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EX-32.2 - NON INVASIVE MONITORING SYSTEMS INC /FL/ex32-2.htm
EX-32.1 - NON INVASIVE MONITORING SYSTEMS INC /FL/ex32-1.htm
EX-31.2 - NON INVASIVE MONITORING SYSTEMS INC /FL/ex31-2.htm
EX-31.1 - NON INVASIVE MONITORING SYSTEMS INC /FL/ex31-1.htm
EX-21.1 - NON INVASIVE MONITORING SYSTEMS INC /FL/ex21-1.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, DC. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

 

[X] Annual report pursuant to Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
   
  For the fiscal year ended July 31, 2018

 

OR

 

[  ] Transition report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
   
  For the transition period from ____________________ to ____________________

 

Commission File Number 000-13176

 

NON-INVASIVE MONITORING SYSTEMS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Florida   59-2007840
(State or other jurisdiction of   (I.R.S. Employer
incorporation or organization)   Identification No.)

 

4400 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 180, Miami, Florida, 33137

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (305) 575-4207

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act: None

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act:

 

Common stock, $0.01 par value per share

(Title of Class)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act. Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to the filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 month (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

  Large accelerated filer [  ] Accelerated filer [  ] Non-accelerated filer [  ] Smaller reporting company [X]
  Emerging growth company [  ]    

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act) Yes [  ] No [X]

 

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of September 24, 2018 was: $6.3 million.

 

As of November 7, 2018, there were 79,007,423 shares of common stock, $0.01 par value outstanding.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE: None

 

 

 

   
 

 

Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, INC.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR FORM 10-K

 

PART I   4
     
Item 1. Business. 4
     
Item 1A. Risk Factors. 12
     
Item 2. Properties. 19
     
Item 3. Legal Proceedings. 19
     
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures. 19
     
PART II   19
     
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities. 19
     
Item 6. Selected Financial Data. 20
     
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. 20
     
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk. 24
     
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data. 25
     
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure. 42
     
Item 9A(T). Controls and Procedures. 43
     
Item 9B. Other Information. 43
     
PART III   44
     
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance. 44
     
Item 11. Executive Compensation. 47
     
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters. 48
     
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence. 49
     
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services. 52
     
PART IV   53
     
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules 53
     
SIGNATURES 54

 

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CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains, in addition to historical information, certain forward-looking statements about our expectations, beliefs or intentions regarding, among other things, our product development and commercialization efforts, business, financial condition, results of operations, strategies or prospects. You can identify forward-looking statements by the fact that these statements do not relate strictly to historical or current matters. Rather, forward-looking statements relate to anticipated or expected events, activities, trends or results as of the date they are made. Because forward-looking statements relate to matters that have not yet occurred, these statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from any future results expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Many factors could cause our actual activities or results to differ materially from the activities and results described in forward-looking statements. These factors include those set forth below as well as those contained in “Item 1A - Risk Factors” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). We do not undertake any obligation to update forward-looking statements, except as required by applicable law. These forward-looking statements reflect our views only as of the date they are made with respect to future events and financial performance.

 

Risks and uncertainties, the occurrence of which could adversely affect our business, include the following:

 

  We have a history of operating losses, we do not expect to become profitable in the near future and absent a significant increase in revenue or additional equity or debt financing, we may be unable to continue as a going concern.
     
  We will require additional funding, which may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all.
     
  We terminated the Product and Supply Agreement with Sing Lin and may potentially be obligated to pay amounts under the agreement.
     
  We rely on third parties to manufacture and supply our products, and we presently have no agreement with any third party to manufacture and supply our products.
     
  Healthcare policy changes, including reforms to the U.S. healthcare system, may have a material adverse effect on us.
     
  Our Exer-Rest device does not have a unique Medicare Reimbursement CPT Code.
     
  The terms of clearances or approvals and ongoing regulation of our products may limit how we manufacture and market our products, which could materially impair our ability to generate anticipated revenues.
     
  Our competitors may develop and market products that are more effective, safer or less expensive than our products, negatively impacting our commercial opportunities.
     
  If we are unable to obtain and enforce patent protection for our products, our business could be materially harmed.
     
  If we are unable to protect the confidentiality of our proprietary information and know-how, the value of our technology and products could be adversely affected.
     
  Our commercial success depends significantly on our ability to operate without infringing the patents and other proprietary rights of third parties.
     
  If we become involved in patent litigation or other proceedings related to a determination of rights, we could incur substantial costs and expenses, substantial liability for damages or be required to stop our product development and commercialization efforts.
     
  Failure to obtain regulatory approval outside the United States will prevent us from marketing our products abroad.
     
  Non-U.S. governments often impose strict price controls, which may adversely affect our future profitability.
     
  Our business is subject to economic, political, regulatory and other risks associated with international operations.
     
  We do not anticipate paying dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future.
     
  Because our common stock is a “penny stock,” it may be more difficult for investors to sell shares of our Common Stock, and the market price of our common stock may be adversely affected.
     
  Our stock price has been volatile and there may not be an active, liquid trading market for our common stock.
     
  Our quarterly results of operations will fluctuate, and these fluctuations could cause our stock price to decline.
     
  Shareholders may experience dilution of ownership interests because of the future issuance of additional shares of our common stock and our preferred stock.

 

* * * * *

 

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PART I

 

Item 1. Business.

 

General

 

Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. (together with its consolidated subsidiaries, the “Company,” “NIMS,” “we,” “us” or “our”) was incorporated under the laws of the State of Florida on July 16, 1980. The Company’s offices are located at 4400 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida, 33137 and its telephone number is (305) 575-4207. The Company’s business is the research, development, manufacture and marketing of a line of motorized, non-invasive, whole body, periodic acceleration platforms, which are intended as aids to increase local circulation and temporary relief of minor aches and pains, produce local muscle relaxation and reduce morning stiffness. Our current products are derivatives of our original acceleration platform, the AT-101 (described below), and are intended for use in homes, wellness and fitness centers, healthcare providers offices and clinics, nursing homes, assisted living facilities, sports facilities and hospitals.

 

Company Overview

 

Prior to 2002, our primary business was the development of computer-assisted, non-invasive diagnostic monitoring devices and related software designed to detect abnormal respiratory, cardiac and other medical conditions from sensors placed externally on the body’s surface.

 

In 2002, we began focusing on the research, development, manufacturing, marketing and sales of non-invasive, motorized, whole body periodic acceleration (“WBPA”) platforms. These therapeutic acceleration platforms are intended as aids to temporarily increase local circulation for temporary relief of minor aches and pains, produce local muscle relaxation and reduce morning stiffness. Our first such platform, the AT-101, was initially registered with the United States Food and Drug Administration (the “FDA”) as a Class 1 (exempt) powered exercise device and was sold to physicians and their patients. In January 2005, the FDA disagreed with our device classification, and requested that we cease commercial sales and marketing of the AT-101 until we received clearance from the FDA to market the device following submission of a 510(k) application incorporating appropriate clinical trial data. Accordingly, we ceased our commercial sales and marketing of therapeutic platforms in 2005.

 

In January 2005, we began development of a less costly and more efficient second generation version of the AT-101, the Exer-Rest® (now designated the Exer-Rest AT). In January 2008, we received ISO 13485 certification for Canada, the United Kingdom and Europe from SGS United Kingdom Ltd., the world’s leading verification and certification body. We did not renew our ISO certification in 2016. In addition, the Exer-Rest AT acceleration therapeutic platform (Class IIa) was awarded CE0120 certification, which requires several safety-related conformity tests, including clinical assessment for safety and effectiveness. The CE0120 certification is often referred to as a “passport” that allows manufacturers from anywhere in the world to sell their goods throughout the European market, as well as in many other countries. Prior to obtaining FDA registration for the sale of our therapeutic acceleration platforms in the United States, we marketed and sold the Exer-Rest AT platforms in the United Kingdom, Canada, India and Latin America.

 

We entered into a product development and supply agreement with Sing Lin Technology Co., Ltd. (“Sing Lin”) of Taichung, Taiwan on September 4, 2007. Under this agreement, Sing Lin began manufacturing the third generation versions of our patented Exer-Rest motorized platforms (designated the Exer-Rest AT3800 and the Exer-Rest AT4700). We filed a 510(k) premarket notification submission with the FDA in October 2008 for approval to market the Exer-Rest line of platforms in the United States. The submission included 23 investigational and clinical studies on the vasodilatation properties of WBPA, as well as a controlled, four week clinical trial in a group of patients with chronic aches and pains carried out at the Center of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. The submission supported Exer-Rest safety and efficacy for the intended uses as an aid to temporarily increase local circulation, to provide temporary relief of minor aches and pains and to provide local muscle relaxation. The FDA informed us in January 2009 that the full Exer-Rest line of products would be registered as Class I (Exempt) Medical Devices as described in the Company’s 510(k) premarket notification submission, at which time we commenced marketing the Exer-Rest in the United States. In June 2009, the FDA notified us that the additional intended use of the Exer-Rest as an aid to reduce morning stiffness would be added to the Exer-Rest’s FDA registration. We have historically marketed and sold our Exer-Rest devices in the United States, Canada, the UK, India, Mexico, the Middle East, the Far East and Latin America. We continue to have our devices available for sale.

 

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Market Opportunities

 

More than thirty peer reviewed scientific publications attest to the benefits of WBPA in animal and human research investigations. According to those studies, the application of this WBPA technology provides objective benefits in patients with angina pectoris and increases the blood supply to the heart muscle in both healthy individuals and patients with heart disease. These findings are not claimed as an intended use of the device for marketing purposes, but demonstrate a potential mechanism for its benefits. We believe the market for our products is driven by, among other factors:

 

  the aging population;
     
  the increasing number of elderly persons reporting chronic ailments;
     
  an increased awareness of the benefits of exercise, particularly as a form of prevention;
     
  an increasing portion of the population that is incapable of performing traditional exercise; and
     
  the expanding body of research connecting the body’s reduction of inflammation and improved transmission of neural impulses.

 

Our products are designed for use by people who are unable or unwilling to exercise or for whom exercise is contraindicated. We market the Exer-Rest line of platforms for the intended uses of temporarily increasing local circulation, temporarily relieving minor aches and pains, providing local muscle relaxation and as an aid to reduce morning stiffness. These symptoms are frequently reported by individuals with chronic cardiovascular, neurological or musculoskeletal conditions, although we do not claim that the Exer-Rest is intended to treat these conditions.

 

Products

 

Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (“WBPA”) Therapeutic Devices

 

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The Exer-Rest AT3800 and Exer-Rest AT4700, which were manufactured for us by Sing Lin prior to the termination of our agreement with them, are next generation versions of the Exer-Rest AT and further advance the acceleration therapeutic platform technology. The AT3800 (38” wide) and AT4700 (47” wide) models combine improved drive technology for quieter operation, a more comfortable “memory-foam” mattress, more convenient operation with a multi-function wireless remote and a more streamlined look to improve the WBPA experience. Sales of the Exer-Rest AT3800 and Exer-Rest AT4700 platforms began outside the United States in October 2008, and U.S. sales commenced in February 2009.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We currently hold five United States patents with respect to both overall design and specific features of our present and proposed products, with corresponding foreign patents issued or pending in multiple jurisdictions. No assurance can be given as to the scope of protection afforded by any patent issued, whether patents will be issued with respect to any pending or future patent application, that patents issued will not be designed around, infringed or successfully challenged by others, that we will have sufficient resources to enforce any proprietary protection afforded by our patents or that our technology will not infringe on patents held by others. We believe that in the event our patent protection is materially impaired, a material adverse effect on our present and proposed business could result. The following table lists our patents, along with their expiration dates (each of which is 20 years from the filing date):

 

US Patent   Inventors   Title   Expiration Date
7,404,221   Sackner, Marvin A.   Reciprocating movement platform for the external addition of pulses to the fluid channels of a subject   August 4, 2028
             
7,228,576   Inman, D. Michael;
Sackner, Marvin A.
  Reciprocating movement platform for the addition of pulses of the fluid channels of a subject   June 12, 2027
             
7,111,346   Inman, D. Michael;
Sackner, Marvin A.
  Reciprocating movement platform for the addition of pulses of the fluid channels of a subject   May 15, 2023
             
7,090,648   Sackner, Marvin A.;
Inman, D. Michael
  External addition of pulses to fluid channels of body to release or suppress endothelial mediators and to determine effectiveness of such intervention   September 28, 2021
             
6,155,976   Sackner, Marvin A.;
Inman, D. Michael;
Meichner, William J.
  Reciprocating movement platform for shifting subject to and fro in headwards-footwards direction   May 24, 2019

 

With respect to our present and potential product line, we have six trademarks and trade names which are registered in the United States and in several foreign countries, including our principal trademark, “Exer-Rest”.

 

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Research and Development

 

In the past, we have sponsored or monitored research investigating the effectiveness of WBPA in chronic heart failure, mild traumatic brain injury, acute myocardial infarction, Parkinson’s disease, peripheral vascular disease and lymphedema.

 

Competition

 

We compete with several entities that market, sell or distribute therapeutic devices that are registered with the FDA as powered exercise devices, or therapeutic vibrators. These include Power Plate of North America, Vibraflex and CERAGEM International, Inc., all of which are larger than we are, have longer operating histories and have financial and personnel resources far greater than ours. We believe that we essentially compete with such competitors based upon the uniqueness of our products and our product differentiation on the basis of intended uses and operation.

 

Government Regulation of our Medical Device Development and Distribution Activities

 

Healthcare is heavily regulated by the federal government and by state and local governments. The federal laws and regulations affecting healthcare change constantly thereby increasing the uncertainty and risk associated with any healthcare-related venture.

 

The federal government regulates healthcare through various agencies, including but not limited to the following: (i) the FDA which administers the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (“FD&C Act”), as well as other relevant laws; (ii) the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) which administers the Medicare and Medicaid programs; (iii) the Office of Inspector General (“OIG”), which enforces various laws aimed at curtailing fraudulent or abusive practices including, by way of example, the Anti-Kickback statute, the Physician Self Referral Law, commonly referred to as the Stark Law, the Anti-Inducement Law, the Civil Money Penalty Law, and the laws that authorize the OIG to exclude health care providers and others from participating in federal healthcare programs; and (iv) the Office of Civil Rights which administers the privacy aspects of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”). All of the aforementioned are agencies within the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”). Healthcare is also provided or regulated, as the case may be, by the Department of Defense through its TriCare program, the Department of Veterans Affairs, especially through the Veterans Health Care Act of 1992, Public Health Service within HHS under the Public Health Service Act, the Department of Justice through the Federal False Claims Act and various criminal statutes, and state governments under the Medicaid and other state sponsored or funded programs and their internal laws regulating all healthcare activities.

 

FDA Regulation of the Design, Manufacture and Distribution of Medical Devices

 

The testing, manufacture, distribution, advertising and marketing of medical devices are subject to extensive regulation by federal, state and local governmental authorities in the United States, including the FDA, and by similar agencies in other countries. Any product that we develop must receive all relevant regulatory clearances or approvals, as the case may be, before it may be marketed in a particular country. Under United States law, a “medical device” (“device”) is an article, which, among other things, is intended for use in the diagnosis of disease or other conditions, or in the cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease, in man or other animals. See FD&C Act § 201(h). Substantially all of our products are classified as medical devices and subject to regulation by numerous agencies and legislative bodies, including the FDA and its foreign counterparts.

 

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As a company that manufactures medical devices, we are required to register with the FDA. As a result, we and any entity that manufactures products on our behalf will be subject to periodic inspection by the FDA for compliance with the FDA’s Quality System Regulation requirements and other regulations. In the European Community, we will be required to maintain certain International Organization for Standardization (“ISO”) certifications in order to sell products and we or our manufacturers undergo periodic inspections by notified bodies to obtain and maintain these certifications. The Company did not maintain its ISO certificate in 2017 and no longer has ISO certification. These regulations require us or our manufacturers to manufacture products and maintain documents in a prescribed manner with respect to design, manufacturing, testing and control activities. Further, we are required to comply with various FDA and other agency requirements for labeling and promotion. The Medical Device Reporting regulations require that we provide information to the FDA whenever there is evidence to reasonably suggest that a device may have caused or contributed to a death or serious injury or, if a malfunction were to occur, could cause or contribute to a death or serious injury. In addition, the FDA prohibits us from promoting a medical device for unapproved indications.

 

The FDA in the course of enforcing the FD&C Act may subject a company to various sanctions for violating FDA regulations or provisions of the Act, including requiring recalls, issuing Warning Letters, seeking to impose civil money penalties, seizing devices that the agency believes are non-compliant, seeking to enjoin distribution of a specific type of device or other product, seeking to revoke a clearance or approval, seeking disgorgement of profits and seeking to criminally prosecute a company and its officers and other responsible parties.

 

Third-Party Payments, Especially payments by Medicare and Medicaid

 

A. Medicare and Medicaid Coverage

 

Because of the projected patient population that could potentially benefit from our devices is elderly, Medicare could be a potential source of reimbursement. Medicare is a federal program that provides certain hospital and medical insurance benefits to persons age 65 and over, certain disabled persons, persons with end-stage renal disease and those suffering from Lou Gehrig’s Disease. In contrast, Medicaid is a medical assistance program jointly funded by federal and state governments and administered by each state pursuant to which benefits are available to certain indigent patients. The Medicare and Medicaid statutory framework is subject to administrative rulings, interpretations and discretion that affect the amount and timing of reimbursement made under Medicare and Medicaid.

 

Medicare reimburses for medical devices in a variety of ways depending on where and how the device is used. However, Medicare only provides reimbursement if CMS, either directly or through one of its contracts, determines that the device should be covered and that the use of the device is consistent with the coverage criteria. A coverage determination can be made at the local level (“Local Coverage Determination”) by the Medicare administrative contractor (formerly called carriers and fiscal intermediaries), a private contractor that processes and pays claims on behalf of CMS for the geographic area where the services were rendered, or at the national level by CMS through a National Coverage Determination. There are statutory provisions intended to facilitate coverage determinations for new technologies under the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (“MMA”) §§ 731 and 942. Coverage presupposes that the device has been cleared or approved by the FDA and, further, that the coverage will be no broader than the FDA approved intended uses of the device (i.e., the device’s label) as cleared or approved by the FDA, but coverage can be narrower. In that regard, a narrow Medicare coverage determination may undermine the commercial viability of a device. It is unclear whether the therapies and treatments that would use our primary products would be covered under Local or National Coverage Determinations.

