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EX-10.7 - EX-10.7 - DOLLAR GENERAL CORPdg-20180202ex107e0777c.htm
EX-10.37 - EX-10.37 - DOLLAR GENERAL CORPdg-20180202ex10377e3ea.htm
EX-10.35 - EX-10.35 - DOLLAR GENERAL CORPdg-20180202ex10352df85.htm
EX-10.19 - EX-10.19 - DOLLAR GENERAL CORPdg-20180202ex1019abdc8.htm
EX-10.15 - EX-10.15 - DOLLAR GENERAL CORPdg-20180202ex10151e192.htm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE

SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended February 2, 2018

 

Commission file number: 001-11421

 

DOLLAR GENERAL CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

TENNESSEE

61-0502302

(State or other jurisdiction of

(I.R.S. Employer

incorporation or organization)

Identification No.)

 

 

100 MISSION RIDGE

GOODLETTSVILLE, TN 37072

(Address of principal executive offices, zip code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (615) 855-4000

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

    

Name of the exchange on which registered

Common Stock, par value $0.875 per share

 

 

New York Stock Exchange

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☒   No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐   No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒   No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ☒   No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b‑2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer ☒

Accelerated filer ☐

Non-accelerated filer ☐

Smaller reporting company ☐

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Emerging growth company ☐

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the Registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐   No ☒

 

The aggregate fair market value of the registrant’s common stock outstanding and held by non-affiliates as of August 4, 2017 was $18.1 billion calculated using the closing market price of our common stock as reported on the NYSE on such date ($74.86). For this purpose, directors, executive officers and greater than 10% record shareholders are considered the affiliates of the registrant.

 

The registrant had 268,741,400 shares of common stock outstanding as of March 16, 2018.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

Certain of the information required in Part III of this Form 10-K is incorporated by reference to the Registrant’s definitive proxy statement to be filed for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on May 30, 2018.

 

 

 

 


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

INTRODUCTION 

 

PART I 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

4

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

9

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

17

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

18

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

19

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

19

 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT

20

 

 

 

PART II 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

23

 

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

24

 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

27

 

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

43

 

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

44

 

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 

44

DOLLAR GENERAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS 

45

DOLLAR GENERAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME 

46

DOLLAR GENERAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME 

47

DOLLAR GENERAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY 

48

DOLLAR GENERAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS 

49

DOLLAR GENERAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

50

 

 

 

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

74

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

74

 

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 

75

 

 

 

 

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

76

 

 

 

PART III 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

78

 

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

78

 

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

79

 

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

79

 

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

79

 

 

 

PART IV 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

80

 

ITEM 16  FORM 10-K SUMMARY

87

 

 

 

SIGNATURES 

88

 

 


 

INTRODUCTION

 

General

 

This report contains references to years 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, and 2013, which represent fiscal years ending or ended February 1, 2019, February 2, 2018, February 3, 2017, January 29, 2016, January 30, 2015, and January 31, 2014, respectively. Our fiscal year ends on the Friday closest to January 31. Our 2016 fiscal year consisted of 53 weeks, while each of the remaining years listed are or were 52-week years. All of the discussion and analysis in this report should be read with, and is qualified in its entirety by, the Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes.

 

Solely for convenience, our trademarks and tradenames may appear in this report without the ® or TM symbol which is not intended to indicate that we will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights or the right to these trademarks and tradenames.

 

Cautionary Disclosure Regarding Forward‑Looking Statements

 

We include “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the federal securities laws throughout this report, particularly under the headings “Business,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and “Note 7 – Commitments and Contingencies,” among others. You can identify these statements because they are not limited to historical fact or they use words such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “can,” “would,” “believe,” “anticipate,” “project,” “plan,” “expect,” “estimate,” “forecast,” “goal,” “seek,” “ensure,” “potential,” “opportunity,” “objective,” “intend,” “predict,” “committed,” “likely to,” “continue,” “scheduled to,” “focused on,” or “subject to” and similar expressions that concern our strategy, plans, initiatives, intentions or beliefs about future occurrences or results. For example, all statements relating to, among others, our estimated and projected expenditures, cash flows, results of operations, financial condition and liquidity; our plans and objectives for, and expectations regarding future operations, economic and competitive market conditions, growth or initiatives including but not limited to the number of planned store openings, remodels and relocations and planned opening dates for new distribution centers, progress of merchandising and other initiatives, trends in sales of consumable and non-consumable products, and the level of future costs and expenses; potential future stock repurchases and cash dividends; anticipated borrowing under our credit facilities and commercial paper program; or the expected outcome or effect of legislative or regulatory changes or initiatives, and our responses thereto, or of pending or threatened litigation or audits are forward-looking statements.

 

All forward-looking statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results to differ materially from those which we expected. Many of these statements are derived from our operating budgets and forecasts, which are based on many detailed assumptions that we believe are reasonable. However, it is very difficult to predict the effect of known factors, and we cannot anticipate all factors that could affect future results.

 

Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the expectations expressed in or implied in our forward-looking statements are disclosed under “Risk Factors” in Part I, Item 1A and elsewhere in this document (including, without limitation, in conjunction with the forward-looking statements themselves and under the heading “Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates”). All forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by these and other cautionary statements that we make from time to time in our other SEC filings and public communications. You should evaluate forward-looking statements in the context of these risks and uncertainties and are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such statements. These factors may not contain all of the factors that are important to you. We cannot assure you that we will realize the results or developments we expect or anticipate or, even if substantially realized, that they will result in the consequences or affect us or our operations in the way we expect. Forward-looking statements in this report are made only as of the date hereof. We undertake no obligation, and specifically disclaim any duty, to update or revise any forward-looking statement as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as otherwise required by law.

3


 

PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

General

 

We are among the largest discount retailers in the United States by number of stores, with 14,609 stores located in 44 states as of March 2, 2018, with the greatest concentration of stores in the southern, southwestern, midwestern and eastern United States. We offer a broad selection of merchandise, including consumables, seasonal items, home products and apparel. Our merchandise includes national brands from leading manufacturers, as well as our own private brand selections with prices at substantial discounts to national brands. We offer our customers these national brand and private brand products at everyday low prices (typically $10 or less) in our convenient small-box locations.

 

Our History

 

J.L. Turner founded our Company in 1939 as J.L. Turner and Son, Wholesale. We were incorporated as a Kentucky corporation under the name J.L. Turner & Son, Inc. in 1955, when we opened our first Dollar General store. We changed our name to Dollar General Corporation in 1968 and reincorporated in 1998 as a Tennessee corporation. Our common stock was publicly traded from 1968 until July 2007, when we merged with an entity controlled by investment funds affiliated with Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. L.P., or KKR. In November 2009 our common stock again became publicly traded, and in December 2013 the entity controlled by investment funds affiliated with KKR sold its remaining shares of our common stock.

 

Our Business Model

 

Our long history of profitable growth is founded on a commitment to a relatively simple business model: providing a broad base of customers with their basic everyday and household needs, supplemented with a variety of general merchandise items, at everyday low prices in conveniently located, small-box stores. We continually evaluate the needs and demands of our customers and modify our merchandise selections and pricing accordingly, while remaining focused on increasing profitability, cash generation and returns for our shareholders.

 

Our long-term operating priorities remain: 1) driving profitable sales growth, 2) capturing growth opportunities, 3) enhancing our position as a low-cost operator, and 4) investing in our people as a competitive advantage.  For more information on these operating priorities, see the “Executive Overview” section of Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, included in Part II, Item 7 of this report.

 

In fiscal year 2017, we achieved our 28th consecutive year of positive same-store sales growth. We believe that this growth, which has taken place in a variety of economic conditions, is a result of our compelling value and convenience proposition, although no assurances can be given that we will achieve positive same-store sales growth in any given year.

 

Compelling Value and Convenience Proposition.  Our ability to deliver highly competitive prices in convenient locations and our easy “in and out” shopping format create a compelling shopping experience that we believe distinguishes us from other discount retailers as well as convenience, drug, grocery, online and mass merchant retailers. Our slogan “Save time. Save money. Every day!” summarizes our appeal to customers. We believe our ability to effectively deliver both value and convenience allows us to succeed in small markets with limited shopping alternatives, as well as in larger and more competitive markets. Our value and convenience proposition is evidenced by the following attributes of our business model:

 

·

Convenient Locations.  Our stores are conveniently located in a variety of rural, suburban and urban communities. We seek to locate our stores in close proximity to our customers, which

4


 

helps drive customer loyalty and trip frequency and makes us an attractive alternative to large discount and other large-box retail and grocery stores.

 

·

Time-Saving Shopping Experience.  We strive to provide customers with a highly convenient, easy to navigate shopping experience. Our small-box stores make it easier to get in and out quickly. Our product offering includes most necessities, such as basic packaged and refrigerated food and dairy products, cleaning supplies, paper products, health and beauty care items, greeting cards and other stationery items, basic apparel, housewares, hardware and automotive supplies, among others. Our convenient hours and broad merchandise offering allow our customers to fulfill their routine shopping requirements and minimize their need to shop elsewhere.

 

·

Everyday Low Prices on Quality Merchandise.  Our research indicates that we offer a price advantage over most food and drug retailers and that our prices are competitive with even the largest discount retailers. Our ability to offer everyday low prices on quality merchandise is supported by our low-cost operating structure and our strategy to maintain a limited number of items per merchandise category, which we believe helps us maintain strong purchasing power. We offer nationally advertised brands at these everyday low prices in addition to offering our own private brands at substantially lower prices.

 

Substantial Growth Opportunities.  We believe we have substantial long-term growth potential in the U.S. We have identified significant opportunities to add new stores in both existing and new markets. In addition, we have opportunities to relocate or remodel locations within our existing store base to better serve our customers. Our attractive store economics, including a relatively low initial investment and simple, low-cost operating model have allowed us to grow our store base to current levels and provide us significant opportunities to continue our profitable store growth strategy.

 

Our Merchandise

 

We offer a focused assortment of everyday necessities, which we believe helps to drive frequent customer visits, and key items in a broad range of general merchandise categories. Our product assortment provides the opportunity for our customers to address most of their basic shopping needs with one trip. We offer a wide selection of nationally advertised brands from leading manufacturers. Additionally, our private brand products offer even greater value with options to purchase products that we believe to be of comparable quality to national brands as well as value items, each at substantial discounts to the national brands.

