agency, self- regulatory organization or body pending or, to the knowledge of the executive officers of our Company or any of our subsidiaries, threatened against or affecting our Company, our common stock, any of our subsidiaries or of our Company’s or our Company’s subsidiaries’ officers or directors in their capacities as such, in which an adverse decision could have a material effect on the Company, with the exception of:

 

Baker, et al. v. Helix TCS, Inc.

 

On March 8, 2017, two former employees filed a lawsuit in the United States District Court for the District of Colorado alleging violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act and the Colorado Wage Act on behalf of themselves and other employees. The plaintiffs seek damages for our alleged failure to compensate them appropriately for the overtime hours they worked as purported “non-exempt” employees. As of December 31, 2019, the parties are outlining a potential settlement agreement.

 

Kenney, et al. v. Helix TCS, Inc.

 

On July 20, 2017 one former employee filed a lawsuit in the United States District Court for the District of Colorado alleging violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act on behalf of themselves and other employees. The plaintiffs seek damages for our alleged failure to compensate them appropriately for the overtime hours they worked as purported “non-exempt” employees. As of December 31, 2019, the claim is currently in the process of discovery.

  

At this time, the Company is not able to predict the outcome of the lawsuits, any possible loss or possible range of loss associated with the lawsuits or any potential effect on the Company’s business, results of operations or financial condition. However, the Company believes the lawsuits are wholly without merit and will defend itself from these claims vigorously.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES.

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock is quoted on the OTCQB tier of the OTC Markets, Inc. under the symbol “HLIX”. Our stock has been thinly traded on the OTCQB and there can be no assurance that a liquid market for our common stock will ever develop. The table below includes activity from the fiscal years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2018  High   Low 
First Quarter  $4.50   $1.35 
Second Quarter  $2.05   $1.30 
Third Quarter  $1.64   $0.98 
Fourth Quarter  $1.45   $0.90 

 

Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2019  High   Low 
First Quarter  $3.09   $0.95 
Second Quarter  $2.84   $1.03 
Third Quarter  $1.09   $0.59 
Fourth Quarter  $0.75   $0.42 

 

Holders

 

As of March 24, 2020 there were approximately 537 record holders of our common stock. The number of record holders was determined from the records of our transfer agent and does not include beneficial owners of common stock whose shares are held in the names of various security brokers, dealers or registered clearing agencies.

 

Transfer Agent and Registrar

 

We have appointed Equiniti, Inc., to act as the transfer agent of our common stock. Their address is 3200 Cherry Creek Dr. South, Denver, CO 80209.

 

Dividend Policy

 

We currently intend to retain future earnings, if any, for use in the operation of our business and to fund future growth. We have never declared or paid cash dividends on our common stock and we do not intend to pay any cash dividends on our common stock for the foreseeable future. Any future determination related to our dividend policy will be made at the discretion of our Board of Directors in light of conditions then-existing, including factors such as our results of operations, financial conditions and requirements, business conditions and covenants under any applicable contractual arrangements.

 

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Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019 we issued 1,429,889 shares of restricted common stock, with proceeds received totaling $1,279,700. We also issued 17,749,027 shares of restricted common stock as part of the Tan Security, Green Tree and Engeni acquisitions. We also issued 370,000 shares of common stock pursuant to the Company’s 2017 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plan. We also issued 188,575 shares of common stock resulting from stock options exercised. We also issued 186,988 shares of common stock from convertible note PIK interest paid, Additionally, we issued 1,031,315 shares of restricted common stock resulting from convertible note conversions. We relied on the exemption provided by Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act of 1933 to issue the common stock. The securities were offered and sold without any form of general solicitation of general advertising and the offerees made representations that they were accredited investors. There were no underwriters or placement agents employed in connection with any of these transactions. Use of the exemption provided in Section 4(a)(2) for transactions not involving a public offering is based on the following facts:

 

  Neither we nor any person acting on our behalf solicited any offer to buy or sell securities by any form of general solicitation or advertising.

 

  The recipients were either accredited or otherwise sophisticated individuals who had such knowledge and experience in business matters that they were capable of evaluating the merits and risks of the prospective investment in our securities.

 

  The recipients had access to business and financial information concerning our company.

 

  All securities issued were issued with a restrictive legend and may only be disposed of pursuant to an effective registration or exemption from registration in compliance with federal and state securities laws.

 

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

Not applicable.

  

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ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

The following discussion and analysis of the results of operations and financial condition for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the notes to those consolidated financial statements that are included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Our discussion includes forward-looking statements based upon current expectations that involve risks and uncertainties, such as our plans, objectives, expectations and intentions. Actual results and the timing of events could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of a number of factors. See “Forward-Looking Statements” at the beginning of this report. 

 

Overview

 

Helix provides the legal cannabis industry with a suite of technology that comprises an end-to-end set of critical infrastructure services built around a single foundation of regulatory compliance for all legal markets, assisting governing bodies in tracking each step of the process and helping industry operators better manage and mitigate risk while they focus on their core business. We accomplish these goals through a unique combination of logistics, risk-management, and investment skills, delivered through a proprietary software suite and partnership platform.

 

When combined, Helix’ full line of SaaS products allow operators to track cannabis plants and processed/manufactured cannabis products from seed-to-sale as well as provide dispensary employees with an easy to use point-of-sale system (Helix BioTrack), provide critical business insights through data analytics and business intelligence via an enhanced machine learning algorithms platform that captures data from each step in the tracking process (Helix Cannalytics), buy and sell bulk products through a compliant and safe online wholesale exchange (Helix Exchange), and ultimately protect their investments with state-of-the-art digital security monitoring (Helix Security). All while being easily accessed and managed from a single consolidated platform that seamlessly integrates with all regulatory tracking and compliance systems in every legal market. 

 

Results of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

Management believes that we will continue to incur losses for the immediate future. Therefore, we may either need additional equity or debt financing until we can achieve profitability and positive cash flows from operating activities, if ever. These conditions raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Our consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recovery of assets or the classification of liabilities that may be necessary should we be unable to continue as a going concern. For the year ended December 31, 2019, we have generated revenue and are trying to achieve positive cash flows from operations.

 

The following table shows our results of operations for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018. The historical results presented below are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for any future period.

 

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   For the Year Ended
December 31,
   Change 
   2019   2018   Dollars   Percentage 
Revenue  $15,292,100   $9,563,573   $5,728,527    60%
Cost of revenue   8,178,137    5,969,039    2,209,098    37%
Gross margin   7,113,963    3,594,534    3,519,429    98%
                     
Operating expenses   17,336,828    14,316,184    3,020,644    21%
                     
Loss from operations   (10,222,865)   (10,721,650)   498,785    -5%
                     
Other income (expense), net   642,696    2,755,848    (2,113,152)   -77%
                     
Net loss  $(9,580,169)  $(7,965,802)  $(1,614,367)   20%
                     
Changes in foreign currency translation adjustment  $(97,892)  $17,991   $(115,883)   100%
                     
Convertible preferred stock beneficial conversion feature accreted as a deemed dividend   -    (22,202,194)   22,202,194    -100%
                     
Net loss attributable to common shareholders  $(9,678,061)  $(30,150,005)  $20,471,944    -68%

 

Revenue

 

Total revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $15,292,100, which represented an increase of $5,728,527, or 60%, compared to total revenue of $9,563,573 for the year ended December 31, 2018. The increase primarily resulted from a substantial increase in the number of clients serviced by Helix and additional revenue resulting from the Tan Security acquisition.

 

Cost of Revenue

 

Cost of revenue for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 primarily consisted of hourly compensation for security personal and employees involved in the creation and development of licensing software. Cost of revenue increased by $2,209,098, or 37%, for the year ended December 31, 2019, to $8,178,137, as compared to $5,969,039 for the year ended December 31, 2018. The increase primarily resulted from the acquisition of Tan Security and a substantial increase in the number of clients serviced by Helix, which required the hiring of additional employees.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Our operating expenses encompass selling, general and administrative expenses, salaries and wages, professional and legal fees and depreciation and amortization. Selling, general and administrative expenses consist primarily of rent/moving expenses, advertising and travel expenses. Salaries and wages is composed of non-revenue generating employees. Professional services are principally comprised of outside legal, audit, information technology consulting, marketing and outsourcing services as well as the costs related to being a publicly traded company. Our operating expenses during the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 were $17,336,828 and $14,316,184, respectively. The overall $3,020,644 increase in operating expenses was primarily attributable to the following increases (decreases) in operating expenses of:

 

  General and administrative expenses – $1,644,567
     
  Salaries and wages – $(70,811)
     
  Professional and legal fees – $419,414
     
  Depreciation and amortization – $1,691,803

 

The $1,644,567 increase in selling, general and administrative expenses is a result of increases in rent expense, advertising and travel expenses resulting from an expansion in our operations. The $70,811 decrease in salaries and wages resulted from a decrease in stock compensation expense. The $419,414 increase in professional and legal fees primarily resulted from an increase in legal fees and costs associated with fundraising. The $1,691,803 increase in depreciation and amortization was due to amortization of intangible assets acquired in the BioTrackTHC, Engeni and GTI acquisitions.

  

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Other Income

 

Other income consisted of a gain on the change in fair value of warrant liability, gain on the change in the fair value of convertible notes, (loss) gain on the change in fair value of convertible notes – related party, loss on the change in fair value of contingent consideration, gain on reduction of obligation pursuant to acquisition, (loss) gain on issuance of warrants, and interest expense. Other income, net during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $642,696 and $2,755,848, respectively. The $2,113,152 decrease in other income, net was primarily attributable to a loss on the change in fair value of convertible notes – related party of $283,453, loss on change in fair value of contingent consideration of $880,050, loss on issuance of warrants of $825,098 and no gain on reduction of obligation pursuant to acquisition, partially offset by a gain on change in fair value of warrant liability of $3,812,977 for the year ended December 31, 2019. 

 

Net Loss

 

For the foregoing reasons, we had a net loss of $9,580,169 for the year ended December 31, 2019, or $0.12 net loss per common share – basic and diluted, compared to net loss of $7,965,802 for the year ended December 31, 2018, or $0.15 net loss per common share – basic and diluted.

 

Convertible preferred stock beneficial conversion feature accreted as a deemed dividend

 

The convertible preferred stock beneficial conversion feature accreted as a deemed dividend resulted from the effective conversion price of the Series B preferred shares at issuance being less than the fair value of the common stock into which the preferred shares are convertible. The result was a non-cash charge in the amount of $0 for the year ended December 31, 2019 compared to $22,202,194 for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Net Loss Attributable to common shareholders

 

For the foregoing reasons, we had a net loss attributable to common shareholders of $9,678,061 for the year ended December 31, 2019, or $0.12 net loss per share attributable to common shareholders - basic and diluted, compared to net loss attributable to common shareholders of $30,150,005 for the year ended December 31, 2018, or $0.56 net loss per share attributable to common shareholders – basic and diluted.

 

Liquidity, Capital Resources and Cash Flows

 

Going Concern

 

Management believes that we will continue to incur losses for the immediate future. Therefore, we may either need additional equity or debt financing until we can achieve profitability and positive cash flows from operating activities, if ever. These conditions raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Our consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recovery of assets or the classification of liabilities that may be necessary should we be unable to continue as a going concern. For the year ended December 31, 2019, we have generated revenue and are trying to achieve positive cash flows from operations. 

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had a cash balance of $652,524, accounts receivable, net of $1,870,722 and $6,934,725 in current liabilities. At the current cash consumption rate, we may need to consider additional funding sources throughout fiscal 2020. We are taking proactive measures to reduce operating expenses, drive growth in revenue and expeditiously resolve any remaining legal matters.

 

The successful outcome of future activities cannot be determined at this time and there is no assurance that, if achieved, we will have sufficient funds to execute our intended business plan or generate positive operating results.

 

The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments related to this uncertainty and as to the recoverability and classification of asset carrying amounts or the amount and classification of liabilities that might result should we be unable to continue as a going concern.

  

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Capital Resources 

 

The following table summarizes total current assets, liabilities and working capital deficit for the periods indicated:

 

   December 31,
2019
   December 31,
2018
   Change 
Current assets  $3,518,224   $1,923,353   $1,594,871 
Current liabilities   6,934,725    4,157,005    2,777,720 
Working capital  $(3,416,501)  $(2,233,652)  $(1,182,849)

 

As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, we had a cash balance of $652,524 and $285,761, respectively.

 

Summary of Cash Flows

 

   For the Year Ended
December 31,
 
   2019   2018 
         
Net cash used in operating activities  $(3,418,862)  $(3,806,285)
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities   (1,215,040)   240,018 
Net cash provided by financing activities   5,212,596    3,006,501 

 

Net cash used in operating activities. Net cash used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $3,418,862. This included a net loss of $9,580,169, non-cash charge related to depreciation and amortization of $4,778,334, non-cash charge related to accretion of debt discounts of $1,354,689, non-cash charge related to loss on issuance of warrants of $825,098, non-cash charge related to provision for doubtful accounts of $357,749, non-cash charge related to share-based compensation expense of $1,783,939, non-cash gains due to changes in fair value of convertible notes and warrant liability of $496,790 and $3,812,977, respectively, non-cash loss of $283,453 and $880,050 regarding the change in fair value of convertible notes – related party and contingent consideration, respectively, non-cash gain on the reduction of contingent consideration of $100,000 and changes in accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other current assets, deposits and other assets, accounts payable and accrued expenses, costs & earning in excess of billings, billings in excess of costs, due to related party, deferred rent and right of use assets and liabilities of $307,762. Net cash used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2018 was $3,806,285. This included a net loss of $7,965,802, non-cash charge related to depreciation and amortization of $3,086,531, non-cash charge related to share-based compensation expense of $3,002,648, non-cash gains due to changes in fair value of convertible notes, warrant liability and convertible notes – related party of $450,216, $1,533,398, and $93,506, respectively, non-cash loss of $131,306 regarding the change in fair value of contingent consideration, non-cash loss on the impairment of goodwill of $664,329, non-cash gain on the reduction of obligation pursuant to acquisition of $607,415 and changes in accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other current assets, deposits and other assets, accounts payable and accrued expenses, costs & earning in excess of billings, billings in excess of costs, due to related party and deferred rent of $(40,762).  

 

Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities. Net cash used in investing activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $1,215,040, which consisted of capital expenditures of $1,044,457, purchase of domain names of $21,856, and cash payments pursuant to business combinations of $148,727. Net cash provided by investing activities for the year ended December 31, 2018 was $240,018, which consisted of capital expenditures of $155,559, cash acquired pursuant to the BioTrackTHC and Engeni acquisitions of $454,306, and cash payments pursuant to the Revolutionary asset acquisition $58,729.

 

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Net cash provided by financing activities. Net cash provided by financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $5,212,596, which resulted from proceeds of $580,000 from the issuance of promissory notes, proceeds from the issuance of convertible notes payable of $3,745,000, proceeds from the issuance of common stock of $1,306,313, promissory note receivable of $75,000, payments pursuant to advances from related parties of $45,250, payments pursuant to notes payable of $18,467, and payments pursuant to a promissory note of $280,000. Net cash provided by financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2018 was $3,006,501, which resulted from proceeds from the issuance of notes payable of $39,723, proceeds of $250,000 from the issuance of promissory notes, proceeds from the issuance of common stock of $3,355,445, payments pursuant to convertible notes payable – related party of $150,000, payments pursuant to notes payable of $27,836, payments pursuant to contingent consideration of $131,331, advances from related parties of $79,500, and payments pursuant to a promissory note of $250,000. 

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

None.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with U.S. GAAP, and our discussion and analysis of its financial condition and operating results require our management to make judgments, assumptions and estimates that affect the amounts reported in its consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. Note 4, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Part II, Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K describes the significant accounting policies and methods used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements. Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities. Actual results may differ from these estimates and such differences may be material.

 

Management believes our critical accounting policies and estimates are those related to accounts receivable and allowance for doubtful accounts, intangibles, accounting for acquisitions, revenue recognition, income taxes, distinguishing liabilities from equity and share-based compensation.