 

Seeking to modify a coverage determination, whether local or national, is a time-consuming, expensive and highly uncertain proposition, especially for a new technology, and inconsistent local determinations are possible. On average, according to an industry report, Medicare coverage determinations for medical devices lag 15 months to five years or more behind FDA approval for respective devices. Moreover, Medicaid programs and private insurers are frequently influenced by Medicare coverage determinations. Our inability to obtain a favorable coverage determination may adversely affect our ability to market our products and thus, the commercial viability of our products.

 

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B. Reimbursement Levels

 

We do not have Medicare or any other third-party reimbursement programs specific for our product. Even if Medicare and other third-party payor programs cover the procedures that use our devices, the level of reimbursement may not be sufficient for commercial success. The Medicare reimbursement levels for covered procedures are determined annually through three sets of rulemakings, one for outpatient departments of hospitals under the Outpatient Prospective Payment System (“OPPS”), another for the inpatient departments of hospitals under the Inpatient Perspective Payment System (“IPPS”), and a third for procedures in physicians’ offices under the Resource-Based Relative Value Scales (“RBRVS”) (the Medicare fee schedule). If the use of a device is covered by Medicare, a physician’s ability to bill a Medicare patient more than the Medicare allowable amount is significantly constrained by the rules limiting balance billing. For covered services in a physician’s office, Medicare normally pays 80% of the Medicare allowable amount and the beneficiary pays the remaining 20%, assuming that the beneficiary has met his or her annual Medicare deductible and is not also a Medicaid beneficiary. For services performed in an outpatient department of a hospital, the patient’s co-payment under Medicare may exceed 20%, depending on the service and depending on whether CMS has set the co-payment at greater than 20%. If a device is used as part of an in-patient procedure, the hospital where the procedure is performed is reimbursed under the IPPS. In general, IPPS provides a single payment to the hospital based on the diagnosis at discharge and devices are not separately reimbursed under IPPS.

 

Usually, Medicaid pays less than Medicare, assuming that the state covers the service. In addition, private payors, including managed care payors, increasingly are demanding discounted fee structures and the assumption by healthcare providers of all or a portion of the financial risk. Efforts to impose greater discounts and more stringent cost controls upon healthcare providers by private and public payors are expected to continue.

 

Significant limits on the scope of services covered or on reimbursement rates and fees on those services that are covered could have a material adverse effect on our ability to commercialize our devices and therefore, on our liquidity and financial condition.

 

State and Federal Security and Privacy Regulations

 

The privacy and security regulations under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, as amended by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 (the “HITECH Act” and collectively, the “HIPAA”), establish comprehensive federal standards with respect to the uses and disclosures of protected health information, or PHI, by health plans and health care providers, in addition to setting standards to protect the confidentiality, integrity and availability of electronic PHI. The regulations establish a complex regulatory framework on a variety of subjects, including:

 

    the circumstances under which uses and disclosures of PHI are permitted or required without a specific authorization by the patient, including but not limited to treatment purposes, to obtain payments for services and health care operations activities;
       
    a patient’s rights to access, amend and receive an accounting of certain disclosures of PHI;
       
    the content of notices of privacy practices for PHI; and
       
    administrative, technical and physical safeguards required of entities that use or receive PHI electronically.

 

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The final omnibus rule implementing the HITECH Act took effect on March 26, 2013. The rule is broad in scope, but certain provisions are particularly significant in light of our business operations. For example, the final “omnibus” rule implementing the HITECH Act:

 

    Makes clear that situations involving impermissible access, acquisition, use or disclosure of protected health information are now presumed to be a breach unless the covered entity or business associate is able to demonstrate that there is a low probability that the information has been compromised;
       
    Defines the term “business associate” to include subcontractors and agents that receive, create, maintain or transmit protected health information on behalf of the business associate;
       
    Establishes new parameters for covered entities and business associates on uses and disclosures of PHI for fundraising and marketing; and
       
    Establishes clear restrictions on the sale of PHI without patient authorization.

 

The privacy and security regulations provide for significant fines and other penalties for wrongful use or disclosure of PHI, including potential civil and criminal fines and penalties.

 

Anti-Kickback Laws, Physician Self-Referral Laws, False Claims Act, Civil Monetary Penalties

 

We are also subject to various federal, state, and international laws pertaining to health care “fraud and abuse,” including anti-kickback laws and false claims laws. The federal Anti-Kickback Statute prohibits anyone from knowingly and willfully soliciting, receiving, offering, or paying any remuneration with the intent to refer, or to arrange for the referral or order of, services or items payable under a federal health care program, including the purchase or prescription of a particular drug or the use of a service or device. Recognizing that the Anti-Kickback Statute is broad and may technically prohibit many innocuous or beneficial arrangements, Congress authorized the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General, or OIG, to issue a series of regulations, known as “safe harbors.” These safe harbors set forth requirements that, if met in their entirety, will assure health care providers and other parties that they will not be prosecuted under the Anti-Kickback Statute. The failure of a transaction or arrangement to fit precisely within one or more safe harbors does not necessarily mean that it is illegal, or that prosecution will be pursued. However, conduct and business arrangements that do not fully satisfy each applicable safe harbor may result in increased scrutiny by government enforcement authorities, such as the OIG.

 

Violations of the Anti-Kickback Statute are punishable by the imposition of criminal fines, civil money penalties, treble damages, and/or exclusion from participation in federal health care programs. Many states have also enacted similar anti-kickback laws. The Anti-Kickback Statute and similar state laws and regulations are expansive. If the government were to allege against or convict us of violating these laws, there could be a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition, and our stock price. Even an unsuccessful challenge could cause adverse publicity and be costly to respond to, which could have a materially adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. We will consult counsel concerning the potential application of these and other laws to our business and our sales, marketing and other activities and will make good faith efforts to comply with them. However, given the broad reach of federal and state anti-kickback laws and the increasing attention given by law enforcement authorities, we are unable to predict whether any of our activities will be challenged or deemed to violate these laws.

 

We are also subject to the physician self-referral laws, commonly referred to as the Stark law, which is a strict liability statute that generally prohibits physicians from referring Medicare patients to providers of “designated health services,” with whom the physician or the physician’s immediate family member has an ownership interest or compensation arrangement, unless an applicable exception applies. Moreover, many states have adopted or are considering adopting similar laws, some of which extend beyond the scope of the Stark law to prohibit the payment or receipt of remuneration for the prohibited referral of patients for designated healthcare services and physician self-referrals, regardless of the source of the payment for the patient’s care. If it is determined that certain of our practices or operations violate the Stark law or similar statutes, we could become subject to civil and criminal penalties, including exclusion from the Medicare programs and loss of government reimbursement. The imposition of any such penalties could harm our business.

 

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Another development affecting the health care industry is the increased use of the federal civil False Claims Act and, in particular, actions brought pursuant to the False Claims Act’s “whistleblower” or “qui tam” provisions. The False Claims Act, as amended by the Fraud Enforcement and Recovery Act of 2009 and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (“Affordable Care Act”), imposes liability on any person or entity who, among other things, knowingly presents, or causes to be presented, a false or fraudulent claim for payment by a federal health care program. The qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act allow a private individual to bring actions on behalf of the federal government alleging that the defendant has submitted a false claim to the federal government, and to share in any monetary recovery. In recent years, the number of suits brought by private individuals has increased dramatically. In addition, various states have enacted false claim laws analogous to the False Claims Act. Many of these state laws apply where a claim is submitted to any third-party payor and not merely a federal health care program. When an entity is determined to have violated the False Claims Act, it may be required to pay up to three times the actual damages sustained by the government, plus civil penalties for each separate false claim. There are many potential bases for liability under the False Claims Act. Liability arises, primarily, when an entity knowingly submits, or causes another to submit, a false claim for reimbursement to the federal government. The False Claims Act has been used to assert liability on the basis of inadequate care, kickbacks and other improper referrals, improper use of Medicare numbers when detailing the provider of services, and allegations as to misrepresentations with respect to the services rendered. Our activities relating to the sale and marketing of our products may be subject to scrutiny under these laws. We are unable to predict whether we would be subject to actions under the False Claims Act or a similar state law, or the impact of such actions. However, the costs of defending such claims, as well as any sanctions imposed, could significantly adversely affect our financial performance.

 

Further, the beneficiary inducement prohibition of the federal Civil Monetary Penalty Law prohibits any entity from offering or transferring to a Medicare or Medicaid beneficiary any remuneration that the entity knows or should know is likely to influence the beneficiary’s selection of a particular provider, practitioner or supplier of Medicare or Medicaid payable items or services, including waivers of copayments and deductible amounts (or any part thereof) and transfers of items or services for free or for other than fair market value. On December 7, 2016, the OIG released amendments to the CMP. Some of the amendments could impact our business. Entities found in violation may be liable for civil monetary penalties of up to $10,000 for each wrongful act. Although we believe that our sales and marketing practices are in material compliance with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations, relevant regulatory authorities may disagree and violation of these laws, or, our exclusion from such programs as Medicaid and other governmental programs as a result of a violation of such laws, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

 

Manufacturing

 

We have no commercial manufacturing facilities, and we do not intend to build commercial manufacturing facilities of our own in the foreseeable future. All of our manufacturing had been performed by Sing Lin, Genemax Medical Products Industry Corp (“Genemax”), QTM and other FDA registered contract manufacturers. Genemax manufactured our product under the management of Sing Lin. All of our contract manufacturers and their manufacturing facilities must comply with FDA regulations, current quality system regulations (referred to as QSRs), which include current good manufacturing practices, or cGMPs, and to the extent laboratory analysis is involved, current good laboratory practices, or cGLPs. We notified Sing Lin in June 2010 that we were terminating our manufacturing agreement with them, which termination was effective September 2010. As a result, we currently have no supplier contracted to manufacture our products, and Sing Lin and its suppliers are currently in possession of the tooling required to manufacture our products. If we are unable to enter into a new agreement for the manufacture and supply of our devices, whether with Sing Lin or another supplier we may not be able to procure additional inventory on a timely basis, in the quantities we require or at all. We estimate that our existing inventory of Exer-Rest products will, at a minimum, be sufficient to meet demand through the end of the 2019 fiscal year.

 

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Sales & Marketing

 

We have no sales personnel and our limited sales effort comes from our directors and officers. In addition to our limited sales efforts, we continue to explore potential distributor and independent sale representative networks in the US, Canada and abroad. There can be no assurance that we will be able to enter into additional distribution and representation agreements on terms acceptable to us or at all, or that our sales and distribution network will generate significant sales.

 

Employees

 

The Company currently does not have full time employees. Our administrative, accounting and legal functions are contracted on a part-time basis.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

 

Our future operating results may vary substantially from anticipated results due to a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control. The following discussion highlights some of these factors and the possible impact of these factors on our future results of operations. If any of the following events actually occurs, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially harmed. In that case, the value of our common stock could decline substantially.

 

Risks Relating to Our Business.

 

We have a history of operating losses, we do not expect to become profitable in the near future and absent a significant increase in revenue or additional equity or debt financing, we may be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Our consolidated financial statements for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017 were prepared on a “going concern” basis; however substantial doubt exists about our ability to continue as a going concern as a result of recurring losses and an accumulated deficit. We are not profitable and have been incurring material losses. Our net losses for our fiscal years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017 were $0.4 and $0.5 million respectively. As of July 31, 2018, we had an accumulated deficit of $26.5 million. Although we have obtained regulatory clearance to market our principal products in the US and abroad, there can be no assurance that our products will achieve market acceptance. Market acceptance of our products may depend upon, among other things: the timing of market introduction of competitive products; the safety and efficacy of our products; and the potential advantage or disadvantages of alternative treatments. If our products fail to achieve market acceptance, we may not be able to generate significant revenues or be profitable. Even if we achieve profitability in the future, we may not be able to sustain profitability in subsequent periods. Absent a significant increase in revenue or additional equity or debt financing, we will be unable to continue as a going concern, and you may lose all of your investment in us.

 

We will require additional funding, which may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all.

 

We will need to raise additional capital in order for us to continue as a going concern. We have reached our borrowing limit under our existing $1.0 million secured credit facility. In addition, we borrowed $1.1 million in promissory notes consisting of $525,000 from Frost Gamma Investments Trust between September 2011 and February 2018 and $50,000 from an unrelated third party in September 2011, $300,000 from Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P. in between May 2012 and February 2018 and $250,000 from Jane Hsiao, the Company’s Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer, between February 2013 and September 2017. Until we can generate a sufficient amount of product revenue to finance our cash requirements, which we may never do, we will need to finance future cash needs primarily through public or private equity offerings, debt financings or strategic collaborations. We do not know whether additional funding will be available on acceptable terms, or at all. We cannot assure you that we could obtain such approval. If we are not able to secure additional funding when needed, we may have to delay, reduce the scope of or eliminate our research and development programs and operations. To the extent that we raise additional funds by issuing equity securities, our shareholders may experience significant dilution, and debt financing, if available, may require that we agree to covenants that restrict our operations. To the extent that we raise additional funds through collaboration and licensing arrangements, it may be necessary to relinquish some rights to our products or grant licenses on terms that may not be favorable to us.

 

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We terminated the Product and Supply Agreement with Sing Lin and may potentially be obligated to pay amounts under the agreement.

 

The now-terminated product and supply agreement with Sing Lin contained obligations to purchase approximately $2.6 million of Exer-Rest units within one year of acceptance of the final product, and an additional $4.1 million and $8.8 million of products in the second and third years following acceptance of the final product, respectively. Under the product and supply agreement, we were required to pay a portion of the product purchase price at the time production orders were placed, with the balance due upon delivery. Through July 31, 2018, we paid Sing Lin $1.7 million in connection with orders placed through that date, with the last payment being made in July 2009. As of the filing date we had not placed orders sufficient to satisfy the first-year or second-year minimum purchase obligations under the agreement. We notified Sing Lin in June 2010 that we were terminating the agreement effective September 2010, and Sing Lin in July 2010 demanded that we place orders sufficient to fulfill the three year purchase obligations under the agreement. As of October 24, 2018 Sing Lin has not followed up on its July 2010 demand. There can be no assurance that Sing Lin will not attempt to enforce its rights under the product and supply agreement, or pursue other available remedies. If Sing Lin seeks to enforce remedies against us, any such remedies could have a material adverse effect on our business, liquidity and results of operations.

 

We rely on third parties to manufacture and supply our products, and we presently have no agreement with any third party to manufacture and supply our products.

 

We do not own or operate manufacturing facilities for clinical or commercial production of our products. We have only have limited experience in medical device manufacturing, and we lack the resources and the capability to manufacture any of our products on a commercial scale. We expect to depend on third-party contract manufacturers for the foreseeable future. Our ability to replace an existing manufacturer may be difficult because the number of potential manufacturers is limited, and the FDA must approve any replacement manufacturer before it can begin manufacturing our product. It may be difficult or impossible for us to identify and engage a replacement manufacturer on acceptable terms in a timely manner, or at all.

 

We entered into an agreement with Sing Lin to, among other things, manufacture all of our acceleration therapeutic platforms. We notified Sing Lin in June 2010 that we were terminating the agreement, which termination was effective September 2010. As a result, we do not currently have a supplier contracted to manufacture our products, and Sing Lin and its suppliers are currently in possession of the tooling required to manufacture our products. If we are unable to enter into a new agreement for the manufacture and supply of our devices, whether with Sing Lin or another supplier, or if we are not able to timely regain possession or remanufacture the tooling, we may not be able to procure additional inventory on a timely basis, in the quantities we require or at all, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, liquidity and results of operations.

 

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Medicare legislation and future legislative or regulatory reform of the health care system may affect our ability to sell our products profitably.

 

In the U.S., there have been a number of legislative and regulatory initiatives, at both the federal and state government levels, to change the healthcare system in ways that, if approved, could affect our ability to sell our products and provide our laboratory services profitably. As such, we cannot assure you that reimbursement payments under governmental and private third party payor programs will remain at levels comparable to present levels or will be sufficient to cover the costs allocable to patients eligible for reimbursement under these programs. Any changes that lower reimbursement rates under Medicare, Medicaid or private payor programs could negatively affect our business.

 

Most significantly, on March 23, 2010, President Obama signed into law both the Affordable Care Act and the reconciliation law known as Health Care and Education Affordability Reconciliation Act (the “Reconciliation Act”) and, combined we refer to both Acts as the “2010 Health Care Reform Legislation.” The constitutionality of the 2010 Health Care Reform Legislation was confirmed on June 28, 2012 by the Supreme Court of the United States. However, as discussed in further detail below, the current Presidential administration has attempted to repeal and replace the 2010 Health Care Reform Legislation.

 

Beyond coverage and reimbursement changes, the 2010 Health Care Reform Legislation subjects manufacturers of medical devices to an excise tax of 2.3% on certain U.S. sales of medical devices beginning in January 2013. However, a two-year moratorium on the tax was issued on December 18, 2015. The moratorium was extended for an additional two-year period on January 22, 2018. As such, the excise tax does not apply to sales in 2016 through 2019. The return of the tax in January 2020 will likely increase our expense in the future.

 

Additionally, the 2010 Health Care Reform Legislation included significant fraud and abuse measures, including (i) required disclosures under the Open Payments Program (which implements the requirements of the Physician Payments Sunshine Act), which in conjunction with its implementing regulations, requires certain manufacturers of certain drugs, biologics, and devices that are reimbursed by Medicare and Medicaid to report annually certain payments or “transfers of value” provided to physicians and teaching hospitals and to report annually ownership and investment interests held by physicians and their immediate family members during the preceding calendar year, (ii) lower thresholds for violations, and (iii) increasing potential penalties for such violations. Federal funding available for combating health care fraud and abuse generally has increased. Many of the laws and regulations applicable to our business, particularly those relating to billing and reimbursement of tests and those relating to relationships with physicians, hospitals and patients, contain language that has not been interpreted by courts. We must rely on our interpretation of these laws and regulations based on the advice of our counsel and regulatory or law enforcement authorities may not agree with our interpretation of these laws and regulations and may seek to enforce legal remedies or penalties against us for violations. From time to time we may need to change our operations, particularly pricing or billing practices, in response to changing interpretations of these laws and regulations or regulatory or judicial determinations with respect to these laws and regulations. These occurrences, regardless of their outcome, could damage our reputation and harm important business relationships that we have with healthcare providers, payors and others. Furthermore, if a regulatory or judicial authority finds that we have not complied with applicable laws and regulations, we could be required to refund amounts that were billed and collected in violation of such laws and regulations. In addition, we may voluntarily refund amounts that were alleged to have been billed and collected in violation of applicable laws and regulations. In either case, we could suffer civil and criminal damages, fines and penalties, exclusion from participation in governmental healthcare programs and the loss of licenses, certificates and authorizations necessary to operate our business, as well as incur liabilities from third-party claims, all of which could harm our operating results and financial condition. Moreover, regardless of the outcome, if we or physicians or other third parties with whom we do business are investigated by a regulatory or law enforcement authority we could incur substantial costs, including legal fees, and our management may be required to divert a substantial amount of time to an investigation.