 

Consumables is our largest merchandise category and has become a larger percentage of our total sales in recent years as indicated in the table below. Consumables include paper and cleaning products (such as paper towels, bath tissue, paper dinnerware, trash and storage bags, laundry and other home cleaning supplies); packaged food (such as cereals, canned soups and vegetables, condiments, spices, sugar and flour); perishables (such as milk, eggs, bread, refrigerated and frozen food, beer and wine); snacks (such as candy, cookies, crackers, salty snacks and carbonated beverages); health and beauty (such as over-the-counter medicines and personal care products including soap, body wash, shampoo, dental hygiene and foot care products); pet (such as pet supplies and pet food); and tobacco products.

 

Seasonal products include decorations, toys, batteries, small electronics, greeting cards, stationery, prepaid phones and accessories, gardening supplies, hardware, automotive and home office supplies.

 

Home products include kitchen supplies, cookware, small appliances, light bulbs, storage containers, frames, candles, craft supplies and kitchen, bed and bath soft goods.

 

Apparel includes casual everyday apparel for infants, toddlers, girls, boys, women and men, as well as socks, underwear, disposable diapers, shoes and accessories.

5


 

 

The percentage of net sales of each of our four categories of merchandise for the fiscal years indicated below was as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

2017

    

2016

    

2015

 

Consumables

 

76.9

%  

76.4

%  

75.9

%

Seasonal

 

12.1

%  

12.2

%  

12.4

%

Home products

 

6.0

%  

6.2

%  

6.3

%

Apparel

 

5.0

%  

5.2

%  

5.4

%

 

Our seasonal and home products categories typically account for the highest gross profit margins, and the consumables category typically accounts for the lowest gross profit margin.

 

The Dollar General Store

 

The typical Dollar General store is operated by a store manager, one or more assistant store managers, and three or more sales associates. Our stores generally feature a low-cost, no frills building with limited maintenance capital, low operating costs, and a focused merchandise offering within a broad range of categories, allowing us to deliver low retail prices while generating strong cash flows and capital investment returns. Our stores average approximately 7,400 square feet of selling space and approximately 75% of our stores are located in towns of 20,000 or fewer people. We generally have had good success in locating suitable store sites in the past, and we believe that there is ample opportunity for new store growth in existing and new markets. In addition, we believe we have significant opportunities available for our relocation and remodel programs.

 

Our store growth over the past three years is summarized in the following table:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

Stores at

    

 

    

 

    

Net

    

 

 

 

 

Beginning

 

Stores

 

Stores

 

Store

 

Stores at

 

Year

 

of Year

 

Opened

 

Closed

 

Increase

 

End of Year

 

2015

 

11,789

 

730

 

36

 

694

 

12,483

 

2016

 

12,483

 

900

 

63

 

837

 

13,320

 

2017

 

13,320

 

1,315

 

101

 

1,214

 

14,534

 

 

Our Customers

 

Our customers seek value and convenience. Depending on their financial situation and geographic proximity, customers’ reliance on Dollar General varies from fill-in shopping, to making periodic trips to stock up on household items, to making weekly or more frequent trips to meet most essential needs. We generally locate our stores and plan our merchandise selections to best serve the needs of our core customers, the low and fixed income households often underserved by other retailers, and we are focused on helping them make the most of their spending dollars. At the same time, however, loyal Dollar General shoppers from a wide range of income brackets and life stages appreciate our quality merchandise as well as our attractive value and convenience proposition.

 

Our Suppliers

 

We purchase merchandise from a wide variety of suppliers and maintain direct buying relationships with many producers of national brand merchandise. Despite our broad offering, we maintain only a limited number of items per category, allowing us to keep our average costs low. Our largest and second largest suppliers each accounted for approximately 8% of our purchases in 2017. Our private brands come from a diversified supplier base. We directly imported approximately 5% of our purchases at cost in 2017.

 

6


 

We have consistently managed to obtain sufficient quantities of core merchandise and believe that, if one or more of our current sources of supply became unavailable, we generally would be able to obtain alternative sources; however, such alternative sources could increase our merchandise costs or reduce the quality of our merchandise, and an inability to obtain alternative sources could adversely affect our sales.

 

Distribution and Transportation

 

Our stores are currently supported by fifteen distribution centers located strategically throughout our geographic footprint. Our sixteenth and seventeenth distribution centers in Longview, Texas and Amsterdam, New York, respectively, are under construction and each is expected to be completed in 2019. We lease additional temporary warehouse space as necessary to support our distribution needs. We continually analyze and rebalance the network to ensure that it remains efficient and provides the service levels our stores require. See “—Properties” below for additional information pertaining to our distribution centers.

 

Most of our merchandise flows through our distribution centers and is delivered to our stores by third-party trucking firms, utilizing our trailers. We also own 79 semi-trailer trucks with which we transport our merchandise. In addition, vendors or third-party distributors ship certain food items and other merchandise directly to our stores.

 

Seasonality

 

Our business is somewhat seasonal. Generally, our most profitable sales mix occurs in the fourth quarter, which includes the Christmas selling season. In addition, our quarterly results can be affected by the timing of certain holidays, the timing of new store openings and store closings, and the amount of sales contributed by new and existing stores. We typically purchase substantial amounts of inventory in the third quarter and incur higher shipping and payroll costs in the third quarter in anticipation of increased sales activity during the fourth quarter. See Note 12 to the consolidated financial statements for additional information.

 

Our Competition

 

We operate in the basic discount consumer goods market, which is highly competitive with respect to price, store location, merchandise quality, assortment and presentation, in-stock consistency, and customer service. We compete with discount stores and with many other retailers, including mass merchandise, warehouse club, grocery, drug, convenience, variety, online, and certain specialty stores. These other retail companies operate stores in many of the areas where we operate, and many of them engage in extensive advertising and marketing efforts. Our direct competitors include Family Dollar, Dollar Tree, Big Lots, Fred’s, 99 Cents Only and various local, independent operators, as well as Walmart, Target, Kroger, Aldi, Lidl, Walgreens, CVS, and RiteAid, among others. Certain of our competitors have greater financial, distribution, marketing and other resources than we do. Competition has intensified and we believe it will continue to do so as competitors move into or increase their presence in our geographic and product markets and increase the availability of mobile, web-based and other digital technology to facilitate a more convenient and competitive customer online and in-store shopping experience.

 

We believe that we differentiate ourselves from other forms of retailing by offering consistently low prices in a convenient, small-store format. We believe that our prices are competitive due in part to our low-cost operating structure and the relatively limited assortment of products offered. Purchasing large volumes of merchandise within our focused assortment in each merchandise category allows us to keep our average costs low, contributing to our ability to offer competitive everyday low prices to our customers. See “—Our Business Model” above for further discussion of our competitive situation.

 

7


 

Our Employees

 

As of March 2, 2018, we employed approximately 129,000 full-time and part-time employees, including divisional and regional managers, district managers, store managers, other store personnel and distribution center and administrative personnel. We have increasingly focused on recruiting, training, motivating and retaining employees, and we believe that the quality, performance and morale of our employees continue to be an important part of our success in recent years. We believe our overall relationship with our employees is good.

 

Our Trademarks

 

We own marks that are registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office and are protected under applicable intellectual property laws, including, without limitation, the trademarks Dollar General®, Dollar General Market®, Clover Valley®, DG®, DG Deals®, DGX®, Forever Pals®, I*Magine®, OT Sport®, OT Revolution®, Smart & Simple®, trueliving®, Sweet Smiles®, Open Trails®, Beauty Cents®, Bobbie Brooks®, Comfort Bay®, Holiday Style®, Swiggles®, More Deals For Your Dollar. Every Day!®, The Fast Way To Save®, Zone Pro®, Operation Storm Force®, Ultimate Caffeine® and Save Time. Save Money. Every Day!®, along with variations and formatives of these trademarks as well as certain other trademarks including Ever Pet™  , DG GO! , Perfect Harvest, In.Out.Save. , and the Good Choices – Smart Prices – Good & Smart stylized logo. We attempt to obtain registration of our trademarks whenever practicable and to pursue vigorously any infringement of those marks. Our trademark registrations have various expiration dates; however, assuming that the trademark registrations are properly renewed, they have a perpetual duration.

 

We also hold an exclusive license to the Rexall brand through March 5, 2020.

 

Available Information

 

Our Internet website address is www.dollargeneral.com. The information on our website is not incorporated by reference into, and is not a part of, this Form 10-K. We file with or furnish to the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports, proxy statements and annual reports to shareholders, and, from time to time, registration statements and other documents. These documents are available free of charge to investors on or through the Investor Information section of our website as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file them with or furnish them to the SEC. In addition, the public may read and copy any of the materials we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington DC 20549. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC maintains an internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers, such as Dollar General, that file electronically with the SEC. The address of that website is http://www.sec.gov.

8


 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

You should carefully consider the risks described below and the other information contained in this report and other filings that we make from time to time with the SEC, including our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. Any of the following risks could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations or liquidity. These risks are not the only risks we face. Our business, financial condition, results of operations or liquidity could also be adversely affected by additional factors that apply to all companies generally or by risks not currently known to us or that we currently view to be immaterial. We can provide no assurance and make no representation that our risk mitigation efforts, although we believe they are reasonable, will be successful.

 

Economic conditions and other economic factors may adversely affect our financial performance and other aspects of our business by negatively impacting our customers’ disposable income or discretionary spending, affecting our ability to plan and execute our strategic initiatives, increasing our costs of goods sold and selling, general and administrative expenses, and adversely affecting our sales or profitability.

 

We believe many of our customers have fixed or low incomes and generally have limited discretionary spending dollars. Any factor that could adversely affect that disposable income would decrease our customers’ confidence, spending, and number of trips to our stores, and could cause our customers to shift their spending to products other than those sold by us or to our less profitable product choices, all of which could result in lower net sales, decreases in inventory turnover, greater markdowns on inventory, a change in the mix of products we sell, and a reduction in profitability due to lower margins. Factors that could reduce our customers’ disposable income and over which we exercise no influence include but are not limited to adverse economic conditions such as increased or sustained high unemployment or underemployment levels, inflation, increases in fuel or other energy costs and interest rates, lack of available credit, consumer debt levels, higher tax rates and other changes in tax laws, uncertainty regarding government mandated participation in health insurance programs, increasing healthcare and housing costs, and decreases in, or elimination of, government subsidies such as unemployment and food assistance programs.

 

Many of the factors identified above that affect disposable income, as well as commodity rates, transportation costs (including the costs of fuel), costs of labor, insurance and healthcare, foreign exchange rate fluctuations, lease costs, measures that create barriers to or increase the costs associated with international trade (including increased import duties or tariffs), or changes in other laws and regulations and other economic factors, also affect our ability to plan and execute our strategic initiatives, our cost of goods sold, our selling, general and administrative expenses, and our real estate costs, and may have other adverse consequences which we are unable to fully anticipate or control, all of which may adversely affect our sales or profitability. We have limited or no ability to control many of these factors.