 

Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

Accounts receivable are recorded at the invoiced amount, net of an allowance for doubtful accounts. The Company performs ongoing credit evaluations of its customers and adjusts credit limits based upon payment history and the customer’s current credit worthiness, as determined by the review of their current credit information, and determines the allowance for doubtful accounts based on historical write-off experience, customer specific facts and economic conditions.

 

Management charges balances off against the allowance after all means of collection have been exhausted and the potential for recovery is considered remote. The Company determines when receivables are past due or delinquent based on how recently payments have been received.

 

Outstanding account balances are reviewed individually for collectability. The allowance for doubtful accounts is the Company’s best estimate of the amount of probable credit losses in the Company’s existing accounts receivable. Allowance for doubtful accounts was $273,138 and $76,156 at December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

  

Accounting for Acquisitions 

 

In accordance with the guidance for business combinations, the Company determines whether a transaction or other event is a business combination, which requires that the assets acquired and liabilities assumed constitute a business. Each business combination is then accounted for by applying the acquisition method. If the assets acquired are not a business, the Company accounts for the transaction or other event as an asset acquisition. Under both methods, the Company recognizes the identifiable assets acquired, the liabilities assumed, and any noncontrolling interest in the acquired entity. In addition, for transactions that are business combinations, the Company evaluates the existence of goodwill or a gain from a bargain purchase. The Company capitalizes acquisition-related costs and fees associated with asset acquisitions and immediately expense acquisition-related costs and fees associated with business combinations. 

 

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Revenue Recognition

 

Under FASB Topic 606, Revenue from Contacts with Customers (“ASC 606”), the Company recognizes revenue when the customer obtains control of promised goods or services, in an amount that reflects the consideration which is expected to be received in exchange for those goods or services. The Company recognizes revenue following the five-step model prescribed under ASC 606: (i) identify contract(s) with a customer; (ii) identify the performance obligation(s) in the contract; (iii) determine the transaction price; (iv) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligation(s) in the contract; and (v) recognize revenues when (or as) the Company satisfies a performance obligation.

 

The security services revenue is generated from performing armed and unarmed guarding which is contracted for on an hourly basis. Revenues associated with these contracted services are recognized under time-based arrangements as services are provided.

 

Additionally, the Company provides transportation security services, which are generally contracted for on a per-run basis and sometimes additional fees and surcharges are also billed to the client depending on the length of the run. Revenues associated with these services are recognized as the transportation service is provided.

 

The Company also generates revenue from developing and licensing seed to sale cannabis compliance software to both private-sector and public-sector (government agencies) businesses that are involved in cannabis related operations. The Company also generates revenue from on-going training, support and software customization services.

 

Occasionally, the Company will enter into systems installation arrangements. Installation jobs are estimated based on the cost of equipment to be installed, the number of hours expected to be incurred to complete the job and other ancillary costs. Revenue associated with these services are recognized over the arrangement period.

 

Lastly, the Company generates monthly recurring revenues from Cannalytics, its business intelligence and data tool for commercial customers. Revenue is recognized over monthly. 

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes under the asset and liability method, which requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the differences between the financial statements and tax basis of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. Valuation allowances are established when necessary to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized. The Company has incurred net operating loss for financial-reporting and tax-reporting purposes. Accordingly, for Federal and state income tax purposes, the benefit for income taxes has been offset entirely by a valuation allowance against the related federal and state deferred tax asset for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018.

 

Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity

 

The Company relies on the guidance provided by ASC Topic 480, Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity, to classify certain redeemable and/or convertible instruments. The Company first determines whether a financial instrument should be classified as a liability. The Company will determine the liability classification if the financial instrument is mandatorily redeemable, or if the financial instrument, other than outstanding shares, embodies a conditional obligation that the Company must or may settle by issuing a variable number of its equity shares.

 

Once the Company determines that a financial instrument should not be classified as a liability, the Company determines whether the financial instrument should be presented between the liability section and the equity section of the balance sheet (“temporary equity”). The Company will determine temporary equity classification if the redemption of the financial instrument is outside the control of the Company (i.e. at the option of the holder). Otherwise, the Company accounts for the financial instrument as permanent equity.

 

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Initial Measurement

 

The Company records its financial instruments classified as liability, temporary equity or permanent equity at issuance at the fair value, or cash received.

 

Subsequent Measurement - Financial instruments classified as liabilities

 

The Company records the fair value of its financial instruments classified as liabilities at each subsequent measurement date. The changes in fair value of its financial instruments classified as liabilities are recorded as other expense/income.

 

Share-based Compensation

 

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation to employees in conformity with the provisions of ASC Topic 718, Stock Based Compensation. Stock-based compensation to employees consist of stock option grants and restricted shares that are recognized in the statement of operations based on their fair values at the date of grant.

 

The Company accounts for equity instruments issued to non-employees in accordance with the provisions of ASC Topic 505, subtopic 50, Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees based upon the fair-value of the underlying instrument. The equity instruments are valued using the Black-Scholes valuation model. The measurement of stock-based compensation is subject to periodic adjustments as the underlying equity instruments vest and is recognized as an expense over the period which services are received.

 

The Company calculates the fair value of option grants utilizing the Black-Scholes pricing model and estimates the fair value of the stock based upon the estimated fair value of the common stock. The amount of stock-based compensation recognized during a period is based on the value of the portion of the awards that are ultimately expected to vest.

 

The resulting stock-based compensation expense for both employee and non-employee awards is generally recognized on a straight- line basis over the requisite service period of the award.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

    

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-.02, Leases (Topic 842) (“Topic 842”) which requires the recognition of right-of-use assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet. The most prominent of the changes in the standard is the recognition of right-of-use (“ROU”) assets and lease liabilities by lessees for those leases classified as operating leases.

 

The Company adopted the new standard on January 1, 2019 and used the modified retrospective approach with the effective date as the date of initial application. Consequently, prior period balances and disclosures have not been restated. The Company elected certain practical expedients, which among other things, allowed us to carry forward prior conclusions about lease identification and classification.

 

Adoption of the standard resulted in the balance sheet recognition of additional lease assets and lease liabilities of approximately $1,500,000. The new standard also provides practical expedients for an entity’s ongoing accounting. The Company currently has elected the short-term lease recognition exemption for all leases that qualify. This means, for those leases that qualify, the Company will not recognize ROU assets or lease liabilities, and this includes not recognizing ROU assets or lease liabilities for existing short-term leases of those assets in separate lease and non-lease components for all our leases. For additional information regarding the Company’s leases, see Note 19 in the notes to the consolidated financial statements.

  

In July 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-11, Earnings Per Share (Topic 260), Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity (Topic 480) and Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): I. Accounting for Certain Financial Instruments with Down Round Features; II. Replacement of the Indefinite Deferral for Mandatorily Redeemable Financial Instruments of Certain Nonpublic Entities and Certain Mandatorily Redeemable Noncontrolling Interests with a Scope Exception. Part I of this update addresses the complexity of accounting for certain financial instruments with down round features. Down round features are features of certain equity-linked instruments (or embedded features) that result in the strike price being reduced on the basis of the pricing of future equity offerings. Current accounting guidance creates cost and complexity for entities that issue financial instruments (such as warrants and convertible instruments) with down round features that require fair value measurement of the entire instrument or conversion option. Part II of this update addresses the difficulty of navigating Topic 480, Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity, because of the existence of extensive pending content in the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. This pending content is the result of the indefinite deferral of accounting requirements about mandatorily redeemable financial instruments of certain nonpublic entities and certain mandatorily redeemable noncontrolling interests. The amendments in Part II of this update do not have an accounting effect. This ASU is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2018. The Company adopted this ASU as of January 1, 2019. The amendments in this ASU did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

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In February 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-02, Income Statement – Reporting Comprehensive Income (Topic 220); Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income. The amendments in this ASU allow a reclassification from accumulated other comprehensive income to retained earnings for stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Act. Consequently, the amendments eliminate the stranded tax effects resulting from the Act and will improve the usefulness of information reported to financial statement users. The amendments in this ASU are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted in any interim period after issuance of the ASU. The Company adopted this ASU as of January 1, 2019. The amendments in this ASU did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07, Compensation-Stock Compensation (ASC 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting, which expands the scope of ASC 718 to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees and applies to all share-based payment transactions in which a grantor acquires goods or services to be used or consumed in a grantor’s own operations by issuing share-based payment awards. ASC 718 does not apply to share-based payments used to effectively provide (1) financing to the issuer or (2) awards granted in conjunction with selling goods or services to customers as part of a contract accounted for under ASC 606. This update is effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within that fiscal year. The Company adopted this ASU as of January 1, 2019. The amendments in this ASU did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (ASC 820): Disclosure Framework-Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement. ASU 2018-13 removes certain disclosures, modifies certain disclosures and adds additional disclosures. The ASU is effective for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is evaluating the effect that this update will have on its financial statements and related disclosures.

 

Management has evaluated other recently issued accounting pronouncements and does not believe that any of these pronouncements will have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

 

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not applicable for a smaller reporting company.

   

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ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

Our consolidated balance sheets as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the related consolidated statements of operations and shareholders’ equity (deficit) and cash flows for each of the two years in the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, together with the related notes and the report of our independent registered public accounting firm, are set forth on pages F-1 to F-47 of this report.

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

None.

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act) that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer (who is our Principal Executive Officer) and our Chief Financial Officer (who is our Principal Financial Officer), to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures. Our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, does not expect that our disclosure controls or procedures will prevent all error and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Further, the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control problems or acts of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected.

 

These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the control. The design of any system of controls is also based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected. Based on such evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that as of December 31, 2019, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective.

 

Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act). Under the supervision and with the participation of management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2019. In making this assessment, management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission in Internal Control—Integrated Framework. Based on our assessment, management has concluded that, as of December 31, 2019, our internal control over financial reporting is effective based upon these criteria.

 

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Changes in internal control over financial reporting

 

Management maintains a system of internal control over financial reporting that is designed to provide reasonable assurance that its books and records accurately reflect transactions and that established policies and procedures are followed. At December 31, 2018, management reported material weaknesses related to (i) the lack of personnel with accounting experience and an adequate supervisory review structure and (ii) a lack of segregation of duties within accounting functions. During 2019 the Company hired internal financial and accounting management to mitigate these material weaknesses. As a result of the increased personnel and establishment of related changes to its system of internal control over financial reporting the Company believes it has mitigated the previous reported material weaknesses. The Company has taken the necessary steps to monitor and maintain appropriate internal control over financial reporting during this period of change and will continue to evaluate the operating effectiveness of related key controls during subsequent periods.

 

Attestation report of Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K does not include an attestation report of our independent registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting because we are a “smaller reporting company.” Our management’s report was not subject to attestation by our independent registered public accounting firm pursuant to rules of the SEC that permit us to provide only management’s report in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

  

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

 

None.

  

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PART III

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Directors and Executive Officers

 

Our directors and executive officers and their respective ages, positions, and biographical information as of March 24, 2020 are set forth below.

 

Name   Position   Age
Zachary Venegas   Chief Executive Officer and Director   49
Scott Ogur   Chief Financial Officer and Director   48
Paul Hodges   Director   65
Steve Janjic   Director   53
Garvis Toler III   Director   47
Andrew Schweibold   Director   37
Satyavrat Joshi   Director   36

 

Our directors are appointed for a one-year term to hold office until the next annual general meeting of our shareholders or until they are removed from office in accordance with our bylaws. Our officers are appointed by our Board and hold office until removed by the Board. All officers and directors listed above will remain in office until the next annual meeting of our stockholders, and until their successors have been duly elected and qualified. There are no written agreements with respect to the election of directors. Our Board appoints officers annually and each executive officer serves at the discretion of our Board.

 

Zachary Venegas, Chief Executive Officer and Director 

 

Mr. Venegas has been the Chief Executive Officer and a director of the Company since its inception. Before joining Helix, he was a managing director at Spruce Investment Advisors, LLC for nearly two years, where he managed a private equity portfolio with a net asset value of $500 million. In 2003, Mr. Venegas co-founded and became managing partner of Scimitar Global Ventures, a Dubai-based private equity and venture firm focused on Europe, Africa and the Middle East. During his tenure with Scimitar, Mr. Venegas led the firm’s activities in deal origination, negotiations, capital raising and macroeconomic and geopolitical analysis, leading investments across four continents and multiple industries. He represented Scimitar in numerous media appearances, including Bloomberg Television, CNBC and Barron’s.

 

In addition, Mr. Venegas was the founder and chief executive officer of Omega Strategic Services Group LLC, a dynamic corporate/competitive intelligence and security advisory firm with operations in the Middle East and Africa that supported investors and corporations in creating successful operating environments and helping them to succeed by providing them with distinct, actionable intelligence and real-time data analytics. Earlier in his career, he worked at J.P. Morgan Private Bank in Geneva, Switzerland focused on the Middle East, and went on to lead the bank’s Bahrain office before leaving to found Scimitar.

 

Mr. Venegas received his M.B.A. in Finance and International Business from New York University’s Stern School of Business and a B.S. in Classical Arabic and Portuguese Languages from the United States Military Academy, West Point. Prior to his business career, he served with distinction in the U.S. Army as an Infantry officer. Born in Brooklyn, New York, he has lived in Switzerland, England, France, Brazil, Egypt, Jordan, Bahrain, the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Ghana, DR Congo, South Africa, Singapore, and Thailand and has operated in over 70 countries throughout the Middle East, Asia, Europe and Africa. Mr. Venegas speaks Arabic, French, Portuguese, Romanian and Spanish and has a conversational command of Afrikaans and Swahili.

  

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We believe Mr. Venegas brings to our Board of Directors valuable perspective and experience as our Chief Executive Officer and as a large stockholder, as well as knowledge of the industry and experience managing and directing companies through various stages of development, all of which qualify him to serve as one of our directors.

 

Scott Ogur, Chief Financial Officer and Director  

 

Scott Ogur, CFA, has been a Director of the Company since May 2017 and our Chief Financial Officer since January 2018. Mr. Ogur has over 20 years of financial services experience. From 2014 to 2017, Mr. Ogur was chief financial officer and managing director of Spruce Investment Advisors, LLC. From 2012 to 2014, he was chief financial officer of Beacon Mortgage Corp. Prior to that, Mr. Ogur was chief financial officer of Algorithmic Trading Management, LLC, chief investment officer of Scimitar Global Ventures, and portfolio manager for J.P. Morgan. He currently serves on the board of directors of MetricStream, a governance, risk, and compliance software company, as well as Independent Diplomat, a not-for-profit diplomatic advisory group of which he is also treasurer. Mr. Ogur holds a B.S. in Business Administration, Accounting from Bucknell University and an M.B.A. from New York University’s Stern School of Business. Mr. Ogur is a CFA Charterholder.

 

We believe Mr. Ogur’s financial and accounting experience, perspective as a large stockholder and his knowledge of our operations, bring to our Board of Directors important skills and qualify him to serve as one of our directors.

 

Paul Hodges, Director 

 

Mr. Hodges has been a Director and Senior Advisor of the Company since 2016. He currently serves as principal, president and chief executive officer of Yottabyte, LLC, a software-defined storage company. Mr. Hodges has a 20-year track record as a successful entrepreneur. Most recently, he served as a principal of Netarx, Inc., a network integration and services organization, which he helped grow substantially during his tenure. Earlier, Mr. Hodges co-founded and was chief executive officer of Codespear, LLC, a developer of broadcast alert and interoperable communications software, now part of Federal Signal Corporation. In 2007, he was a founder of First Michigan Bancorp, Inc. (renamed Talmer Bancorp, Inc. and acquired by Chemical Financial Corporation (NASDAQ: CHFC) in 2016) and a director until 2018. Other companies he has founded include Bloomfield Computer Systems, Inc., later purchased by Datatec Ltd., an international IT and managed services provider, and the marketing and advertising agencies ePrize, Inc. and Alteris Group, LLC. Mr. Hodges was appointed by the Governor of Michigan to serve as a director of the Michigan Strategic Fund from 2007 through 2012. Mr. Hodges studied computer engineering at Lawrence Technological University.