 

Prior to the 2016 U.S. elections (including the current Presidential administration), regulations under the 2010 Health Care Reform Legislation were expected to continue being drafted, released and finalized throughout the next several years. In 2017, the President and members of Congress sought to repeal and replace the 2010 Health Care Reform Legislation. It is uncertain whether such repeal and replace legislation will be enacted into law, and if enacted, what the impact might be on our business. It is also uncertain whether regulatory changes to the implementation of the 2010 Health Care Reform Legislation will restrict patient access to affordable insurance and impact their access to novel, biosimilar and complex generic products. The full effects of any repeal and replacement of the 2010 Health Care Reform Legislation, or regulatory changes to its implementation, cannot be known until a new law is enacted or existing law is implemented through regulations or guidance issued by the CMS and other federal and state health care agencies. Because of the continued uncertainty about the implementation of the 2010 Health Care Reform Legislation, including the potential for further legal challenges or repeal of that legislation, we cannot quantify or predict with any certainty the likely impact of the 2010 Health Care Reform Legislation or its repeal on our business model, prospects, financial condition or results of operations. We also anticipate that Congress, state legislatures, and third-party payors may continue to review and assess alternative healthcare delivery and payment systems and may in the future propose and adopt legislation or policy changes or implementations effecting additional fundamental changes in the healthcare delivery system. In addition, litigation may prevent some or all of the legislation from taking effect. We cannot assure you as to the ultimate content, timing, or effect of changes, nor is it possible at this time to estimate the impact of any such potential legislation.

 

To enhance compliance with applicable health care laws, and mitigate potential liability in the event of noncompliance, regulatory authorities, such as the United States Health and Human Services Department Office of Inspector General (“OIG”), have recommended the adoption and implementation of a comprehensive health care compliance program that generally contains the elements of an effective compliance and ethics program described in Section 8B2.1 of the United States Sentencing Commission Guidelines Manual, and for many years the OIG has made available a model compliance program targeted to the clinical laboratory industry. In addition, certain states, such as New York, requires that health care providers, such as clinical laboratories, that engage in substantial business under the state Medicaid program have a compliance program that generally adheres to the standards set forth in the Model Compliance Program. Also, under the 2010 Health Care Reform Legislation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or HHS, requires suppliers, such as the Company, to adopt, as a condition of Medicare participation, compliance programs that meet a core set of requirements. While we have adopted U.S. healthcare compliance and ethics programs that generally incorporate the OIG’s recommendations and train our employees in such compliance, having such a program can be no assurance that we will avoid any compliance issues.

 

Our Exer-Rest device does not have a unique Medicare Reimbursement CPT Code.

 

The procedures using our Exer-Rest device technology are new, and the existing Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes do not accurately describe the Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (WBPA) therapy. Medicare and other third-party payors recognize that there may be procedures performed by physicians or other qualified health care professionals where a number of specific code numbers could be, and have been, designated for reporting unlisted procedures. We provide a Standard Operating Procedure for the healthcare professional to submit WBPA therapy as an unlisted procedure using a paper claim submission. However, depending on the Medicare intermediary, Medicare submissions using unlisted codes may not be reimbursed fully or at all. If Medicare and/or third-party payors elect not to “cover” WBPA as a qualified unlisted procedure or if a new reimbursement code is not established, it may weaken demand for our product among healthcare providers, which could have a material adverse effect on the results of our operations and financial position.

 

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The terms of clearances or approvals and ongoing regulation of our products may limit how we manufacture and market our products, which could materially impair our ability to generate anticipated revenues.

 

Once regulatory clearance or approval has been granted, the cleared or approved product and its manufacturer are subject to continual review. Any cleared or approved product may only be promoted for its indicated uses. Accordingly, it is possible that our products may be cleared or approved for fewer or more limited uses than we request or that clearance or approval may be granted contingent on the performance of costly post-marketing clinical trials. In addition, if the FDA or other non-U.S. regulatory authorities clear or approve our products, the labeling, packaging, adverse event reporting, storage, advertising and promotion for the products will be subject to extensive regulatory requirements. It is possible that the FDA or other non-U.S. regulatory authorities may not approve the labeling claims necessary or desirable for the successful commercialization of our products. Further, regulatory agencies must approve our manufacturing facilities before they can be used to manufacture our products, and these facilities are subject to ongoing regulatory inspection. If we fail to comply with the regulatory requirements of the FDA and other non-U.S. regulatory authorities, or if previously unknown problems with our products, manufacturers or manufacturing processes are discovered, FDA may seek to revoke our clearance or clearances, or may hold that a previously exempt device is subject to premarket notification and clearance and may not be marketed until such clearance issues. We could also be subject to administrative or judicially imposed sanctions. FDA may also conclude that a previously exempt or cleared device is subject to full FDA approval and that marketing must cease until the device is approved. FDA approval is time-consuming, extraordinarily expensive and highly uncertain.

 

In addition, the FDA and other non-U.S. regulatory authorities may change their policies and additional regulations may be enacted that could prevent or delay regulatory clearance or approval of our products. We cannot predict the likelihood, nature or extent of government regulation that may arise from future legislation or administrative action, either in the United States or abroad. If we are not able to maintain regulatory compliance, we would likely not be permitted to market our products and we may not achieve or sustain profitability.

 

Our competitors may develop and market products that are more effective, safer or less expensive than our products, negatively impacting our commercial opportunities.

 

The life sciences industry is highly competitive, and we face significant competition from many medical device companies that are researching and marketing products designed to address the same ailments we are endeavoring to address. The medical devices that we have developed or are developing will compete with other medical devices that currently exist or are being developed. Products we may develop in the future are also likely to face competition from other medical devices and therapies. Many of our competitors have significantly greater financial, manufacturing, marketing and product development resources than we do. If our competitors market products that are more effective, safer, easier to use or less expensive than our products, or that reach the market sooner than our products, we may not achieve commercial success. In addition, the medical device industry is characterized by rapid technological change. It may be difficult for us to stay abreast of the rapid changes in each technology. If we fail to stay at the forefront of technological change, then we may be unable to compete effectively. Technological advances or products developed by our competitors may render our technologies or products obsolete or less competitive. Any of the foregoing may have a material adverse effect on our business, liquidity and results of operations.

 

If we are unable to obtain and enforce patent protection for our products, our business could be materially harmed.

 

We currently hold five United States patents with respect to overall design and specific features of our present and proposed products and have submitted applications with respect to four foreign patents. The issuance of a patent does not guarantee that it is valid or enforceable. Any patents we have obtained, or obtain in the future, may be challenged, invalidated, unenforceable or circumvented. Moreover, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (the “USPTO”) may commence interference proceedings involving our patents or patent applications. Any challenge to, finding of unenforceability or invalidation or circumvention of, our patents or patent applications would be costly, would require significant time and attention of our management and could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

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Our pending patent applications may not result in issued patents. The patent position of medical device companies, including us, is generally uncertain and involves complex legal and factual considerations. The standards that the USPTO and its foreign counterparts use to grant patents are not always applied predictably or uniformly and can change. There is also no uniform, worldwide policy regarding the subject matter and scope of claims granted or allowable in medical device patents. Accordingly, we do not know the degree of future protection for our proprietary rights or the breadth of claims that will be allowed in any patents issued to us or to others.

 

If we are unable to protect the confidentiality of our proprietary information and know-how, the value of our technology and products could be adversely affected.

 

In addition to patent protection, we also rely on other proprietary rights, including protection of trade secrets, know-how and confidential and proprietary information. Adequate remedies may not exist in the event of unauthorized use or disclosure of our confidential information. The disclosure of our trade secrets would impair our competitive position and may materially harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. To the extent that our employees, consultants or contractors use technology or know-how owned by third parties in their work for us, disputes may arise between us and those third parties as to the rights in related inventions.

 

Our commercial success depends significantly on our ability to operate without infringing the patents and other proprietary rights of third parties.

 

Other entities may have or obtain patents or proprietary rights that could limit our ability to manufacture, use, sell, offer for sale or import products or impair our competitive position. In addition, to the extent that a third party develops new technology that covers our products, we may be required to obtain licenses to that technology, which licenses may not be available or may not be available on commercially reasonable terms, if at all. If licenses are not available to us on acceptable terms, we will not be able to market the affected products or conduct the desired activities, unless we challenge the validity, enforceability or infringement of the third party patent or circumvent the third party patent, which would be costly and would require significant time and attention of our management. Third parties may have or obtain valid and enforceable patents or proprietary rights that could block us from developing products using our technology. Our failure to obtain a license to any technology that we require may materially harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

If we become involved in patent litigation or other proceedings related to a determination of rights, we could incur substantial costs and expenses, substantial liability for damages or be required to stop our product development and commercialization efforts any of which could materially adversely affect our liquidity, business prospects and results of operations.

 

Third parties may sue us for infringing their patent rights. Likewise, we may need to resort to litigation to enforce a patent issued or licensed to us or to determine the scope and validity of proprietary rights of others. In addition, a third party may claim that we have improperly obtained or used its confidential or proprietary information. The cost to us of any litigation or other proceeding relating to intellectual property rights, even if resolved in our favor, could be substantial, and the litigation would divert our management’s efforts. Some of our competitors may be able to sustain the costs of complex patent litigation more effectively than we can because they have substantially greater resources. Uncertainties resulting from the initiation and continuation of any litigation could limit our ability to continue our operations.

 

If any parties successfully claim that our creation or use of proprietary technologies infringes upon their intellectual property rights, we might be forced to pay damages, potentially including treble damages, if we are found to have willfully infringed on such parties’ patent rights. In addition to any damages we might have to pay, a court could require us to stop the infringing activity or obtain a license. Any license required under any patent may not be made available on commercially acceptable terms, if at all. In addition, such licenses are likely to be non-exclusive and, therefore, our competitors may have access to the same technology licensed to us. If we fail to obtain a required license and are unable to design around a patent, we may be unable to effectively market some of our technology and products, which could limit our ability to generate revenues or achieve profitability and possibly prevent us from generating revenue sufficient to sustain our operations.

 

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Failure to obtain regulatory approval outside the United States will prevent us from marketing our products abroad.

 

We may market certain of our products in non-U.S. markets. In order to market our existing and future products in the European Union and many other non-U.S. jurisdictions, we must obtain separate regulatory approvals. We have had limited interactions with non-U.S. regulatory authorities, the approval procedures vary among countries and can involve additional testing, and the time required to obtain approval may differ from that required to obtain FDA approval. Approval or clearance by the FDA does not ensure approval by regulatory authorities in other countries, and approval by one or more non-U.S. regulatory authorities does not ensure approval by regulatory authorities in other countries or by the FDA. The non-U.S. regulatory approval process may include all of the risks associated with obtaining FDA approval or clearance. We may not obtain non-U.S. regulatory approvals on a timely basis, if at all. We may not be able to file for non-U.S. regulatory approvals and may not receive necessary approvals to commercialize our future product candidates in any market.

 

Non-U.S. governments often impose strict price controls, which may adversely affect our future profitability.

 

We have obtained approval to market certain of our products in one or more non-U.S. jurisdictions, which subjects us to rules and regulations in those jurisdictions relating to our products. In some countries, particularly countries of the European Union, each of which has developed its own rules and regulations, some pricing is subject to governmental control. In these countries, pricing negotiations with governmental authorities can take considerable time after the receipt of marketing approval for a medical device candidate. To obtain reimbursement or pricing approval in some countries, we may be required to conduct a clinical trial that compares the cost-effectiveness of our existing and future product candidates to other available products. If reimbursement of our future product candidates is unavailable or limited in scope or amount, or if pricing is set at unsatisfactory levels, we may be unable to achieve or sustain profitability.

 

Our business is subject to economic, political, regulatory and other risks associated with international operations.

 

Our business is subject to risks associated with conducting business internationally, in part due to some of our suppliers historically being located outside the United States. Accordingly, our future results could be harmed by a variety of factors, including:

 

  difficulties in compliance with non-U.S. laws and regulations;
     
  changes in non-U.S. regulations and customs;
     
  changes in non-U.S. currency exchange rates and currency controls;
     
  changes in a specific country’s or region’s political or economic environment;
     
  trade protection measures, import or export licensing requirements or other restrictive actions by U.S. or non-U.S. governments;
     
  negative consequences from changes in tax laws; and
     
  difficulties associated with staffing and managing foreign operations, including differing labor relations.

 

Risks Relating to Our Stock.

 

We do not anticipate paying dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future.

 

We have not declared and paid cash dividends on our common stock in the past, and we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. We intend to retain all of our earnings, if any, for the foreseeable future to finance the operation and expansion of our business. Additionally, our current credit facility prohibits us from paying dividends on our capital stock at any time during which we have outstanding borrowings thereunder. As a result, you may only receive a return on your investment in our common stock if the market price of our common stock increases and you sell your shares.

 

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Because our common stock is a “penny stock,” it may be more difficult for investors to sell shares of our common stock, and the market price of our common stock may be adversely affected.

 

Our common stock, which trades on the OTCBB, is a “penny stock” since, among other things, the stock price is below $5.00 per share, it is not listed on a national securities exchange, and it has not met certain net tangible asset or average revenue requirements. Broker-dealers who sell penny stocks must provide purchasers of these stocks with a standardized risk-disclosure document prepared by the SEC. This document provides information about penny stocks and the nature and level of risks involved in investing in the penny-stock market. A broker must also give a purchaser, orally or in writing, bid and offer quotations and information regarding broker and salesperson compensation, make a written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and obtain the purchaser’s written agreement to the purchase. Broker-dealers must also provide customers that hold penny stock in their accounts with such broker-dealer a monthly statement containing price and market information relating to the penny stock. If a penny stock is sold to an investor in violation of the penny stock rules, the investor may be able to cancel its purchase and get its money back.

 

If applicable, the penny stock rules may make it difficult for investors to sell their shares of our common stock. Because of the rules and restrictions applicable to a penny stock, there is less trading in penny stocks and the market price of our common stock may be adversely affected. Also, many brokers choose not to participate in penny stock transactions. Accordingly, investors may not always be able to resell their shares of our common stock publicly at times and prices acceptable to them.

 

Our stock price has been volatile and there may not be an active, liquid trading market for our common stock.

 

Our stock price has experienced significant price and volume fluctuations and may continue to experience volatility in the future. The price of our common stock has ranged between $0.06 and $0.17 for the 52-week period ended July 31, 2018. Many factors, including those described in this report and others, have a significant impact on the price of our common stock. Also, you may not be able to sell your shares at the best market price if trading in our stock in not active or if the volume is low. There is no guarantee that an active trading market for our common stock will be maintained on the OTCBB or elsewhere.

 

Our quarterly results of operations will fluctuate, and these fluctuations could cause our stock price to decline.

 

Our quarterly operating results are likely to fluctuate in the future. These fluctuations could cause our stock price to decline. The nature of our business involves variable factors, such as the timing of the research, development and regulatory submissions of our devices that could cause our operating results to fluctuate. As a result, in some future quarters our clinical, financial or operating results may not meet the expectations of securities analysts and investors which could result in a decline in the price of our stock.

 

Shareholders may experience dilution of ownership interests because of the future issuance of additional shares of our common stock and our preferred stock.

 

In the future, we may issue our authorized but previously unissued equity securities, resulting in the dilution of the ownership interests of our present shareholders. We are currently authorized to issue an aggregate of 401,000,000 shares of capital stock, consisting of 400,000,000 shares of common stock and 1,000,000 designated shares of preferred stock with preferences and rights to be determined by our Board of Directors. As of October 24, 2018, there were outstanding: a) 79,007,423 shares of our common stock, b) 100 shares of our Series B preferred stock, c) 62,048 shares of our Series C preferred stock, each currently convertible into 25 shares of our common stock and d) 2,782 shares of our Series D preferred stock, each currently convertible into 5,000 shares of our common stock. Also as of October 24, 2018, there were no outstanding options to purchase shares of our common stock, and we have reserved 1,551,200 shares of our common stock for issuance upon conversion of our Series C preferred stock and 13,910,000 shares of our common stock for issuance upon conversion of our Series D preferred stock. We may also issue additional shares of our common stock or other securities that are convertible into or exercisable for common stock in connection with hiring or retaining employees, future acquisitions, future sales of our securities for capital raising purposes, or for other business purposes. The future issuance of any such additional shares of our common stock may create downward pressure on the trading price of the common stock. We may issue additional shares, warrants or other convertible securities in the future in conjunction with capital raising efforts, including at a price (or exercise price) below the price at which shares of our common stock are then currently traded on the OTCBB.

 

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Item 2. Properties.

 

Our principal corporate office is located at 4400 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Florida. We occupy this space from Frost Real Estate Holdings, LLC, which is a company controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, one of our largest beneficial shareholders. We previously leased the approximately 1,800 square feet under a lease agreement, which commenced with a five-year term on January 1, 2008 and expired on December 31, 2012, and then we went on a month-to-month basis and then in February 2016 the office space rent was reduced to $0 per month.

 

We house our inventory in approximately 4,000 square feet of warehouse space in Pembroke Park, Florida. The lease commenced September 15, 2014 and expired on September 31, 2015 and we have exercised our option to renew the lease and extended the expiration to September 15, 2017. Following the expiration, we have remained on a month-to-month term.

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

 

None.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

Not applicable.

 

PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

 

Market for common stock

 

Our common stock is quoted on the OTCBB under the symbol NIMU.OB. The table below sets forth, for the respective periods indicated, the high and low bid prices for the Company’s common stock as reported by the OTCBB. The following bid quotations represent inter-dealer prices, without adjustments for retail mark-ups, mark-downs or commissions and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.