 

Our plans depend significantly on strategies and initiatives designed to increase sales and profit and improve the efficiencies, costs and effectiveness of our operations, and failure to achieve or sustain these plans could affect our performance adversely.

 

We have short-term and long-term strategies and initiatives (such as those relating to merchandising, marketing, real estate and new store development, digital, sourcing, shrink, private brand, inventory management, distribution and transportation, store operations, store formats, budgeting and expense reduction, and technology) in various stages of testing, evaluation, and implementation, upon which we expect to rely to continue to improve our results of operations and financial condition and to achieve our financial plans. These initiatives are inherently risky and uncertain, even when tested successfully, in their application to our business in general. It is possible that successful testing can result partially from resources and attention that cannot be duplicated in broader implementation, particularly in light of the diverse geographic locations of our stores and the decentralized nature of our field management. General implementation also may be negatively affected by other risk factors described herein. Successful systemwide implementation relies on consistency of training, stability of workforce, ease of execution, and the absence of offsetting factors that can influence results adversely. Failure to achieve successful

9


 

implementation of our initiatives or the cost of these initiatives exceeding management’s estimates could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

The success of our merchandising initiatives, particularly those with respect to non-consumable merchandise and store-specific products and allocations, depends in part upon our ability to predict consistently and successfully the products that our customers will demand and to identify and timely respond to evolving trends in demographic mixes in our markets and consumer preferences, expectations and needs. If we are unable to select products that are attractive to customers, to timely obtain such products at costs that allow us to sell them at an acceptable profit, or to effectively market such products, our sales, market share and profitability could be adversely affected. If our merchandising efforts in the non-consumables area or the higher margin areas within consumables are unsuccessful, we could be further adversely affected by our inability to offset the lower margins associated with our consumables business.

 

If we cannot open, relocate or remodel stores profitably and on schedule, our planned future growth will be impeded, which would adversely affect sales.

 

Our ability to open, relocate and remodel profitable stores is a key component of our planned future growth. Our ability to timely open stores and to expand into additional market areas depends in part on the following factors: the availability of attractive store locations; the absence of entitlement process or occupancy delays; the ability to negotiate acceptable lease and development terms; the ability to hire and train new personnel, especially store managers, in a cost effective manner; the ability to identify customer demand in different geographic areas; general economic conditions; and the availability of capital funding for expansion. Many of these factors also affect our ability to successfully relocate stores, and many of them are beyond our control.

 

Delays or failures in opening new stores or completing relocations or remodels, or achieving lower than expected sales in these projects, could materially adversely affect our growth and/or profitability. We also may not anticipate all of the challenges imposed by the expansion of our operations and, as a result, may not meet our targets for opening new stores, remodeling or relocating stores or expanding profitably. In addition, our construction costs could increase as a result of economic factors discussed above.

 

Some new stores and future new store opportunities may be located in areas, including but not limited to new states or metro urban areas, where we have limited or no meaningful experience or brand recognition. Those areas may have different competitive and market conditions, consumer tastes and discretionary spending patterns than our existing markets, as well as higher cost of entry. These factors may cause our new stores to be initially less successful than stores in our existing markets, which could slow future growth in these areas.

 

Many new stores will be located in areas where we have existing stores. Although we have experience in these areas, increasing the number of locations in these markets may result in inadvertent oversaturation and temporarily or permanently divert customers and sales from our existing stores, thereby adversely affecting our overall financial performance.

 

We face intense competition that could limit our growth opportunities and adversely impact our financial performance.

 

The retail business is highly competitive with respect to price, store location, merchandise quality, product assortment and presentation, in-stock consistency, customer service, promotional activity, customers, market share, and employees. We compete with discount stores and with many other retailers, including mass merchandise, warehouse club, grocery, drug, convenience, variety, online retailers, and certain specialty stores. This competitive environment subjects us to the risk of adverse impact to our financial performance because of the lower prices, and thus the lower margins, that may be required to maintain our competitive position. Also, as a discount retailer, due to customer demographics and other factors, we may have limited ability to increase prices in response to increased costs without losing competitive position. This limitation may adversely affect our margins and financial performance. Certain of our competitors have greater financial, distribution, marketing and other resources than we do and may be able to secure better arrangements with suppliers than we can. If we fail to

10


 

respond effectively to competitive pressures and changes in the retail markets, it could adversely affect our financial performance.

Competition for customers has intensified as competitors have moved into, or increased their presence in, our geographic and product markets and increased the availability of mobile, web-based and other digital technology to facilitate a more convenient and competitive customer online and in-store shopping experience. We expect this competition to continue to increase. We remain vulnerable to the marketing power and high level of consumer recognition of larger competitors and to the risk that these competitors or others could venture into our industry in a significant way, including through the introduction of new store formats. Further, consolidation within the retail industry could significantly alter the competitive dynamics of the retail marketplace. This consolidation may result in competitors with greatly improved financial resources, improved access to merchandise, greater market penetration and other improvements in their competitive positions, as well as result in the provision of a wider variety of products and services at competitive prices by these consolidated companies, which could adversely affect our financial performance.

 

Our profitability may be negatively affected by inventory shrinkage.

 

We are subject to the risk of inventory loss and theft. We experience significant inventory shrinkage and cannot be sure that incidences of inventory loss and theft will decrease in the future or that the measures we are taking will effectively reduce the problem of inventory shrinkage. Although some level of inventory shrinkage is an unavoidable cost of doing business, if we were to experience higher rates of inventory shrinkage or incur increased security or other costs to combat inventory theft, our results of operations and financial condition could be affected adversely.

 

Our cash flows from operations may be negatively affected if we are not successful in managing our inventory balances.

 

Our inventory balance represented approximately 52% of our total assets exclusive of goodwill and other intangible assets as of February 2, 2018. Efficient inventory management is a key component of our business success and profitability. To be successful, we must maintain sufficient inventory levels and an appropriate product mix to meet our customers’ demands without allowing those levels to increase to such an extent that the costs to store and hold the goods unduly impacts our financial results or that subjects us to the risk of increased inventory shrinkage. If our buying decisions do not accurately predict customer trends, we inappropriately price products or our expectations about customer spending levels are inaccurate, we may have to take unanticipated markdowns to dispose of the excess inventory, which also can adversely impact our financial results. We continue to focus on ways to reduce these risks, but we cannot make assurances that we will be successful in our inventory management. If we are not successful in managing our inventory balances, our cash flows from operations may be negatively affected.

 

Any failure to maintain the security of information we hold relating to proprietary business information or our customers, employees and vendors, whether as a result of cybersecurity attacks or otherwise, could expose us to litigation, government enforcement actions and costly response measures, and could materially disrupt our operations and harm our reputation and sales.

 

In connection with sales, we transmit confidential credit and debit card information. We also have access to, collect or maintain certain private or confidential information regarding our customers, employees and vendors, as well as our business. Some of this information is stored digitally in connection with our e-commerce website and our mobile applications, some of which may leverage third-party service providers. Additionally, under certain circumstances, we may share information with vendors that assist us in conducting our business (for example, third-party service providers assist us in the transmittal of credit and debit card information in connection with sales), as required by law, or otherwise in accordance with our privacy policy. While we have implemented procedures and technology intended to protect and safeguard our information and require appropriate controls of our service providers, it is possible that cyberattackers might compromise our security measures or those of our technology and other vendors or service providers in the future and obtain the personal information of our customers, employees and vendors that we hold or our business information, as cyberattacks

11


 

are rapidly evolving and those threats and the means for obtaining access to information in digital and other storage media are becoming increasingly sophisticated and may not immediately produce signs of intrusion. Moreover, employee error or malfeasance or other irregularities may result in a defeat of our or our third-party vendors’ security measures and breach our or our third-party vendors’ information systems. If customer passwords are obtained through unrelated third-party breaches, cyberattackers also could gain access to our customers’ accounts.

 

Because we accept debit and credit cards for payment, we are subject to industry data protection standards and protocols, such as the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards (“PCI DSS”), issued by the Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council. Additionally, we have implemented technology in our stores to allow for the acceptance of Europay, Mastercard and Visa (EMV) credit transactions and point-to-point encryption. Complying with PCI DSS standards and implementing related procedures, technology and information security measures require significant resources and ongoing attention. However, even as we comply with PCI DSS standards and offer EMV and point-to-point encryption technology in our stores, we may be vulnerable to, and unable to detect and appropriately respond to, data security breaches and data loss, including cybersecurity attacks or other breach of cardholder data.

 

A security breach of any kind (whether experienced by us or one of our vendors), which could be undetected for a period of time, or any failure by us to comply with the applicable privacy and information security laws, regulations and standards could expose us to risks of data loss, litigation, government enforcement actions, fines or penalties, credit card brand assessments, and costly response measures (including, for example, providing notification to, and credit monitoring services for, affected customers, as well as further upgrades to our security measures) which may not be covered by or may exceed the coverage limits of our insurance policies, and could materially disrupt our operations. Any resulting negative media attention and publicity could significantly harm our reputation which could cause us to lose market share as a result of customers discontinuing the use of debit or credit cards in our stores or not shopping in our stores altogether and could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial performance.

 

A significant disruption to our distribution network, to the capacity of our distribution centers or to the timely receipt of inventory could adversely impact sales or increase our transportation costs, which would decrease our profits.

 

We rely on our distribution and transportation network to provide goods to our stores in a timely and cost‑effective manner. Using various modes of transportation, including ocean, rail, and truck, we and our vendors move goods from vendor locations to our distribution centers. Deliveries to our stores occur from our distribution centers or directly from our vendors. Any disruption, unanticipated or unusual expense or operational failure related to this process could affect store operations negatively. For example, delivery delays or increases in transportation costs (including through increased fuel costs, increased carrier rates or driver wages as a result of driver shortages, a decrease in transportation capacity for overseas shipments, or work stoppages or slowdowns) could significantly decrease our ability to make sales and earn profits. Labor shortages or work stoppages in the transportation industry or long-term disruptions to the national and international transportation infrastructure that lead to delays or interruptions of deliveries or which would necessitate our securing alternative labor or shipping suppliers could also increase our costs or otherwise negatively affect our business.