 

We believe Mr. Hodges’ experience as an entrepreneur and directing companies through various stages of development, bring to our Board of Directors important skills related to strategic planning and qualify him to serve as one of our directors.

 

Garvis Toler III, Director

 

Mr. Toler has served as the Company’s President of Data Services since August 2019. From July 2018 to July 2019, Mr. Toler served as Head of OTC Business Development for Kraken Digital Asset Exchange. From March 2015 to September 2016, he served as Global Head of Capital Markets for the New York Stock Exchange. From August 2011 to February 2015, he served as Global Head of Equity Capital Markets and Global Head of Sales for Dealogic. Mr. Toler holds an MBA from New York University and a BS from the University of Virginia. 

 

Steve Janjic, President of Helix Exchange and Director

 

Dr. Steve Janjic has more than twenty years of experience in the financial markets. Prior to joining Helix, he was the Director of FX Sales at Tullett Prebon, one of the world’s largest and oldest institutional brokerage firms. At Tullett Prebon, Dr. Janjic established a global sales force focusing on Institutional e-Commerce and Prime Brokerage Sales/Distribution. Previously, Dr. Janjic was the Global Head of eFX/IRS Sales and Distribution at Christopher Street Capital (GFI Securities Group). He also held a similar position with Morgan Stanley’s FX Group. Dr. Janjic’s extensive experience includes successfully managing e-commerce trading room technology, most recently in low-latency e-trading technology, executable streaming prices, request-for-quote, execution algorithms, price aggregation, white-label solutions and pricing retail e-platforms. He has held a senior management position in several global organizations and played an integral part in the success in a number of thriving startup companies, such as the 2010 IPO of Gain Capital Group. Dr. Janjic studied finance at the University of South Carolina and obtained his M.D. from St Mary’s Medical College.

 

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Andrew Schweibold, Director

 

Andrew is the Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Rose Capital. Andrew has 12 years of institutional investment and financial advisory experience, having invested, monitored and/or managed more than $800 million of capital in investments. Prior to forming Rose Capital, Andrew was a Co-Founder, Partner, and one of two Investment Committee members of Delos Capital, a middle market private equity firm. In 2016, Andrew was awarded the M&A Advisor 40 Under 40 Emerging Leaders Award for his efforts as Co-Founder and Partner of Delos at the age of 33. Prior to co-founding Delos, Andrew was a Principal of the Americas business for Vision Capital, worked at Apollo Management, GTCR Golder Rauner as well as Lazard. Andrew has a BBA from the Stephen M. Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan with a concentration in finance and accounting.

 

We believe Mr. Schweibold’s extensive financial services experience and degree in finance and accounting bring to our Board of Directors important skills and qualify him to serve as one of our directors.

 

Satyavrat Joshi, Director

 

Satyavrat “Sat” Joshi is the Chief Investment Officer of Rose Capital. Over the last 13 years, Sat has deployed and/or managed in excess of $1 billion of capital into both public securities and private investments across the capital structure. Prior to joining Rose Capital in 2018, Sat held senior investment roles at Hillhouse Capital, Incline Global Management and Ziff Brothers Investments. At Hillhouse Capital, Sat was a member of the Global Financials team, where he spent the majority of his time on private equity opportunities in the financial technology sector. During Sat’s tenure, Incline Global Management saw its assets under management triple and was named as one of Barron’s “Best 100 Hedge Funds.” Earlier in his career, Sat was an Associate at Apollo Management, where he focused on lower middle market private investments as well as public debt and equity investments. Sat began his career at Lazard, where he was a member of its New York-based Restructuring Group. Sat has a B.S. in Commerce from the McIntire School of Commerce at the University of Virginia with concentrations in finance and management.

 

We believe Mr. Joshi’s extensive financial services experience and degree in finance and management bring to our Board of Directors important skills and qualify him to serve as one of our directors.

 

Committees of our Board of Directors

 

Our securities are not quoted on an exchange that has requirements that a majority of our directors be independent and we are not currently otherwise subject to any law, rule or regulation requiring that all or any portion of our Board of Directors include “independent” directors, nor are we required to establish or maintain an audit committee or other committee of our Board. Our Board does not expect this structure to adversely affect its ability to act independently and satisfy its other requirements.

 

Our Board of Directors has not established an audit committee and does not have an audit committee financial expert due to our limited size. Since we do not have an audit committee comprised of independent directors, the functions that would have been performed by the audit committee are performed by our directors.

  

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Our Board of Directors also does not have standing compensation or nominating committees. Our Board does not believe a compensation or nominating committee is necessary based on the size of our Company and the current levels of compensation to corporate officers. Our Board will consider establishing compensation and nominating committees at the appropriate time.

 

Our entire Board of Directors participates in the consideration of compensation issues and of director nominees. Candidates for director nominees are reviewed in the context of the current composition of our Board and the Company’s operating requirements and the long-term interests of its stockholders. In conducting this assessment, our Board considers skills, diversity, age, and such other factors as it deems appropriate given the current needs of our Board and the Company, to maintain a balance of knowledge, experience and capability.

 

Our Board’s process for identifying and evaluating nominees for director, including nominees recommended by stockholders, will involve compiling names of potentially eligible candidates, conducting background and reference checks, conducting interviews with the candidate and others (as schedules permit), meeting to consider and approve the final candidates and, as appropriate, preparing an analysis with regard to particular recommended candidates.

 

Compliance with Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act

 

Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act requires the Company’s directors, executive officers and persons who beneficially own 10% or more of a class of securities registered under Section 12 of the Exchange Act to file reports of beneficial ownership and changes in beneficial ownership with the SEC. Directors, executive officers and greater than 10% stockholders are required by the rules and regulations of the SEC to furnish the Company with copies of all reports filed by them in compliance with Section 16(a).

 

Based solely on our review of certain reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, the reports required to be filed with respect to transactions in our Common Stock during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019, were timely.

 

Code of Ethics

 

We have adopted a Code of Business Conduct and Ethics that applies to all of our employees, officers and directors. We will provide a copy of our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics, without charge, to any person desiring a copy, by written request to our company at 10200 E. Girard Avenue, Suite B420, CO 80231, Attention: Corporate Secretary.

 

 Legal Proceedings

 

No director or executive officer has been a director or executive officer of any business which has filed a bankruptcy petition or had a bankruptcy petition filed against it during the past ten years. No director or executive officer has been convicted of a criminal offense or is the subject of a pending criminal proceeding during the past ten years. No director or executive officer has been the subject of any order, judgment or decree of any court permanently or temporarily enjoining, barring, suspending or otherwise limiting his involvement in any type of business, securities or banking activities during the past ten years. No director or officer has been found by a court to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law during the past ten years.

  

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ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION.

 

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

The following table sets forth certain information about compensation paid, earned or accrued for services of our named executive officers for the past two fiscal years.

 

Summary Compensation Table

 

          All     
      Base   Other     
   Fiscal  Salary   Compensation   Total 
Name and Principal Position  Year  ($)   ($)   ($) 
Zachary Venegas  2019   200,000    975,736    1,175,736 
President/CEO, Director  2018   200,000    629,200    829,200 
Scott Ogur  2019   180,000    575,136    755,136 
CFO, Director  2018   135,000    -    135,000 
Patrick Vo  2019   114,507    -    114,507 
CEO, BioTrackTHC (1)  2018   102,000    -    102,000 
Terence J. Ferraro  2019   175,000    -    175,000 
Chief Software Architect, BioTrackTHC  2018   102,000    -    102,000 

 

(1)Reflects compensation for the period from January 1, 2019 to September 12, 2019, through date of resignation.

 

On March 15, 2018 we awarded Zachary Venegas two options to purchase a total of 490,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. On March 19, 2019 we awarded Zachary Venegas two options to purchase a total of 500,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. On March 19, 2019 we awarded Scott Ogur two options to purchase a total of 300,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. 100% of the amounts in the All Other Compensation column above represent the Black-Scholes value of the options at the date of grant. We made no other individual grants of restricted stock or stock options to, and there were no stock options exercised by, our named executive officers for the period from October 25, 2015 (inception) through December 31, 2019.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End Table

 

Name  Stock Underlying Option  Option Exercise
Price
   Option Expiration Date
Zachary Venegas  40,000 shares of common stock  $2.090*  3/28/2023
Zachary Venegas  450,000 shares of common stock  $1.900   3/28/2028
Zachary Venegas  114,000 shares of common stock  $2.590*  3/19/2024
Zachary Venegas  386,000 shares of common stock  $2.350   3/19/2029
Scott Ogur  114,000 shares of common stock  $2.590*  3/19/2024
Scott Ogur  186,000 shares of common stock  $2.350   3/19/2029

 

*Represents 110% of the fair market value of the Company’s common stock on the day of issuance.

   

DIRECTOR COMPENSATION

 

There was no compensation awarded to, earned by, or paid to the members of our Board of Directors by us during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018.

 

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS.

 

The following table sets forth certain information regarding the beneficial ownership of our Common Stock as of March 24, 2020 by (a) each stockholder who is known to us to own beneficially 5% or more of our outstanding Common Stock; (b) all directors; (c) our executive officers, and (d) all executive officers and directors as a group. Except as otherwise indicated, all persons listed below have (i) sole voting power and investment power with respect to their shares of Common Stock, except to the extent that authority is shared by spouses under applicable law, and (ii) record and beneficial ownership with respect to their shares of Common Stock.

 

For purposes of this table, a person or group of persons is deemed to have “beneficial ownership” of any shares of Common Stock that such person has the right to acquire within 60 days of March 24, 2020. For purposes of computing the percentage of outstanding shares of our Common Stock held by each person or group of persons named above, any shares that such person or persons has the right to acquire within 60 days of March 24, 2020 is deemed to be outstanding, but is not deemed to be outstanding for the purpose of computing the percentage ownership of any other person. The inclusion herein of any shares listed as beneficially owned does not constitute an admission of beneficial ownership. Unless otherwise identified, the address of our directors and officers is c/o Helix TCS, Inc., 10200 E. Girard Avenue, Suite B420, Denver, CO 80231

  

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The following table assumes 95,279,713 shares are outstanding as of March 24, 2020. 

 

Name of Beneficial Owner   Number of
Shares of
Common
Stock
Beneficially
Owned
    Percentage of
Ownership of
Common
Stock
Beneficially
Owned
    Number of
Shares of
Series A
Preferred
Stock
Beneficially
Owned
    Percentage
Ownership
of Series A
Preferred
Stock
    Number of
Shares of
Series B
Preferred
Stock
Beneficially
Owned
    Percentage
Ownership
of Series B
Preferred
Stock
    Total
Percentage
of Voting
Power
 
5% Beneficial Shareholders                                                        
RSF4, LLC (1)     13,680,116       14.4 %     -       0.0 %     13,784,201       100.0 %     25.0 %
Helix Opportunities, LLC (2)     22,182,228       23.3 %     1,000,000       100.0 %     -       0.0 %     21.1 %
RSF5, LLC (1)     13,680,116       14.4 %     -       -       13,784,201       100.0 %     25.0 %
Nightstone Unlimited, Inc.     8,451,082       8.9 %     -       0.0 %     -       0.0 %     7.7 %
Minds Eye Trust     7,525,903       7.9 %     -       0.0 %     -       0.0 %     6.8 %
Officers and Directors                                                    
Zachary Venegas (2)(3)     22,874,894       23.8 %     1,000,000       100.0 %     -       0.0 %     21.6 %
Scott Ogur (2)(4)     22,282,228       23.4 %     1,000,000       100.0 %     -       0.0 %     21.1 %
Andrew Schweibold (1)     13,680,116       14.4 %     -       0.0 %     13,784,201       100.0 %     25.0 %
Satyavrat Joshi     -       0.0 %     -       0.0 %     -       0.0 %     0.0 %
Paul Hodges     820,206       0.9 %     -       0.0 %     -       0.0 %     0.7 %
Garvis Toler III (5)     100,000       0.1 %     -       0.0 %     -       0.0 %     0.1 %
Steve Janjic (6)     1,907,626       2.0 %     -       0.0 %     -               1.7 %
Officers and Directors as a Group (7 persons)     39,446,842       41.0 %     1,000,000       100.0 %     13,784,201       0.0 %     48.9 %

   

(1)RSF4, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, is solely managed by Rose Capital Fund I GP, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“Rose GP”). Rose GP has the sole power to vote or sell the shares of our Series B Preferred Stock held by RSF4, LLC. Rose GP is owned 50% by Andrew Schweibold and 50% by Jonathan Rosenthal. As a result of the foregoing, Rose GP, Schweibold and Rosenthal may be deemed to be beneficial owners of the shares of our Series B Preferred Stock held by RSF4, LLC.

 

(2)Messrs. Venegas and Ogur each own 50% of Helix Opportunities, LLC.

 

(3)Consists of (i) his beneficial ownership in Helix Opportunities, LLC and (ii) options to purchase up to 656,666 shares of Helix Common Stock.

 

(4)Consists of (i) his beneficial ownership in Helix Opportunities, LLC and (ii) options to purchase up to 100,000 shares of Helix Common Stock

 

(5) Consists of options to purchase up to 100,000 shares of Helix Common Stock

 

(6) Consists of (i) 1,882,626 shares of Common Stock and (ii) options to purchase up to 25,000 shares of Helix Common Stock

 

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Equity Compensation Plan Information Table

 

The following table sets forth the indicated information as of December 31, 2019 with respect to our equity compensation plan:

 

Plan Category  Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants and rights   Weighted-average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights   Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans 
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders            
Helix TCS, Inc. 2017 Omnibus Stock Plan   1,835,000   $1.97    2,400,055 
Bio-Tech Medical Software, Inc. 2014 Stock Incentive Plan   5,398,018   $0.62    286,140 

 

Our only equity compensation plans are the Helix TCS, Inc. 2017 Omnibus Stock Plan and Bio-Tech Medical Software, Inc. 2014 Stock Incentive Plan, which were approved by our stockholders. We do not have any equity compensation plans or arrangements that have not been approved by our stockholders.

 

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

Zachary L. Venegas, our Chief Executive Officer, director and Scott Ogur, Chief Financial Officer, director each own 50% of Helix Opportunities LLC.

 

Advances from Related Parties

 

The Company had a loan outstanding from a former Company executive. The advance did not accrue interest and had no definite repayment terms. The loan balance was $0 and $45,250 as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

On March 1, 2019, the Company entered into a $1,500,000 Secured Convertible Promissory Note (“Note Nine”) with Rose Capital Fund I, LP (the Related Party Holder”). A Managing Member of the Related Party Holder is also a Director of the Company. The Related Party Holder provided the Company with $1,475,000 in cash proceeds, which was received by the Company during the period ended September 30, 2019. The additional $25,000 was retained by the Related Party Holder for legal bills for the transaction. Note Nine will mature on March 1, 2020 and bear interest at a rate of 25% per annum, payable by the Company half in cash and half in kind on a quarterly basis. The principal balance of Note Nine is convertible at the election of the Related Party Holder, in whole or in part, at any time or from time to time, into the Company’s common stock at the lower of $0.90 per share or a 30% discount to the Company’s 30-day weighted average listed price per share immediately before the date of conversion. In conjunction with Note Nine, the Company issued a warrant to the Related Party Holder to purchase 535,715 shares of the Company’s common stock at $1.40 per share.

 

The Company evaluated Note Nine in accordance with ASC 480, Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity and determined Note Nine will be accounted for as a liability initially measured at fair value and subsequently at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in earnings. As of December 31, 2019, the fair value of Note Nine was $1,783,454. Accordingly, the Company recorded a change in fair value of $283,453 related to Note for the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

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In addition, the company recorded a debt discount relating to the warrants issued in the amount of $1,186,153 based on the relative fair value of the warrants at inception of Note Nine. The additional $25,000 retained by the Related Party Holder for legal bills for the transaction will be recorded as a debt discount. Debt discounts amortized to interest expense were $1,012,059 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The unamortized discount balance at December 31, 2019 was $199,094. In May and October 2019, the Company issued 52,083 and 83,311 restricted shares of common stock as PIK interest payments in the amount of $46,875 and $45,821, respectively. Accrued interest expense associated with Note Nine was $93,750 as of December 31, 2019, which includes PIK interest payable. As of December 31, 2019, the balance of Note Nine, net of debt discount for warrants and legal bills was $1,584,360.

