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EX-32.1 - EXHIBIT 32.1 - ERA GROUP INC.exhibit321ceosoxcertificat.htm
EX-32.2 - EXHIBIT 32.2 - ERA GROUP INC.exhibit322cfosoxcertificat.htm
EX-31.2 - EXHIBIT 31.2 - ERA GROUP INC.exhibit312cfocertification.htm
EX-31.1 - EXHIBIT 31.1 - ERA GROUP INC.exhibit311ceocertification.htm
EX-23.2 - EXHIBIT 23.2 - ERA GROUP INC.exhibit232kpmgconsent10-k.htm
EX-23.1 - EXHIBIT 23.1 - ERA GROUP INC.exhibit231eyconsent10-k.htm
EX-21.1 - EXHIBIT 21.1 - ERA GROUP INC.exhibit211subsidiaries-2016.htm



United States
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549 
FORM 10-K

ANNUAL REPORT
PURSUANT TO SECTIONS 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
(Mark one)
ý
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016
OR
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from              to             
Commission file number 001-35701
Era Group Inc.
(Exact name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)
Delaware
 
72-1455213
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
 
818 Town & Country Blvd., Suite 200
Houston, Texas
 
77024
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
 
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (713) 369-4700
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
 
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. ¨ Yes     ý No
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. ¨ Yes     ý No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. ý Yes ¨ No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). ý Yes     ¨ No
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filer  ¨
 
Accelerated filer  x
 
Non-accelerated filer  ¨
(Do not check if a smaller
reporting company)
 
Smaller reporting company  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). ¨ Yes     ý No
The aggregate market value of the voting stock of the registrant held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2016 was $184,016,562. The total number of shares of Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share, outstanding as of March 3, 2017 was 20,933,566. The Registrant has no other class of Common Stock outstanding.






DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the registrant’s Proxy Statement for the 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days of the registrant’s fiscal year ended December 31, 2016 are incorporated herein by reference in Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.





ERA GROUP INC.
FORM 10-K

TABLE OF CONTENTS
 




 
 
 
 
 
PART II
 
 
 
 
Item 5.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 6.
 
 
 
Item 7.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 7A.
 
 
 
Item 8.
 
 
 








FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K includes “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Such forward-looking statements concerning management’s expectations, strategic objectives, business prospects, anticipated performance and financial condition and other similar matters involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other important factors that could cause the actual results, performance or achievements of results to differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements discussed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such risks, uncertainties and other important factors include, among others:
the Company’s dependence on, and the cyclical and volatile nature of, offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production activity, and the impact of general economic conditions and fluctuations in worldwide prices of and demand for oil and natural gas on such activity levels;
the Company’s reliance on a small number of customers and the reduction of its customer base resulting from bankruptcies or consolidation;
risks that the Company’s customers reduce or cancel contracted services or tender processes;
cost savings initiatives implemented by the Company’s customers;
risks inherent in operating helicopters;
the Company’s ability to maintain an acceptable safety record;
the impact of increased United States (“U.S.”) and foreign government regulation and legislation, including potential government implemented moratoriums on drilling activities;
the impact of a grounding of all or a portion of the Company’s fleet for extended periods of time or indefinitely on the Company’s business, including its operations and ability to service customers, results of operations or financial condition and/or the market value of the affected helicopter(s);
the Company’s ability to successfully expand into other geographic and aviation service markets;
risks associated with political instability, governmental action, war, acts of terrorism and changes in the economic condition in any foreign country where the Company does business, which may result in expropriation, nationalization, confiscation or deprivation of the Company’s assets or result in claims of a force majeure situation;
the impact of declines in the global economy and financial markets;
the impact of fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates on the Company’s asset values and cost to purchase helicopters, spare parts and related services;
risks related to investing in new lines of service without realizing the expected benefits;
risks of engaging in competitive processes or expending significant resources for strategic opportunities, with no guaranty of recoupment;
the Company’s reliance on a small number of helicopter manufacturers and suppliers;
the Company’s ongoing need to replace aging helicopters;
the Company’s reliance on the secondary helicopter market to dispose of older helicopters;
the Company’s reliance on information technology;
the impact of allocation of risk between the Company and its customers;
the liability, legal fees and costs in connection with providing emergency response services;
adverse weather conditions and seasonality;
risks associated with the Company’s debt structure;
the Company’s counterparty credit risk exposure;
the impact of operational and financial difficulties of the Company’s joint ventures and partners and the risks associated with identifying and securing joint venture partners when needed;
conflict with the other owners of the Company’s non-wholly owned subsidiaries and other equity investees;
adverse results of legal proceedings;
the Company’s ability to obtain insurance coverage and the adequacy and availability of such coverage;
the Company’s ability to remediate the material weakness in its internal controls over financial reporting described in “Item 9A. Controls and Procedures” of this Annual Report;
the possibility of labor problems;
the attraction and retention of qualified personnel;
restrictions on the amount of foreign ownership of the Company’s common stock; and
various other matters and factors, many of which are beyond the Company’s control.
It is not possible to predict or identify all such factors. Consequently, the foregoing should not be considered a complete discussion of all potential risks or uncertainties. The words “estimate,” “project,” “intend,” “believe,” “plan” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of the document in which they are made. The Company disclaims any obligation or undertaking to provide any updates or revisions to