 

We maintain a network of distribution facilities and are moving forward with plans to build new facilities to support our growth objectives. Delays in opening distribution centers could adversely affect our future financial performance by slowing store growth, which may in turn reduce revenue growth, or by increasing transportation costs. In addition, distribution-related construction or expansion projects entail risks that could cause delays and cost overruns, such as: shortages of materials or skilled labor; work stoppages; unforeseen construction, scheduling, engineering, environmental or geological problems; weather interference; fires or other casualty losses; and unanticipated cost increases. For these reasons, the completion date and ultimate cost of these projects could differ significantly from initial expectations, and we cannot guarantee that any project will be completed on time or within established budgets.

 

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Risks associated with or faced by our suppliers could adversely affect our financial performance.

 

The products we sell are sourced from a wide variety of domestic and international suppliers, and we are dependent on our vendors to supply merchandise in a timely and efficient manner. In 2017, our largest and second largest suppliers each accounted for approximately 8% of our purchases. We have not experienced any difficulty in obtaining sufficient quantities of core merchandise and believe that, if one or more of our current sources of supply became unavailable, we would generally be able to obtain alternative sources. However, such alternative sources could increase our merchandise costs, result in a temporary reduction in store inventory levels, and reduce the quality of our merchandise, and an inability to obtain alternative sources could adversely affect our sales. Additionally, if a supplier fails to deliver on its commitments, whether due to financial difficulties or other reasons, we could experience merchandise out‑of‑stocks that could lead to lost sales and damage to our reputation.

 

We directly imported approximately 5% of our purchases (measured at cost) in 2017, but many of our domestic vendors directly import their products or components of their products. Changes to the prices and flow of these goods for any reason, such as political unrest or acts of war, currency fluctuations, disruptions in maritime lanes, port labor disputes, and economic conditions and instability in the countries in which foreign suppliers are located, the financial instability of suppliers, suppliers’ failure to meet our standards, issues with labor practices of our suppliers or labor problems they may experience (such as strikes, stoppages or slowdowns, which could also increase labor costs during and following the disruption), the availability and cost of raw materials to suppliers, increased import duties, merchandise quality or safety issues, transport availability and cost, increases in wage rates and taxes, transport security, inflation, and other factors relating to the suppliers and the countries in which they are located or from which they import, are beyond our control and could adversely affect our operations and profitability. While we are working to diversify our sources of imported goods and reduce the percentage of goods imported from China, a substantial amount of our imported merchandise still comes from China, and thus, a change in the Chinese leadership, economic and market conditions, internal economic stimulus actions, or currency or other policies, as well as increases in costs of labor and wage taxes, could negatively impact our merchandise costs. In addition, the United States’ foreign trade policies, duties, tariffs and other impositions on imported goods, trade sanctions imposed on certain countries, the limitation on the importation of certain types of goods or of goods containing certain materials from other countries and other factors relating to foreign trade and port labor agreements are beyond our control. These and other factors affecting our suppliers and our access to products could adversely affect our business and financial performance. As we increase our imports of merchandise from foreign vendors, the risks associated with these imports also will increase, and we may be exposed to additional or different risks as we increase imports of goods produced in countries other than China.

 

Product liability, product recall or other product safety or labeling claims could adversely affect our business, reputation and financial performance.

 

All of our vendors and their products must comply with applicable product safety laws and regulations (including those relating to product labeling), and we are dependent on them to ensure that the products we buy comply with all applicable safety and labeling standards.  However, product liability, personal injury or other claims may be asserted against us relating to product contamination, product tampering, product expiration, mislabeling, recall and other safety or labeling issues with respect to the products that we sell.

 

We seek but may not be successful in obtaining contractual indemnification and insurance coverage from our vendors. If we do not have adequate contractual indemnification or insurance available, such claims could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Our ability to obtain indemnification from foreign vendors may be hindered by our ability to obtain jurisdiction over such vendors to enforce contractual indemnification obligations. Even with adequate insurance and indemnification, such claims could significantly damage our reputation and consumer confidence in our products. Our litigation expenses could increase as well, which also could have a materially negative impact on our results of operations even if a product liability claim is unsuccessful or is not fully pursued.

 

13


 

Our private brands may not be successful in improving our gross profit rate and may increase certain of the risks we face.

 

The sale of private brand items is an important component of our sales growth and gross profit rate enhancement plans. We have invested in our development and procurement resources and marketing efforts relating to these private brand offerings. We believe that our success in maintaining broad market acceptance of our private brands depends on many factors, including pricing, our costs, quality, customer perception and the timely development and introduction of new products. We may not achieve or maintain our expected sales for our private brands. The sale and expansion of our private brand offerings also subjects us to certain risks, such as: potential product liability risks and mandatory or voluntary product recalls; potential supply chain and distribution chain disruptions for raw materials and finished products; our ability to successfully protect our proprietary rights and successfully navigate and avoid claims related to the proprietary rights of third parties; our ability to successfully administer and comply with applicable contractual obligations and legal and regulatory requirements; and other risks generally encountered by entities that source, sell and market exclusive branded offerings for retail. An increase in sales of our private brands may also adversely affect sales of our vendors’ products, which, in turn, could adversely affect our relationship with certain of our vendors. Any failure to appropriately address some or all of these risks could have a significant adverse effect on our private brand initiatives and on our reputation, business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

We are subject to governmental regulations, procedures and requirements. A significant change in, or noncompliance with, these regulations could have a material adverse effect on our financial performance.

 

Our business is subject to numerous and frequently changing federal, state and local laws and regulations. We routinely incur significant costs in complying with these regulations. The complexity of the regulatory environment in which we operate and the related cost of compliance are increasing due to additional legal and regulatory requirements, our expanding operations, and increased enforcement efforts. Further, uncertainties exist regarding the future application of certain of these legal requirements to our business. New laws, regulations, policies and the related interpretations and enforcement practices, particularly those dealing with environmental compliance, product safety or labeling, food safety, information security and privacy, and labor and employment, among others, or changes in existing laws, regulations, policies and the related interpretations and enforcement practices, particularly those governing the sale of products or employee wages, may result in significant added expenses or may require extensive system and operating changes that may be difficult to implement and/or could materially increase our cost of doing business. Untimely compliance or noncompliance with applicable regulations or untimely or incomplete execution of a required product recall, can result in the imposition of penalties (including loss of licenses, eligibility to accept certain government benefits such as SNAP or significant fines or monetary penalties), class action litigation or other litigation, in addition to reputational damage. Additionally, changes in tax laws, the interpretation of existing laws, or our failure to sustain our reporting positions on examination could adversely affect our overall effective tax rate.

 

Litigation may adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Our business is subject to the risk of litigation by employees, consumers, suppliers, competitors, shareholders, government agencies and others through private actions, class actions, administrative proceedings, regulatory actions or other litigation. The outcome of litigation, particularly class action lawsuits and regulatory actions, is difficult to assess or quantify. Plaintiffs in these types of lawsuits may seek recovery of very large or indeterminate amounts, and the magnitude of the potential loss relating to these lawsuits may remain unknown for substantial periods of time. In addition, certain of these lawsuits, if decided adversely to us or settled by us, may result in liability material to our financial statements as a whole or may negatively affect our operating results if changes to our business operations are required. The cost to defend future litigation may be significant. There also may be adverse publicity associated with litigation that could negatively affect customer perception of our business, regardless of whether the allegations are valid or whether we are ultimately found liable. As a result, litigation may adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. See Note 7 to the consolidated financial statements for further details regarding certain of these pending matters.

 

14


 

Our current insurance program may expose us to unexpected costs and negatively affect our financial performance.

 

Our insurance coverage reflects deductibles, self-insured retentions, limits of liability and similar provisions that we believe are prudent based on the dispersion of our operations. However, there are types of losses we may incur but against which we cannot be insured or which we believe are not economically reasonable to insure, such as losses due to acts of war, employee and certain other crime, certain wage and hour and other employment-related claims, including class actions, actions based on certain consumer protection laws, and some natural and other disasters or similar events. If we incur these losses and they are material, our business could suffer. Certain material events may result in sizable losses for the insurance industry and adversely impact the availability of adequate insurance coverage or result in excessive premium increases. To offset negative insurance market trends, we may elect to self-insure, accept higher deductibles or reduce the amount of coverage in response to these market changes. In addition, we self-insure a significant portion of expected losses under our workers’ compensation, automobile liability, general liability (including claims made against certain of our landlords) and group health insurance programs. Unanticipated changes in any applicable actuarial assumptions and management estimates underlying our recorded liabilities for these losses, including expected increases in medical and indemnity costs, could result in materially different expenses than expected under these programs, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. Although we continue to maintain property insurance for catastrophic events at our store support center and distribution centers, we are effectively self-insured for other property losses. If we experience a greater number of these losses than we anticipate, our financial performance could be adversely affected.

 

Natural disasters and unusual weather conditions (whether or not caused by climate change), pandemic outbreaks, terrorist acts, and global political events could disrupt business and result in lower sales and otherwise adversely affect our financial performance.

 

The occurrence of one or more natural disasters, such as hurricanes, fires, floods, tornadoes and earthquakes, unusual weather conditions, pandemic outbreaks, terrorist acts or disruptive global political events, such as civil unrest in countries in which our suppliers are located, or similar disruptions could adversely affect our business and financial performance. Uncharacteristic or significant weather conditions can affect consumer shopping patterns, which could lead to lost sales or greater than expected markdowns and adversely affect our short-term results of operations. To the extent these events result in the closure of one or more of our distribution centers, a significant number of stores, or our corporate headquarters or impact one or more of our key suppliers, our operations and financial performance could be materially adversely affected through an inability to make deliveries or provide other support functions to our stores and through lost sales. In addition, these events could result in increases in fuel (or other energy) prices or a fuel shortage, delays in opening new stores, the temporary lack of an adequate work force in a market, the temporary or long-term disruption in the supply of products from some domestic and overseas suppliers, the temporary disruption in the transport of goods from overseas, delay or increased transportation costs in the delivery of goods to our distribution centers or stores, the inability of customers to reach or have transportation to our stores directly affected by such events, the temporary reduction in the availability of products in our stores and disruption of our utility services or to our information systems. These events also can have indirect consequences such as increases in the costs of insurance if they result in significant loss of property or other insurable damage.

 

Material damage or interruptions to our information systems as a result of external factors, staffing shortages or challenges or difficulties in maintaining or updating our existing technology or developing or implementing new technology could have a material adverse effect on our business or results of operations.