  

Warrants

 

On March 1, 2019, in connection with the issuance of Note Nine, the Company issued warrants, of which the value was derived and based off the fair value of Note Nine, to the investor to purchase 535,715 shares of the Company’s common stock at $1.40 per share. Exercise of the purchase rights represented by the warrant may be made, in whole or in part, at any time or times on or after March 1, 2019 and on or before March 1, 2024, by delivery to the Company of the Notice of Exercise.

 

The Company determined that the warrants associated with Note Nine are puttable for cash upon a fundamental transaction at the option of the holder and as such required classification as a liability pursuant to ASC 480, Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity. The Company has no plans to consummate a fundamental transaction and does not believe a fundamental transaction is likely to occur during the remaining term of the outstanding warrants. In accordance with the accounting guidance, the outstanding warrants are recognized as a warrant liability on the balance sheet and are measured at their inception date fair value and subsequently re-measured at each reporting period with changes being recorded as a component of other income in the statement of operations. At inception, March 1, 2019, the fair value of the warrant liability was $1,186,153 while as of December 31, 2019, the fair value of the warrant liability was $182,065. Accordingly, the Company recorded a change in fair value of $1,004,088 for the year ended December 31, 2019, which is reflected in the unaudited consolidated statements of operations. 

 

Promissory Note

 

On January 3, 2019, the Company entered into an unsecured promissory note with the Related Party Holder in the amount of $280,000. The unsecured promissory note has a fixed interest rate of 10% and is due and payable on March 31, 2019. On March 2, 2019, the unsecured promissory note was paid off in full.

 

On July 29, 2019, the Company entered into an unsecured promissory note with the Related Party Holder in the amount of $300,000. The unsecured promissory note has a fixed interest rate of 12% and is due and payable on January 29, 2020. Accrued interest expense associated with the promissory note was $15,288 as of December 31, 2019

 

Director Independence

 

Our securities are not quoted on an exchange that has requirements that a majority of our directors be independent and we are not currently otherwise subject to any law, rule or regulation requiring that all or any portion of our Board of Directors include “independent” directors, nor are we required to establish or maintain an audit committee or other committee of our Board. Our Board does not expect this structure to adversely affect its ability to act independently and satisfy its other requirements.

  

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ITEM 14.

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

 

The following table sets forth all fees paid or accrued by the Company for the audit and other services provided by the Company’s public accounting firm for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

Services  2019   2018 
         
Audit Fees  $159,000   $142,843 
Audit-Related Services   -    - 
Tax Fees   -    - 
Total Fees  $159,000   $142,843 

 

Audit Fees - This category includes the audit of our annual financial statements, review of financial statements included in our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and services that are normally provided by the independent registered public accounting firm in connection with engagements for those fiscal years. This category also includes advice on audit and accounting matters that arose during, or as a result of, the audit or the review of interim financial statements.

 

Audit-Related Fees - This category consists of assurance and related services by the independent registered public accounting firm that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of our financial statements and are not reported above under “Audit Fees.” The services for the fees disclosed under this category include consultation regarding our correspondence with the SEC and other accounting consulting.

 

Tax Fees - This category consists of professional services rendered by our independent registered public accounting firm for tax compliance and tax advice. The services for the fees disclosed under this category include tax return preparation and technical tax advice.

 

Our Board of Directors has adopted a procedure for pre-approval of all fees charged by our independent registered public accounting firm. Under the procedure, the Board approves the engagement letter with respect to audit, tax and review services. Other fees are subject to pre-approval by the Board, or, in the period between meetings, by a designated member of Board. Any such approval by the designated member is disclosed to the entire Board at the next meeting.

 

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PART IV

 

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES.

 

(a)1. Financial Statements.

 

Our consolidated balance sheets as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the related consolidated statements of operations and shareholders’ equity (deficit) and cash flows for each of the two years in the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, together with the related notes and the report of our independent registered public accounting firm, are set forth on pages F-1 to F-47 of this report.

 

(b)Exhibits.

 

Exhibit Number   Description   Filing   Filing Exhibit   Filing Date
                 
2.1   Reorganization Agreement dated as of December 21, 2015 by and between Helix Opportunities, LLC and its members and Helix TCS, Inc.   10-12G   2.1   12/09/16
                 
2.2   Agreement and Plan of Merger by and among Helix TCS, Inc., Helix Acquisition Sub, Inc., Bio-Tech Medical Software, Inc. and Terence J. Ferraro, as the Securityholder Representative, dated March 3, 2018.   8-K   2.1   06/01/18
                 
3.1   Certificate of Incorporation of Jubilee4 Gold, Inc.   10-12G   3.i.1   12/09/16
                 
3.1.2   Certificate of Amendment of Certificate of Incorporation of Helix TCS, Inc.   10-12G   3.i.2   12/09/16
                 
3.1.3   Certificate of Amendment of Certificate of Incorporation of Helix TCS, Inc. – Certificate of Designation of Rights and Privileges of Class A Preferred Convertible Super Majority Voting Stock.   10-12G   3.i.3   12/09/16
                 
3.1.4   Certificate of Designations, Preferences and Rights of Series B Preferred Stock, $.001 Par Value Per Share.   8-K   3.1   05/19/17
                 
3.1.5   Amendment No. 1 to Certificate of Designations, Preferences and Rights of Series B Preferred Stock, $0.001 Par Value Per Share.   8-K   3.1   8/30/17
                 
3.1.6   Amended and Restated Certificate of Designations, Preferences and Rights of Class A Preferred Convertible Super Majority Voting Stock, $.001 Par Value Per Share   8-K   3.1   9/21/17
                 
3.1.7   Amendment No. 2 to Certificate of Designations, Preferences and Rights of Series B Preferred Stock, $0.001 Par Value Per Share    8-K   3.1   12/20/17
                 
3.2   Bylaws of Jubilee4 Gold, Inc.   10-12G   3(ii).1   12/09/16

 

37

 

 

4.1   Form of Registration Rights Agreement dated as of February 13, 2017 by and between Helix TCS, Inc. and RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   8-K/A   10.4   02/24/17
                 
4.2   Form of Warrant for the purchase of 25,000 shares of common stock of Helix TCS, Inc. issued February 13, 2017.   8-K/A   10.8   02/24/17
                 
4.3   Form of Warrant for the purchase of 150,000 shares of common stock of Helix TCS, Inc. issued April 26, 2017.   8-K   10.2   05/01/17
                 
4.4   Form of Registration Rights Agreement, dated March 1, 2019, by and between Helix TCS, Inc. and Diamond Rock, LLC.   10-K   4.4   04/01/2019
                 
4.5   Description of Securities           Filed herewith 
                 
10.1   Asset Purchase Agreement dated as of April 11, 2016 by Revolutionary Software, LLC and Helix TCS, Inc.   10-12G   10.1   12/09/16
                 
10.2   Form of Convertible Promissory Note.   10-12G   4.1   12/09/16
                 
10.3   Form of Unsecured Promissory Note.   8-K   10.1   02/16/17
                 
10.4   Form of Investment Agreement dated as of February 13, 2017 by and between Helix TCS, Inc. and RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   8-K/A   10.6   02/24/17
                 
10.5   Form of Subsidiary Guarantee dated as of February 13, 2017 by each of the signatories thereto.   8-K/A   10.7   02/24/17
                 
10.6   Form of Security Agreement dated as of February 13, 2017 among Helix TCS, Inc., all of the Subsidiaries of Helix TCS, Inc. and RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   8-K/A   10.9   02/24/17
                 
10.7   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement dated as of February 13, 2017 by and between Helix TCS, Inc. and RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   8-K/A   10.10   02/24/17
                 
10.7.1   Annexes III and IV to the Securities Purchase Agreement.   8-K/A   10.2   02/24/17
                 
10.8   Form of 10% Fixed Secured Convertible Promissory Note dated February 13, 2017 for $183,333.33 payable to RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   8-K/A   10.1   02/24/17
                 
10.8.1    Amendment to 10% Fixed Secured Convertible Promissory Note dated February 13, 2017 for $183,333.33 payable to RedDiamond Partners, LLC, dated November 16, 2017.   10-K   10.8.1   03/28/2018

 

38

 

 

10.9   Form of 10% Fixed Secured Convertible Promissory Note dated February 13, 2017 for $25,0000 payable to RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   8-K/A   10.3   02/24/17
                 
10.9.1    Amendment to 10% Fixed Secured Convertible Promissory Note dated February 13, 2017 for $25,000 payable to RedDiamond Partners, LLC, dated November 16, 2017.   10-K   10.9.1   03/28/2018
                 
10.10   Form of Term Sheet and Summary of the Offering and Subscription Agreement for shares of common stock of Helix TCS, Inc.   10-K   10.13   04/17/17
                 
10.11   Form of Term Sheet and Summary of the Offering and Subscription Agreement and Representations for Unsecured Convertible Promissory Note.   10-K   10.14   04/17/17
                 
10.12   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement dated as of April 26, 2017 by and between Helix TCS, Inc. and RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   8-K   10.1   05/01/17
                 
10.13   Form of Security Agreement dated as of April 26, 2017 among Helix TCS, Inc., all of the Subsidiaries of Helix TCS, Inc. and RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   8-K   10.3   05/01/17
                 
10.14   Form of Subsidiary Guarantee dated as of April 26, 2017 by each of the signatories thereto.   8-K   10.4   05/01/17
                 
10.15   Form of 10% Secured Convertible Promissory Note dated April 26, 2017 for $100,000 payable to RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   8-K   4.1   05/01/17
                 
10.15.1    Amendment to 10% Secured Convertible Promissory Note dated April 26, 2017 for $100,0000 payable to RedDiamond Partners, LLC, dated November 16, 2017.   10-K   10.15.1   03/28/2018
                 
10.16   Form of Subscription Agreement and Representations for 111,111 shares of common stock of Helix TCS, Inc. dated as of May 2017.   8-K   10.1   05/11/17
                 
10.17   Form of Helix TCS, Inc. Series B Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement dated May 17, 2017 by and among Helix TCS, Inc., Helix Opportunities, LLC and RSF4, LLC.   10-Q   10.1   5/22/17
                 
10.18   Form of Helix TCS, Inc. Second Series B Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement by and among Helix TCS, Inc. and RSF4, LLC.   8-K   10.2   8/02/17
                 
10.19   Form of Helix TCS, Inc. Third Series B Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement dated as of August 25, 2017 by and among Helix TCS, Inc. and RSF4, LLC.   8-K   10.2   8/30/17
                 
10.20   Form of Helix TCS, Inc. Fourth Series B Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement dated as of September 15, 2017 by and among Helix TCS, Inc. and RSF4, LLC.   8-K   10.2   9/21/17

 

39

 

 

10.21   Form of Helix TCS, Inc. Fifth Series B Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement dated as of October 11, 2017 by and among Helix TCS, Inc. and RSF4, LLC.   8-K   10.3   10/11/17
                 
10.22   Form of Helix TCS, Inc. Sixth Series B Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement dated as of October 31, 2017 by and among Helix TCS, Inc. and RSF4, LLC.   8-K   10.4   11/2/17
                 
10.23   Form Helix TCS, Inc. Seventh Series B Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement dated as of October 31, 2017 by and among Helix TCS, Inc. and RSF4, LLC.   8-K   10.5   11/2/17
                 
10.24   Form of Helix TCS, Inc. Eighth Series B Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement dated as of December 19, 2017 by and among Helix TCS, Inc. and RSF4, LLC.   8-K   10.7   12/20/17
                 
10.25   Form of Helix TCS, Inc. Investor Rights Agreement dated May 17, 2017 by and among Helix TCS, Inc. and the investors listed, including Rose Capital.   10-Q   10.2   5/22/17
                 
10.26   Form of Helix TCS, Inc. Right of First Refusal and Co-Sale Agreement dated May 17, 2017 by and among Helix TCS, Inc., those certain holders of Helix TCS, Inc. Series A Preferred and Common Stock listed and those person and entities listed.   10-Q   10.3   5/22/17
                 
10.27   Form of Helix TCS, Inc. Voting Agreement dated May 17, 2017 by and among Helix TCS, Inc., those certain holders of Helix TCS, Inc. common stock and persons and entities listed therein.   10-Q   10.4   5/22/17
                 
10.28   Form of Membership Interest Purchase Agreement by and between Helix TCS, Inc. and Security Grade Protective Services, Ltd. and Sellers dated June 2, 2017.   8-K   10.1   06/08/17
                 
10.29#   Form of Employment Agreement dated 2017 by and between Security Grade Protective Services, Ltd. and Derek Porter.   8-K   10.2   06/08/17
                 
10.30#   Form of Employment Agreement dated 2017 by and between Security Grade Protective Services, Ltd. and David Beckett.   8-K   10.3   06/08/17
                 
10.31#   Helix TCS, Inc. 2017 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plan.   8-K   10.6   11/16/17

 

40

 

 

10.32#   Bio-Tech Medical Software, Inc. 2014 Stock Incentive Plan.   8-K   10.32   06/05/18
                 
10.33   Pledge and Security Agreement dated February 1, 2018 by RSF5, LLC and Helix TCS, Inc. for the benefit of BTC Investment LLC.   10-Q   10.33   08/14/18
                 
10.34#   Employment Agreement, dated March 19, 2019, by and between Helix TCS, Inc. and Zachary L. Venegas.   8-K   10.34   03/21/2019
                 
10.35#   Employment Agreement, dated March 19, 2019, by and between Helix TCS, Inc. and Scott M. Ogur.   8-K   10.35   03/21/2019
                 
10.36   Form Securities Purchase Agreement, dated March 1, 2019, by and between Helix TCS, Inc. and each purchaser identified therein.   10-K   10.36   04/01/2019
                 
10.37(a)   Form Secured Convertible Promissory Note.   10-K   10.37(a)   04/01/2019
                 
10.37(b)   Form Secured Convertible Promissory Note.   10-K   10.37(b)   04/01/2019
                 
10.38(a)   Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant of Helix TCS, Inc.   10-K   10.38(a)   04/01/2019
                 
10.38(b)   Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant of Helix TCS, Inc.   10-K   10.38(b)   04/01/2019
                 
10.39   Form of Security Agreement, dated March 1, 2019, by and between Helix TCS, Inc., the subsidiaries of Helix TCS, Inc. and DiamondRock LLC.   10-K   10.39   04/01/2019
                 
10.40   Form of Subsidiary Guarantee, dated March 1, 2019 by each of the signatories thereto.   10-K   10.40   04/01/2019
                 
10.41   Pledge Agreement, dated March 1, 2019, by Helix TCS, Inc. Helix TCS LLC and Engeni, LLC for the benefit of Rose Capital Fund I, LP.   10-K   10.41   04/01/2019
                 
10.42   Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated February 5, 2019, by and among Helix TCS, Inc., Helix Acquisition Sub, Inc., Green Tree International, Inc. and the Securityholder Representative.   10-K   10.42   04/01/2019
                 
10.43   Form of Management Consulting Services Agreement by and between the Company and Rose Management Group LLC.   8-K   10.43   04/18/2019
                 
10.44   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated August 15, 2019, by and between Helix TCS, Inc. and RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   10-Q   10.44   11/14/19
                 
10.45   Form of 10% Fixed Convertible Promissory Note, dated August 15, 2019, for $400,000 payable to RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   10-Q   10.45   11/14/19

 

41

 

 

10.46   Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant of Helix TCS, Inc., dated August 15, 2019.   10-Q   10.46   11/14/19
                 
10.47   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated September 16, 2019, by and between Helix TCS, Inc. and RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   10-Q   10.47   11/14/19
                 
10.48   Form of 10% Fixed Convertible Promissory Note, dated September 16, 2019, for $450,000 payable to RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   10-Q   10.48   11/14/19
                 
10.49   Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant of Helix TCS, Inc., dated September 16, 2019.   10-Q   10.49   11/14/19
                 
10.50   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated October 11, 2019, by and between Helix TCS, Inc. and RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   10-Q   10.50   11/14/19
                 
10.51   Form of 10% Fixed Convertible Promissory Note, dated October 11, 2019, for $450,000 payable to RedDiamond Partners, LLC.   10-Q   10.51   11/14/19
                 
10.52   Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant of Helix TCS, Inc., dated October 11, 2019.   10-Q   10.52   11/14/19
                 
10.53   Unsecured Convertible Promissory Note, dated November 15, 2019, for up to $5,000,000 payable to RSF4 II, LLC.   8-K   10.53   11/21/19
                 
10.54   Agreement for the Purchase and Sale of Future Receipts.   8-K   10.54   02/14/20
                 
21.1   Subsidiaries of the Company           Filed herewith 
                 
31.1   Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.           Filed herewith
                 
31.2   Certification of the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.           Filed herewith
                 
32.1   Certification of Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.           Filed herewith
                 
32.2   Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.           Filed herewith

 

Exhibit Number   Description   Filing   Filing Exhibit   Filing Date
                 
101.INS    XBRL Instance Document.    -   -   Filed herewith
                 
101.SCH    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document.    -   -   Filed herewith
                 
101.CAL    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document.    -   -   Filed herewith
                 
101.DEF    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document.    -   -   Filed herewith
                 
101.LAB    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document.    -   -   Filed herewith
                 
101.PRE    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document.    -   -   Filed herewith

 

#Management contract or compensatory plan.