 

Quarter Ended  High   Low 
October 31, 2016  $0.15   $0.07 
January 31, 2017  $0.20   $0.10 
April 30, 2017  $0.19   $0.14 
July 31, 2017  $0.18   $0.13 
October 31, 2017  $0.17   $0.14 
January 31, 2018  $0.16   $0.09 
April 30, 2018  $0.10   $0.06 
July 31, 2018  $0.15   $0.08 

 

Since our inception, we have not paid any dividends on our common stock, and we do not anticipate that we will pay dividends in the foreseeable future. Additionally, our current credit facility prohibits us from paying dividends on our capital stock at any time during which we have outstanding borrowings thereunder. At July 31, 2018, we had 1,385 shareholders of record based on information provided by our transfer agent, Equity Stock Transfer. We believe that the actual number of beneficial shareholders is considerably higher.

 

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Item 6. Selected Financial Data.

 

As a smaller reporting company as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act, we are not required to include information otherwise required by this item.

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains, in addition to historical information, certain forward-looking statements about our expectations, beliefs or intentions regarding, among other things, our product development and commercialization efforts, business, financial condition, results of operations, strategies or prospects. You can identify forward-looking statements by the fact that these statements do not relate strictly to historical or current matters. Rather, forward-looking statements relate to anticipated or expected events, activities, trends or results as of the date they are made. Because forward-looking statements relate to matters that have not yet occurred, these statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from any future results expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Many factors could cause our actual activities or results to differ materially from the activities and results anticipated in forward-looking statements. These factors include those set forth below as well as those contained in “Item 1A - Risk Factors” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We do not undertake any obligation to update forward-looking statements, except as required by applicable law. These forward-looking statements reflect our views only as of the date they are made with respect to future events and financial performance.

 

Overview

 

We are primarily engaged in the development, manufacture and marketing of non-invasive, whole body periodic acceleration (“WBPA”) therapeutic platforms, which are motorized platforms that move a subject repetitively head to foot. Our acceleration therapeutic platforms are the inventions of Marvin A. Sackner, M.D., our founder, former CEO and a current director. Over thirty peer reviewed scientific publications attest to the benefits of whole body periodic acceleration in animal and human research investigations. According to those studies, the application of this WBPA technology provides objective benefits in patients with angina pectoris and increases the blood supply to the heart muscle in both healthy individuals and patients with heart disease. These findings are not being claimed as an intended use of the device for marketing purposes, but demonstrate a potential mechanism for its benefits.

 

The development and commercialization of the Exer-Rest has historically necessitated substantial expenditures and commitments of capital. Although we have recently reduced these expenditures, we continue to anticipate expenses and associated losses to continue for the foreseeable future, as we expect to continue minimal sales efforts in the United States, Canada, the UK, India, Mexico, Latin America, the Middle East and the Far East. We will be required to raise additional capital to fulfill our business plan, but no commitment to raise such additional capital exists or can be assured. If we are unsuccessful in our efforts to expand sales and/or raise capital, we will not be able to continue operations.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. On an on-going basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to accounts receivable, inventory, property and equipment, intangible assets, contingencies and litigation. Regarding inventories, the provision is an estimate based on multiple factors as further described in Notes 2 and 3. The ultimate realization of the inventory amount may be materially different. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. A more detailed discussion on the application of these and other accounting policies can be found in Note 2 in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements set forth in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. While we believe that the factors we evaluate provide us with a meaningful basis for establishing and applying sound accounting policies, we cannot guarantee that the results will always be accurate. Since the determination of these estimates requires the exercise of judgment, actual results could differ from such estimates.

 

20
 

 

Results of Operations

 

Our Exer-Rest AT3800 and AT4700, which we developed under our former agreement with Sing Lin, became available for sale in October 2008. In January 2009, the Exer-Rest line of therapeutic platforms was registered by the FDA in the United States as Class I (Exempt) Medical Devices. We began our U.S. and international sales activity with marketing and promotional pricing beginning in February 2009.

 

Year Ended July 31, 2018 Compared to Year Ended July 31, 2017

 

Revenue. There was no revenue for the year ended July 31, 2018, as compared to $6,000 for the year ended July 31, 2017. This $6,000 decrease resulted from not having sales of our Exer-Rest platform units. Exer-Rest platform unit sales for the 2018 fiscal year decreased 100% over the 2017 fiscal year.

 

Cost of sales. There was no cost of sales for the year ended July 31, 2018, as compared to $100,000 for the year ended July 31, 2017. This $100,000 net decrease was primarily attributed a $99,000 inventory impairment adjustment that included the write-off of spare parts and Exer-Rest units for the year ended July 31, 2017.

 

Selling, general and administrative costs and expenses. Selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) costs and expenses was $225,000 for the year ended July 31, 2018, as compared to $201,000 for the year ended July 31, 2017. This $24,000 net increase was primarily from professional fees and insurance expense. There was no stock-based compensation expense for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

Total operating costs and expenses. Total operating costs and expenses was $225,000 for the year ended July 31, 2018, as compared to $301,000 for the year ended July 31, 2017. This $76,000 decrease is primarily attributable to the inventory impairment adjustments noted above.

 

Interest expense. Interest expense was $220,000 for the year ended July 31, 2018, as compared to $193,000 for the year ended July 31, 2017. This $27,000 increase was primarily attributable to the increase in net interest expense resulting from the additional promissory notes entered into during the year ended July 31, 2018 as described in Note 5.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Our operations have been primarily financed through private sales of our equity securities and advances under credit facilities available to us. We currently do not have any additional borrowing capacity under our $1.0 million revolving credit facility, described below. In September 2011, we issued two promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $100,000, in May 2012 we issued an additional promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000, in February 2013 we issued an additional promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000, in September 2014 we issued an additional promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000, in February 2015 we issued an additional promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000, in April 2015 we issued an additional promissory note in the principal amount of $100,000, in August 2015 we issued an additional promissory note in the principal amount of $25,000, in October 2015 we issued two promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $100,000, in June 2016 we issued two promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $200,000, in April 2017 we issued two promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $100,000, in September 2017 we issued two promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $100,000 and most recently in February 2018 we issued two promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $200,000 for a total aggregate principal amount of $1,125,000 from promissory notes.

 

21
 

 

At July 31, 2018, we had cash of $90,000 and negative working capital of approximately $1,553,000. We expect that our existing funds will not be sufficient to support our current operations over the next twelve months. We anticipate that we will require additional external financing to continue operations beyond December 2018. No assurance can be given that such additional financing will be available on acceptable terms or at all. Our ability to sell additional shares of our stock and/or borrow cash could be materially adversely affected by the economic uncertainty in the global equity and credit markets. Current economic conditions have been, and continue to be, volatile, and continued instability in these market conditions may limit our ability to access the capital necessary to fund and grow our business and to replace, in a timely manner, maturing liabilities.

 

Net cash used in operating activities decreased to $221,000 for the year ended July 31, 2018 as compared to $176,000 for the year ended July 31, 2017. This $45,000 increase was principally due to increased accounts payable and accrued expenses during the year ended July 31, 2018.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities increased to $300,000 for the year ended July 31, 2018 as compared to $100,000 for the year ended July 31, 2017. This $200,000 increase was principally due to a decrease in proceeds from promissory notes in 2018 (see Note 5 to the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements).

 

At July 31, 2018, the Company had available Federal and State net operating loss carry forwards of approximately $16.4 million and foreign net operating loss carry forwards of approximately $0.1 million which expire in various years beginning in 2019. The net operating loss carry forwards may be subject to limitation due to change of ownership provisions under section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code and similar state provisions.

 

2010 Credit Facility. On March 31, 2010, we entered into a new Note and Security Agreement with Frost Gamma Investments Trust, a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of our common stock, and Hsu Gamma Investments, LP, an entity controlled by our Chairman (together, the “Lenders”), pursuant to which the Lenders have provided a revolving credit line (the “Credit Facility”) in the aggregate principal amount of up to $1.0 million, secured by all of our personal property. We are permitted to borrow and reborrow from time to time under the Credit Facility until July 31, 2013 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020 (the “Credit Facility Maturity Date”). The Company received a waiver from the lenders relating to the covenant prohibiting aggregate borrowings in excess of $100,000. The interest rate payable on amounts outstanding under the Credit Facility is 11% per annum, and increases to 16% per annum after the Credit Facility Maturity Date or after an event of default. All amounts owing under the Credit Facility are required to be repaid by the Credit Facility Maturity Date, and amounts outstanding are prepayable at any time. As of July 31, 2018, we had drawn an aggregate of $1,000,000 under the Credit Facility and there is no available balance remaining.

 

2011 Promissory Notes. On September 12, 2011, we entered into two promissory notes in the principal amount of $50,000 each with Frost Gamma, a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock, and with an unrelated third party for a total of $100,000. The interest rate payable by the Company on both the Frost Gamma Note and the unrelated third party note is 11% per annum, payable on the maturity date of September 12, 2014 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020 (the “Promissory Notes Maturity Date”). We may prepay either or both notes in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

2012 Promissory Note. On May 30, 2012, we entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Hsu Gamma, an entity controlled by our Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer, Jane H. Hsiao, (the “Hsu Gamma Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the Hsu Gamma Note is 11% per annum, payable on the maturity date of September 12, 2014 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020. The Hsu Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

2013 Promissory Note. On February 22, 2013, we entered into a promissory note in the amount of $50,000 with Jane Hsiao, our Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer (the “2013 Hsiao Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2013 Hsiao Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of September 12, 2014 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020. The 2013 Hsiao Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

22
 

 

2014 Promissory Note. On September 24, 2014, we entered into a promissory note (the “2014 Hsiao Note”) in the principal amount of $50,000 with Jane Hsiao, our Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer. The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2014 Hsiao Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2015 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020. The 2014 Hsiao Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without penalty.

 

2015 Promissory Notes. On February 2, 2015, we entered into a promissory note (the “2015 Hsiao Note”) in the principal amount of $50,000 with Jane Hsiao, our Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer. The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2015 Hsiao Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2015 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020. The 2015 Hsiao Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without penalty.

 

On April 16, 2015, we entered into a promissory note (“April 2015 Frost Note”) in the amount of $100,000 with Frost Gamma, a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the April 2015 Frost Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2015 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020. The April 2015 Frost Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On August 12, 2015, we entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $25,000 with Frost Gamma (the “August 2015 Frost Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the August 2015 Frost Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020. The August 2015 Frost Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On October 27, 2015, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Frost Gamma (the “October 2015 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the October 2015 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020. The October 2015 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On October 27, 2015, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Jane Hsiao, the Company’s Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer (the “October 2015 Hsiao Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the October 2015 Hsiao Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020. The October 2015 Hsiao Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

2016 Promissory Notes. On June 1, 2016, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $100,000 with Frost Gamma (the “June 2016 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the June 2016 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020. The June 2016 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On June 1, 2016, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $100,000 with Hsu Gamma, an entity controlled by NIMS’ Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer, Jane H. Hsiao, (the “June 2016 Hsu Gamma Note”). The interest rate payable by NIMS on the June 2016 Hsu Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020. The June 2016 Hsu Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

23
 

 

2017 Promissory Notes. On April 6, 2017, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Frost Gamma (the “April 2017 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2017 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020. The 2017 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On April 6, 2017, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Hsu Gamma, an entity controlled by NIMS’ Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer, Jane H. Hsiao, (the “April 2017 Hsu Gamma Note”). The interest rate payable by NIMS on the 2017 Hsu Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020. The 2017 Hsu Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On September 22, 2017, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Frost Gamma (the “September 2017 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2017 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2020. The 2017 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On September 22, 2017, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Hsu Gamma, an entity controlled by NIMS’ Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer, Jane H. Hsiao, (the “September 2017 Hsu Gamma Note”). The interest rate payable by NIMS on the 2017 Hsu Gamma Note is 11% per annum, payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2020. The 2017 Hsu Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

2018 Promissory Notes. On February 15, 2018, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $100,000 with Frost Gamma Investments Trust (the “2018 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of NIMS’ common stock. The interest rate payable by NIMS on the 2018 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2020. The 2018 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Maturity Date without penalty.

 

On February 15, 2018, NIMS entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $100,000 with Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P., an entity controlled by the Company’s Chairman and Interim CEO, Jane Hsiao (the “2018 Hsu Gamma Note”). The interest rate payable by NIMS on the 2018 Hsu Gamma Note is 11% per annum, payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2020. The 2018 Hsu Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Maturity Date without penalty.

 

As of October 19, 2018, we had cash and cash equivalents of approximately $40,000 and did not have any further funding available under the Credit Facility. We do not expect to generate significant revenues from sales of Exer-Rest platforms and anticipate that we will not have sufficient funds to repay debt and continue operations without raising additional capital. There can be no assurance that we will be able to raise such additional capital on terms acceptable to us or at all.

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

 

As a smaller reporting company as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act, we are not required to include the information otherwise required by this item.

 

24
 

 

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

 

Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm(s) 26
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets at July 31, 2018 and 2017 28
   
Consolidated Comprehensive Statements of Operations for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017 29
   
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders’ Deficit for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017 30
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017 31
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements 32

 

25
 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of

Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of July 31, 2018, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders’ deficit, and cash flows for the year ended July 31, 2018, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of the Company as of July 31, 2018, and the consolidated results of their operations and their cash flows for the year ended July 31, 2018, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1 to the financial statements, the Company has experienced recurring net losses, cash outflows from operating activities, has an accumulated deficit and substantial purchase commitment that raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans in regard to these matters are also described in Note 1. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audit we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audit included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audit also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

  

/s/ EisnerAmper LLP

 

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2018.

 

EISNERAMPER LLP

Fort Lauderdale, FL

November 13, 2018

 

26
 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

Board of Directors and Stockholders

Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc.

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. and subsidiaries as of July 31, 2017, and the related consolidated comprehensive statements of operations, changes in shareholders’ deficit and cash flows for the years then ended. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. We were not engaged to perform an audit of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Our audit includes consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. and subsidiaries as of July 31, 2017, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for the years then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has experienced recurring net losses, cash outflows from operating activities, has an accumulated deficit and substantial purchase commitments that raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans in regard to these matters are also described in Note 1. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

/s/ Morrison, Brown Argiz & Farra, LLC

Morrison, Brown Argiz & Farra, LLC

Miami, Florida

October 30, 2017

 

27
 

 

NON-INVASIVE MONITORING SYSTEMS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands, except share and per share data)

 

    July 31, 2018     July 31, 2017  
ASSETS                
Current assets                
Cash   $ 90     $ 11  
Prepaid expenses, deposits, and other current assets     20       10  
                 
Total current assets     110       21  
                 
Total assets   $ 110     $ 21  
                 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT                
                 
Current liabilities                
Notes payable – Related party   $ -     $ 1,775  
Notes Payable – other     -       50  
Accounts payable and accrued expenses     1,659       1,425  
Customer deposits     4       4  
                 
Total current liabilities     1,663       3,254  
                 
Long Term liabilities                
Notes payable – Related party   2,075       -  
Notes Payable – other     50       -  
                 
Total long term liabilities     2,125       -  
                 
Total liabilities     3,788       3,254  
                 
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 9)                
                 
Shareholders’ deficit                
Series B Preferred Stock, par value $1.00 per share; 100 shares authorized, issued and outstanding as of July 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively; liquidation preference $10            
Series C Convertible Preferred Stock, par value $1.00 per share; 62,048 shares authorized, issued and outstanding as of July 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively; liquidation preference $62     62       62  
Series D Convertible Preferred Stock, par value $1.00 per share; 5,500 shares authorized; 2,782 shares issued and outstanding as of July 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively; liquidation preference $4,173     3       3  
Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share; 400,000,000 shares authorized; 79,007,423 shares issued and outstanding as of July 31, 2018 and 2017     790       790  
Additional paid in capital     21,930       21,930  
Accumulated deficit     (26,463 )     (26,018 )
Total shareholders’ deficit     (3,678 )     (3,233 )
Total liabilities and shareholders’ deficit   $ 110     $ 21  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

28
 

 

NON-INVASIVE MONITORING SYSTEMS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED COMPREHENSIVE STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

Years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017

(In thousands, except per share data)

 

    2018     2017  
Revenues                
Product sales, net   $     $ 6  
                 
Operating costs and expenses                
                 
Cost of sales (including inventory provision of $99 for 2017)           100  
Selling, general and administrative     225       201  
                 
Total operating costs and expenses     225       301  
                 
Operating loss     (225 )     (295 )
                 
Interest expense     (220 )     (193 )
                 
Net loss   $ (445 )   $ (488 )
                 
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding - basic and diluted     79,007       79,007  
                 
Basic and diluted loss per common share   $ (0.01 )   $ (0.01 )

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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NON-INVASIVE MONITORING SYSTEMS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

Years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017

(Dollars in Thousands)

 

   Preferred Stock               Additional         
   Series B   Series C       Series D       Common Stock   Paid in   Accumulated     
   Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Total 
                                             
Balance at July 31, 2016   100   $    62,048   $62       2,782   $        3    79,007,423   $    790   $21,930   $(25,530)  $(2,745)
Net loss                                       (488)   (488)
Balance at July 31, 2017   100        62,048    62    2,782    3    79,007,423    790    21,930    (26,018)   (3,233)
Net loss                                       (445)   (445)
Balance at July 31, 2018   100   $    62,048   $62    2,782   $3    79,007,423   $790   $21,930   $(26,463)  $(3,678)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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NON-INVASIVE MONITORING SYSTEMS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

Years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017

(Dollars in Thousands)

 

   2017   2016 
Operating Activities          
Net loss  $(445)  $(488)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:          
           
Write down of inventory       99 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities          
Prepaid expenses, deposits and other current assets   (10)   46 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   234    167 
Net cash used in operating activities   (221)   (176)
           
Financing Activities          
Proceeds from note payable – related party   300    100 
Net cash provided by financing activities   300    100 
           
Net (decrease) increase in cash   79    (76)
Cash, beginning of year   11    87 
Cash, end of year  $90   $11 
           
Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information          
Cash paid for:          
Interest  $-    $ - 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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NON-INVASIVE MONITORING SYSTEMS, INC.

 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

1. ORGANIZATION AND BUSINESS

 

Organization. Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc., a Florida corporation (together with its consolidated subsidiaries, the “Company” or “NIMS”), began business as a medical diagnostic monitoring company to develop computer-aided continuous monitoring devices to detect abnormal respiratory and cardiac events using sensors on the human body’s surface. It has ceased to operate in this market and has licensed the rights to its technology. The Company is now focused on developing and marketing its Exer-Rest® line of acceleration therapeutic platforms based upon unique, patented whole body periodic acceleration (“WBPA”) technology. The Exer-Rest line of acceleration therapeutic platforms currently includes the Exer-Rest AT, AT3800 and AT4700 models.