 

We depend on a variety of information technology systems for the efficient functioning of our business, including, without limitation the processing of transactions and the management of our employees, facilities, logistics, inventories, stores and customer-facing digital operations. We are continually improving our information processes and computer systems to better run our business. These technology initiatives may not deliver desired results or may do so on a delayed schedule. Additionally, such systems are subject to damage or interruption from power outages, facility damage, computer and telecommunications failures, computer viruses, cybersecurity breaches, cyber attacks (including malicious codes, worms, phishing and denial of service attacks, and

15


 

ransomware), software upgrade failures or code defects, natural disasters and human error. Damage or interruption to, or defects of design related to, these systems may require a significant investment to fix or replace them, and we may suffer interruptions or disruptions in our operations in the interim, may experience loss or corruption of critical data and may receive negative publicity, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business or results of operations.

 

We also rely heavily on our information technology staff. Failure to meet these staffing needs may negatively affect our ability to fulfill our technology initiatives while continuing to provide maintenance on existing systems. We rely on certain vendors and service providers to maintain and periodically upgrade many of these systems so that they can continue to support our business. The software programs supporting many of our systems were licensed to us by independent software developers. The inability of these vendors, developers or us to continue to maintain and upgrade these information systems and software programs might disrupt or reduce the efficiency of our operations if we were unable to convert to alternate systems in an efficient and timely manner and could expose us to greater risk of a cybersecurity breach or other cyber attack. In addition, costs and potential problems and interruptions associated with the implementation of new or upgraded systems and technology or with maintenance or adequate support of existing systems could also disrupt or reduce the efficiency of our operations.

 

Failure to attract, train and retain qualified employees while controlling labor costs, as well as other labor issues, could adversely affect our financial performance.

 

Our future growth and performance, positive customer experience and regulatory compliance depends on our ability to attract, train, retain and motivate qualified employees, many of whom are in positions with historically high rates of turnover. Our ability to meet our labor needs, while controlling our labor costs, is subject to many external factors, including competition for and availability of qualified personnel in a given market, unemployment levels within those markets, wage rates within particular markets, minimum wage laws, health and other insurance costs, changes in employment and labor laws (including changes in the process for our employees to join a union) or other workplace regulations (including changes in employee benefit programs such as health insurance and paid leave programs), employee activism, and our reputation and relevance within the labor market. If we are unable to attract and retain adequate numbers of qualified employees, our operations, customer service levels and support functions could suffer. In addition, to the extent a significant portion of our employee base unionizes, or attempts to unionize, our labor costs could increase. Our ability to pass along labor costs to our customers is constrained by our everyday low price model, and we may not be able to offset such increased costs elsewhere in our business.

 

Our success depends on our executive officers and other key personnel. If we lose key personnel or are unable to hire additional qualified personnel, our business may be harmed.

 

Our future success depends to a significant degree on the skills, experience and efforts of our executive officers and other key personnel. The unexpected loss of the services of any of our executive officers could have an adverse effect on our operations. There can be no assurance that our executive succession planning, retention or hiring efforts will be successful. Competition for skilled and experienced management personnel is intense, and our future success will also depend on our ability to attract and retain qualified personnel, and a failure to attract and retain new qualified personnel could have an adverse effect on our operations.

 

Because our business is somewhat seasonal, adverse events during the fourth quarter could materially affect our financial statements as a whole.

 

Primarily because of sales of Christmas-related merchandise, our most profitable sales mix generally occurs in the fourth quarter.  In anticipation of this holiday, we purchase substantial amounts of seasonal inventory. Adverse events, such as deteriorating economic conditions, high unemployment rates, high gas prices, public transportation disruptions, or unusual or unanticipated adverse weather could result in lower-than-planned sales during the Christmas selling season, which in turn could reduce our operating profit. Additionally, an excess of seasonal merchandise inventory could result if our net sales during the Christmas selling season fall below

16


 

seasonal norms or expectations, which could adversely affect our financial performance and operating results as a result of unanticipated markdowns.

 

Deterioration in market conditions or changes in our credit profile could adversely affect our business operations and financial condition.

 

We rely on the positive cash flow we generate from our operating activities and our access to the credit and capital markets to fund our operations, growth strategy, and return of cash to our shareholders through share repurchases and dividends. Changes in the credit and capital markets, including market disruptions, limited liquidity and interest rate fluctuations, may increase the cost of financing or restrict our access to these potential sources of future liquidity. Our continued access to these liquidity sources on favorable terms depends on multiple factors, including our operating performance and our credit ratings. Our debt securities currently have an investment grade rating, and a downgrade of this rating likely would negatively impact our access to the debt capital markets and increase our cost of borrowing. As a result, any disruptions or turmoil in the debt markets or any downgrade of our credit ratings could adversely affect our business operations and financial condition and our ability to return cash to our shareholders. There can be no assurances that our ability to obtain additional financing through the debt markets will not be adversely impacted by economic conditions or that we will be able to maintain or improve our current credit ratings.

 

New accounting guidance or changes in the interpretation or application of existing accounting guidance could adversely affect our financial performance.

 

The implementation of new accounting standards could require certain systems, internal process and other changes that could increase our operating costs, and also will result in changes to our financial statements. In particular, the implementation of accounting standards related to leases, as issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) are requiring us to make significant changes to our lease management and other accounting systems, and will result in a material impact to our consolidated financial statements. Additionally, the FASB has issued accounting standards related to intra-entity transfers that will result in changes to our financial statements.

 

U.S. generally accepted accounting principles and related accounting pronouncements, implementation guidelines and interpretations with regard to a wide range of matters that are relevant to our business involve many subjective assumptions, estimates and judgments by our management. Changes in these rules or their interpretation or changes in underlying assumptions, estimates or judgments by our management could significantly change our reported or expected financial performance. The outcome of such changes could include litigation or regulatory actions which could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None.

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ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

As of March 2, 2018, we operated 14,609 retail stores located in 44 states as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

State

    

Number of Stores

                

State

    

Number of Stores

 

Alabama

 

720

 

Nebraska

 

120

 

Arizona

 

109

 

Nevada

 

22

 

Arkansas

 

414

 

New Hampshire

 

30

 

California

 

202

 

New Jersey

 

121

 

Colorado

 

42

 

New Mexico

 

97

 

Connecticut

 

47

 

New York

 

439

 

Delaware

 

44

 

North Carolina

 

787

 

Florida

 

825

 

North Dakota

 

15

 

Georgia

 

827

 

Ohio

 

755

 

Illinois

 

521

 

Oklahoma

 

429

 

Indiana

 

494

 

Oregon

 

38

 

Iowa

 

224

 

Pennsylvania

 

675

 

Kansas

 

230

 

Rhode Island

 

13

 

Kentucky

 

500

 

South Carolina

 

518

 

Louisiana

 

536

 

South Dakota

 

47

 

Maine

 

46

 

Tennessee

 

733

 

Maryland

 

136

 

Texas

 

1,413

 

Massachusetts

 

41

 

Utah

 

11

 

Michigan

 

468

 

Vermont

 

35

 

Minnesota

 

119

 

Virginia

 

395

 

Mississippi

 

483

 

West Virginia

 

234

 

Missouri

 

501

 

Wisconsin

 

153

 

 

Most of our stores are located in leased premises. Individual store leases vary as to their terms, rental provisions and expiration dates. Many stores are subject to build-to-suit arrangements with landlords, which typically carry a primary lease term of up to 15 years with multiple renewal options. We also have stores subject to shorter-term leases and many of these leases have renewal options. A significant portion of our new stores are subject to build-to-suit arrangements.

 

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As of March 2, 2018, we operated fifteen distribution centers, as described in the following table:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

Year

    

Approximate Square

    

Number of

 

Location

 

Opened

 

Footage

 

Stores Served

 

Scottsville, KY

 

1959

 

720,000

 

 695

 

Ardmore, OK

 

1994

 

1,310,000

 

1,242

 

South Boston, VA

 

1997

 

1,250,000

 

 1,055

 

Indianola, MS

 

1998

 

820,000

 

787

 

Fulton, MO

 

1999

 

1,150,000

 

1,204

 

Alachua, FL

 

2000

 

980,000

 

 977

 

Zanesville, OH

 

2001

 

1,170,000

 

1,223

 

Jonesville, SC

 

2005

 

1,120,000

 

1,085

 

Marion, IN

 

2006

 

1,110,000

 

1,191

 

Bessemer, AL

 

2012

 

940,000

 

1,137

 

Lebec, CA

 

2012

 

600,000

 

 385

 

Bethel, PA

 

2014

 

1,000,000

 

 1,004

 

San Antonio, TX

 

2016

 

920,000

 

 993

 

Janesville, WI

 

2016

 

1,000,000

 

895

 

Jackson, GA

 

2017

 

1,000,000

 

736

 

 

We lease the distribution centers located in California, Oklahoma, Mississippi and Missouri and own the remaining distribution centers in the table above. Approximately 7.25 acres of the land on which our Kentucky distribution center is located is subject to a ground lease. As of February 2, 2018, we leased approximately 1,082,000 square feet of additional temporary warehouse space to support our distribution needs.

 

Our executive offices are located in approximately 302,000 square feet of owned buildings and approximately 42,000 square feet of leased office space in Goodlettsville, Tennessee.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

The information contained in Note 7 to the consolidated financial statements under the heading “Legal proceedings” contained in Part II, Item 8 of this report is incorporated herein by this reference.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

None.

 

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EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT

 

Information regarding our current executive officers as of March 23, 2018 is set forth below. Each of our executive officers serves at the discretion of our Board of Directors and is elected annually by the Board to serve until a successor is duly elected. There are no familial relationships between any of our directors or executive officers.

 

Name

    

Age

    

Position

Todd J. Vasos

 

56

 

Chief Executive Officer and Director

John W. Garratt

 

49

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Jeffery C. Owen

 

48

 

Executive Vice President, Store Operations

Robert D. Ravener

 

59

 

Executive Vice President and Chief People Officer

Jason S. Reiser

 

49

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Merchandising Officer

Rhonda M. Taylor

 

50

 

Executive Vice President and General Counsel

Carman R. Wenkoff

 

50

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer

Anita C. Elliott

 

53

 

Senior Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer

Michael J. Kindy

 

52

 

Senior Vice President, Global Supply Chain

 

Mr. Vasos has served as Chief Executive Officer and a member of our Board since June 2015.  He joined Dollar General in December 2008 as Executive Vice President, Division President and Chief Merchandising Officer. He was promoted to Chief Operating Officer in November 2013.  Prior to joining Dollar General, Mr. Vasos served in executive positions with Longs Drug Stores Corporation for seven years, including Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer (February 2008 through November 2008) and Senior Vice President and Chief Merchandising Officer (2001 –  2008), where he was responsible for all pharmacy and front-end marketing, merchandising, procurement, supply chain, advertising, store development, store layout and space allocation, and the operation of three distribution centers. He also previously served in leadership positions at Phar-Mor Food and Drug Inc. and Eckerd Corporation.