 

42

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

Date: March 30, 2020 By: /s/ Zachary L. Venegas
    Zachary L. Venegas
   

Chief Executive Officer

(Principal Executive Officer)

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Signature   Title   Date
         
/s/ Zachary L. Venegas   Chief Executive Officer   March 30, 2020
Zachary L. Venegas*   (Principal Executive Officer)    
         
/s/ Scott Ogur   Chief Financial Officer   March 30, 2020
Scott Ogur   (Principal Financial Officer)    
         
/s/ Paul Hodges   Director   March 30, 2020
Paul Hodges*        
         
/s/ Steve Janjic   Director   March 30, 2020
Steve Janjic*        
         
/s/ Garvis Toler III   Director   March 30, 2020
Garvis Toler III*        
         
/s/ Andrew Schweibold   Director   March 30, 2020
Andrew Schweibold*        
         
/s/ Satyavrat Joshi   Director   March 30, 2020
Satyavrat Joshi*        

 

* By: Scott Ogur, as Attorney in Fact, pursuant to the
Power of Attorney dated March 30, 2020 and filed herewith.
 

 

43

 

  

HELIX TCS, INC.

 

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

  PAGE
Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm F-2
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-3
   
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-4
   
Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-5
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-7
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements F-8

 

F-1

 

  

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

To the shareholders and the board of directors of Helix TCS, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Helix TCS, Inc. as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the related statements of operations, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audit included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audit also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

Substantial Doubt about the Company’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 2 to the financial statements, the Company’s significant operating losses raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

/S/ BF Borgers CPA PC

BF Borgers CPA PC

 

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2016

Lakewood, CO

March 30, 2020

 

F-2

 

 

HELIX TCS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

   December 31, 
   2019   2018 
ASSETS        
Current assets:        
Cash  $652,524   $285,761 
Accounts receivable, net   1,879,722    1,184,923 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   737,159    409,800 
Costs & earnings in excess of billings   257,819    42,869 
Total current assets   3,518,224    1,923,353 
Property and equipment, net   805,679    349,518 
Intangible assets, net   14,395,287    18,604,078 
Goodwill   53,716,207    39,913,559 
Deposits and other assets   1,172,600    146,990 
Promissory note receivable   75,000    - 
Total assets  $73,682,997   $60,937,498 
           
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY          
           
Current liabilities:          
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities  $3,263,146   $1,702,713 
Advances from related parties   -    45,250 
Billings in excess of costs   164,663    155,192 
Deferred rent   -    2,937 
Notes payable, current portion   24,805    24,805 
Obligation pursuant to acquisition   50,000    201,667 
Convertible notes payable, net of discount   832,492    187,177 
Convertible notes payable, net of discount - related party   1,584,360    - 
Due to related party   -    32,489 
Contingent consideration   -    908,604 
Warrant liability   715,259    896,171 
Promissory notes   300,000    - 
Total current liabilities   6,934,725    4,157,005 
           
Long-term liabilities:          
Notes payable, net of current portion   433,087    51,554 
Convertible notes payable, net of current portion and discount   385,000      
Other long-term liabilities   783,230    - 
Total long-term liabilities   1,601,317    51,554 
Total liabilities   8,536,042    4,208,559 
           
Shareholders’ equity:          
Preferred stock (Class A), $0.001 par value, 3,000,000 shares authorized; 1,000,000 issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018   1,000    1,000 
Preferred stock (Class B), $0.001 par value, 17,000,000 shares authorized; 13,784,201 issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018   13,784    13,784 
Common stock; par value $0.001; 200,000,000 shares authorized; 93,608,619 shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2019; 72,660,825 shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2018   93,608    72,660 
Additional paid-in capital   100,906,143    82,831,014 
Accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income   (79,901)   17,991 
Accumulated deficit   (35,787,679)   (26,207,510)
Total shareholders’ equity   65,146,955    56,728,939 
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity  $73,682,997   $60,937,498 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

F-3

 

 

HELIX TCS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

   For the Years Ended
December 31,
 
   2019   2018 
         
Security and guarding  $5,022,436   $4,889,472 
Systems installation   783,192    499,138 
Software   9,486,472    4,174,963 
Total revenues   15,292,100    9,563,573 
Cost of revenue   8,178,137    5,969,039 
Gross margin   7,113,963    3,594,534 
           
Operating expenses:          
Selling, general and administrative   4,111,085    2,491,518 
Salaries and wages   5,739,783    5,810,594 
Professional and legal fees   2,682,626    2,263,212 
Depreciation and amortization   4,778,334    3,086,531 
Loss on impairment of Goodwill   -    664,329 
Total operating expenses   17,336,828    14,316,184 
           
Loss from operations   (10,222,865)   (10,721,650)
           
Other income (expenses):          
Change in fair value of convertible note   496,790    450,216 
Change in fair value of convertible note - related party   (283,453)   93,506 
Change in fair value of warrant liability   3,812,977    1,641,398 
Change in fair value of contingent consideration   (880,050)   (131,306)
(Loss) gain on issuance of warrants   (825,098)   91,778 
Gain on reduction of obligation pursuant to acquisition   -    607,415 
Interest expense   (1,695,149)   - 
Other income   16,679    2,841 
Other income   642,696    2,755,848 
Net loss  $(9,580,169)  $(7,965,802)
Other comprehensive (loss) income:          
Changes in foreign currency translation adjustment   (97,892)   17,991 
Total other comprehensive (loss) income   (97,892)   17,991 
Total comprehensive loss   (9,678,061)   (7,947,811)
           
Convertible preferred stock beneficial conversion feature accreted as a deemed dividend   -    (22,202,194)
           
Net loss attributable to common shareholders  $(9,678,061)  $(30,150,005)
           
Net loss per share attributable to common shareholders:          
Basic  $(0.12)  $(0.56)
Diluted  $(0.12)  $(0.56)
           
Weighted average common shares outstanding:          
Basic   80,206,895    53,777,343 
Diluted   80,206,895    53,777,343 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

F-4

 

 

HELIX TCS, INC.

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

   Common Stock   Preferred Stock (Class A)   Preferred Stock (Class B)   Additional Paid-In   Accumulated Other Comprehensive   Accumulated   Total Shareholders’ 
   Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Capital   Income   Deficit   Equity 
Balance at December 31, 2018   72,660,825   $72,660    1,000,000   $1,000    13,784,201   $13,784   $82,831,014   $17,991   $(26,207,510)  $56,728,939 
Issuance of common stock per investment unit agreements   1,421,889    1,422    -    -    -    -    66,247    -    -    67,669 
Issuance of common stock resulting from convertible note conversion   1,031,315    1,031    -    -    -    -    675,710    -    -    676,741 
Share-based compensation expense   370,000    370    -    -    -    -    1,783,569    -    -    1,783,939 
Issuance of common stock resulting from exercise of stock options   78,644    79    -    -    -    -    26,534    -    -    26,613 
Issuance of common stock resulting from cashless exercise of stock options   109,931    110    -    -    -    -    (110)   -    -    - 
Restricted common stock issued as part of the Tan Security acquisition   250,000    250    -    -    -    -    709,750    -    -    710,000 
Issuance of common stock in satisfaction of contingent consideration   733,300    733    -    -    -    -    1,787,921    -    -    1,788,654 
Issuance of common stock resulting from convertible note PIK interest (paid)   186,988    187    -    -    -    -    132,663    -    -    132,850 
Restricted common stock issued as part of the Green Tree acquisition   16,765,727    16,766    -    -    -    -    12,892,845    -    -    12,909,611 
Foreign currency translation   -    -    -    -    -    -         (97,892)        (97,892)
Net loss   -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    (9,580,169)   (9,580,169)
Balance at December 31, 2019   93,608,619   $93,608    1,000,000   $1,000    13,784,201   $13,784   $100,906,143   $(79,901)  $(35,787,679)  $65,146,955 

 

F-5

 

 

   Common Stock   Preferred Stock (Class A)   Preferred Stock (Class B)   Additional Paid-In   Accumulated Other Comprehensive   Accumulated   Total Shareholders’ 
   Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Capital   Income   Deficit   Equity 
Balance at December 31, 2017   28,771,402   $28,771    1,000,000   $1,000    13,784,201   $13,784   $18,741,114   $-   $(18,241,708)  $542,961 
Beneficial conversion feature of Series B convertible preferred stock   -    -    -    -    -    -    22,202,194    -    -    22,202,194 
Deemed dividend on conversion of Series B convertible preferred stock to common stock   -    -    -    -    -    -    (22,202,194)   -    -    (22,202,194)
Issuance of common stock per stock subscription agreements   3,949,997    3,949    -    -    -    -    3,351,269    -    -    3,355,218 
Issuance of common stock resulting from convertible note conversion   205,974    206    -    -    -    -    174,794    -    -    175,000 
Issuance of restricted common stock   115,000    115    -    -    -    -    134,850    -    -    134,965 
Reduction in Additional Paid-In Capital due to Security Grade acquisition settlement agreement   -    -    -    -    -    -    (340,039)   -    -    (340,039)
Restricted common stock issued as part of BioTrack acquisition   38,184,985    38,185    -    -    -    -    57,513,848    -    -    57,552,033 
Restricted common stock issued as part of Engeni acquisition   366,700    367    -    -    -    -    388,335    -    -    388,702 
Issuance of common stock to employees under Stock Incentive Plan   514,945    515    -    -    -    -    915,968    -    -    916,483 
Grant of an option to purchase common stock   -    -    -    -    -    -    629,200    -    -    629,200 
Issuance of common stock resulting from inducement of consulting agreement   200,000    200    -    -    -    -    251,800    -    -    252,000 
Issuance of restricted common stock resulting from an investor relation consulting agreement   125,000    125    -    -    -    -    126,875    -    -    127,000 
Issuance of warrants pursuant to consulting agreement   -    -    -    -    -    -    943,000    -    -    943,000 
Issuance of common stock resulting from exercise of stock options   226,822    227    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    227 
Foreign currency translation   -    -    -    -    -    -    -    17,991    -    17,991 
Net loss   -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    (7,965,802)   (7,965,802)
Balance at December 31, 2018   72,660,825   $72,660    1,000,000   $1,000    13,784,201   $13,784   $82,831,014   $17,991   $(26,207,510)  $56,728,939 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

F-6

 

 

HELIX TCS, INC.

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

   For the Years Ended
December 31,
 
   2019   2018 
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:        
Net loss  $(9,580,169)  $(7,965,802)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:          
Depreciation and amortization   4,778,334    3,086,531 
Accretion of debt discounts   1,354,689    - 
Loss on issuance of warrants   825,098    - 
Provision for doubtful accounts   357,749    - 
Share-based compensation expense   1,783,939    3,002,648 
Change in fair value of convertible notes, net of discount   (496,790)   (450,216)
Change in fair value of warrant liability   (3,812,977)   (1,533,398)
Change in fair value of convertible notes, net of discount - related party   283,453    (93,506)
Change in fair value of contingent consideration   880,050    131,306 
Loss on impairment of goodwill   -    664,329 
Gain on reduction of obligation pursuant to acquisition   -    (607,415)
Gain on reduction of contingent consideration   (100,000)   - 
Change in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts receivable   (932,832)   (415,939)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   (334,627)   (406,997)
Deposits and other assets   65,454    280,703 
Due to related party   (32,489)   32,489 
Costs & earnings in excess of billings   (214,950)   (2,022)
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   1,684,797    342,733 
Deferred rent   (2,937)   (6,730)
Billings in excess of costs   9,471    135,001 
Right of use assets and liabilities   65,875    - 
Net cash used in operating activities   (3,418,862)   (3,806,285)
           
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:          
Purchase of property and equipment   (1,044,457)   (155,559)
Purchase of domain names   (21,856)   - 
Payments for business combination, net of cash acquired   (148,727)   - 
Cash acquired as part of business combination   -    454,306 
Payments for asset acquisition   -    (58,729)
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities   (1,215,040)   240,018 
           
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:          
Payments pursuant to convertible notes payable - related party   -    (150,000)
Promissory note receivable   (75,000)   - 
Payments pursuant to advances from related parties   (45,250)   - 
Payments pursuant to notes payable   (18,467)   (27,836)
Payments pursuant to a promissory note   (280,000)   (250,000)
Payments pursuant to contingent consideration   -    (131,331)
Advances from related parties   -    (79,500)
Proceeds from notes payable   -    39,723 
Proceeds from the issuance of a promissory note   580,000    250,000 
Proceeds from the issuance of convertible notes payable   3,745,000    - 
Proceeds from the issuance of common stock   1,306,313    3,355,445 
Net cash provided by financing activities   5,212,596    3,006,501 
           
Effect of foreign exchange rate changes on cash   (211,931)   (23,027)
Net change in cash   366,763    (582,793)
Cash, beginning of period   285,761    868,554 
Cash, end of period  $652,524   $285,761 
           
Supplemental disclosure of cash and non-cash transactions:          
Cash paid for interest  $40,625   $- 
Common stock issued pursuant to convertible notes payable  $676,741   $- 
Debt discount for warrant liability  $(1,594,936)  $- 
Equity issued pursuant to acquisition  $13,619,611   $57,940,735 
Security Grade acquisition consideration settlement  $-   $- 
Cash payable pursuant to acquisition  $50,000   $- 
PIK interest payment of common stock  $132,850   $- 
Common stock issued pursuant to contingent consideration as part of acquisition  $1,788,654   $- 
Supplemental non-cash amounts of lease liabilities arising from obtaining right of use assets  $1,485,511   $- 
Partial conversion of convertible note into common stock  $-   $175,000 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

F-7

 

 

HELIX TCS, INC.

 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

1. Description of Business

 

Helix TCS, Inc. (the “Company” or “Helix”) was incorporated in Delaware on March 13, 2014. Pursuant to the acquisition of the assets of Helix TCS, LLC, as discussed below, we changed our name from Jubilee4 Gold, Inc. to Helix TCS, Inc. effective October 25, 2015.

 

Effective October 25, 2015, we entered into an acquisition and exchange agreement with Helix TCS, LLC. We closed the transaction contemplated under the acquisition and exchange agreement on December 23, 2015 and Helix TCS, LLC was merged into and with Helix. 