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any forward-looking statement to reflect any change in the Company’s expectations or any change in events, conditions or circumstances on which the forward-looking statement is based. The forward-looking statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K should be evaluated together with the many uncertainties that affect the Company’s businesses, particularly those discussed in greater detail in Part I, Item 1A, “Risk Factors” and Part II, Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

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PART I
ITEM 1.
BUSINESS
General    
Unless the context indicates otherwise, the terms “we,” “our,” “ours,” “us” and the “Company” refer to Era Group Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries. “Era Group” refers to Era Group Inc., incorporated in 1999 in Delaware. “Common Stock” refers to the common stock, par value $0.01 per share, of Era Group. The Company’s fiscal year ended on December 31, 2016.
We are one of the largest helicopter operators in the world and the longest serving helicopter transport operator in the U.S., which is our primary area of operations. Our helicopters are primarily used to transport personnel to, from and between offshore oil and gas production platforms, drilling rigs and other installations. In the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, approximately 62%, 66% and 67%, respectively, of our total operating revenues were earned in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. In the same periods, approximately 31%, 21% and 15%, respectively, of total operating revenues were earned in international locations. We currently have customers in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, India, Suriname and the United Kingdom.
The primary users of our helicopter services are international, independent and major integrated oil and gas exploration, development and production companies. Our customers include Anadarko Petroleum Corporation (“Anadarko”), Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (“Petrobras”), Williams Strategic Sourcing Company (“Williams”), and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (“BSEE”), a U.S. government agency. In the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, approximately 88%, 78% and 76%, respectively, of our operating revenues were derived from helicopter services, including emergency response search and rescue (“SAR”) services, provided to customers primarily engaged in offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production activities. Accordingly, our results of operations are, to a large extent, tied to the level of offshore exploration, development and production activity by oil and gas companies in the Americas, including the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and Brazil. In addition to serving the oil and gas industry, we provide air medical services, utility services to support firefighting, mining, power line and pipeline survey activities and Alaska flightseeing tours, among other activities. In 2016, we began to provide unmanned aerial solutions (“UAS”) utilizing unmanned aerial vehicles and related sensory technologies for multiple applications such as inspections, surveys, mapping, imagery and construction and engineering to service numerous industries.
In addition to operating helicopters, we also lease helicopters to third parties and foreign affiliates and, in some cases, provide services such as logistical and maintenance support, training and flight and maintenance crews in addition to the helicopters. These third parties and affiliates in turn provide helicopter services to customers in their local markets, many of which include oil and gas exploration, development and production companies. Under these leasing arrangements, operational responsibility is typically assumed by the lessee, eliminating, in large part, the need to incur the investment costs for direct support infrastructure in the location the helicopters are utilized.
In certain countries where we believe it is beneficial to access the local market for offshore helicopter support, we conduct our international operations through subsidiaries, strategic alliances with foreign partners or through entities structured as joint ventures with local shareholders. In Brazil, we hold a 50% economic and 20% voting interest in Aeróleo Taxi Aéreo S/A (“Aeróleo”), a helicopter transport service provider to the offshore oil and gas industry based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Aeróleo is consolidated in our financial statements as it is a variable interest entity of which we are the primary beneficiary. In Colombia, we hold a 75% interest in Sicher Helicopters SAS (“Sicher”), a leading helicopter operator based in Bogota, Colombia with a strong presence in the existing onshore oil and gas market. Sicher is also consolidated in our financial statements.
We provide additional services through joint ventures that complement our core helicopter operating and leasing activities. We hold a 50% interest in our Dart Holding Company Ltd. (“Dart”) joint venture, which is a sales and manufacturing organization based in Canada that engineers and manufactures after-market helicopter parts and accessories for sale to helicopter manufacturers and operators and distributes parts and accessories on behalf of other manufacturers. We also hold a 50% interest in Era Training Center LLC (“Era Training”), a joint venture based in Lake Charles, Louisiana, which provides classroom instruction, flight simulator and other training to our employees and third parties.
Era Group’s principal executive office is located at 818 Town & Country Blvd., Suite 200, Houston, Texas 77024, and its telephone number is (713) 369-4700. Era Group’s website address is www.erahelicopters.com. The reference to Era Group’s website is not intended to incorporate the information on the website into this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Emerging Growth Company