 

Mr. Garratt has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since December 2015.   He joined Dollar General in October 2014 as Senior Vice President, Finance & Strategy and subsequently served as Interim Chief Financial Officer from July 2015 to December 2015.  Prior to joining Dollar General, Mr. Garratt held various positions of increasing responsibility with Yum! Brands, Inc., one of the world’s largest restaurant companies, between May 2004 and October 2014, holding leadership positions in corporate strategy and financial planning.  He served as Vice President, Finance and Division Controller for the KFC division and earlier for the Pizza Hut division and for Yum Restaurants International between October 2013 and October 2014.  He also served as the Senior Director, Yum Corporate Strategy, from March 2010 to October 2013, reporting directly to the corporate Chief Financial Officer and leading corporate strategy as well as driving key cross-divisional initiatives.  Mr. Garratt served in various other financial positions at Yum from May 2004 to March 2010.  He served as Plant Controller for Alcoa Inc. between April 2002 and May 2004, and held various financial management positions at General Electric from March 1999 to April 2002.  He began his career in May 1990 at Alcoa, where he served for approximately nine years.

 

Mr. Owen returned to Dollar General in June 2015 as Executive Vice President of Store Operations, with over 21 years of previous employment experience with the Company.  Prior to his departure from Dollar General in July 2014, he was Senior Vice President, Store Operations.  Prior to August 2011, Mr. Owen served as Vice President, Division Manager.  From November 2006 to March 2007, he served as Retail Division Manager.  Prior to November 2006, he was Senior Director, Operations Process Improvement.  Mr. Owen served the Company in various operations roles of increasing importance and responsibility from December 1992 to September 2004.  Mr. Owen has served as a director of Kirkland’s Inc. since March 2015.

 

Mr. Ravener joined Dollar General as Senior Vice President and Chief People Officer in August 2008. He was promoted to Executive Vice President in March 2010.  Prior to joining Dollar General, he served in

20


 

human resources executive roles with Starbucks Corporation, a roaster, marketer and retailer of specialty coffee, from September 2005 until August 2008 as the Senior Vice President of U.S. Partner Resources and, prior to that, as the Vice President, Partner Resources—Eastern Division. As the Senior Vice President of U.S. Partner Resources at Starbucks, Mr. Ravener oversaw all aspects of human resources activity for more than 10,000 stores. Prior to serving at Starbucks, Mr. Ravener held Vice President of Human Resources roles for The Home Depot Inc., a home improvement retailer, at its Store Support Center and a domestic field division from April 2003 to September 2005. Mr. Ravener also served in executive roles in both human resources and operations at Footstar, Inc. and roles of increasing leadership at PepsiCo, Inc.

 

Mr. Reiser has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Merchandising Officer since July 12, 2017.  Prior thereto, he served as the Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Vitamin Shoppe, Inc., a multi-channel specialty retailer and contract manufacturer of vitamins, minerals, herbs, specialty supplements, sports nutrition and other health and wellness products, from July 2016 to June 2017, where he was responsible for leading merchandising, operations, end-to-end supply chain, information technology, real estate and construction, planning, pricing and merchandising operations. He also previously served as Executive Vice President, Chief Merchandising Officer from January 2014 to June 2016 and as Senior Vice President, Hardlines Merchandising from July 2013 to January 2014, for Dollar Tree, Inc. (successor to Family Dollar Stores, Inc.). Prior to his employment with Family Dollar, Mr. Reiser was employed by Walmart Stores, Inc. for 17 years in a variety of roles, including Vice President, Merchandising, Health & Family Care of Sam’s Club from November 2010 to June 2013; Vice President, Operations & Compliance, Health & Wellness of Sam’s Club from May 2010 to November 2010; Divisional Merchandise Manager, Wellness, from May 2009 to May 2010; Senior Buyer Pharmacy/OTC of Sam’s Club from November 2006 to May 2009; Director, Government Relations and Regulatory Affairs from August 2002 to November 2006; Pharmacy District Manager from August 2000 to August 2002; and Pharmacy Manager from October 1995 to August 2000.

 

Ms. Taylor has served as Executive Vice President and General Counsel since March 2015.  She joined Dollar General as an Employment Attorney in March 2000 and was subsequently promoted to Senior Employment Attorney in 2001, Deputy General Counsel in 2004, Vice President and Assistant General Counsel in March 2010, and Senior Vice President and General Counsel in June 2013.  Prior to joining Dollar General, she practiced law with Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C., where she specialized in labor law and employment litigation.  She has also held attorney positions with Ford & Harrison LLP and Stokes Bartholomew.

 

Mr. Wenkoff has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer since July 10, 2017.  Prior thereto, he served as the Chief Information Officer (May 2012 – June 2017) and Chief Digital Officer (June 2016 – June 2017) of Franchise World Headquarters, LLC (“Subway”), where he was responsible for global technology and digital strategy, execution and operations for the Subway brand and all of its restaurants. He also owned a Subway franchise in Southport, Connecticut from July 2015 until October 2017. Prior to joining Subway, he served as the Chairman of the Board and Co-President of Retail Gift Card Association, a member organization of diverse, closed loop gift card retailers committed to promoting and protecting the use of gift cards, from February 2008 to May 2012. He also served as the Deputy Chief Information Officer for Independent Purchase Cooperative, Inc., an independent Subway franchisee-owned and operated purchasing and services cooperative, from May 2005 to May 2012, and as President of its subsidiary, Value Pay Services LLC, from May 2005 to February 2011.  He was the founder and President of Stored Value Management, Inc., an independently owned program and consulting company, from January 2004 to May 2005 and the Vice President, Operations and Finance, as well as General Counsel of Ontain Corporation, a technology company focused on providing turn-key retail merchant solutions, from January 2000 to December 2004.  Mr. Wenkoff began his career in 1993 as an articled student, and then attorney with Douglas Symes & Brissenden and served in various legal positions, including General Counsel, with Pivotal Corporation from 1997 to 2000.

 

Ms. Elliott has served as Senior Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer since December 2015.  She joined Dollar General as Senior Vice President and Controller in August 2005. Prior to joining Dollar General, she served as Vice President and Controller of Big Lots, Inc., a closeout retailer, from May 2001 to August 2005, where she was responsible for accounting operations, financial reporting and internal audit. Prior to serving at Big

21


 

Lots, she served as Vice President and Controller for Jitney-Jungle Stores of America, Inc., a grocery retailer, from April 1998 to March 2001. At Jitney-Jungle, Ms. Elliott was responsible for the accounting operations and the internal and external financial reporting functions. Prior to serving at Jitney-Jungle, she practiced public accounting for 12 years, 6 of which were with Ernst & Young LLP.

 

Mr. Kindy joined Dollar General as Vice President, Distribution Centers in December 2008. He became Vice President, Transportation in May 2013 and was promoted to Senior Vice President, Global Supply Chain in June 2015. Prior to joining Dollar General, Mr. Kindy had 14 years of grocery distribution management and 5 years of logistics and distribution consulting experience. He served as Senior Director, Warehouse Operations, for ConAgra Foods, one of North America’s largest packaged food companies, from November 2007 to December 2008.  Since beginning his career in July 1989, Mr. Kindy also held various distribution and warehouse leadership positions at Safeway, Inc., Crum & Crum Logistics, and Specialized Distribution Management, Inc., and served as a principal consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers.

 

 

 

22


 

PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “DG.” The high and low sales prices during each quarter in fiscal 2017 and 2016 were as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

First

    

Second

    

Third

    

Fourth

 

2017

 

Quarter

 

Quarter

 

Quarter

 

Quarter

 

High

 

$

79.35

 

$

79.28

 

$

85.07

 

$

105.82

 

Low

 

$

67.94

 

$

65.97

 

$

70.30

 

$

79.79

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

First

    

Second

    

Third

    

Fourth

 

2016

 

Quarter

 

Quarter

 

Quarter

 

Quarter

 

High

 

$

87.42

 

$

96.88

 

$

94.75

 

$

80.67

 

Low

 

$

67.90

 

$

78.91

 

$

66.50

 

$

68.04

 

 

On March 16, 2018, our stock price at the close of the market was $95.43 and there were approximately 2,383 shareholders of record of our common stock.

 

Dividends

 

On March 14, 2018, our Board of Directors declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.29 per share, which is payable on or before April 24, 2018 to shareholders of record of our common stock on April 10, 2018. We paid quarterly cash dividends of $0.26 per share in 2017 and $0.25 per share in 2016. Prior to March 2015, we had not declared or paid recurring dividends since March 2007. Although the Board currently expects to continue regular quarterly cash dividends, the declaration and amount of future cash dividends are subject to the Board’s sole discretion and will depend upon, among other things, our results of operations, cash requirements, financial condition, contractual restrictions and other factors that the Board may deem relevant in its sole discretion.

 

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

The following table contains information regarding purchases of our common stock made during the quarter ended February 2, 2018 by or on behalf of Dollar General or any “affiliated purchaser,” as defined by Rule 10b‑18(a)(3) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

    

 

 

    

Total Number

    

Approximate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

of Shares

 

Dollar Value

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchased

 

of Shares that May

 

 

 

Total Number

 

Average

 

as Part of Publicly

 

Yet Be Purchased

 

 

 

of Shares

 

Price Paid

 

Announced Plans or

 

Under the Plans

 

Period

 

Purchased

 

per Share

 

Programs(a)

 

or Programs(a)

 

11/04/17-11/30/17

 

 —

 

$

 —

 

 —

 

$

634,594,000

 

12/01/17-12/31/17

 

2,056,411

 

$

92.38

 

2,056,411

 

$

444,616,000

 

01/01/18-02/02/18

 

954,934

 

$

95.29

 

954,934

 

$

353,617,000

 

Total

 

3,011,345

 

$

93.31

 

3,011,345

 

$

353,617,000

 


(a)

On September 5, 2012, the Company announced a program permitting the Company to repurchase a portion of its outstanding shares not to exceed a dollar maximum established by the Company’s Board of Directors. The program was most recently amended on March 14, 2018 to increase the repurchase authorization by $1.0 billion, bringing the total value of authorized share repurchases under the program to $6.0 billion. Under the authorization, purchases may be made in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions from time to time subject to market and other conditions. This repurchase authorization has no expiration date.