 

Effective October 1, 2015, for accounting purposes, as part of an acquisition amounting to a reorganization dated December 21, 2015, Helix Opportunities LLC exchanged 100% of Helix TCS, LLC and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, Security Consultants Group, LLC and Boss Security Solutions, Inc. to the Company in exchange for 20 million common shares and 1 million convertible preferred shares of the Company.

 

The acquisition of Helix was treated as a recapitalization for financial accounting purposes. Jubilee4 Gold, Inc. is considered the acquiree for accounting purposes and their historical financial statements before the Acquisition Agreement were replaced with the historical financial statements of the Company. The common stock account of the Company continues post-merger, while the retained earnings of the acquiree is eliminated. Furthermore, on April 11, 2016, the Company acquired the assets of Revolutionary Software, LLC (“Revolutionary”).

 

On March 3, 2018, Helix TCS, Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiary, Helix Acquisition Sub, Inc. (“BioTrackTHC Merger Sub”), entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger (the “BioTrackTHC Merger Agreement”) with Bio-Tech Medical Software, Inc. (“BioTrackTHC”) and Terence J. Ferraro, as the representative of the BioTrackTHC stockholders, pursuant to which BioTrackTHC Merger Sub merged with and into BioTrackTHC (the “BioTrackTHC Merger”).

 

On June 1, 2018 (the “BioTrackTHC Closing Date”), in connection with closing the BioTrackTHC Merger, the Company issued 38,184,985 unregistered shares of its common stock to BioTrackTHC stockholders, of which 1,852,677 shares were held back to satisfy indemnification obligations in the BioTrackTHC Merger Agreement, if necessary. The Company also assumed the Bio-Tech Medical Software, Inc. 2014 Stock Incentive Plan (“BioTrackTHC Stock Plan”), pursuant to which options exercisable in the amount of 8,132,410 shares of common stock are outstanding. As a result, BioTrackTHC stockholders owned approximately 48% of the Company on a fully diluted basis as of the BioTrackTHC Closing Date.

 

On August 3, 2018 (the “Engeni Closing Date”), the Company and its wholly owned subsidiary, Engeni Merger Sub, LLC (“Engeni Merger Sub”), entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger (the “Engeni Merger Agreement”) with Engeni LLC (“Engeni US”), Engeni S.A (“Engeni SA”), Scott Zienkewicz, Nicolas Heller and Alberto Pardo Saleme (the Engeni US members), and Scott Zienkewicz, as the representative of the Engeni US members. Pursuant to the Engeni Merger Agreement, Engeni Merger Sub merged with and into Engeni US, with Engeni US surviving the merger as a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company (the “Engeni Merger”).

 

On the Engeni Closing Date, in connection with closing the Engeni Merger Agreement, the Company issued 366,700 shares of Company common stock to Engeni US members. Furthermore, the Company subsequently issued Engeni US members 733,300 shares of Company common stock on April 2, 2019.

 

On April 1, 2019 (“Tan Security Closing Date”), the Company entered into a Membership Interest and Stock Purchase Agreement (the “Tan Security Acquisition Agreement”) with Tan’s International Security and Tan’s International LLC (collectively, “Tan Security”). Pursuant to the Tan Security Acquisition Agreement, the Company purchased all membership interests and capital stock of Tan Security and collectively holds 100% of the interests of Tan Security (the “Tan Security Acquisition”).

 

On February 5, 2019, the Company and its wholly owned subsidiary, Merger Sub, entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger (the “Amercanex Merger Agreement”) with Green Tree International, Inc. (“GTI”) and Steve Janjic, as the representative of the GTI shareholders, pursuant to which Merger Sub merged with and into GTI (the “GTI Merger”).

 

On September 10, 2019 (the “GTI Closing Date”), the Company closed the GTI Merger and entered into an Addendum No. 1 to the Amercanex Merger Agreement acknowledging and approving certain events that occurred since signing as well as implementing various related amendments to the Amercanex Merger Agreement. In connection with closing the GTI Merger, the Company issued 16,765,727 unregistered shares of Company common stock to GTI shareholders, of which 4,140,274 shares were held back to satisfy indemnification obligations in the Amercanex Merger Agreement, if necessary.

 

F-8

 

 

2. Going Concern Uncertainty, Financial Condition and Management’s Plans

 

The Company believes that there is substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The Company believes that its available cash balance as of the date of this filing will not be sufficient to fund its anticipated level of operations for at least the next 12 months. The Company believes that its ability to continue operations depends on its ability to sustain and grow revenue and results of operations as well as its ability to access capital markets when necessary to accomplish the Company’s strategic objectives. The Company believes that the Company will continue to incur losses for the immediate future. The Company expects to finance future cash needs from the results of operations and, depending on the results of operations, the Company will need additional equity or debt financing until the Company can achieve profitability and positive cash flows from operating activities, if ever.

 

At December 31, 2019, the Company had a working capital deficit of approximately $3,416,501, as compared to working capital deficit of approximately $2,233,652 at December 31, 2018. The increase of $1,182,849 in the Company’s working capital from December 31, 2018 to December 31, 2019 was primarily the result of an increase in the Company’s convertible notes payable, net of discount – related party and accounts payable and accrued expenses, partially offset by a decrease in contingent consideration and an increase in accounts receivable, net. 

 

The Company’s future capital requirements for its operations will depend on many factors, including the profitability of its businesses, the number and cash requirements of other acquisition candidates that the Company pursues, and the costs of operations. The Company has been investing in expanding its operation in new states, its security service in Colorado and California, and upgrading the capabilities of BioTrackTHC. The Company’s management has taken several actions to ensure that it will have sufficient liquidity to meet its obligations for the next twelve months, including growing and diversifying its revenue streams, selectively reducing expenses, and considering additional funding. Additionally, if the Company’s actual revenues are less than forecasted, the Company anticipates that variable expenses will also decline, and the Company’s management can implement expense reduction as necessary. The Company is evaluating other measures to further improve its liquidity, including the sale of equity or debt securities. Lastly, the Company may elect to reduce certain related-party and third-party debt by converting such debt into common shares. The Company’s management believes that these actions will enable the Company to meet its liquidity requirements for the next twelve months. There is no assurance that the Company will be successful in any capital-raising efforts that it may undertake to fund operations during 2020 and beyond.  

 

The Company plans to generate positive cash flow from its Colorado and California security operations, BioTrackTHC and Engeni software operations to address some of the liquidity concerns. The Company also plans to generate positive cash flows from the acquisitions of Tan Security and Green Tree made during 2019. However, to execute the Company’s business plan, service existing indebtedness and implement its business strategy, the Company anticipates that it will need to obtain additional financing from time to time and may choose to raise additional funds through public or private equity or debt financings, borrowings from affiliates or other arrangements. The Company cannot be sure that any additional funding, if needed, will be available on terms favorable to the Company or at all. Furthermore, any additional capital raised through the sale of equity or equity-linked securities may dilute the Company’s current stockholders’ ownership and could also result in a decrease in the market price of the Company’s common stock. The terms of those securities issued by the Company in future capital transactions may be more favorable to new investors and may include the issuance of warrants or other derivative securities, which may have a further dilutive effect. The Company also may be required to recognize non-cash expenses in connection with certain securities it issues, such as convertible notes and warrants, which may adversely impact the Company’s operating results and financial condition. Furthermore, any debt financing, if available, may subject the Company to restrictive covenants and significant interest costs. There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to raise additional capital, when needed, to continue operations in their current form.

 

F-9

 

 

3. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (“GAAP”). The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, which include Helix TCS, LLC (“Helix TCS”), Security Consultants Group, LLC (“Security Consultants”), Boss Security Solutions, Inc. (“Boss Security”), Security Consultants Group Oregon, LLC (“Security Oregon”), Security Grade, BioTrackTHC (since June 1, 2018), Engeni US (since August 3, 2018), Tan Security (since April 1, 2019) and Green Tree International, Inc. (since September 10, 2019).

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities as of the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expense during the reporting period. Changes in estimates and assumptions are reflected in reported results in the period in which they become known. Use of estimates includes the following: 1) allowance for doubtful accounts, 2) estimated useful lives of property, equipment and intangible assets, 3) intangibles impairment, 4) valuation of convertible notes payable and 5) revenue recognition. Actual results could differ from estimates.

 

Cash

 

Cash consists of checking accounts. The Company considers all highly-liquid investments purchased with a maturity of three months or less at the time of purchase to be cash equivalents. The Company has no cash equivalents as of December 31, 2019 or 2018.

 

Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

Accounts receivable are recorded at the invoiced amount, net of an allowance for doubtful accounts. The Company performs ongoing credit evaluations of its customers and adjusts credit limits based upon payment history and the customer’s current credit worthiness, as determined by the review of their current credit information; and determines the allowance for doubtful accounts based on historical write-off experience, customer specific facts and economic conditions.

 

Management charges balances off against the allowance after all means of collection have been exhausted and the potential for recovery is considered remote. The Company determines when receivables are past due, or delinquent based on how recently payments have been received.

 

Outstanding account balances are reviewed individually for collectability. The allowance for doubtful accounts is the Company’s best estimate of the amount of probable credit losses in the Company’s existing accounts receivable. Allowance for doubtful accounts was $273,138 and $76,156 at December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

  

Long-Lived Assets, Including Definite Lived Intangible Assets

 

Long-lived assets, other than goodwill and other indefinite-lived intangibles, are evaluated for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the assets may not be recoverable through the estimated undiscounted future cash flows derived from such assets. Definite-lived intangible assets primarily consist of non-compete agreements and customer relationships. For long-lived assets used in operations, impairment losses are only recorded if the asset’s carrying amount is not recoverable through its undiscounted, probability-weighted future cash flows. The Company measures the impairment loss based on the difference between the carrying amount and the estimated fair value. When an impairment exists, the related assets are written down to fair value.

 

Goodwill

 

Goodwill, which represents the excess of purchase price over the fair value of net assets acquired, is carried at cost. Goodwill is not amortized; rather, it is subject to a periodic assessment for impairment by applying a fair value-based test. Helix reviews goodwill for possible impairment annually during the fourth quarter, or whenever events or circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable.

 

The impairment model prescribes a two-step method for determining goodwill impairment. However, an entity is permitted to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether the two-step goodwill impairment test is necessary. The qualitative factors considered by Helix may include, but are not limited to, general economic conditions, Helix’s outlook, market performance of Helix’s industry and recent and forecasted financial performance. Further testing is only required if the entity determines, based on the qualitative assessment, that it is more likely than not that a reporting unit’s fair value is less than its carrying amount. Otherwise, no further impairment testing is required. In the first step, Helix determines the fair value of its reporting unit using a discounted cash flow analysis. If the net book value of the reporting unit exceeds its fair value, Helix then performs the second step of the impairment test, which requires allocation of the reporting unit’s fair value to all of its assets and liabilities using the acquisition method prescribed under authoritative guidance for business combinations with any residual fair value being allocated to goodwill. An impairment charge is recognized when the implied fair value of Helix’s goodwill is less than its carrying amount.

 

Assumptions and estimates used in the evaluation of impairment may affect the carrying value of long-lived assets, which could result in impairment charges in future periods. Such assumptions include projections of future cash flows and the current fair value of the asset. It was determined that during the first quarter of 2018, the Company’s entire amount of goodwill attributable to the Security Grade acquisition was impaired. See Note 7 for a further discussion on the impairment.

 

F-10

 

 

Accounting for Acquisitions

 

In accordance with the guidance for business combinations, the Company determines whether a transaction or other event is a business combination, which requires that the assets acquired, and liabilities assumed constitute a business. Each business combination is then accounted for by applying the acquisition method. If the assets acquired are not a business, the Company accounts for the transaction or other event as an asset acquisition. Under both methods, the Company recognizes the identifiable assets acquired, the liabilities assumed, and any noncontrolling interest in the acquired entity. In addition, for transactions that are business combinations, the Company evaluates the existence of goodwill or a gain from a bargain purchase. The Company capitalizes acquisition-related costs and fees associated with asset acquisitions and immediately expense acquisition-related costs and fees associated with business combinations.

 

Business Combinations

 

The Company accounts for its business combinations under the provisions of Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 805-10, Business Combinations (“ASC 805-10”), which requires that the purchase method of accounting be used for all business combinations. Assets acquired and liabilities assumed, including non-controlling interests, are recorded at the date of acquisition at their respective fair values. ASC 805-10 also specifies criteria that intangible assets acquired in a business combination must meet to be recognized and reported apart from goodwill. Goodwill represents the excess purchase price over the fair value of the tangible net assets and intangible assets acquired in a business combination. Acquisition-related expenses are recognized separately from the business combinations and are expensed as incurred. If the business combination provides for contingent consideration, the Company records the contingent consideration at fair value at the acquisition date and any changes in fair value after the acquisition date are accounted for as measurement-period adjustments. Changes in fair value of contingent consideration resulting from events after the acquisition date, such as earn-outs, are recognized as follows: 1) if the contingent consideration is classified as equity, the contingent consideration is not re-measured and its subsequent settlement is accounted for within equity, or 2) if the contingent consideration is classified as a liability, the changes in fair value are recognized in earnings.

 

The estimated fair value of net assets acquired, including the allocation of the fair value to identifiable assets and liabilities, was determined using established valuation techniques. The estimated fair value of the net assets acquired was determined using the income approach to valuation based on the discounted cash flow method. Under this method, expected future cash flows of the business on a stand-alone basis are discounted back to a present value. The estimated fair value of identifiable intangible assets, consisting of software and trade name acquired were determined using the relief from royalty method.

   

The most significant assumptions under the relief from royalty method used to value software and trade names include: estimated remaining useful life, expected revenue, royalty rate, tax rate, discount rate and tax amortization benefit. The discounted cash flow method used to value non-compete agreements includes assumptions such as: expected revenue, term of the non-compete agreements, probability and ability to compete, operating margin, tax rate and discount rate. Management has developed these assumptions on the basis of historical knowledge of the business and projected financial information of the Company. These assumptions may vary based on future events, perceptions of different market participants and other factors outside the control of management, and such variations may be significant to estimated values.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Under FASB Topic 606, Revenue from Contacts with Customers (“ASC 606”), the Company recognizes revenue when the customer obtains control of promised goods or services, in an amount that reflects the consideration which is expected to be received in exchange for those goods or services. The Company recognizes revenue following the five-step model prescribed under ASC 606: (i) identify contract(s) with a customer; (ii) identify the performance obligation(s) in the contract; (iii) determine the transaction price; (iv) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligation(s) in the contract; and (v) recognize revenues when (or as) the Company satisfies a performance obligation.

 

The security services revenue is generated from performing armed and unarmed guarding which is contracted for on an hourly basis. Revenues associated with these contracted services are recognized under time-based arrangements as services are provided.

 

Additionally, the Company provides transportation security services, which are generally contracted for on a per-run basis and sometimes additional fees and surcharges are also billed to the client depending on the length of the run. Revenues associated with these services are recognized as the transportation service is provided.

 

The Company also generates revenue from developing and licensing seed to sale cannabis compliance software to both private-sector and public-sector (government agencies) businesses that are involved in cannabis related operations. The Company also generates revenue from on-going training, support and software customization services.

 

F-11

 

 

Occasionally, the Company will enter into systems installation arrangements. Installation jobs are estimated based on the cost of equipment to be installed, the number of hours expected to be incurred to complete the job and other ancillary costs. Revenue associated with these services are recognized over the arrangement period.

 

Lastly, the Company generates monthly recurring revenues from Cannalytics, its business intelligence and data tool for commercial customers. Revenue is recognized monthly.

 

Segment Information

 

Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 280, Segment Reporting, establishes standards for reporting information about operating segments. Operating segments are defined as components of an enterprise about which separate financial information is available that is evaluated regularly by the chief operating decision maker, or decision-making group, in deciding how to allocate resources and in assessing performance. The Company’s chief operating decision maker is the Chief Executive Officer, who reviews the financial performance and the results of operations of the segments prepared in accordance with GAAP when making decisions about allocating resources and assessing performance of the Company.