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On January 31, 2013, SEACOR Holdings Inc. (“SEACOR”) completed the spin-off of Era Group, and we are now an independent company with our Common Stock traded on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) under the symbol “ERA.” We are an “Emerging Growth Company,” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act (the “JOBS Act”), and are eligible to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies. These include, but are not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“the Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements and exemptions from the requirements of holding a non-binding advisory vote on executive compensation and obtaining stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments. Unless our public float exceeds $700 million or our annual revenues exceed $1 billion before then, we will cease to be an emerging growth company no later than December 31, 2018.
Segment and Geographic Information
We have determined that our operations comprise a single segment. Helicopters are mobile and versatile assets and, as a result, may be utilized in any of our service lines as business needs dictate. Financial data for geographic areas is reported in Note 13 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Our Strategy
Our goal is to be the most efficient helicopter operator in the industry and to pursue additional business opportunities that leverage our strengths. Our operational, commercial and capital allocation strategies to achieve this goal are as follows:
Be the preferred provider of helicopter services in the Americas. The primary focus of our business operations is the provision of safe, reliable and efficient helicopter services to our valued customers. We believe our customers consider safety and reliability as the two primary attributes required of their helicopter service providers. We are a founding member of HeliOffshore Ltd. (“HeliOffshore”), a global offshore helicopter industry safety association, and we continue to maintain a leadership role in the organization, which uses cross-industry cooperation as a platform for enhancing the industry’s overall strong safety record by sharing best practices, developing and applying advanced technology and encouraging common global flight standards. Amongst the helicopter service operators who meet their safety and reliability requirements, we believe customers usually make their selection of a provider based on aircraft availability, quality and location of facilities, customer service and pricing. We maintain 22 bases of operations in the Americas to support our customer needs, including a 35-acre super base in Houma, Louisiana that is one of the premier heliports servicing the Gulf of Mexico offering state of the art technology, security screening and passenger processing and comfort to our passengers and employees. We maintain a close partnership with our customers to better enable us to anticipate their needs, to enhance customer service, to better manage our fleet utilization and to inform our capital allocation decisions.
Continue to upgrade our versatile helicopter fleet to enhance fleet utilization and facilitate fleet management. We are one of the largest helicopter operators in the world, operating a diverse and technologically advanced fleet of helicopters. We seek to enhance our fleet through the acquisition of new helicopter models and the installation of newer and safer technologies. An integral part of our fleet strategy is premised upon maintaining well-qualified and well-trained maintenance, ground and flight crews to service our fleet. We regularly review our asset portfolio by assessing market conditions and our customers’ demand for different helicopter models. We buy, sell and lease our equipment in the ordinary course of our business. We believe our strong relationships with the helicopter original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) help us maintain an asset base suitable for use within our own operations and for a variety of leasing solutions to other operators. We have ordered and maintain options on a number of new helicopters from the OEMs. During 2016, we took delivery of two AW189 heavy helicopters, and we have orders for two additional S92 heavy helicopters, five additional AW189 helicopters and five AW169 light twin helicopters. These new helicopter models enhance our fleet diversity and better enable us to meet customer needs. In order to maintain the flexibility required to address changing industry and market conditions that impact the supply and demand for our services and our customer needs, we retain the ability to terminate a significant portion of our commitments to purchase new helicopters subject to specified minimal liquidated damages.
Pursue additional leasing opportunities. We believe the various leasing solutions that we offer to other helicopter operators permit us to monetize demand from end markets that we may not otherwise have access to without a further investment in infrastructure and/or operations. There is intense competition in the leasing market with the introduction and expansion of specialized helicopter leasing companies. We believe customers look to us for a variety of leasing solutions because of our fleet diversity, including selection of light, medium and heavy helicopters to meet customer needs, and our ability as an operator to provide related services such as training, maintenance support and temporary ground and flight crews, which differentiates us from the financial leasing companies. During 2016, we began leasing helicopters together with related support services to a new customer providing helicopter transport services in Argentina.