 

Business. The Company is developing and marketing its Exer-Rest® line of acceleration therapeutic platforms based upon unique, patented whole body periodic acceleration (“WBPA”) technology. The Exer-Rest line of acceleration therapeutic platforms currently includes the Exer-Rest AT, AT3800 and AT4700 models.

 

The Company received revenue from royalties on sales of diagnostic monitoring hardware and software by SensorMedics and from VivoMetrics in prior years. SensorMedics indicated they will discontinue licensed product sales after current inventory is depleted and, therefore, the royalty revenue from SensorMedics is expected to be minimal to none. VivoMetrics ceased operations in July 2009 and filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in October 2009. Pursuant to VivoMetrics’ approved bankruptcy plan of reorganization, our license with VivoMetrics was assigned to another company; however, there can be no assurance as to the future amount of royalty revenue, if any, that we may derive from this license or from our existing license with SensorMedics. In fiscal year 2009, NIMS began commercial sales of its third generation Exer-Rest therapeutic platforms.

 

During the calendar years 2005 to 2007, the Company designed, developed and manufactured the first Exer-Rest platform (now the Exer-Rest AT), a second generation acceleration therapeutics platform, and updated its operations to promote the Exer-Rest AT overseas as an aid to improve circulation and joint mobility and to relieve minor aches and pains.

 

The Company has developed a third generation of Exer-Rest acceleration therapeutic platforms (designated the Exer-Rest AT3800 and the Exer-Rest AT4700) that had been manufactured by Sing Lin Technologies Co. Ltd. (“Sing Lin”) based in Taichung, Taiwan (see Note 9).

 

The Company’s consolidated financial statements have been prepared and presented on a basis assuming it will continue as a going concern. As reflected in the accompanying consolidated financial statements, the Company had net losses in the amount of $0.4 and $0.5 million for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively, and has experienced negative cash outflows from operating activities. The Company also has an accumulated deficit of $26.5 million as of July 31, 2018, and has purchase commitments at July 31, 2018 (see Note 9). These matters raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern.

 

Absent any significant revenues from product sales, the Company will need to incur additional debt, equity financing or a strategic collaboration for the Company to continue its business activities, which are currently focused on strategic collaborations and commercial sale of the Exer-Rest. Management intends to obtain any additional capital needed to continue its business activities through new debt or equity financing, but there can be no assurance that it will be successful in this regard. The accompanying consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be necessary from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

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As further discussed in Note 9, the Company in 2010 terminated its agreement with Sing Lin. As of July 31, 2018, the Company has payables due to Sing Lin of approximately $41,000.

 

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Consolidation. The consolidated financial statements for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017 include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems of Florida, Inc., which has no current operations, and NIMS of Canada, Inc., a Canadian corporation, which has no current operations. All inter-company accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Use of Estimates. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) requires management to make estimates and assumptions, such as accounts receivable, stock based compensation, warranty accrual and deferred taxes as estimates, that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Such items include input variables for stock based compensation, accounts receivable, lower of cost or market determination for inventory, warranty accrual and deferred taxes. Actual results could differ materially from these estimates.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents. The Company considers all highly liquid short-term investments purchased with an original maturity date of three months or less to be cash equivalents. The Company had approximately $90,000 and $11,000 in checking accounts at July 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

Allowances for Doubtful Accounts. Royalties and other receivables are recorded at the stated amount of the transactions. The Company provides an allowance for royalties and other receivables it believes it may not collect in full. Receivables are written off when they are deemed to be uncollectible and all collection attempts have ceased. The amount of bad debt recorded each period and the resulting adequacy of the allowance at the end of each period are determined using a combination of the Company’s historical loss experience, customer-by-customer analysis of the Company’s accounts receivable each period and subjective assessments of the Company’s future bad debt exposure.

 

Inventories. Inventories are stated at lower of cost or net realizable value using the first-in, first-out method, and are evaluated at least annually for impairment. Inventories at July 31, 2018 and 2017 had been written down to zero.

 

Long-lived Assets. The Company reviews its long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. In performing the review for recoverability, the Company estimates the future undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use of the asset and its eventual disposition. If the sum of the expected future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the assets, an impairment loss is recognized as the difference between the fair value and the carrying amount of the asset.

 

Segments The Company operates in only one segment. Management uses cash flow as the primary measure to manage its business and does not segment its business for internal reporting or decision-making.

 

Taxes Assessed on Revenue-Producing Transactions. The Company presents sales taxes assessed on revenue-producing transactions between a seller and customer using the net presentation; thus, sales and cost of revenues are not affected by such taxes.

 

Income Taxes. The Company provides for income taxes using an asset and liability based approach. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are recorded to reflect the tax consequences in future years of temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial statement and income tax purposes. The deferred tax asset for loss carryforwards and other potential future tax benefits has been fully offset by a valuation allowance since it is uncertain whether any future benefit will be realized. The Company files its tax returns as prescribed by the laws of the jurisdictions in which it operates. Tax years ranging from 2015 to 2018 remain open to examination by various taxing jurisdictions as the statute of limitations has not expired. It is the Company’s policy to include income tax interest and penalty expense in its tax provision.

 

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Revenue Recognition. The Company adopted ASC Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, on January 1, 2018. The Company’s revenue consists of product sales and parts. The Company accounts for a contract with a customer when there is a legally enforceable contract between the Company and the customer, the rights of the parties are identified, the contract has commercial substance, and collectability of the contract consideration is probable. The Company’s revenues are measured based on consideration specified in the contract with each customer, net of any sales incentives and taxes collected from customers that are remitted to government authorities.

 

Advertising Costs. The Company expenses all costs of advertising and promotions as incurred. There were no advertising and promotional costs for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

Research and Development Costs. Research and development costs are expensed as incurred, and primarily consist of payments to third parties for research and development of the Exer-Rest device and regulatory testing costs to obtain FDA approval.

 

Warranties. The Company’s warranties are two years on all Exer-Rest products sold domestically and one year for products sold outside of the U.S. and are accrued based on management’s estimates and the history of warranty costs incurred. There were no material warranty costs incurred for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017, and management estimates that the Company’s accrued warranty expense at July 31, 2018 will be sufficient to offset claims made for units under warranty. Warranty accruals of approximately $12,000 are included in accounts payable and accrued expenses at July 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

Stock-based compensation. The Company recognizes all share-based payments, including grants of stock options, as operating expenses, based on their grant date fair values. Stock-based compensation expense is recognized over the vesting life of the underlying stock options and is included in selling, general and administrative costs and expenses in the consolidated comprehensive statements of operations for all periods presented. Forfeitures are accounted for when they occur.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments. Fair value estimates discussed herein are based upon certain market assumptions and pertinent information available to management as of July 31, 2018 and 2017. The respective carrying value of certain on-balance-sheet financial instruments such as cash and cash equivalents, royalties and other receivables, accounts payable and accrued expenses approximate fair values because they are short term in nature or they bear current market interest rates.

 

As of July 31, 2018 and 2017, the respective carrying value of the notes payable – related party and notes payable – other approximate our current borrowing rate for similar debt instruments of comparable maturity and are considered Level 3 measurements within the fair value hierarchy.

 

Comprehensive Income (Loss). Comprehensive income (loss) is defined as the change in equity of a business enterprise during a period from transactions and other events and circumstances from non-owner sources, including foreign currency translations. There were no transactions that resulted in comprehensive income or losses during the years ended July 31, 2018 or 2017.

 

Loss Contingencies. We recognize contingent losses that are both probable and estimable. In this context, we define probability as circumstances under which events are likely to occur. In regard to legal costs, we record such costs as incurred.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements.

 

The Company considers the applicability and impact of all Accounting Standard Updates (“ASU’s”). ASU’s not discussed below were assessed and determined to be either not applicable or are expected to have minimal impact on our consolidated balance sheets or consolidated comprehensive statement of operations.

 

In February 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). ASU 2016-02 impacts any entity that enters into a lease with some specified scope exceptions. This new standard establishes a right-of-use (ROU) model that requires a lessee to record a ROU asset and a lease liability on the balance sheet for all leases with terms longer than 12 months. Leases will be classified as either finance or operating, with classification affecting the pattern of expense recognition in the statement of operations. The guidance updates and supersedes Topic 840, Leases. For public entities, ASU 2016-02 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods with those years, beginning after December 15, 2018, and early adoption is permitted. A modified retrospective transition approach is required for leases existing at, or entered into after, the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements, with certain practical expedients available. The Company has not yet implemented this guidance. However, based on the Company’s current operating lease arrangements, the Company does not expect the adoption of this standard to have a material impact on its financial statements based upon current obligations.

 

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In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2014-09, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers.” ASU 2014-09, as amended and codified into Topic 606, clarifies the principles for recognizing revenue and develops a common revenue standard for GAAP that removes inconsistencies and weaknesses in revenue requirements, provides a more robust framework for addressing revenue issues, improves comparability of revenue recognition practices across entities, industries, jurisdictions, and capital markets, provides more useful information to users of financial statements through improved disclosure requirements and simplifies the preparation of financial statements by reducing the number of requirements to which an entity must refer. As required, we adopted ASU 2014-09 using the modified retrospective approach on January 1, 2018.

 

In March 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2016-09 – Compensation – Stock Compensation (Topic 718). The amendments in this update affect all entities that issue share-based payment awards to their employees. The areas for simplification in this update involve several aspects of the accounting for share-based payment transactions, including the income tax consequences, classification of awards as either equity or liabilities, and classification on the statement of cash flows. Changes introduced by this relates to the timing of when unrecognized tax benefits are recognized, minimum statutory withholding requirements, and forfeitures, The Company implemented this ASU on August 1, 2017. The adoption of this update did not impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230). This standard addresses the classification of eight specific cash flow issues with the objective of reducing the existing diversity in practice. ASU 2016-15 will be effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted. We are currently evaluating the impact of this new guidance on our Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

3. INVENTORIES

 

The Company’s inventory valuation is zero as of July 31, 2018. The Company recorded an inventory valuation adjustment of $99,000 during the year ended July 31, 2017. The $99,000 inventory valuation adjustment during the year ended July 31, 2017 resulted from management’s business review and related assessment of the net realizable value of the Exer-Rest units. Factors in this determination included the age of inventory, recent historical sales, and the uncertainty of when the Company would have a sales team, either internal or through an alliance or collaboration, for the Exer-Rest. In light of the change in circumstances in connection with management’s business review which included a decision to not pursue re-hiring a sales force or such other alternatives in the foreseeable future, management reassessed its inventory valuation and recorded a provision on inventory.

 

4. STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION

 

The Company measures the cost of employee, officer and director services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the grant-date fair value of the award. The fair value of the Company’s stock option awards is expensed over the vesting life of the underlying stock options using the graded vesting method, with each tranche of vesting options valued separately. The Company did not record any stock based compensation expense for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

In November 2010, the Board and Compensation Committee approved the Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. 2011 Stock Incentive Plan (the “2011 Plan”). Awards granted under the 2011 Plan may consist of incentive stock options, stock appreciation rights (SAR), restricted stock grants, restricted stock units (RSU) performance shares, performance units or cash awards. The 2011 Plan authorizes up to 4,000,000 shares of our common stock for issuance pursuant to the terms of the 2011 Plan. The 2011 Plan was approved by our shareholders in March 2012 and no awards have been granted under the 2011 Plan as of July 31, 2018.

 

The Company did not grant any stock options for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

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A summary of the Company’s stock option activity for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017 is as follows:

 

    Shares     Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
    Weighted average
remaining
contractual term
(years)
    Aggregate
Intrinsic
Value
 
Options outstanding, July 31, 2016     200,000     $ 0.430       .75        
Options granted         $ 0.000                  
Options exercised         $ 0.000                  
Options expired     200,000     $ 0.430              
Options outstanding, July 31, 2017         $ 0.000                  
Options granted         $                  
Options exercised         $                  
Options expired         $                  
Options outstanding, July 31, 2018         $                          $                   
Options expected to vest, July 31, 2018         $           $  
Options exercisable, July 31, 2018         $           $  

 

As of July 31, 2018, there were no unrecognized costs related to outstanding stock options.

 

5. NOTES PAYABLE

 

2010 Credit Facility. On March 31, 2010, the Company entered into a new Note and Security Agreement with Frost Gamma Investments Trust (“Frost Gamma”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock, and Hsu Gamma Investments, LP (“Hsu Gamma”), an entity controlled by the Company’s Chairman and Interim CEO(together, the “Lenders”), pursuant to which the Lenders have provided a revolving credit line (the “Credit Facility”) in the aggregate principal amount of up to $1.0 million, secured by all of the Company’s personal property. The Company is permitted to borrow and reborrow from time to time under the Credit Facility until July 31, 2013 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020 (the “Credit Facility Maturity Date”). The Company received a waiver from the lenders relating to the covenant prohibiting aggregate borrowings in excess of $100,000. The interest rate payable on amounts outstanding under the Credit Facility is 11% per annum, and increases to 16% per annum after the Credit Facility Maturity Date or after an event of default. All amounts owing under the Credit Facility are required to be repaid by the Credit Facility Maturity Date, and amounts outstanding are prepayable at any time. As of July 31, 2018 and 2017, the Company had drawn an aggregate of $1,000,000 under the Credit Facility and there is no available balance remaining.

 

2011 Promissory Notes. On September 12, 2011, the Company entered into two promissory notes in the principal amount of $50,000 each with Frost Gamma, a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock, and with an unrelated third party for a total of $100,000. The interest rate payable by the Company on both the 2011 Frost Gamma Note and the unrelated third party note is 11% per annum, payable on the maturity date of September 12, 2014 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020 (the “Promissory Notes Maturity Date”). The Company may prepay either or both notes in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

2012 Promissory Note. On May 30, 2012, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Hsu Gamma, an entity controlled by the Company’s Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer, Jane H. Hsiao, (the “2012 Hsu Gamma Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2012 Hsu Gamma Note is 11% per annum, payable on the maturity date of September 12, 2014 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2012 Hsu Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

2013 Promissory Note. On February 22, 2013, we entered into a promissory note in the amount of $50,000 with Jane Hsiao, our Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer (the “2013 Hsiao Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2013 Hsiao Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of September 12, 2014 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2013 Hsiao Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

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2014 Promissory Note. On September 24, 2014, we entered into a promissory note (the “2014 Hsiao Note”) in the principal amount of $50,000 with Jane Hsiao, our Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer. The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2014 Hsiao Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2015 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2014 Hsiao Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without penalty.

 

2015 Promissory Notes. On February 2, 2015, we entered into a promissory note (the “2015 Hsiao Note”) in the principal amount of $50,000 with Jane Hsiao, our Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer. The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2015 Hsiao Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2015 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2015 Hsiao Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without penalty.

 

On April 16, 2015, we entered into a promissory note (“April 2015 Frost Gamma Note”) in the amount of $100,000 with Frost Gamma, a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the April 2015 Frost Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2015 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The April 2015 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On August 12, 2015, we entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $25,000 with Frost Gamma (the “August 2015 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the August 2015 Frost Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The August 2015 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On October 27, 2015, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Frost Gamma (the “October 2015 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the October 2015 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The October 2015 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On October 27, 2015, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Jane Hsiao, the Company’s Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer (the “October 2015 Hsiao Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the October 2015 Hsiao Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The October 2015 Hsiao Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

2016 Promissory Notes. On June 1, 2016, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $100,000 with Frost Gamma (the “June 2016 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the June 2016 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The June 2016 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On June 1, 2016, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $100,000 with Hsu Gamma, an entity controlled by the Company’s Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer, Jane H. Hsiao, (the “June 2016 Hsu Gamma Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the June 2016 Hsu Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The June 2016 Hsu Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

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2017 Promissory Notes. On April 6, 2017, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Frost Gamma (the “April 2017 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the April 2017 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The April 2017 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On April 6, 2017, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Hsu Gamma, an entity controlled by NIMS’ Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer, Jane H. Hsiao, (the “April 2017 Hsu Gamma Note”). The interest rate payable by NIMS on the 2017 Hsu Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2017 Hsu Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On September 22, 2017, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Frost Gamma (the “September 2017 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2017 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, payable on the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2017 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On September 22, 2017, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Jane Hsiao, the Company’s Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer, (the “September 2017 Hsiao Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the September 2017 Hsiao Note is 11% per annum, payable on the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The September 2017 Hsiao Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

2018 Promissory Notes.

 

On February 15, 2018, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $100,000 with Frost Gamma Investments Trust (the “2018 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2018 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, payable on the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2018 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Maturity Date without penalty.

 

On February 15, 2018, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $100,000 with Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P., an entity controlled by the Company’s Chairman and Interim CEO, Jane Hsiao (the “2018 Hsu Gamma Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2018 Hsu Gamma Note is 11% per annum, payable on the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2018 Hsu Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Maturity Date without penalty.

 

As of the date these financial statements are issued, the Company was obligated under the above described Credit Facility and Promissory Notes to make future principal payments (excluding interest) as follows:

 

Year Ending July 31,    
     
2020  $2,125,000 

 

6. SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

The Company has three classes of Preferred Stock. Holders of Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock are entitled to vote with the holders of common stock as a single class on all matters.

 

Series B Preferred Stock is not redeemable by the Company and has a liquidation value of $100 per share, plus declared and unpaid dividends, if any. Dividends are non-cumulative, and are at the rate of $10 per share, if declared.

 

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Series C Preferred Stock is redeemable by the Company at a price of $0.10 per share upon 30 days prior written notice. This series has a liquidation value of $1.00 per share plus declared and unpaid dividends, if any. Dividends are non-cumulative, and are at the rate of $0.10 per share, if declared. Each share of Series C Preferred Stock is convertible into 25 shares of the Company’s common stock upon payment of a conversion premium of $4.20 per share of common stock. The conversion rate and the conversion premium are subject to adjustments in the event of stock splits, stock dividends, reverse stock splits and certain other events.

 

Series D Preferred Stock is not redeemable by the Company. This series has a liquidation value of $1,500 per share, plus declared and unpaid dividends, if any. Each share of Series D Preferred Stock is convertible into 5,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. The conversion rate is subject to adjustments in the event of stock splits, stock dividends, reverse stock splits and certain other events.

 

The Company did not convert any Preferred Stock and did not issue any shares of the Company’s common stock for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017. No preferred stock dividends have been declared as of July 31, 2018 or 2017.