 

Asset information by operating segment is not presented since the chief operating decision maker does not review this information by segment. The reporting segments follow the same accounting policies used in the preparation of the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

Expenses

 

Cost of Revenue

 

The cost of revenues is the total cost incurred to obtain a sale and the cost of the goods or services sold. Cost of revenues primarily consisted of hourly compensation for security personnel and employees involved in the creation and development of licensing software.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expenses encompass selling general and administrative expenses, salaries and wages, professional and legal fees and depreciation and amortization. Selling, general and administrative expenses consist primarily of rent/moving expenses, advertising and travel expenses. Salaries and wages is composed of non-revenue generating employees. Professional services are principally comprised of outside legal, audit, information technology consulting, marketing and outsourcing services as well as the costs related to being a publicly traded company.

 

Other Income

 

Other income consisted of a gain on the change in fair value of convertible notes, gain on the change in the fair value of warrant liability, loss on the change in fair value of convertible notes – related party, loss on the change in fair value of contingent consideration, loss on issuance of warrants and interest expense.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost and depreciated on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives. Useful lives are 3 years for vehicles and 5 years for furniture and equipment. Maintenance and repairs are expensed as incurred and major improvements are capitalized. When assets are sold, or retired, the cost and related accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts and the resulting gain or loss is included in loss from operations.

 

Contingencies

 

Occasionally, the Company may be involved in claims and legal proceedings arising from the ordinary course of its business. The Company records a provision for a liability when it believes that it is both probable that a liability has been incurred, and the amount can be reasonably estimated. If these estimates and assumptions change or prove to be incorrect, it could have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements. Contingencies are inherently unpredictable, and the assessments of the value can involve a series of complex judgments about future events and can rely heavily on estimates and assumptions.

 

F-12

 

 

Advertising

 

Advertising costs are expensed as incurred and included in selling, general and administrative expenses and amounted to $378,233 and $96,420 for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

Foreign Currency

 

The local currency is the functional currency for one entity’s operations outside the United States. Assets and liabilities of these operations are translated to U.S. dollars at the exchange rate in effect at the end of each period. Income statement accounts are translated at the average exchange rate prevailing during the period. Translation adjustments arising from the use of differing exchange rates from period to period are included as a component of other comprehensive loss within shareholders’ equity. Gains and losses from foreign currency transactions are included in net loss for the period.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes under the asset and liability method, which requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the differences between the financial statements and tax basis of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. Valuation allowances are established when necessary to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized. The Company has incurred net operating loss for financial-reporting and tax-reporting purposes. Accordingly, for Federal and state income tax purposes, the benefit for income taxes has been offset entirely by a valuation allowance against the related federal and state deferred tax asset for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018.

 

Comprehensive Loss

 

Comprehensive loss consists of consolidated net loss and foreign currency translation adjustments. Foreign currency translation adjustments included in comprehensive loss were not tax-effected as investments in international affiliates are deemed to be permanent.

 

F-13

 

 

Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity

 

The Company relies on the guidance provided by ASC Topic 480, Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity, to classify certain redeemable and/or convertible instruments. The Company first determines whether a financial instrument should be classified as a liability. The Company will determine the liability classification if the financial instrument is mandatorily redeemable, or if the financial instrument, other than outstanding shares, embodies a conditional obligation that the Company must or may settle by issuing a variable number of its equity shares.

 

Once the Company determines that a financial instrument should not be classified as a liability, the Company determines whether the financial instrument should be presented between the liability section and the equity section of the balance sheet (“temporary equity”). The Company will determine temporary equity classification if the redemption of the financial instrument is outside the control of the Company (i.e. at the option of the holder). Otherwise, the Company accounts for the financial instrument as permanent equity.

 

Initial Measurement

 

The Company records its financial instruments classified as liability, temporary equity or permanent equity at issuance at the fair value, or cash received.

 

Subsequent Measurement – Financial instruments classified as liabilities

 

The Company records the fair value of its financial instruments classified as liabilities at each subsequent measurement date. The changes in fair value of its financial instruments classified as liabilities are recorded as other expense/income.

 

Share-based Compensation

 

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation to employees in conformity with the provisions of ASC Topic 718, Stock Based Compensation. Stock-based compensation to employees consist of stock option grants and restricted shares that are recognized in the statement of operations based on their fair values at the date of grant.

 

The Company accounts for equity instruments issued to non-employees in accordance with the provisions of ASC Topic 718, based upon the fair-value of the underlying instrument. The equity instruments are valued using the Black-Scholes valuation model. The measurement of stock-based compensation is subject to periodic adjustments as the underlying equity instruments vest and is recognized as an expense over the period which services are received.

 

The Company calculates the fair value of option grants utilizing the Black-Scholes pricing model and estimates the fair value of the stock based upon the estimated fair value of the common stock. The amount of stock-based compensation recognized during a period is based on the value of the portion of the awards that are ultimately expected to vest.

 

The resulting stock-based compensation expense for both employee and non-employee awards is generally recognized on a straight- line basis over the requisite service period of the award.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures (“ASC Topic 820”) provides a framework for measuring fair value in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

 

ASC Topic 820 defines fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. ASC Topic 820 establishes a fair value hierarchy that distinguishes between (1) market participant assumptions developed based on market data obtained from independent sources (observable inputs) and (2) an entity’s own assumptions about market participant assumptions developed based on the best information available in the circumstances (unobservable inputs).

 

F-14

 

 

The fair value hierarchy consists of three broad levels, which gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy under ASC Topic 820 are described as follows:

 

  Level 1 – Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that are accessible at the measurement date.
     
  Level 2 – Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. Level 2 inputs include quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active; inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for the asset or liability; and inputs that are derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data by correlation or other means.
     
  Level 3 – Inputs that are unobservable for the asset or liability.

 

Certain assets and liabilities of the Company are required to be recorded at fair value either on a recurring or non-recurring basis. Fair value is determined based on the price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction based on market participants. The following section describes the valuation methodologies that the Company used to measure, for disclosure purposes, its financial instruments at fair value.

 

Convertible notes payable

 

The fair value of the Company’s convertible notes payable, approximated the carrying value as of December 31, 2019 and 2018. Factors that the Company considered when estimating the fair value of its debt included market conditions and the term of the debt. The level of the debt would be considered as Level 2.

 

Additional Disclosures Regarding Fair Value Measurements

 

The carrying value of cash, accounts receivable, prepaid expenses, deposits, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, advances from shareholders and obligation pursuant to acquisition approximate their fair value due to the short-term maturity of those items.

 

Earnings (Loss) per Share

 

The Company follows ASC 260, Earnings Per Share, which requires presentation of basic and diluted earnings per share (“EPS”) on the face of the income statement for all entities with complex capital structures. Basic EPS is computed by dividing net loss available to common shareholders (numerator) by the weighted average number of shares outstanding (denominator) during the period. Diluted EPS gives effect to all dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period including stock options and warrants, using the treasury stock method, and convertible debt and convertible securities, using the if-converted method.

 

Basic net loss per share is based on the weighted average number of common and common-equivalent shares outstanding. Potential common shares includable in the computation of fully-diluted per share results are not presented in the consolidated financial statements for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 as their effect would be anti-dilutive.

 

The anti-dilutive shares of common stock outstanding for years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 were as follows:

 

   For the Years Ended
December 31,
 
   2019   2018 
Potentially dilutive securities:        
Convertible notes payable   5,994,838    124,784 
Convertible Preferred A Stock   1,000,000    1,000,000 
Convertible Preferred B Stock   13,784,201    13,784,201 
Warrants   5,113,058    3,418,184 
Stock options   11,617,381    8,729,463 

 

F-15

 

 

Reclassifications

 

Certain reclassifications have been made to the prior period financial statements to conform to the current period financial statement presentation. These reclassifications had no effect on net earnings or cash flows as previously reported.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-.02, Leases (Topic 842) (“Topic 842”) which requires the recognition of right-of-use assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet. The most prominent of the changes in the standard is the recognition of right-of-use (“ROU”) assets and lease liabilities by lessees for those leases classified as operating leases.

 

The Company adopted the new standard on January 1, 2019 and used the modified retrospective approach with the effective date as the date of initial application. Consequently, prior period balances and disclosures have not been restated. The Company elected certain practical expedients, which among other things, allowed us to carry forward prior conclusions about lease identification and classification.

 

Adoption of the standard resulted in the balance sheet recognition of additional lease assets and lease liabilities of approximately $1,500,000. The new standard also provides practical expedients for an entity’s ongoing accounting. The Company currently has elected the short-term lease recognition exemption for all leases that qualify. This means, for those leases that qualify, the Company will not recognize ROU assets or lease liabilities, and this includes not recognizing ROU assets or lease liabilities for existing short-term leases of those assets in separate lease and non-lease components for all our leases. For additional information regarding the Company’s leases, see Note 19 in the notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

  

In July 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-11, Earnings Per Share (Topic 260), Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity (Topic 480) and Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): I. Accounting for Certain Financial Instruments with Down Round Features; II. Replacement of the Indefinite Deferral for Mandatorily Redeemable Financial Instruments of Certain Nonpublic Entities and Certain Mandatorily Redeemable Noncontrolling Interests with a Scope Exception. Part I of this update addresses the complexity of accounting for certain financial instruments with down round features. Down round features are features of certain equity-linked instruments (or embedded features) that result in the strike price being reduced on the basis of the pricing of future equity offerings. Current accounting guidance creates cost and complexity for entities that issue financial instruments (such as warrants and convertible instruments) with down round features that require fair value measurement of the entire instrument or conversion option. Part II of this update addresses the difficulty of navigating Topic 480, Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity, because of the existence of extensive pending content in the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. This pending content is the result of the indefinite deferral of accounting requirements about mandatorily redeemable financial instruments of certain nonpublic entities and certain mandatorily redeemable noncontrolling interests. The amendments in Part II of this update do not have an accounting effect. This ASU is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2018. The Company adopted this ASU as of January 1, 2019. The amendments in this ASU did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In February 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-02, Income Statement – Reporting Comprehensive Income (Topic 220); Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income. The amendments in this ASU allow a reclassification from accumulated other comprehensive income to retained earnings for stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Act. Consequently, the amendments eliminate the stranded tax effects resulting from the Act and will improve the usefulness of information reported to financial statement users. The amendments in this ASU are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted in any interim period after issuance of the ASU. The Company adopted this ASU as of January 1, 2019. The amendments in this ASU did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07, Compensation-Stock Compensation (ASC 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting, which expands the scope of ASC 718 to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees and applies to all share-based payment transactions in which a grantor acquires goods or services to be used or consumed in a grantor’s own operations by issuing share-based payment awards. ASC 718 does not apply to share-based payments used to effectively provide (1) financing to the issuer or (2) awards granted in conjunction with selling goods or services to customers as part of a contract accounted for under ASC 606. This update is effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within that fiscal year. The Company adopted this ASU as of January 1, 2019. The amendments in this ASU did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

F-16

 

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (ASC 820): Disclosure Framework-Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement. ASU 2018-13 removes certain disclosures, modifies certain disclosures and adds additional disclosures. The ASU is effective for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is evaluating the effect that this update will have on its financial statements and related disclosures

 

Management has evaluated other recently issued accounting pronouncements and does not believe that any of these pronouncements will have a significant impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and related disclosures effective for public companies for the reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019.

 

4. Revenue Recognition

 

Adoption of ASC 606 Revenue from Contracts with Customers

 

The Company adopted the new revenue standard, ASC 606, using the modified retrospective method with respect to all non-completed contracts as of January 1, 2018. This method required retrospective application of the new accounting standard to all unfulfilled contracts that were outstanding as of January 1, 2018.

 

The Company has determined that there were no adjustments required with respect to the adoption of ASC 606 with respect to any prior periods.

 

Disaggregation of revenue 

 

   For the Years Ended
December 31,
 
   2019   2018 
Types of Revenues:        
Security and Guarding  $5,022,436   $4,889,472 
Systems Installation   783,192    499,138 
Software   9,486,472    4,174,963 
Total revenues  $15,292,100   $9,563,573 

 

The following is a description of the principal activities from which we generate our revenue.

 

Security and Guarding Revenue

 

Helix provides armed and unarmed guards, monitoring of security alarms and cameras, as well as armed transportation services. The guards are charged out at an hourly rate, as are the monitoring services, with invoices typically sent to clients shortly after each month-end for the previous month, with revenue being recognized over time. The customer simultaneously receives and consumes benefits provided by the Helix performance. Transportation services are typically invoiced on a per-run basis, with revenue being recognized at a point in time once the service has been completed.

 

Systems Installation Revenue

 

Security systems, including Internet Protocol camera, intrusion alarm systems, perimeter alarm systems, and access controls are installed for clients. Installation jobs are estimated based on the cost of the equipment, the number of man hours expected to complete the work, supplies, travel, and any other ancillary costs. The installation is typically invoiced with 60% of the total price immediately after signing and the balance upon completion of the installation service. The timing of these contracts is short-term in nature and less than 12 months in duration, and revenue is recognized over the term of the contracts, utilizing the cost-to-cost   method.

 

F-17

 

 

Software

 

The Company generates revenue from developing and licensing seed to sale cannabis compliance software to both private-sector and public-sector (government agencies) clients that are involved in cannabis related operations. The Company also generates revenue from on-going training, support and software customization services.

 

The private-sector software entails cultivation tracking, inventory management, point of sale and analytic reporting to assist businesses in meeting their compliance requirements and effectively managing their businesses. Customers within the private sector business are charged an initial one-time installation fee and the revenues associated with these services are recognized upon completion of installation and configuration at a point in time. After the installation and configuration of the software is completed, the customer is invoiced monthly and revenues associated with these services are recognized monthly over a period of time in which the customer continues to use the software and related services.

 

The public-sector software assists government agencies in efficient oversight of cannabis related business under their jurisdiction. Revenues associated with governmental contracts are longer-term in nature and recognized upon completion of certain milestones over a period of time or on a completed-contract basis at a point in time. The Company considers the contract to be complete when all significant costs have been incurred and the customer accepts the project. Costs incurred prior to the customer accepting the project are deferred and reflected on the consolidated balance sheets as prepaid expenses and other current assets.

  

Performance Obligations

 

A performance obligation is a promise in a contract to transfer a distinct good or service to the customer and is the unit of account in accordance with ASC 606. A contract’s transaction price is allocated to each distinct performance obligation and recognized as revenue when, or as, the performance obligation is satisfied.  Generally, the Company’s contracts include a single performance obligation that is separately identifiable, and therefore, distinct. Under ASC 606, the allocation of transaction price is not necessary if only one performance obligation is identified.

 

Significant Judgments

 

Accounting for long-term contracts involves the use of various techniques to estimate total contract revenue, costs and satisfaction of performance obligation. The Company satisfies its performance obligations and subsequently recognizes revenue, at a point in time, as security and installation services are performed. There were no changes to the significant judgments used by the Company to determine the timing of satisfaction of the performance obligations under ASC 606.

 

Costs to Obtain or Fulfill Contract

 

The Company’s costs to fulfill or obtain contracts with customers primarily consist of commissions and legal costs. The Company provides sales team members with commissions at 0-6%. Although sales commissions are incremental in nature and are only incurred when a contract is obtained, there is no up-front commission paid on the satisfactory obtainment of a contract, resulting in no sales commissions being capitalized at December 31, 2019 and 2018. The Company also incurs legal costs relating to the drafting and negotiating of contracts with select customers. Because legal costs are not incremental in nature and are incurred regardless of whether a contract is ultimately obtained, there were no legal costs capitalized as of December 31, 2019 and 2018.