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Expand into new and growing geographic markets. We believe there are significant opportunities in markets outside of the U.S., and we selectively seek to access these growth markets. In addition to our 50% economic interest in Aeróleo in Brazil and 75% interest in Sicher in Colombia, we continue to develop relationships in targeted markets that we believe are underserved by larger multinational helicopter operators, may benefit from our unique offering of services and expertise and provide us with opportunities for growth. During 2016, we expanded our footprint with the commencement of operations in Suriname, which, together with our entry into Argentina, has enhanced our position as one of the preferred providers of helicopter services in the Americas with a presence from Alaska to Argentina. As we seek to grow our business, we regularly evaluate new opportunities and entry into new markets through operating contracts, leases, acquisitions, joint venture investments and alliances with other industry participants.
Maximize shareholder value. We proactively manage our fleet as a portfolio of assets, and we plan our capital allocation with a focus on achieving business growth and improving rates of return, taking into careful account our balance sheet, liquidity and risk management. During 2016, we amended our $200.0 million senior secured revolving credit facility (the “Revolving Credit Facility”) to, among other things, revise our maintenance covenants to provide us with additional flexibility. Our goal is to deliver strong returns over time by: improving cash returns through capital and operational efficiency improvements; deploying more capital into opportunities management believes can deliver strong returns for the benefit of our shareholders, including strategic acquisitions or equity investments; and withdrawing capital from areas where returns are deemed inadequate and unable to be sufficiently improved. We continuously evaluate and optimize our fleet utilization, and as helicopters come off of current contracts or are replaced by newer models, we assess our future opportunities for such helicopters against our ability to recover our remaining investments in the secondary helicopter market. When appropriate, we may divest helicopters when such actions provide the highest expected shareholder return and often upgrade our fleet by reinvesting the proceeds in newer helicopters, such as the S92 and AW189 helicopter models. In addition, we pursue opportunities that leverage our fleet’s versatility by shifting assets between markets when circumstances warrant.
We will continue to build upon the expertise, relationships and buying power in our operating businesses to develop other business opportunities and sources of revenue. Leveraging our extensive aviation experience, during 2016, we launched our UAS services and entered into an alliance to provide UAS services with Total Safety U.S., Inc. (“Total Safety”), the world's premier provider of industrial inspection and integrated safety solutions. Our UAS services utilize unmanned aerial and related sensory technologies for multiple applications such as inspections, surveys, mapping, imagery, and construction and engineering to service numerous industries. We offer solutions that are complementary to our helicopter transportation services or that provide significant benefits over traditionally delivered services, including increased safety and enhanced efficiencies through reduced manpower needs.
Equipment and Services
We own and operate three classes of helicopters:
Heavy helicopters, which have twin engines and a typical passenger capacity of 16 to 19, are primarily used in support of the deepwater offshore oil and gas industry, frequently in harsh environments or in areas with long distances from shore, such as those in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, Brazil, Australia and the North Sea. Heavy helicopters are also used to support emergency response SAR operations.
Medium helicopters, which have twin engines and a typical passenger capacity of 11 to 12, are primarily used to support the offshore oil and gas industry, emergency response SAR and air medical services, utility services and corporate uses.
Light helicopters, which may have single or twin engines and a typical passenger capacity of five to nine, are used to support a wide range of activities, including the shallow water oil and gas industry, air medical and utility services, tourism and corporate uses.
As of December 31, 2016, we owned, leased or managed a total of 136 helicopters, consisting of 13 heavy helicopters, 49 medium helicopters, 33 light twin engine helicopters and 41 light single engine helicopters. We also owned two AW189 helicopters that were delivered during the fourth quarter of 2016 but not placed in service as of December 31, 2016. We had commitments to purchase 12 new helicopters consisting of five AW189 helicopters, two S92 helicopters and five AW169 helicopters. The AW189 and S92 helicopters are scheduled to be delivered in 2017 through 2019. Delivery dates for the AW169 helicopters have not been determined. In addition, we have outstanding options to purchase up to an additional ten AW189 helicopters. If these options were exercised, the helicopters would be delivered in 2019 and 2020.
As of December 31, 2016, 105 of our helicopters were located in the U.S. and 31 were located in foreign jurisdictions.
The following table identifies the types of helicopters that comprise our fleet and the number of those helicopters in our fleet as of December 31, 2016. “Owned” are those helicopters owned by us. “Leased-in” are those helicopters leased-in under operating leases. “Managed” are those helicopters that are owned by non-affiliated entities and operated by us for a fee.