 

7. BASIC AND DILUTED LOSS PER SHARE

 

Basic net loss per common share is computed by dividing net loss attributable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted net loss per common share is computed giving effect to all dilutive potential common shares that were outstanding during the period. Diluted potential common shares consist of incremental shares issuable upon exercise of stock options and warrants and conversion of preferred stock. In computing diluted net loss per share for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017, no dilution adjustment has been made to the weighted average outstanding common shares because the assumed exercise of outstanding options and warrants and the conversion of preferred stock would be anti-dilutive.

 

Potential common shares not included in calculating diluted net loss per share are as follows:

 

   July 31, 2018   July 31, 2017 
Series C Preferred Stock   1,551,200    1,551,200 
Series D Preferred Stock   13,910,000    13,910,000 
Total   15,461,200    15,461,200 

 

8. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

Dr. Hsiao, Dr. Frost and directors Steven Rubin and Rao Uppaluri are each stockholders, current or former officers and/or directors or former directors of TransEnterix, Inc. (formerly SafeStitch Medical, Inc.) (“TransEnterix”), a publicly-traded medical device company. The Company’s Chief Financial Officer also served as the Chief Financial Officer of TransEnterix until October 2, 2013. The Company’s Chief Financial Officer continued as an employee of TransEnterix until March 3, 2014, during which he supervised the Miami based accounting staff of TransEnterix under a cost sharing arrangement whereby the total salaries of the Miami based accounting staff was shared by the Company and TransEnterix. The Chief Financial Officer continues to serve as the Chief Financial Officer of Cocrytal Pharma, Inc., a clinical stage biotechnology company, and in which Steve Rubin and Jane Hsiao, serve on the Board. Since December 2009, the Company’s Chief Legal Officer has served under a similar cost sharing arrangement as the Chief Legal Officer of TransEnterix. The Company recorded additions to selling, general and administrative costs and expenses to account for the sharing of costs under these arrangements of $5,000 for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Aggregate accounts payable to TransEnterix totaled approximately $800 and $800 at July 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

The Company signed a five year lease for office space in Miami, Florida with a company controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, who is the beneficial owner of more than 10% of the Company’s common stock. The rental payments under the Miami office lease, which commenced January 1, 2008 and expired on December 31, 2012, were approximately $1,250 per month and then continued on a month-to-month basis. In February 2016 the rent was reduced to $0 per month. For the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017, the Company did not record any rent expense related to the Miami lease. At July 31, 2018 and 2017, approximately $76,000 in rent was payable.

 

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The Company signed a three year lease for warehouse space in Hialeah, Florida with a company jointly controlled by Dr. Frost and Dr. Jane Hsiao, the Company’s Chairman and Interim CEO. The rental payments under the Hialeah warehouse lease, which commenced February 1, 2009 and expired on January 31, 2012, were approximately $5,000 per month for the first year and were subsequently on a month-to-month basis following the expiration of the lease. The Company vacated the Hialeah warehouse in September 2014 and entered into a new lease with an unrelated third party. The Company did not record any rent expense related to the Hialeah lease for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. At July 31, 2018 and 2017, approximately $115,000 in rent was payable under the previous Hialeah lease.

 

The Company has the Credit Facility and multiple notes payable outstanding to related parties, as more fully described in Note 5 to these consolidated financial statements. The Company incurred interest expense related to the Credit Facility of approximately $110,000 for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. The Company also incurred interest expense related to the promissory notes of approximately $110,000 and $83,000 for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. A total of $1.2 million and $1.0 million in accumulated interest payable on the Credit Facility and promissory notes remained outstanding as of July 31, 2018 and July 31, 2017, respectively, and is included in accounts payable and accrued expenses.

 

The Company is under common control with multiple entities and the existence of that control could result in operating results or financial position of each individual entity significantly different from those that would have been obtained if the entities were autonomous. One of those related parties, OPKO Health, Inc. (“OPKO”) and the Company are under common control and OPKO has a one percent ownership interest in the Company that OPKO has accounted for as an equity method investment due to the ability to significantly influence the Company.

 

9. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Leases.

 

The Company is under an operating lease agreement for our corporate office space that expired in 2012. The lease currently continues on a month to month basis at no cost.

 

We house our inventory in approximately 4,000 square feet of warehouse space in Pembroke Park, Florida. The lease commenced September 15, 2014 and originally expired on September 30, 2015 and we exercised our option to renew the lease and extended the expiration to September 15, 2017. Following the expiration, we have remained on a month-to-month term.

 

The Pembroke Park lease agreement requires the payment of base rent plus escalations for increases in building operating costs and real estate taxes. Rental expense for operating leases amounted to $45,000 and $44,000 for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

Product Development and Supply Agreement.

 

In September 2007, the Company entered into a Product Development and Supply Agreement (the “Agreement”) with Sing Lin Technologies Co. Ltd., a company based in Taichung, Taiwan (“Sing Lin”). Pursuant to the Agreement, the Company consigned to Sing Lin the development and design of the next generation Exer-Rest and related devices. The Agreement commenced as of September 3, 2007 and had a term that extended three years from the acceptance by NIMS of the first run of production units. Thereafter, the Agreement automatically renewed for successive one year terms unless either party sent the other a notice of non-renewal. Either party was permitted to terminate the Agreement with ninety days prior written notice. Upon termination, each party’s obligations under the Agreement were to be limited to obligations related to confirmed orders placed prior to the termination date.

 

Pursuant to the Agreement, Sing Lin designed, developed and manufactured the tooling required to manufacture the acceleration therapeutic platforms for a total cost to the Company of $471,000. Sing Lin utilized the tooling in the performance of its production obligations under the Agreement. The Company paid Sing Lin $150,000 of the tooling cost upon execution of the Agreement and $150,000 upon the Company’s approval of the product prototype concepts and designs. The balance of the final tooling cost became due and payable in September 2008 upon acceptance of the first units produced using the tooling, and was paid in full during the year ended July 31, 2009.

 

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Under the now-terminated Agreement, the Company also granted Sing Lin the exclusive distribution rights for the products in certain countries in the Far East, including Taiwan, China, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Indonesia and certain other countries. Sing Lin agreed not to sell the Products outside its geographic areas in the Far East.

 

The Agreement provided for the Company to purchase approximately $2.6 million of Exer-Rest units within one year of the September 2008 acceptance of the final product. The Agreement further provided for the Company to purchase $4.1 million and $8.8 million of Exer-Rest products in the second and third years following such acceptance, respectively. These minimum purchase amounts were based upon 2007 product costs multiplied by volume commitments. Through July 31, 2018, the Company had paid Sing Lin $1.7 million in connection with orders placed through that date. As of July 31, 2018, the Company has approximately $41,000 of payables due to Sing Lin. As of July 31, 2018, aggregate minimum future purchases under the Agreement totaled approximately $13.9 million.

 

As of July 31, 2018, the Company had not placed orders sufficient to meet the first-year or second-year minimum purchase obligations under the Agreement. The Company notified Sing Lin in June 2010 that it was terminating the Agreement effective September 2010, and Sing Lin in July 2010 demanded that the Company place orders sufficient to fulfill the three year minimum purchase obligations in the Agreement. As of October 24, 2018, Sing Lin has not followed up on its July 2010 demand. There can be no assurance that Sing Lin will not attempt to enforce its remedies under the Agreement, or pursue other potential remedies.

 

10. ACCOUNTS PAYABLE AND ACCCRUED EXPENSES

 

Accounts payable and accrued expenses are summarized in the following table (in thousands):

 

    July 31, 2018     July 31, 2017  
Accounts Payable   $ 417     403  
Accrued Interest     1,223       1,003  
Accrued Warranty     12       12  
Accrued Other     7       7  
Total   $ 1,659     $ 1,425  

 

11. INCOME TAXES

 

The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability method, the objective of which is to establish deferred tax assets and liabilities for the temporary differences between the financial reporting and the tax bases of the Company’s assets and liabilities at enacted tax rates expected to be in effect when such amounts are realized or settled. A valuation allowance related to deferred tax assets is recorded when it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

 

The accounting for uncertain tax positions guidance under ASC 740 requires that we recognize the financial statement benefit of a tax position only after determining that the relevant tax authority would more likely than not sustain the position following an audit. For tax positions meeting the more-likely-than-not threshold, the amount recognized in the financial statements is the largest benefit that has a greater than 50 percent likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement with the relevant tax authority. The application of this guidance does not affect the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

The Company files its tax returns in the U.S. federal jurisdiction, Canada federal jurisdiction and with various U.S. states and the Ontario province of Canada. The Company is subject to tax audits in all jurisdictions for which it files tax returns. Tax audits by their very nature are often complex and can require several years to complete. There are currently no tax audits that have commenced with respect to income tax or any other returns in any jurisdiction. Tax years ranging from 2015 to 2018 remain open to examination by various taxing jurisdictions as the statute of limitations has not expired. Because the Company is carrying forward income tax attributes, such as net operating losses and tax credits from 2014 and earlier tax years, these attributes can still be audited when utilized on returns filed in the future. It is the Company’s policy to include income tax interest and penalties expense in its tax provision.

 

On December 22, 2017, the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act” (Tax Reform), was signed into law. In addition to changes or limitations to certain tax deductions, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act permanently lowered the corporate tax rate to 21% from the existing maximum rate of 35%, effective for tax years commencing January 1, 2018. As a result of the reduction of the corporate tax rate to 21%, the Company reduced the amount of its net deferred tax assets by $2 million, with a corresponding decrease in the valuation allowance, which resulted in no net tax adjustment.

 

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The difference between income taxes at the statutory federal income tax rate of 21% in 2018 and 34% in 2017 and income taxes reported in the consolidated comprehensive statements of operations are attributable to the following (in thousands):

 

   July 31, 2018   July 31, 2017 
Income tax benefit at the federal statutory rate  $(95)  $(166)
State and local income taxes, net of effect of federal taxes   (20)   10 
Stock-based compensation   -    272 
Tax Reform – Reduction in tax rate   2,013    - 
Decrease in valuation allowance   (1,898)   (116)
Provision for income tax  $-   $- 

 

The tax effects of temporary differences that give rise to significant portions of the deferred tax assets consist of the following (in thousands):

 

   July 31, 2018   July 31, 2017 
Federal and State net operating loss  $4,146   $5,988 
Foreign net operating loss   18    18 
Stock-based compensation and other   116    173 
    4,281    6,179 
Less: Valuation allowance   (4,281)   (6,179)
Net deferred tax asset  $   $ 

 

At July 31, 2018, the Company had available Federal and State net operating loss carry forwards of approximately $16.4 million and foreign net operating loss carry forwards of approximately $0.1 million which expire in various years beginning in 2019. The net operating loss carry forwards may be subject to limitation due to change of ownership provisions under section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code and similar state provisions.

 

A valuation allowance is required to reduce the deferred tax assets reported if, based on the weight of the evidence, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. After consideration of all the evidence, both positive and negative, management has determined that a full $4.3 million valuation allowance at July 31, 2018 ($6.2 million at July 31, 2017) was necessary. The decrease in the valuation allowance for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017 were approximately $1.9 million (which includes a reduction of $2 million resulting from the change in federal tax rate from Tax Reform) and $116,000, respectively. The Company paid no taxes for the years 2018 or 2017.

 

12. RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES AND CONCENTRATIONS OF RISK

 

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to risk consist principally of cash and purchases and advances to contract manufacturer.

 

Purchases from and Advances to Contract Manufacturer. Substantially all of the Company’s current inventory has been acquired from Sing Lin pursuant to the now-terminated Agreement. The Company notified Sing Lin in June 2010 that it was terminating the agreement effective September 2010. If the Company is unable to establish a contract and obtain a sufficient alternative supply from Sing Lin or another supplier, it may not be able to procure additional inventory on a timely basis or in the quantities required. Sing Lin and its subcontractors currently maintain custody of the Company’s specialized tooling, which could adversely impact the Company’s ability to reallocate production to other vendors.

 

Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.

 

None.

 

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Item 9A(T). Controls and Procedures.

 

The Company’s management, with the participation of its Interim Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) or 15d-15(e)) as of July 31, 2018. Based upon that evaluation, the Interim Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that, as of that date, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of the end of the period covered by this annual report.

 

Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that: (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the Company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the Company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the Company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the Company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 

For the period ended July 31, 2018, pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, management (with the participation of our principal executive officer and principal financial officer) conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on the framework established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Based on this evaluation, management concluded that, as of July 31, 2018, our internal control over financial reporting was effective.

 

This annual report does not include an attestation report of our registered public accounting firm EisnerAmper LLP, regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by our registered public accounting firm pursuant to rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission that permit us to provide only management’s report in this annual report.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting during the last quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Item 9B. Other Information.

 

None.

 

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PART III

 

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.

 

We believe that the combination of the respective qualifications, skills and experience of our directors contribute to an effective and well-functioning board and that, individually and as a whole, our directors possess the necessary qualifications to provide effective oversight of our business and quality advice to our management. Our directors are elected annually and serve until the next annual meeting of shareholders and until their successors are elected and appointed, or until his or her earlier resignation, removal from office or death. Information regarding the age, experience and qualifications of each director is set forth below.

 

Name   Age  
Jane H. Hsiao, Ph.D., MBA     71  
Marvin A. Sackner, M.D.     86  
Morton J. Robinson, M.D.     86  
Steven D. Rubin     58  
Subbarao V. Uppaluri, Ph.D.     69  
Taffy Gould (former director)     76  

 

Jane H. Hsiao, Ph.D., MBA. Dr. Hsiao has served as a Director and Chairman of the Board of Directors (the “Board”) of the Company since October 2008 and as Interim Chief Executive Officer since February 2012. Dr. Hsiao has served as Vice Chairman and Chief Technical Officer of OPKO Health, Inc. (“OPKO”), a specialty healthcare company, since May 2007 and as a director since February 2007. Dr. Hsiao served as the Vice Chairman – Technical Affairs of IVAX from 1995 to January 2006. Dr. Hsiao served as Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President of IVAX Animal Health, IVAX’s veterinary products subsidiary, from 1998 to 2006. Dr. Hsiao is also a director of each of TransEnterix, Inc., a medical device company, Neovasc, Inc., a company developing and marketing medical specialty vascular devices, and Cocrystal Pharma, Inc., a biotechnology company developing antiviral therapeutics for human diseases. Dr. Hsiao previously served as a director for Sorrento Therapeutics, Inc., a development stage pharmaceutical company, PROLOR Biotech, Inc., prior to its acquisition by OPKO in August 2013, and as Chairman of the Board of SafeStitch Medical, Inc., a medical device company, prior to its merger with TransEnterix, Inc.

 

Dr. Hsiao’s background in medical device and pharmaceutical industry, as well as her senior management experience, allow her to play an integral role in overseeing our product development and regulatory affairs and in navigating the regulatory pathways for our products and product candidates. In addition, as a result of her role as director and/or chairman of other companies in the biotechnology and life sciences space, she also has a keen understanding and appreciation of the many regulatory and development issues confronting pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies.

 

Marvin A. Sackner, M.D. Dr. Sackner has served as a Director since he was first elected as our Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and Director in November 1989 and served as Chairman of the Board from November 1989 until October 2008. He served as our CEO from 1989 until 2002 and from December 2007 to February 2012. In 1977, Dr. Sackner co-founded Respitrace Corporation, a predecessor to the Company, and was the Chairman of its board of directors from 1981 until October 1989. Dr. Sackner served as a director of Continucare Corporation (“Continucare”), a provider of outpatient healthcare services, until October 2011. From 1974 until October 1991, Dr. Sackner was the Director of Medical Services at Mount Sinai in Miami Beach, Florida. From 1973 through 1996, he served as Professor of Medicine, University of Miami at Mount Sinai. Since 2004, he has been Voluntary Professor of Medicine, Leonard Miller Medical School of University of Miami. From 1979 to 1980, Dr. Sackner was the President of the American Thoracic Society. Dr. Sackner was the Chairman of the Pulmonary Disease Subspecialty Examining Board of the American Board of Internal Medicine from 1977 to 1980. In 2007, he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate Degree for “outstanding work in the entire field of pulmonology and sleep disorders,” by the University of Zurich (Switzerland). Dr. Sackner holds more than 30 U.S. patents and has published four books and more than 200 scientific papers.

 

Dr. Sackner’s experience as the Company’s former CEO, as a medical doctor and as the primary inventor of the Company’s products enables him to provide valuable board leadership and insight into the development of our products.

 

Taffy Gould. Ms. Gould has served as a Director of the Company from December, 2000 to April 23, 2018 and served as Vice Chairman of the Board from April 2002 to October 2008. Since 1977, she has been the President of Housing Engineers of Florida, Inc., a Florida real estate management company. Since 2002 she has served as Chairman of the Oceania University of Medicine, an internationally accredited medical school located in Apia, Samoa. Additionally, she has served since March 2002 as the managing member of e-Medical Education, LLC, a company founded in 2002 that creates and delivers online medical education and administers the Oceania University of Medicine.

 

On April 23, 2018, Taffy Gould notified the Company of her resignation as a director.

 

Morton J. Robinson, M.D. has served as a Director of the Company since November 1989, and served as Secretary of the Company from August 2001 to November 2009. Dr. Robinson has been a practicing pathologist since 1961, and from 1987 until December 2004, Dr. Robinson served as Director and Chairman of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach. Dr. Robinson has served as Chairman Emeritus of that department since January 2005.

 

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Dr. Robinson’s medical background and expertise brings a unique perspective to our Board on a variety of medical and healthcare related issues. We believe Dr. Robinson’s insight and experience will be valuable in the further development of our products.