 

23


 

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

The following table sets forth selected consolidated financial and operating information of Dollar General Corporation as of the dates and for the periods indicated. The selected historical statement of income data and statement of cash flows data for the fiscal years ended February 2, 2018, February 3, 2017, and January 29, 2016, and balance sheet data as of February 2, 2018 and February 3, 2017, have been derived from our historical audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report. The selected historical statement of income data and statement of cash flows data for the fiscal years ended January 30, 2015 and January 31, 2014 and balance sheet data as of January 29, 2016, January 30, 2015, and January 31, 2014 presented in this table have been derived from audited consolidated financial statements not included in this report.

 

The information set forth below should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified by reference to, the Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes included in Part II, Item 8 of this report and the Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations included in Part II,

24


 

Item 7 of this report. Certain financial disclosures relating to prior periods have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Amounts in millions, excluding per share data,

    

Year Ended

 

number of stores, selling square feet, and net sales

 

February 2,

 

February 3,

 

January 29,

 

January 30,

 

January 31,

 

per square foot)

 

2018

 

2017(1)

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014

 

Statement of Income Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

$

23,471.0

 

$

21,986.6

 

$

20,368.6

 

$

18,909.6

 

$

17,504.2

 

Cost of goods sold

 

 

16,249.6

 

 

15,204.0

 

 

14,062.5

 

 

13,107.1

 

 

12,068.4

 

Gross profit

 

 

7,221.4

 

 

6,782.6

 

 

6,306.1

 

 

5,802.5

 

 

5,435.7

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

 

5,213.5

 

 

4,719.2

 

 

4,365.8

 

 

4,033.4

 

 

3,699.6

 

Operating profit

 

 

2,007.8

 

 

2,063.4

 

 

1,940.3

 

 

1,769.1

 

 

1,736.2

 

Interest expense

 

 

97.0

 

 

97.8

 

 

86.9

 

 

88.2

 

 

89.0

 

Other (income) expense

 

 

3.5

 

 

 —

 

 

0.3

 

 

 —

 

 

18.9

 

Income before income taxes

 

 

1,907.3

 

 

1,965.6

 

 

1,853.0

 

 

1,680.9

 

 

1,628.3

 

Income tax expense

 

 

368.3

 

 

714.5

 

 

687.9

 

 

615.5

 

 

603.2

 

Net income

 

$

1,539.0

 

$

1,251.1

 

$

1,165.1

 

$

1,065.3

 

$

1,025.1

 

Earnings per share—basic

 

$

5.64

 

$

4.45

 

$

3.96

 

$

3.50

 

$

3.17

 

Earnings per share—diluted

 

 

5.63

 

 

4.43

 

 

3.95

 

 

3.49

 

 

3.17

 

Dividends per share

 

 

1.04

 

 

1.00

 

 

0.88

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

Statement of Cash Flows Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash provided by (used in):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating activities

 

$

1,802.1

 

$

1,605.0

 

$

1,391.7

 

$

1,326.9

 

$

1,244.1

 

Investing activities

 

 

(645.0)

 

 

(550.9)

 

 

(503.4)

 

 

(371.7)

 

 

(250.0)

 

Financing activities

 

 

(1,077.6)

 

 

(1,024.1)

 

 

(1,310.2)

 

 

(880.9)

 

 

(629.3)

 

Total capital expenditures

 

 

(646.5)

 

 

(560.3)

 

 

(504.8)

 

 

(374.0)

 

 

(538.4)

 

Other Financial and Operating Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Same store sales growth(2)

 

 

2.7

%  

 

0.9

%  

 

2.8

%  

 

2.8

%  

 

3.3

%

Same store sales(2)

 

$

21,871.6

 

$

20,348.1

 

$

19,254.3

 

$

17,818.7

 

$

16,365.5

 

Number of stores included in same store sales calculation

 

 

13,150

 

 

12,383

 

 

11,706

 

 

11,052

 

 

10,387

 

Number of stores (at period end)

 

 

14,534

 

 

13,320

 

 

12,483

 

 

11,789

 

 

11,132

 

Selling square feet (in thousands at period end)

 

 

107,821

 

 

98,943

 

 

92,477

 

 

87,205

 

 

82,012

 

Net sales per square foot(3)

 

$

227

 

$

229

 

$

226

 

$

223

 

$

220

 

Consumables sales

 

 

76.9

%  

 

76.4

%  

 

75.9

%  

 

75.7

%  

 

75.2

%

Seasonal sales

 

 

12.1

%  

 

12.2

%  

 

12.4

%  

 

12.4

%  

 

12.9

%

Home products sales

 

 

6.0

%  

 

6.2

%  

 

6.3

%  

 

6.4

%  

 

6.4

%

Apparel sales

 

 

5.0

%  

 

5.2

%  

 

5.4

%  

 

5.5

%  

 

5.5

%

Rent expense

 

$

1,081.5

 

$

942.4

 

$

856.9

 

$

785.2

 

$

686.9

 

Balance Sheet Data (at period end):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments

 

$

267.4

 

$

187.9

 

$

157.9

 

$

579.8

 

$

505.6

 

Total assets

 

 

12,516.9

 

 

11,672.3

 

 

11,257.9

 

 

11,208.6

 

 

10,848.2

 

Long-term debt(4)

 

 

3,006.0

 

 

3,211.5

 

 

2,970.6

 

 

2,725.1

 

 

2,799.5

 

Total shareholders’ equity

 

 

6,125.8

 

 

5,406.3

 

 

5,377.9

 

 

5,710.0

 

 

5,402.2

 


(1)

The fiscal year ended February 3, 2017 was comprised of 53 weeks.

 

25


 

(2)

Same-store sales are calculated based upon stores that were open at least 13 full fiscal months and remain open at the end of the reporting period. We include stores that have been remodeled, expanded or relocated in our same-store sales calculation. Changes in same-store sales are calculated based on the comparable 52 calendar weeks in the current and prior years.

 

(3)

Net sales per square foot was calculated based on total sales for the preceding 12 months as of the ending date of the reporting period divided by the average selling square footage during the period, including the end of the fiscal year, the beginning of the fiscal year, and the end of each of our three interim fiscal quarters.

 

(4)

Debt issuance costs are reflected as a deduction from the corresponding debt liability for all periods presented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended

 

 

    

February 2,

 

February 3,

 

January 29,

 

January 30,

    

January 31,

 

 

 

2018

 

2017(1)

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014

 

Ratio of earnings to fixed charges(2):

 

3.9

x  

4.3

x  

4.5

x  

4.4

x  

4.7

x


(1)

The fiscal year ended February 3, 2017 was comprised of 53 weeks.

 

(2)

For purposes of computing the ratio of earnings to fixed charges, (a) earnings consist of income (loss) before income taxes, plus fixed charges less capitalized expenses related to indebtedness (amortization expense for capitalized interest is not significant) and (b) fixed charges consist of interest expense (whether expensed or capitalized), the amortization of debt issuance costs and discounts related to indebtedness, and the interest portion of rent expense.

 

26


 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

This discussion and analysis should be read with, and is qualified in its entirety by, the Consolidated Financial Statements and the notes thereto. It also should be read in conjunction with the Cautionary Disclosure Regarding Forward‑Looking Statements and the Risk Factors disclosures set forth in the Introduction and in Item 1A of this report, respectively.

 

Executive Overview

 

We are among the largest discount retailers in the United States by number of stores, with 14,609 stores located in 44 states as of March 2, 2018, with the greatest concentration of stores in the southern, southwestern, midwestern and eastern United States. We offer a broad selection of merchandise, including consumable products such as food, paper and cleaning products, health and beauty products and pet supplies, and non-consumable products such as seasonal merchandise, home decor and domestics, and basic apparel. Our merchandise includes national brands from leading manufacturers, as well as our own private brand selections with prices at substantial discounts to national brands. We offer our customers these national brand and private brand products at everyday low prices (typically $10 or less) in our convenient small-box locations.

 

Because the customers we serve are value-conscious, many with low or fixed incomes, we are intensely focused on helping them make the most of their spending dollars. We believe our convenient store formats, locations, and broad selection of high-quality products at compelling values have driven our substantial growth and financial success over the years and through a variety of macroeconomic environments. Like other retailers, we have been operating for several years in an environment with ongoing macroeconomic challenges and uncertainties. Our core customers are often among the first to be affected by negative or uncertain economic conditions, and are among the last to feel the effects of improving economic conditions particularly when, as in the recent past, trends are inconsistent and their duration unknown. The primary macroeconomic factors that affect our core customers include the unemployment rate, the underemployment rate, wage growth, fuel prices, and changes to certain government assistance programs, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Additionally, our customers are impacted by increases in those expenses that generally comprise a large portion of their household budget, such as rent and healthcare.  We believe that at various times the overall effect of the factors listed above has negatively affected our customer traffic and could do so in the future.

 

During 2017, we continued to make progress on certain strategic initiatives to pursue long-term growth opportunities. Such opportunities include leveraging existing and developing additional digital tools and technology to provide our customers with additional shopping access points and even greater convenience, as well as an in-depth analysis of and refreshed approach to our non-consumables product offerings. These growth initiatives will be ongoing priorities in 2018, while ensuring that we maintain our brand heritage and build upon our organizational capabilities.    

 

We remain committed to the following long-term operating priorities as we consistently strive to improve our performance while retaining our customer-centric focus: 1) driving profitable sales growth, 2) capturing growth opportunities, 3) enhancing our position as a low-cost operator, and 4) investing in our people as a competitive advantage.

 

We seek to drive profitable sales growth through initiatives aimed at increasing customer traffic and average transaction amount, as well as an ongoing focus on enhancing our gross margins while maintaining both everyday low price and affordability.

 

Historically, our sales of consumables, which tend to have lower gross margins, have been the key drivers of net sales and customer traffic, while sales of non-consumables, which tend to have higher gross margins, have contributed to profitable sales growth and an increase in average transaction amount.  In addition, throughout 2017, our sales mix continued to shift slightly toward consumables, and, within consumables, slightly

27


 

toward lower margin departments such as perishables and tobacco. We expect the trends of consumables, and lower margin consumables, comprising an increasingly larger percentage of our sales than non-consumables to continue throughout at least the beginning of 2018. Certain of our initiatives, including those related to the non-consumables categories, are intended to address these trends, although there can be no assurance we will be successful in their reversal.