 

F-18

 

 

5. Business Combination

 

Security Grade Acquisition

  

On June 2, 2017, the Company entered into a Membership Interest Purchase Agreement (the “Agreement”) in which the Company purchased all issued and outstanding Units of Security Grade Protective Services, Ltd. (“Security Grade”), which comprised of 800,000 Class A Units and 200,000 Class B Units. At closing, the Company delivered $800,000 in cash and 207,427 non-qualified stock options (the “Initial Stock Options”). Furthermore, provided that, within the first 60 days following the closing, no material customer identified in the Agreement terminates its contractual relationship with the Company and that all contracts with such material customers are in full force and effect without default or cancellation as of the 60th day following the closing, on the 61st day following the closing, the Company shall deliver an additional $800,000 in cash and issue 207,427 additional stock options (the “Additional Stock Options”). In the event of termination, cancellation or default of any contract with one or more material customer identified in the Agreement within the first 60 days following the closing, the stock options received by the acquiree shall be reduced and/or forfeited to the extent necessary (pro rata based upon their ownership interest in the Company immediately preceding the closing) by a percentage equal to the revenue received by the Company from the terminating customer(s) in the 180 days immediately preceding such termination divided by the revenue received by the Company from all material customers identified in the Agreement in the 180 days immediately preceding such termination. As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company had a liability pursuant to the Agreement of $0 and $101,667, respectively, payable following the closing.

 

The merger is being accounted for as a business combination in accordance with ASC 805. The Company’s allocation of the purchase price was calculated as follows:

 

Base Price - Cash  $2,100,373 
Base Price - Stock Options   916,643 
Contingent Consideration - Stock Options   916,643 
Total Purchase Price  $3,933,659 

 

       Weighted Average Useful Life
Description  Fair Value   (in years)
Assets acquired:       
Cash  $14,137    
Accounts receivable   53,792    
Costs & earnings in excess of billings   96,898    
Property, plant and equipment, net   27,775    
Trademarks   25,000   10
Customer lists   3,154,578   5
Web address   5,000   5
Goodwill   664,329    
Other assets   3,880    
 Total assets acquired  $4,045,389    
Liabilities assumed:        
Billings in excess of costs  $23,967    
Loans payable   18,414    
Credit card payable and other liabilities   69,349    
Total liabilities assumed   111,730    
Estimated fair value of net assets acquired  $3,933,659    

 

The initial stock options are included as part of the purchase price. The Company determined the fair value of the contingent consideration to be $916,643 at June 2, 2017 and recorded it as a liability in its unaudited consolidated balance sheets. The Company satisfied their contingent consideration liability during the third quarter of 2017. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company reached settlement agreements with all six selling members. As a result of these settlements, a gain on reduction of obligation pursuant to acquisition in the amount of $607,415 has been recorded for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

F-19

 

 

BioTrackTHC Acquisition

 

In connection with closing the BioTrackTHC Merger, the Company issued 38,184,985 unregistered shares of Company common stock to BioTrackTHC stockholders, of which 1,852,677 shares were held back to satisfy indemnification obligations in the BioTrackTHC Merger Agreement, if necessary. The Company also assumed the BioTrackTHC Stock Plan, pursuant to which options exercisable for 8,132,410 shares of Company common stock are outstanding so that the BioTrackTHC stockholders owned approximately 48% of the Company on a fully diluted basis as of the BioTrackTHC Closing Date.

  

The BioTrackTHC Merger is being accounted for as a business combination in accordance with ASC 805. The Company’s allocation of the purchase price was calculated as follows:

  

Base Price - Common Stock  $44,905,542 
Base Price - Stock Options   12,646,491 
Total Purchase Price  $57,552,033 

 

       Weighted Average Useful Life
Description  Fair Value   (in years)
Assets acquired:       
Cash  $448,697    
Accounts receivable   128,427    
Prepaid expenses   351,615    
Property, plant and equipment, net   72,252    
Goodwill   39,135,007    
Customer list   8,304,449   5
Software   9,321,627   4.5
Tradename   466,081   4.5
Total assets acquired  $58,228,155    
Liabilities assumed:        
Accounts payable  $223,581    
Other liabilities   452,541    
Total liabilities assumed   676,122    
Estimated fair value of net assets acquired  $57,552,033    

 

Total acquisition costs for the BioTrackTHC merger incurred during the year ended December 31, 2018 was $116,624, and is included in selling, general and administrative expense in the Company’s consolidated statements of operations.

 

Engeni SA Acquisition

 

On the Engeni Closing Date, in connection with closing the Engeni Merger Agreement, the Company issued 366,700 shares of Company common stock to Engeni US members. Furthermore, the Company may also issue Engeni US members 366,700 and 366,600 shares of Parent common stock upon the achievement of specific objectives. If applicable, the Company will pay Engeni US members the aggregate amount of $100,000, on a pro rata basis, if Engeni SA reaches financial breakeven on or before December 31, 2018, as determined by the Company’s Chief Financial Officer and Scott Zienkewicz.

 

The Engeni Merger is being accounted for as a business combination in accordance with ASC 805.

 

F-20

 

 

During the first quarter of 2019, it was determined Engeni SA did not reach financial breakeven and therefore the contingent consideration of $100,000 was deemed by the Company not to be payable and was reduced to zero. In accordance with ASC 805-30-35-1, the Company recognized the change in the fair value of contingent consideration subsequent to the acquisition date in general and administrative expenses. The Company’s allocation of the purchase price was calculated as follows:

 

Base Price - Common Stock  $388,702 
Contingent Consideration - Common Stock   777,298 
Total Purchase Price  $1,166,000 

 

       Weighted Average Useful Life
Description  Fair Value   (in years)
Assets acquired:       
Cash  $5,609    
Accounts receivable and other assets   30,479    
Property, plant and equipment, net   57,830    
Software   449,568   3.3
Goodwill   778,552    
Total assets acquired  $1,322,038    
Liabilities assumed:        
Accounts payable  $56,038    
Total liabilities assumed   56,038    
Estimated fair value of net assets acquired  $1,266,000    

 

The Company determined the fair value of the contingent consideration to be $777,298 at August 3, 2018 and recorded it as a liability in its unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheets. On April 2, 2019, the Company satisfied their contingent consideration liability and issued 733,300 shares of the Company’s common stock to Engeni US members.

 

Tan’s International Security

 

On the Tan Security Closing Date, the Company entered into the Tan Security Acquisition Agreement. Pursuant to the Tan Security Acquisition Agreement, Helix purchased all membership interests and capital stock of Tan Security and collectively holds 100% of the interests of Tan Security. The purchase price of $100,000 in cash plus 250,000 shares of the Company’s restricted common stock will be paid to Rocky Tan as follows:

 

  250,000 shares of Helix Stock at closing.
     
  $25,000 at closing
     
  $25,000 on the 4-month anniversary of the Tan Security Closing Date
     
  $25,000 on the 8-month anniversary of the Tan Security Closing Date
     
  $25,000 on the 12-month anniversary of the Tan Security Closing Date

 

The Tan Security Acquisition is being accounted for as a business combination in accordance with ASC 805. The Company has determined preliminary fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed in the Tan Security Acquisition. These values are subject to change as we perform additional reviews of our assumptions utilized.

 

F-21

 

 

The Company has made a provisional allocation of the purchase price of the Tan Security transaction to the assets acquired and the liabilities assumed as of the purchase date. The following table summarizes the provisional purchase price allocations relating to the Tan Security Acquisition:

  

Base Price – Cash at closing  $25,000 
Base Price – Deferred cash payment (including $25,000 to be made on the 4,8 and 12-month anniversaries of closing)   75,000 
Base Price – Common Stock   710,000 
Total Purchase Price  $810,000 

 

Description  Fair Value 
Assets acquired:    
Cash  $2,940 
Accounts receivable   7,635 
Goodwill   821,807 
Total assets acquired  $832,382 
Liabilities assumed:     
Accounts payable  $12,526 
Other liabilities   9,856 
Total liabilities assumed   22,382 
Estimated fair value of net assets acquired  $810,000 

 

Green Tree International, Inc.

 

Pursuant to the Amercanex Merger Agreement, the Company issued to the GTI stockholders an amount of unregistered shares of the Company’s common stock equal to $15 million, based on the average closing price of the Company’s common stock over the forty-five (45) trading day period ending three (3) trading days prior to the GTI Closing Date. If revenues of GTI in the second 12 month period following the GTI Closing Date exceed $5 million and are less than or equal to $10 million, the Company shall issue to the GTI shareholders a number of unregistered Helix shares (whether issued or reserved for issuance) equal to the quotient of (a) $5 million divided by (b) Helix share price multiplied by the quotient of (c) the revenues of GTI in the second 12 month period following the GTI Closing Date less $5 million divided by (d) $5 million.

 

To secure the indemnification obligations of the GTI shareholders to the Company under the GTI Merger Agreement, 4,140,274 of the Company shares issued to the GTI shareholders were held back and the Company is entitled to retain such number of the holdback shares as necessary to satisfy those indemnification obligations. 50% of the holdback shares that remain after satisfaction of any indemnification obligations will be released 12 months after the GTI Closing Date of the merger, and the remainder 24 months after the GTI Closing Date of the merger. Additionally, if in the first 12 months following the closing GTI generates less than $1.5 million of revenues, 100% of the holdback shares shall be returned to the Company.

 

In connection with closing the GTI Merger on September 10, 2019, the Company issued 16,765,727 unregistered shares of its common stock to GTI stockholders. In connection with the GTI Merger, Steve Janjic joined the board of directors of the Company.

 

The GTI Merger is being accounted for as a business combination in accordance with ASC 805. The Company has determined preliminary fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed in the GTI Merger. These values are subject to change as we perform additional reviews of our assumptions utilized.

 

The Company has made a provisional allocation of the purchase price of the GTI transaction to the assets acquired and the liabilities assumed as of the purchase date. The following table summarizes the provisional purchase price allocations relating to the GTI transaction:

 

Base Price - Common Stock  $12,909,611 
Total Purchase Price  $12,909,611 

 

F-22

 

 

Description  Fair Value   Weighted Average Useful Life
(Years)
Assets acquired:       
Note Receivable, net  $135,000    
Property, Plant and Equipment, Net   12,142    
Software   452,002   4.5
Goodwill   12,980,840    
Total assets acquired  $13,579,984    
         
Liabilities assumed:        
Accounts Payable   43,717    
Notes Payable   400,000    
Other Liabilities   226,656    
Total liabilities assumed:   670,373    
Estimated fair value of net assets acquired:  $12,909,611    

  

Total acquisition costs for the GTI Merger incurred during the year ended December 31, 2019 was $83,324, and is included in selling, general and administrative expense in the Company’s consolidated statements of operations.

 

Unaudited Pro Forma Results

 

GTI contributed revenues of $0 and a net loss of $73,644 for the period September 10, 2019 through December 31, 2019, included in the Company’s consolidated statements of operations.

 

6. Property and Equipment, Net

 

At December 31, 2019 and 2018, property and equipment consisted of the following: 

 

   December 31, 
   2019   2018 
Furniture and equipment  $262,167   $264,659 
Software equipment   561,964    - 
Vehicles   201,066    202,700 
Total   1,025,197    467,359 
Less: Accumulated depreciation   (219,518)   (117,841)
Property and equipment, net  $805,679   $349,518 

 

Depreciation expense for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $95,685 and $106,625, respectively.

 

7. Intangible Assets, Net and Goodwill

 

The following table summarizes the Company’s intangible assets:

 

      December 31, 2019 
   Estimated Useful Life (Years)  Gross Carrying Amount   Assets Acquired Pursuant to Business Combination (2)   Assets Acquired   Accumulated Amortization   Net Book Value 
Database  5  $93,427   $-   $-   $(69,533)  $23,894 
Trade names and trademarks  5 - 10   591,081    -    -    (207,525)   383,556 
Web addresses  5   130,000    -    -    (95,611)   34,389 
Customer list  5   11,459,027    -    -    (4,256,070)   7,202,957 
Software  4.5   9,771,195    452,002    1,625    (3,492,525)   6,732,297 
Domain Name  5   -    -    20,231    (2,037)   18,194 
      $22,044,730   $452,002   $21,856   $(8,123,301)  $14,395,287 

 

F-23

 

 

          December 31, 2018 
   Estimated Useful Life (Years)  Gross Carrying Amount at December 31, 2017   Assets Acquired Pursuant to Business Combination (1) (2)   Accumulated Amortization   Net Book Value 
Database  5  $93,427   $-   $(50,858)  $42,569 
Trade names and trademarks  5-10   125,000    466,081    (91,554)   499,527 
Web addresses  5   130,000    -    (69,625)   60,375 
Customer list  5   3,154,578    8,304,449    (1,965,520)   9,493,507 
Software  4.5   -    9,771,195    (1,263,095)   8,508,100 
      $3,503,005   $18,541,725   $(3,440,652)  $18,604,078 

 

(1) On June 1, 2018, the Company acquired various assets of BioTrackTHC (See Note 5)
   
(2) On August 3, 2018, the Company acquired various assets of Engeni (See Note 5)
   
(3) On September 10, 2019, the Company acquired various assets of GTI (See Note 5)

 

The Company uses the straight-line method to determine the amortization expense for its definite lived intangible assets. Amortization expense related to the purchased intangible assets was $4,682,649 and $2,979,906 for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

The estimated future amortization expense for the next five years and thereafter is as follows:

 

Years Ending December 31,  Future amortization expense 
2020  $4,773,348 
2021   4,718,392 
2022   4,036,485 
2023   808,591 
2024   39,669 
Thereafter   18,802 
Total  $14,395,287 

 

F-24

 

 

The following table summarizes the Company’s goodwill as of December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

   Total Goodwill 
Balance at December 31, 2017  $664,329 
Impairment of goodwill   (664,329)
Goodwill attributable to Biotrack acquisition   39,135,007 
Goodwill attributable to Engeni acquisition   778,552 
Balance at December 31, 2018  $39,913,559 
      
Goodwill attributable to Tan Security acquisition   821,807 
Goodwill attributable to Green Tree acquisition   12,980,840 
Balance at December 31, 2019  $53,716,207 

  

8. Costs, Estimated Earnings and Billings

 

Costs, estimated earnings and billings on uncompleted contracts are summarized as follows as of December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

   December 31, 
   2019   2018 
Costs incurred on uncompleted contracts  $444,344   $89,700 
Estimated earnings   150,355    50,512 
Cost and estimated earnings earned on uncompleted contracts   594,699    140,212 
Billings to date   501,543    252,535 
Billings in excess of costs and costs in excess of billings on uncompleted contracts   93,156    (112,323)
           
Costs in excess of billings  $257,819   $42,869 
Billings in excess of cost   (164,663)   (155,192)
   $93,156   $(112,323)

 

9. Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses

 

As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, accounts payable and accrued expenses consisted of the following:

 

   December 31, 
   2019   2018 
Accounts payable  $895,785   $842,389 
Accrued compensation and related expenses   260,280    - 
Accrued expenses   1,733,371    847,560 
Accrued interest   -    12,764 
Lease obligation - current   373,710    - 
Total  $3,263,146   $1,702,713 

 

10. Convertible Notes Payable, net of discount

 

   December 31, 
   2019   2018 
Note Five, 5% convertible promissory note, fixed secured, maturing November 16, 2019  $-   $187,177 
Note Ten, 25% convertible promissory note, fixed secured, maturing March 1, 2020, net of debt discount for warrants   143,630    - 
Note Eleven, 10% convertible promissory note, fixed secured, maturing May 15, 2020, net of debt discount for warrants and legal fees   185,313    - 
Note Twelve, 10% convertible promissory note, fixed secured, maturing June 16, 2020, net of debt discount for warrants and legal fees   205,363    - 
Note Thirteen, 10% convertible promissory note, fixed secured, maturing July 11, 2020, net of debt discount for warrants and legal fees   206,091    - 
Note Fourteen, 12% convertible promissory note, fixed secured, maturing September 26, 2020, net of debt discount for warrants and legal fees   92,095    - 
Note Fifteen, 12% convertible promissory note, fixed secured, maturing November 15, 2021   385,000    - 
    1,217,492    187,177 
Less: Current portion   (832,492)   (187,177)
Long-term portion  $385,000   $- 

 

F-25

 

 

On May 16, 2018, the Company amended Note Five (“Second Amendment”) with the First Investor. The Second Amendment states that Note Five shall have a maturity of November 16, 2018 and shall be pre-payable at any time at 120% of the unpaid principal and accrued interest balance. The principal amount as of the date of the Second Amendment was $112,305.