 

Steven D. Rubin. Mr. Rubin has served as a Director of the Company since October 2008. Mr. Rubin has served as Executive Vice President – Administration since May 2007 and as a director of the OPKO (NASDAQ: OPKO) since February 2007. Mr. Rubin currently serves on the board of directors of VBI Vaccines, Inc. (NASDAQ CM:VBIV), a commercial-stage biopharmaceutical company which develops, produces and markets next generation of vaccines to address unmet needs in infectious disease and immuno-oncology, Red Violet, Inc. (NASDAQ CM:RDVT), a software and services company, Kidville, Inc. (OTCBB:KVIL), which operates large, upscale facilities, catering to newborns through five-year-old children and their families and offers a wide range of developmental classes for newborns to five-year-olds, Cocrystal Pharma, Inc. (NASDAQ GM:COCP), a publicly traded biotechnology company developing new treatments for viral diseases, Eloxx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (OTC US:ELOX), a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company dedicated to treating patients suffering from rare and ultra-rare disease caused by premature termination codon nonsense mutations, Castle Brands, Inc. (NYSE American:ROX), a developer and marketer of premium brand spirits, Neovasc, Inc. (NASDAQ CM:NVCN), a company that develops and markets medical specialty vascular devices, and ChromaDex Corp. (NASDAQ CM:CDXC), a science-based, integrated nutraceutical company devoted to improving the way people age. Mr. Rubin previously served as a director of Cogint, Inc. (NASDAQ GM:COGT), an information solutions provider focused on the data-fusion market, prior to the spin-off of its data and analytics operations and assets into Red Violet, Inc., Sevion Therapeutics, Inc., prior to its merger with Eloxx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Dreams, Inc. (NYSE American:DRJ), a vertically integrated sports licensing and products company, Safestitch Medical, Inc. prior to its merger with TransEnterix, Inc., SciVac Therapeutics, Inc. prior to its merger with VBI Vaccines, Inc., Tiger X Medical, Inc. prior to its merger with BioCardia, Inc., and PROLOR Biotech, Inc., prior to its acquisition by the OPKO in August 2013. Mr. Rubin also served as the Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary of IVAX from August 2001 until September 2006.

 

Mr. Rubin brings extensive leadership, business, and legal experience, as well as tremendous knowledge of our business and the pharmaceutical industry generally, to the Board. He has advised pharmaceutical companies in several aspects of business, regulatory, transactional, and legal affairs for more than 25 years. His experience as a practicing lawyer, general counsel, management executive and board member to multiple public companies, including several pharmaceutical and life sciences companies, has given him broad understanding and expertise, particularly relating to strategic planning and acquisitions.

 

Subbarao V. Uppaluri, Ph.D. Dr. Uppaluri has served as a Director of the Company since October 2008. Dr. Uppaluri served as Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of OPKO from May 2007 until July 2012 and as a consultant of OPKO until February 2014. Dr. Uppaluri is a member of The Frost Group. Dr. Uppaluri served as the Vice President, Strategic Planning and Treasurer of IVAX from 1997 until December 2006. Before joining IVAX, from 1987 to August 1996, Dr. Uppaluri was Senior Vice President, Senior Financial Officer and Chief Investment Officer with Intercontinental Bank, a publicly traded commercial bank in Florida. In addition, he served in various positions, including Senior Vice President, Chief Investment Officer and Controller, at Peninsula Federal Savings & Loan Association, a publicly traded Florida S&L, from October 1983 to 1987. His prior employment, during 1974 to 1983, included engineering, marketing and research positions with multinational companies and research institutes in India and the United States. Dr. Uppaluri previously served on the boards of OPKO, Winston Pharmaceuticals Inc., Ideation Acquisition Corp., Tiger X Medical, Inc. and Kidville.

 

Dr. Uppaluri brings extensive leadership, business, and accounting experience, as well as knowledge of our business and the pharmaceutical industry generally, to the Board. His experience as the former chief financial officer of OPKO and board member to multiple public companies, including several pharmaceutical and life sciences companies, has given him broad understanding and expertise, particularly relating to business, accounting and finance matters.

 

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Identification of Executive Officers

 

The following individuals are our executive officers:

 

Name   Age   Position
Jane H. Hsiao, Ph.D., MBA   71   Interim Chief Executive Officer and Director
James J. Martin, CPA, MBA   51   Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

 

Each of our officers serves until the earlier of her or his resignation, removal by the Board or death.

 

Biographical information for Jane H. Hsiao is set forth above.

 

James J. Martin. Mr. Martin, has served as our Chief Financial Officer since January 2011, and, from July 2010 through January 2011, he served as our Controller. Since February 2017, Mr. Martin has served as the Chief Financial Officer of Cocrystal Pharma, Inc (NASDAQ: COCP), a clinical stage biotechnology company. From January 2011 to October 2, 2013, Mr. Martin served as Chief Financial Officer of SafeStitch prior to its merger with TransEnterix, Inc. Since September 2014 Mr. Martin has served as Chief Financial Officer of VBI Vaccines Inc. (formerly SciVac Therapeutics, Inc.) (NASDAQ: VBIV), pharmaceutical development and manufacturing company. From April 2014 to September 2015, Mr. Martin served as Chief Financial Officer of Vapor Corp, Inc. (NASDAQ: VPCO), a vaporizer retail and wholesale company. From July 2010 through January 2011, Mr. Martin served as Controller of each of SafeStitch and Aero Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (“Aero”). Prior to joining NIMS, from 2008 through 2010, Mr. Martin served as Controller of AAR Aircraft Services-Miami, a subsidiary of AAR Corp, an aerospace and defense company at which he was responsible for all financial reporting and logistics for AAR Aircraft Services-Miami. From 2005-2008, Mr. Martin served as Controller of Avborne Heavy Maintenance, a commercial aircraft maintenance repair and overhaul company. Mr. Martin previously has served as Vice President of Finance of Aero, a privately held pharmaceutical distributor.

 

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

 

Under section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), the Company’s directors, executive officers and persons who own more than ten percent (10%) of our common stock are required to file with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) initial reports of ownership and reports of changes in ownership of the common stock and other equity securities of the Company. To the Company’s knowledge, based solely on a review of copies of such reports furnished to the Company during and/or with respect to Fiscal 2018, the Company is not aware of any late or delinquent filings required under Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act in respect of the Company’s common stock or other equity securities.

 

Code of Ethics

 

We have adopted a Code of Business Conduct and Ethics that applies to our principal executive officer, principal financial officer and other persons performing similar functions. A copy of our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics is available on our website at www.nims-inc.com. We intend to post amendments to, or waivers from a provision of, our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics that apply to our principal executive officer, principal financial officer or persons performing similar functions on our website. Neither our website nor any information contained or linked therein constitutes a part of this report.

 

Audit Committee

 

We have a separately-designated standing audit committee, established in accordance with section 3(a)(58)(A) of the Exchange Act. The Audit Committee is composed of the following non-employee directors: Dr. Subbarao V. Uppaluri, Chairman and Steven D. Rubin. Our Board has determined that Dr. Uppaluri is an independent audit committee financial expert as defined in Item 407(d)(5)(ii) of Regulation S-K.

 

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Item 11. Executive Compensation.

 

Summary Compensation Table

 

The following table summarizes the compensation information for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017 for our principal executive officer and each of the two most highly compensated executive officers receiving compensation in excess of $100,000 in any such fiscal year. We refer to these persons as our named executive officers.

 

SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

 

Name and Principal Position   Year    Salary ($)    Bonus ($)    

Option

Awards ($)

    

All Other Compensation

($)

    Total ($) 
Jane Hsiao – Interim CEO (1)   2018                     
    2017                     

 

  1. Dr. Hsiao receives no salary from the Company and does not have any outstanding stock option awards.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards as of July 31, 2018

 

The following table sets forth information with respect to outstanding option awards as of July 31, 2018 for our named executive officers(“NEO”). Our NEO’s do not have any outstanding stock options. We did not grant any stock awards in Fiscal 2018 or 2017.

 

    Option Awards 
Name   Number of Securities Underlying Unexercised Options (#) Exercisable    Number of Securities Underlying Unexercised Options (#) Unexercisable    Option Exercise Price ($)    Option Expiration Date 
Jane Hsiao, Interim CEO          $     
James J. Martin, CFO          $     

 

Risk Considerations in our Compensation Programs

 

We have reviewed our compensation structures and policies as they pertain to risk and have determined that our compensation programs do not create or encourage the taking of risks that are reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on the Company.

 

We did not grant any stock awards in the year ended July 31, 2018 and we did not have any outstanding. As of July 31, 2018, the aggregate number of outstanding stock options (both exercisable and unexercisable) for each non-employee director was as follows:

 

Name   

Stock

Options

 
Jane H. Hsiao, Chairman/CEO    
Marvin Sackner, M.D.    
Morton J. Robinson, M.D.    
Steven D. Rubin    
Subbarao V. Uppaluri, Ph.D.    

 

Director Compensation

 

For the year ended July 31, 2018, our Directors did not receive any compensation for their respective service on our Board or any committee thereof. Our Directors do not have any outstanding stock options.

 

47
 

 

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.

 

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT

 

The following table sets forth certain information as of October 16, 2018 concerning the beneficial ownership of our voting stock by (i) each person known by us to be the beneficial owner of more than 5% of the outstanding shares of each class of voting stock, (ii) each of our directors, (iii) each current named executive officer, and (iv) all of our current named executive officers and directors as a group. Unless otherwise noted, all holders listed below have sole voting power and investment power over the shares beneficially owned by them, except to the extent such power may be shared with such person’s spouse.

 

   Common Stock   Series C Convertible Preferred Stock   Series D Convertible Preferred Stock 
Names and Addresses of Directors, Officers and 5% Beneficial Holders (1)  No. of Shares Beneficially Owned (2)  

Percent of

Class

(3)

  

No. of

Shares Beneficially Owned(2)

  

Percent of

Class

(4)

  

No. of

Shares Beneficially Owned(2)

  

Percent of

Class

(5)

 
                         
Jane H. Hsiao, Ph.D., Chairman of the Board and Interim CEO (6)   16,220,000    19.1%       *    1,164    41.8%
Marvin A. Sackner, M.D., Director (7)   15,000    *        *        * 
Morton Robinson, M.D., Director (8)   1,020,320    1.3%   1,073    1.7%       * 
Steven D. Rubin, Director   100,000    *        *        * 
Subbarao V. Uppaluri, Ph.D., Director       *        *        * 
James J. Martin, Chief Financial Officer   25,000    *        *        * 
All Directors and Executive Officers as a group (6 Persons) (9)   17,380,320    20.5%   1,073    1.7%   1,164    41.8%
Phillip Frost, M.D. (10)   21,348,125    25.0%   525    *    1,267    45.5%
Frost Gamma Investments Trust (11)   21,348,125    25.0%   500    *    1,267    45.5%
Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P. (12)   3,670,000    4.4%       *    734    26.4%
Richard Rosenstock (13)   

5,535,556

    7.0%       *        * 

 

 * Less than 1%
   
(1) The mailing address of each 5% beneficial holder listed is 4400 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Florida 33137.
   
(2) A person is deemed to be the beneficial owner of common stock and preferred stock that can be acquired by such person within 60 days from July 31, 2018 upon exercise of option and warrants, or through the conversion of convertible preferred stock.
   
(3) Based on 79,007,423 shares of common stock issued and outstanding as of July 31, 2018. Each beneficial owner’s percentage ownership is determined by assuming that options and warrants that are held by such person (but not those held by any other person) and that are exercisable within 60 days from the date hereof have been exercised and that any convertible secured stock held by such person (but no other person) has been converted into common stock.
   
(4) Based on 62,048 shares of Series C Convertible Preferred Stock issued and outstanding as of July 31, 2018. Each share of Series C Convertible Preferred Stock converts into 25 shares of common stock upon payment of a $4.20 per share of common stock conversion premium. Holders of Series C Convertible Stock are entitled to one vote for each share of Series C Convertible Stock.

 

(5) Based on 2,782 shares of Series D Convertible Preferred Stock issued and outstanding as of July 31, 2018. Each share of Series D Convertible Preferred Stock converts into 5,000 shares of common stock. Holders of Series D Convertible Stock are entitled to one vote for each share of Series D Convertible Stock.
   
(6) Common stock holdings include 2,150,000 shares of common stock that may be acquired upon conversion of 430 shares of Series D Convertible Preferred Stock held by the Chin Hsiung Hsiao Family Trust A, and 3,670,000 shares of common stock that may be acquired upon conversion of 734 shares of Series D Convertible Preferred Stock held by Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P. Dr. Hsiao is trustee of the Chin Hsiung Hsiao Family Trust A. and Dr. Jane Hsiao is the general partner of Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P.
   
(7) Common stock holdings.
   
(8) Includes186,159 shares held jointly with Dr. Robinson’s spouse and 26,250 shares owned by Dr. Robinson’s spouse. Includes 26,829 shares of common stock which may be acquired upon conversion of 1,073 shares of Series C Convertible Preferred Stock.
   
(9) Common stock holdings include 26,829 shares of common stock which may be acquired upon conversion of 1,073 Series C Convertible Preferred Stock and 5,820,000 shares of common stock which may be acquired upon conversion of 1,164 shares of Series D Convertible Preferred Stock.
   
(10) Common stock holdings include 625 shares of common stock that may be acquired upon conversion of 25 shares of Series C Convertible Preferred Stock. Common stock and Preferred Stock holdings include beneficial ownership of shares held by Frost Gamma Investments Trust.
   
(11) Common stock holdings include 12,500 shares of common stock that may be acquired upon conversion of 500 shares of Series C Convertible Preferred Stock and 6,335,000 shares of common stock that may be acquired upon conversion of 1,267 shares of Series D Convertible Preferred Stock. Dr. Phillip Frost is the trustee and Frost Gamma, Limited Partnership is the sole and exclusive beneficiary of Frost Gamma Investments Trust. Dr. Frost is one of two limited partners of Frost Gamma, Limited Partnership. The general partner of Frost Gamma Limited Partnership is Frost Gamma Inc. and the sole shareholder of Frost Gamma, Inc. is Frost-Nevada Corporation. Dr. Frost is also the sole shareholder of Frost-Nevada Corporation.
   
(12) Common stock holdings include 3,670,000 shares of common stock that may be acquired upon conversion of 734 shares of Series D Convertible Preferred Stock. Dr. Jane Hsiao is the general partner of Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P.
   
(13)

Common stock holdings include 1,387,916 shares held directly, 166,200 shares held in a retirement account for the benefit of Richard J. Rosenstock, 10,000 shares held by Mr. Rosenstock’s spouse, 3,200,000 shares owned by Mr. Rosenstock’s spouse as trustee for Mr. Rosenstock’s spouse, 65,900 shares owned in an IRA for the benefit of Mr. Rosenstock’s spouse, 65,000 shares owned in an IRA for the benefit of Mr. Rosenstock and 640,540 shares owned by the Rosenstock Family partnership. Based on Schedule 13G/A filing on May 26, 2015.

 

48
 

 

Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

A majority of our shareholders approved the Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. 2011 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2011 Plan”) on March 16, 2012. We have reserved a total of 4,000,000 shares of our common stock for issuance under this plan, subject to adjustment for stock splits or any future stock dividends or other similar changes in our common stock or our capital structure. As of July 31, 2018, no options have been granted under the 2011 Plan. A more detailed summary of the 2000 Plan is contained in Note 4 to our consolidated financial statements set forth herein under Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The following table provides information about our equity compensation plans as of July 31, 2018:

 

  

Number of

securities to be

issued upon

exercise of

outstanding

options,

warrants and

rights

(a)

  

Weighted-

average exercise

price of

outstanding

options, warrants

and rights

(b)

  

Number of

securities

remaining

available for

future issuance

under equity

compensation

plans

(c)

 
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders(1)      $    4,000,000 
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders(2)            
                
Total      $    4,000,000 

 

(1)

Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. 2011 Stock Option Plans. The 2011 Plan authorizes up to 4,000,000 shares of our common stock. No options have been granted under the 2011 Stock Option Plan.
   
(2) There are no outstanding options that were not granted under shareholder approved plans.

 

In November 2010, our Board and Compensation Committee approved the Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. 2011 Stock Incentive Plan (the “2011 Plan”). Awards granted under the 2011 Plan may consist of incentive stock options, stock appreciation rights (SAR), restricted stock grants, restricted stock units (RSU) performance shares, performance units or cash awards. The 2011 Plan authorizes up to 4,000,000 shares of our common stock for issuance pursuant to the terms of the 2011 Plan. The 2011 Plan was approved by our shareholders in March 2012 and no awards have been granted under the 2011 Plan as of July 31, 2018.

 

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.

 

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS

 

Our principal corporate office is located at 4400 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 180, Miami, Florida. We rent this space from Frost Real Estate Holdings, LLC, a company controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, who is the beneficial owner of more than 10% of our common stock. We currently lease approximately 1,800 square feet under the lease agreement, which had a five-year term that began on January 1, 2008. The lease required annual rent of approximately $56,000, and increased by approximately 4.5% per year. The lease expired on December 31, 2012 and we had been renting on a month-to-month basis at approximately $1,250 per month. In February 2016 the office space rent was reduced to $0 per month.

 

We also leased approximately 5,200 square feet of warehouse space in Hialeah, Florida from a company jointly controlled by Dr. Frost and Dr. Hsiao, our Chairman of the Board. The warehouse lease, which had a three-year term that began on February 1, 2009, required annual rent of approximately $58,000, which increased by approximately 3.5% per year. The lease expired on January 31, 2012 and we had been renting on a month-to-month basis until September 2014. We vacated the Hialeah warehouse in September 2014 and entered into a new lease with an unrelated third party.

 

Dr. Hsiao, Dr. Frost and directors Steven Rubin and Rao Uppaluri are each stockholders, current or former officers and/or directors or former directors of TransEnterix, Inc. (formerly SafeStitch Medical, Inc.) (“TransEnterix”), a publicly-traded medical device company. The Company’s Chief Financial Officer also served as the Chief Financial Officer of TransEnterix until October 2, 2013. The Company’s Chief Financial Officer continued as an employee of TransEnterix until March 3, 2014, during which he supervised the Miami based accounting staff of TransEnterix under a cost sharing arrangement whereby the total salaries of the Miami based accounting staff was shared by the Company and TransEnterix. The Chief Financial Officer continues to serve as the Chief Financial Officer of Cocrytal Pharma, Inc., a clinical stage biotechnology company, and in which Steve Rubin and Jane Hsiao, serve on the Board. Since December 2009, the Company’s Chief Legal Officer has served under a similar cost sharing arrangement as the Chief Legal Officer of TransEnterix. The Company recorded additions to selling, general and administrative costs and expenses to account for the sharing of costs under these arrangements of $5,000 for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Aggregate accounts payable to TransEnterix totaled approximately $800 and $800 at July 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

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2010 Credit Facility. On March 31, 2010, the Company entered into a new Note and Security Agreement with Frost Gamma Investments Trust (“Frost Gamma”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock, and Hsu Gamma Investments, LP (“Hsu Gamma”), an entity controlled by the Company’s Chairman and Interim CEO(together, the “Lenders”), pursuant to which the Lenders have provided a revolving credit line (the “Credit Facility”) in the aggregate principal amount of up to $1.0 million, secured by all of the Company’s personal property. The Company is permitted to borrow and reborrow from time to time under the Credit Facility until July 31, 2013 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020 (the “Credit Facility Maturity Date”). The Company received a waiver from the lenders relating to the covenant prohibiting aggregate borrowings in excess of $100,000. The interest rate payable on amounts outstanding under the Credit Facility is 11% per annum, and increases to 16% per annum after the Credit Facility Maturity Date or after an event of default. All amounts owing under the Credit Facility are required to be repaid by the Credit Facility Maturity Date, and amounts outstanding are prepayable at any time. As of July 31, 2018 and 2017, the Company had drawn an aggregate of $1,000,000 under the Credit Facility and there is no available balance remaining.