 

We believe same-store sales growth is key to achieving our financial objectives. Accordingly, our initiatives are designed to increase customer traffic and average transaction amounts. We made significant progress in 2017 on many of these initiatives, which included the continued expansion of coolers, the rollout of additional strategies across many of our merchandise departments, including a redesign of our Health and Beauty department to drive further product awareness and market share, a continued focus on improving our in-stock position and the addition of a queue line containing items intended to drive impulse purchases in a portion of our existing store base. In 2018, we plan to continue expanding the cooler count, as well as to launch a second phase of the Health and Beauty initiative. Additionally, we plan to implement a redesign of the snack and beverage aisle to enhance customer awareness, particularly in immediate consumption items. We  also plan to test an expanded assortment of “better-for-you” food choices across a select group of stores. In non-consumables, the planned introduction of new and expanded product classes will provide increased opportunities for our customers to take advantage of our value and convenience offering. Many of these initiatives support our plans to continue investing in our existing store base, with a goal to drive increased customer traffic and average transaction amount and, as a result, our same-store sales.

 

We demonstrate our commitment to the affordability needs of our core customer as more than 80% of our stock-keeping units were priced at $5 or less at the end of 2017.  Even as we work to provide everyday low prices and meet our customers’ affordability needs, we also remain focused on enhancing our margins through effective category management, inventory shrink reduction initiatives, private brands penetration, distribution and transportation efficiencies, global sourcing and pricing and markdown optimization. With respect to category management, we strive to maintain an appropriate mix of consumables and non-consumables sales because, as noted above, the mix of sales affects profitability due to the varying gross margins between, and even within, the consumables and non-consumables categories. We believe expanded and improved private brand offerings in 2018 will provide increased value offerings for our customers in addition to improving the profitability of certain product categories. To support our efforts to reduce inventory shrink, in 2018 we expect to continue to implement in-store defensive merchandising and technology-based tools, including a significant increase in the number of stores utilizing Electronic Article Surveillance (“EAS”), as the results from stores in which EAS has been implemented suggest these measures help reduce shrink and improve our in-stock position. Increasing carrier and fuel rates pressured our overall gross margin in the latter half of 2017, and we anticipate that these negative impacts will continue into and throughout 2018. However, we continue to seek to reduce our stem miles and optimize shipment loads to improve distribution and transportation efficiencies.

 

To support our other operating priorities, we remain focused on capturing growth opportunities. In 2017, we opened 1,315 new stores, along with remodeling or relocating 764 stores. For 2018, we plan to open approximately 900 new stores, remodel approximately 1,000 mature store locations, and relocate approximately 100 stores for an approximate total of 2,000 real estate projects.

 

We continue to innovate within our channel and are able to utilize the most productive of our various store formats based on the specific market opportunity.  We expect that our traditional 7,300 square foot store format will continue to be the primary store layout for new stores, relocations and remodels in 2018. We expect a significant number of the planned 1,000 remodels in 2018 to include a greater cooler count for increased selection of perishable items. In addition, our smaller format store (less than 6,000 square feet) allows us to capture growth opportunities in metropolitan areas as well as in rural areas with a low number of households. We continue to incorporate into our existing store base lessons learned from our various store formats and layouts with a goal of driving increased customer traffic, average transaction amount, same-store sales and overall store productivity.

 

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To support our new store growth and drive productivity, we continue to make investments in our distribution center network. Our fifteenth distribution center in Jackson, Georgia began shipping in October 2017. We began construction on our sixteenth and seventeenth distribution centers in Longview, Texas and Amsterdam, New York, respectively, in 2017 to continue to support our growth. We expect both of these distribution centers to open in 2019.

 

We have established a position as a low-cost operator, continuously seeking ways to reduce or control costs that do not affect our customers’ shopping experience. We plan to continue enhancing this position over time as we aim to continually streamline our business while also employing ongoing cost discipline to reduce certain expenses as a percentage of sales. Although we did not leverage Selling, General & Administrative (“SG&A”) expenses in 2017, as discussed in more detail below, it was largely because of specific planned investments such as store manager pay and training, and the increased store openings in the second half of the year, both of which will pressure SG&A comparisons in the first half of 2018.

 

In 2017, we installed LED lighting in a significant number of stores, which reduces utilities and maintenance costs across our store base in addition to fostering a more customer and environmentally friendly shopping experience. We anticipate the remaining stores in the chain that are eligible for our LED lighting program will be completed in 2018.  Over the long term, we believe actions such as these will support our goal of leveraging SG&A expenses at a lower same store sales growth percentage.  In addition, we remain committed to simplifying or eliminating store-level tasks and processes so that those time savings can be reinvested by our store managers and their teams in important areas such as enhanced customer service, higher in-stock levels and improved store standards.

 

Our employees are a competitive advantage, and we are always searching for ways to continue investing in them.  We invest in our employees in an effort to create an environment that attracts and retains talented personnel, as we believe that, particularly at the store level, employees who are promoted from within our company generally have longer tenures and are greater contributors to improvements in our financial performance.  Our store managers play an important role in our customer experience and individual store profitability, and beginning in March 2017 we implemented certain investments in compensation and training for this position in the form of increased SG&A expenses that we believe have already contributed to improved customer experience scores, higher sales and improved turnover metrics. 

 

To further enhance shareholder return, we continued to repurchase shares of our common stock and paid quarterly cash dividends throughout 2017. In 2018, we intend to continue our share repurchase activity, at a significantly greater dollar amount than in 2017, and to pay quarterly cash dividends, subject to Board discretion and approval.

 

On December 22, 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”) was signed into law. Among other impacts, the Act reduces the federal corporate tax rate to 21% from 35% effective January 1, 2018. The Act reduced our effective tax rate in 2017 primarily as a result of the one-time remeasurement of the federal portion of our deferred tax assets and liabilities to a lower rate, accompanied by a reduction in the current year federal corporate tax rate to 33.7%, due to our fiscal year ending approximately one month after the effective date of the Act.  The Act will have a positive material impact on our effective tax rate in 2018 and subsequent years.

 

A continued focus on our four operating priorities as discussed above, coupled with strong cash flow management and share repurchases resulted in solid overall operating and financial performance in 2017 as compared to 2016, as set forth below. Basis points, as referred to below, are equal to 0.01% as a percentage of net sales.

 

·

Net sales in 2017 increased 6.8% over 2016. Sales in same-stores increased 2.7%, due to an increase in average transaction amount and increased customer traffic. Average sales per square foot in 2017 were $227 compared to $229, including a $4 contribution from the 53rd week, in 2016.

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·

Our gross profit rate decreased by 8 basis points due primarily to a greater proportion of sales of consumables compared to non-consumables, higher markdowns, and increased transportation costs.

 

·

The increase in SG&A, as a percentage of sales, was due primarily to increases in retail labor costs, occupancy costs and store closures and related costs.

 

·

The decrease in the effective income tax rate to 19.3% in 2017 from 36.3% in 2016 was due primarily to changes (some of which are nonrecurring) to the federal income tax laws pursuant to the Act.

 

·

We reported net income of $1.54 billion, or $5.63 per diluted share, for 2017 compared to net income of $1.25 billion, or $4.43 per diluted share, for 2016. Reduced income tax expense in 2017 due to the Act contributed to the increase in diluted earnings per share.

 

·

We generated approximately $1.8 billion of cash flows from operating activities in 2017, an increase of 12.3% compared to 2016. We primarily utilized our cash flows from operating activities to invest in the growth of our business, repurchase our common stock, and pay quarterly cash dividends.

 

·

Inventory turnover was 4.7 times on a rolling four-quarter basis. Inventories increased 1.5% on a per store basis compared to 2016.

 

·

We repurchased approximately 7.1 million shares of our outstanding common stock for $580 million.

 

Readers should refer to the detailed discussion of our operating results below for additional comments on financial performance in the current year as compared with the prior years presented.

 

Results of Operations

 

Accounting Periods. The following text contains references to years 2017, 2016, and 2015, which represent fiscal years ended February 2, 2018, February 3, 2017, and January 29, 2016, respectively. Our fiscal year ends on the Friday closest to January 31. Fiscal year 2016 was a 53-week accounting period and fiscal years 2017 and 2015 were 52-week accounting periods.

 

Seasonality.  The nature of our business is somewhat seasonal. Primarily because of sales of Christmas-related merchandise, operating profit in our fourth quarter (November, December and January) has historically been higher than operating profit achieved in each of the first three quarters of the fiscal year. Expenses, and to a greater extent operating profit, vary by quarter. Results of a period shorter than a full year may not be indicative of results expected for the entire year. Furthermore, the seasonal nature of our business may affect comparisons between periods.

 

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The following table contains results of operations data for fiscal years 2017, 2016 and 2015, and the dollar and percentage variances among those years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2017 vs. 2016

 

2016 vs. 2015

 

(amounts in millions, except

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

Amount

  

%

  

Amount

  

%

 

per share amounts)

 

2017

 

2016

 

2015

 

Change

 

Change

 

Change

 

Change

 

Net sales by category:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumables

 

$

18,054.8

 

$

16,798.9

 

$

15,457.6

 

$

1,255.9

 

7.5

%  

$

1,341.3

 

8.7

%  

% of net sales

 

 

76.92

%  

 

76.41

%  

 

75.89

%  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seasonal

 

 

2,837.3

 

 

2,674.3

 

 

2,522.7

 

 

163.0

 

6.1

 

 

151.6

 

6.0

 

% of net sales

 

 

12.09

%  

 

12.16

%  

 

12.39

%  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home products

 

 

1,400.6

 

 

1,373.4

 

 

1,289.4

 

 

27.2

 

2.0

 

 

84.0

 

6.5

 

% of net sales

 

 

5.97

%  

 

6.25

%  

 

6.33

%  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apparel

 

 

1,178.3

 

 

1,140.0

 

 

1,098.8

 

 

38.3

 

3.4

 

 

41.2

 

3.7

 

% of net sales

 

 

5.02

%  

 

5.18

%  

 

5.39

%  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

$

23,471.0

 

$

21,986.6

 

$

20,368.6

 

$

1,484.4

 

6.8

%  

$

1,618.0

 

7.9

%  

Cost of goods sold

 

 

16,249.6

 

 

15,204.0

 

 

14,062.5

 

 

1,045.6

 

6.9

 

 

1,141.5

 

8.1

 

% of net sales

 

 

69.23

%  

 

69.15

%  

 

69.04

%  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gross profit

 

 

7,221.4

 

 

6,782.6

 

 

6,306.1

 

 

438.7

 

6.5

 

 

476.5

 

7.6

 

% of net sales

 

 

30.77

%  

 

30.85

%  

 

30.96

%  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

 

5,213.5

 

 

4,719.2

 

 

4,365.8

 

 

494.4

 

10.5

 

 

353.4

 

8.1

 

% of net sales

 

 

22.21

%  

 

21.46

%  

 

21.43

%  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating profit

 

 

2,007.8

 

 

2,063.4