 

2011 Promissory Notes. On September 12, 2011, the Company entered into two promissory notes in the principal amount of $50,000 each with Frost Gamma, a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock, and with an unrelated third party for a total of $100,000. The interest rate payable by the Company on both the 2011 Frost Gamma Note and the unrelated third party note is 11% per annum, payable on the maturity date of September 12, 2014 and subsequently the date was extended to July 31, 2020 (the “Promissory Notes Maturity Date”). The Company may prepay either or both notes in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

2012 Promissory Note. On May 30, 2012, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Hsu Gamma, an entity controlled by the Company’s Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer, Jane H. Hsiao, (the “2012 Hsu Gamma Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2012 Hsu Gamma Note is 11% per annum, payable on the maturity date of September 12, 2014 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2012 Hsu Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

2013 Promissory Note. On February 22, 2013, we entered into a promissory note in the amount of $50,000 with Jane Hsiao, our Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer (the “2013 Hsiao Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2013 Hsiao Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of September 12, 2014 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2013 Hsiao Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

2014 Promissory Note. On September 24, 2014, we entered into a promissory note (the “2014 Hsiao Note”) in the principal amount of $50,000 with Jane Hsiao, our Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer. The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2014 Hsiao Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2015 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2014 Hsiao Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without penalty.

 

2015 Promissory Notes. On February 2, 2015, we entered into a promissory note (the “2015 Hsiao Note”) in the principal amount of $50,000 with Jane Hsiao, our Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer. The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2015 Hsiao Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2015 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2015 Hsiao Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without penalty.

 

50
 

 

On April 16, 2015, we entered into a promissory note (“April 2015 Frost Gamma Note”) in the amount of $100,000 with Frost Gamma, a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the April 2015 Frost Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2015 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The April 2015 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On August 12, 2015, we entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $25,000 with Frost Gamma (the “August 2015 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the August 2015 Frost Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The August 2015 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On October 27, 2015, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Frost Gamma (the “October 2015 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the October 2015 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The October 2015 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On October 27, 2015, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Jane Hsiao, the Company’s Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer (the “October 2015 Hsiao Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the October 2015 Hsiao Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The October 2015 Hsiao Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

2016 Promissory Notes. On June 1, 2016, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $100,000 with Frost Gamma (the “June 2016 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the June 2016 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The June 2016 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On June 1, 2016, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $100,000 with Hsu Gamma, an entity controlled by the Company’s Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer, Jane H. Hsiao, (the “June 2016 Hsu Gamma Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the June 2016 Hsu Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The June 2016 Hsu Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

2017 Promissory Notes. On April 6, 2017, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Frost Gamma (the “April 2017 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the April 2017 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The April 2017 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On April 6, 2017, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Hsu Gamma, an entity controlled by NIMS’ Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer, Jane H. Hsiao, (the “April 2017 Hsu Gamma Note”). The interest rate payable by NIMS on the 2017 Hsu Gamma Note is 11% per annum, originally payable on the maturity date of July 31, 2017 and subsequently the date was extended to the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2017 Hsu Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

51
 

 

On September 22, 2017, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Frost Gamma (the “September 2017 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2017 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, payable on the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2017 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

On September 22, 2017, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $50,000 with Jane Hsiao, the Company’s Chairman of the Board and Interim Chief Executive Officer, (the “September 2017 Hsiao Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the September 2017 Hsiao Note is 11% per annum, payable on the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The September 2017 Hsiao Note may be prepaid in advance of the Promissory Notes Maturity Date without premium or penalty.

 

2018 Promissory Notes.

 

On February 15, 2018, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $100,000.00 with Frost Gamma Investments Trust (the “2018 Frost Gamma Note”), a trust controlled by Dr. Phillip Frost, which beneficially owns in excess of 10% of the Company’s common stock. The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2018 Frost Gamma Note is 11% per annum, payable on the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2018 Frost Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Maturity Date without penalty.

 

On February 15, 2018, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $100,000.00 with Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P., an entity controlled by the Company’s Chairman and Interim CEO, Jane Hsiao (the “2018 Hsu Gamma Note”). The interest rate payable by the Company on the 2018 Hsu Gamma Note is 11% per annum, payable on the Promissory Notes Maturity Date. The 2018 Hsu Gamma Note may be prepaid in advance of the Maturity Date without penalty.

 

The Audit Committee of the Board reviews and approves all transactions that are required to be reported under Item 404(a) of Regulation S-K, including each transaction described above. In order to approve a related party transaction, the Audit Committee requires that (i) such transactions be fair and reasonable to us at the time it is authorized by the Audit Committee and (ii) such transaction must be authorized, approved or ratified by the affirmative vote of a majority of the members of the Audit Committee who have no interest, either directly or indirectly, in any such related party transaction.

 

Director Independence

 

The Board of Directors, in the exercise of its reasonable business judgment, has determined that each of the Company’s directors qualifies as an independent director pursuant to Nasdaq Stock Market Rule 5605(a)(2) and applicable SEC rules and regulations, with the exception of Dr. Marvin Sackner, who previously was employed as the Company’s CEO. Dr. Subbarao V. Uppaluri and Steven D. Rubin comprise our Audit Committee, and each such person is “independent” for audit committee purposes as defined by the more stringent standard contained in Nasdaq Stock Market Rule 5605(c)(2).

 

Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services.

 

Principal Accountant

 

Morrison, Brown, Argiz and Farra, LLC (“MBAF”) had served as our independent registered public accounting firm since May 14, 2009. On October 4, 2018, the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors (the “Audit Committee”) of the Company approved the engagement of EisnerAmper LLP (“EisnerAmper”) as the Company’s new independent registered public accounting firm for the fiscal year ending July 31, 2018. In connection with the selection of EisnerAmper, the Audit Committee dismissed MBAF as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm on October 4, 2018.

 

52
 

 

Fees and Services

 

The following table sets forth the total fees billed to us by MBAF and EisnerAmper for its audit of our consolidated annual financial statements and other services for the years ended July 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

   2018   2017 
Audit Fees  $49,000   $49,000 
Audit-Related Fees        
Tax Fees        
All Other Fees        
Total Fees  $49,000   $49,000 

 

Pre-Approval Policies and Procedures

 

Our Audit Committee has a policy in place that requires its review and pre-approval of all audit and permissible non-audit services provided by our independent auditors. The services requiring pre-approval by the audit committee may include audit services, audit related services, tax services and other services. The pre-approval requirement is waived with respect to the provision of non-audit services if (i) the aggregate amount of all such non-audit services provided to us constitutes not more than 5% of the total fees paid by us to our independent auditors during the fiscal year in which such non-audit services were provided, (ii) such services were not recognized at the time of the engagement to be non-audit services, and (iii) such services are promptly brought to the attention of the Audit Committee or by one or more of its members to whom authority to grant such approvals has been delegated by the Audit Committee. During fiscal 2018 and 2017, 100% of the audit related services, tax services and all other services provided by MBAF for the periods as our principal independent registered public accountant were pre-approved by the Audit Committee.

 

PART IV

 

Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

 

(a) List of documents filed as part of this report:

 

1. Financial Statements: The information required by this item is contained in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

2. Financial Statement Schedules: The information required by this item is included in the consolidated financial statements contained in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

3. Exhibits: See Index to Exhibits.

 

53
 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

  NON-INVASIVE MONITORING SYSTEMS, INC.
     
Date: November 13, 2018 By: /s/ Jane H. Hsiao
    Jane H. Hsiao
    Interim Chief Executive Officer

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Signature   Title   Date
         
/s/ Jane H. Hsiao, Ph.D.  

Interim Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the

  November 13, 2018
Jane H. Hsiao, Ph.D.   Board of Directors (Principal Executive Officer)    
         
/s/ Marvin A. Sackner, M.D   Director   November 13, 2018
Marvin A. Sackner, M.D        
         
/s/ Morton J. Robinson, M.D.   Director   November 13, 2018
Morton J. Robinson, M.D.        
         
/s/ Steven D. Rubin   Director   November 13, 2018
Steven D. Rubin        
         
/s/ Subbarao V. Uppaluri   Director   November 13, 2018
Subbarao Uppaluri        
         
/s/ James J. Martin  

Chief Financial Officer (Principal Financial Officer)

  November 13, 2018
James J. Martin        

 

54
 

 

INDEX TO EXHIBITS

 

The following exhibits are filed as part of, or incorporated by reference into, this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Exhibit No.   Description of Exhibits
3.1   Articles of Incorporation, as amended (Incorporated by Reference from Exhibit 3.1 to Form 8-K filed on April 8, 2008)
     
3.2   Articles of Amendment to Articles of Incorporation (Incorporated by Reference from Exhibit 3.1 to Form 8-K filed on December 3, 2008)
     
3.3   Articles of Amendment to Articles of Incorporation (Incorporated by Reference from Exhibit 3.3 to Form 10-Q filed on March 17, 2010)
     
3.4   By-Laws, as amended (Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on December 15, 2009)
     
3.5   Articles of Amendment to Articles of Incorporation (incorporated by Reference from Annex A to Schedule 14C filed on April 3, 2012).
     
10.1   License Agreement dated as of May 22, 1996 between the Company and SensorMedics Corporation (Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 10-KSB/A filed on April 22, 2008)
     
10.2   Letter of Agreement dated April 21, 1999 between the Company and SensorMedics Corporation (Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to Form 10-KSB/A filed on April 22, 2008)
     
10.3   Agreement Regarding Assignment of Patents and Intellectual Property dated August 14, 2000 between the Company and LifeShirt.com, Inc. (Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.3 to Form 10-KSB/A filed on April 22, 2008)
     
10.4   Amendment to Agreement Regarding Assignment of Patents and Intellectual Property dated December 23, 2000 between the Company and LifeShirt.com, Inc. (Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.4 to Form 10-KSB/A filed on April 22, 2008)
     
10.5   Form of Preferred Stock Purchase Agreements dated as of December 1 and 2, 2008 between the Company and the Investors named therein (Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on December 3, 2008)
     
10.6   Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement dated as of January 29, 2009 between the Company and the Investors named therein (Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on April 8, 2008)
     
10.7   Product Development and Supply Agreement executed September 4, 2007 between Sing Lin Technologies Ltd and the Company (Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 10-QSB/A filed on April 22, 2008) (Confidentiality Treatment has been granted for portions of this Exhibit)
     
10.8   Note and Security Agreement dated as of August 28, 2008 between the Company and various lenders (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on September 12, 2008)
     
10.12   2000 Stock Option Plan (Incorporated by reference from the Company’s Information Statement on Schedule 14C filed on April 5, 2001)(SEC Accession No. 0000950170-01-000484)
     
10.13   Lease Agreement dated January 1, 2008 between the Registrant and Frost Real Estate Holdings, LLC (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.17 to Form 10-K filed on October 29, 2009).

 

55
 

 

10.14   Lease Agreement dated February 1, 2009 between the Registrant and Hialeah Warehouse Holdings, LLC (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.18 to Form 10-K filed on October 29, 2009).
     
10.15   First Amendment to Letter of Agreement, dated as of April 21, 2009 between the Registrant and Cardinal Health 211, Inc. (as successor in interest to SensorMedics Corporation)(incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on June 9, 2009).
     
10.16   Note and Security Agreement dated as of March 31, 2010 between the Company and Frost Gamma Investments Trust and Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P. (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on April 6, 2010).
     
10.17   First Amendment Dated March 14, 2011 Note and Security Agreement dated as of March 31, 2010 between the Company and Frost Gamma Investments Trust and Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P. (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on March 18, 2011).
     
10.18   Second Amendment Dated July 29, 2011 Note and Security Agreement dated as of March 31, 2010 between the Company and Frost Gamma Investments Trust and Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P. (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on August 04, 2011).
     
10.19   Promissory Note Dated September 12, 2011 between the Company and Frost Gamma Investments Trust (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on September 16, 2011).
     
10.20   Promissory Note Dated September 12, 2011 between the Company and Marie Wolf (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to Form 8-K filed on September 16, 2011).
     
10.21   Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P. dated May 30, 2012 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on June 5, 2012).
     
10.22   Third Amendment dated May 30, 2012 to Note and Security Agreement dated as of March 31, 2010 between Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. and Frost Gamma Investment Trust and Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P. (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to Form 8-K filed on June 5, 2012).
     
10.23   2011 Equity Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 10-Q filed on June 14, 2012).
     
10.24   Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Jane Hsiao dated February 22, 2013 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on February 28, 2013).
     
10.25   Form of Stock Purchase Agreements dated as of April 8, 2013 between the Company and the Investors named therein (Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on April 10, 2013).
     
10.26   Fourth Amendment dated April 8, 2013 to Note and Security Agreement dated as of March 31, 2010 between Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. and Frost Gamma Investment Trust and Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P. (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to Form 8-K filed on April 10, 2013).
     
10.27   First Amendment dated July 31, 2013 to Promissory Note dated September 12, 2011 between the Company and Marie Wolf (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on August 6, 2013).
     
10.28   First Amendment dated July 31, 2013 to Promissory Note dated September 12, 2011 between the Company and Frost Gamma Investments Trust (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to Form 8-K filed on August 6, 2013).

 

56
 

 

10.29   First Amendment dated July 31, 2013 to Promissory Note dated May 30, 2012 between the Company and Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P. (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.3 to Form 8-K filed on August 6, 2013).
     
10.30   First Amendment dated July 31, 2013 to Promissory Note dated February 22, 2013 between the Company and Jane Hsiao (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.4 to Form 8-K filed on August 6, 2013).
     
10.31   Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Jane Hsiao, dated September 24, 2014 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed September 26, 2014).
     
10.32   Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Jane Hsiao, dated February 2, 2015 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed February 4, 2015).
     
10.33   Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Frost Gamma Investments Trust, dated April 16, 2015 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed April 20, 2015).
     
10.34   Fifth Amendment dated July 27, 2015 to Note and Security Agreement of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of HSU Gamma Investments, L.P. and Frost Gamma Investments Trust, dated March 31, 2010 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed July 30, 2015).
     
10.35   Second Amendment dated July 27, 2015 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Marie Wolf, dated September 12, 2011(incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to Form 8-K filed July 30, 2015).
     
10.36   Second Amendment dated July 27, 2015 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor or Frost Gamma Investments Trust, dated September 12, 2011 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.3 to Form 8-K filed July 30, 2015
     
10.37   Second Amendment dated July 27, 2015 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P., dated May 30, 2012 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.4 to Form 8-K filed July 30, 2015).
     
10.38   Second Amendment dated July 27, 2015 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Dr. Hsiao, dated February 22, 2013 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.5 to Form 8-K filed July 30, 2015).
     
10.39   First Amendment dated July 27, 2015 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Dr. Hsiao, dated September 24, 2014 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.6 to Form 8-K filed July 30, 2015).
     
10.40   First Amendment dated July 27, 2015 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Dr. Hsiao, dated February 2, 2015 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.7 to Form 8-K filed July 30, 2015).
     
10.41   First Amendment dated July 27, 2015 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Frost Gamma Investments Trust, dated April 16, 2015 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.8 to Form 8-K filed July 30, 2015).
     
10.42   Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Frost Gamma Investments Trust, dated August 12, 2015 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed on August 14, 2015).

 

57
 

 

10.43   Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. Promissory Note in Favor of Frost Gamma Investments Trust dated October 27, 2015 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed October 30, 2015).
     
10.44   Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. Promissory Note in Favor of Jane Hsiao dated October 27, 2015 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to Form 8-K filed October 30, 2015).
     
10.45   Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. Promissory Note in Favor of Frost Gamma Investments Trust dated June 1, 2016 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed June 3, 2016).
     
10.46   Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. Promissory Note in Favor of Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P. dated June 1, 2016 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to Form 8-K filed June 3, 2016).
     
10.47   Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. Promissory Note in Favor of Frost Gamma Investments Trust dated April 6, 2017, 2016 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed April 10, 2017).
     

10.48

  Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. Promissory Note in favor of Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P. dated April 6, 2017 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to Form 8-K filed April 10, 2017).
     

10.49

  Sixth Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Note and Security Agreement of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of HSU Gamma Investments, L.P. and Frost Gamma Investments Trust, dated March 31, 2010 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).
     

10.50

  Third Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Frost Gamma Investments Trust, dated September 12, 2011 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).
     

10.51

 

 

Third Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Marie Wolf, dated September 12, 2011 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.3 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).
     
10.52   Third Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P., dated May 30, 2012 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.4 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).
     
10.53   Third Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Dr. Jane Hsiao, dated February 22, 2013 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.5 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).
     
10.54   Second Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Dr. Jane Hsiao, dated September 24, 2014 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.6 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).
     
10.55   Second Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Dr. Jane Hsiao, dated February 2, 2015 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.7 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).
     
10.56   Second Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Frost Gamma Investments Trust, dated April 16, 2015 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.8 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).
     
10.57   First Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Frost Gamma Investments Trust, dated August 12, 2015 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.9 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).

 

58
 

 

10.58   First Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Frost Gamma Investments Trust, dated October 27, 2015 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.10 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).
     
10.59   First Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Dr. Jane Hsiao, dated October 27, 2015 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.11 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).
     
10.60   First Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Frost Gamma Investments Trust, dated June 1, 2016 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.12 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).
     
10.61   First Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P., dated June 1, 2016 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.13 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).
     
10.62   First Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Frost Gamma Investments Trust, dated April 6, 2017 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.14 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).
     
10.63   First Amendment dated July 20, 2017 to Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Hsu Gamma Investments, L.P., dated April 6, 2017 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.15 to Form 8-K filed July 26, 2017).
     
10.64   Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Frost Gamma Investments Trust dated September 22, 2017 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K filed September 27, 2017).
     
10.65   Promissory Note of Non-Invasive Monitoring Systems, Inc. in favor of Jane Hsiao, dated September 22, 2017 (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to Form 8-K filed September 27, 2017).
     
14.1   Code of Ethics (incorporated by reference from Exhibit 14.1 to Form 10-K filed on October 29, 2009).
     
21.1