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As of December 31, 2016
 
Owned(1)
 
Leased-in
 
Managed
 
Total
 
Max.
Pass.(2)
 
Cruise
Speed
 
Approx.
Range
 
Average
Age(3)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(mph)
 
(miles)
 
(years)
Heavy:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
S92
 
2

 

 

 
2

 
19

 
175

 
620

 
1
H225
 
9

 

 

 
9

 
19

 
162

 
582

 
7
AW189
 
2

 

 

 
2

 
16

 
173

 
490

 
1
 
 
13

 

 

 
13

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Medium:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AW139
 
36

 

 

 
36

 
12

 
173

 
426

 
7
S76 C+/C++
 
5

 

 
1

 
6

 
12

 
161

 
348

 
10
B212
 
7

 

 

 
7

 
11

 
115

 
299

 
37
 
 
48

 

 
1

 
49

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Light—twin engine:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A109
 
7

 

 

 
7

 
7

 
161

 
405

 
11
EC135
 
13

 
2

 
1

 
16

 
7

 
138

 
288

 
8
EC145
 
3

 

 
2

 
5

 
9

 
150

 
336

 
8
BK117
 

 
2

 

 
2

 
9

 
150

 
336

 
n/a
BO105
 
3

 

 

 
3

 
4

 
138

 
276

 
27
 
 
26

 
4

 
3

 
33

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Light—single engine:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A119
 
14

 

 

 
14

 
7

 
161

 
270

 
10
AS350
 
27

 

 

 
27

 
5

 
138

 
361

 
20
 
 
41

 

 

 
41

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total Fleet
 
128

 
4

 
4

 
136

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12
_______________
(1)
Excludes two AW189 helicopters that were delivered in 2016 but not yet placed in service as of December 31, 2016.
(2)
In typical configuration for our operations.
(3)
Reflects the average age of helicopters that are owned by us.
The management of our fleet involves a careful evaluation of the expected demand for helicopter services across global markets and the types of helicopters needed to meet this demand. As offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production globally moves to deeper water, more heavy and medium helicopters and newer technology helicopters may be required. Our orders and options to purchase helicopters are primarily for heavy helicopters. These capital commitments reflect our effort to meet customer demand for helicopters suitable for the deepwater market.
Heavy and medium helicopters fly longer distances at higher speeds and can carry heavier payloads than light helicopters and are usually equipped with sophisticated avionics permitting them to operate in more demanding weather conditions and difficult climates. Heavy and medium helicopters are most commonly used for crew changes on large offshore production facilities and drilling rigs servicing the oil and gas industry.
In the U.S., we provide and operate helicopters under contracts using a Federal Aviation Administration (“FAA”) issued Part 135 Air Operator’s Certificate (“AOC”) for a variety of activities, primarily offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production, emergency response SAR and air medical services, utility services and flightseeing tours. For operating contracts, we are required to provide a complete support package including flight crews, helicopter maintenance and management of flight operations.
In international markets, local regulatory requirements may require us to conduct our international operations using another operator’s AOC through strategic alliances with foreign partners or through non-wholly owned entities with local shareholders. When we lease helicopters to customers that operate them on their AOC, our customers generally handle all the operational support except where our contracts require us to provide limited operational support, which may consist of helicopter maintenance, logistical support and/or training.

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Markets
Our current principal markets for our transportation and emergency response SAR services to the offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production industry are in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, Brazil, Suriname, Colombia and Alaska. In addition, we currently have customers in Argentina, the Dominican Republic, India and the United Kingdom.
Demand for helicopters in support of offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production, both in the U.S. and internationally, is affected by the level of offshore exploration and drilling activities. Activity levels in the offshore oil and gas industry, in turn, are affected by prevailing oil and gas prices, expectations about future prices, price volatility and long-term trends in oil and gas prices. Historically, the prices for oil and gas and, consequently, the level of activity in the offshore oil and gas industry, have been volatile and subject to wide fluctuations in response to changes in the supply of and demand for oil and gas, market uncertainty and a variety of additional factors beyond our control, such as:
customer assessments of offshore drilling prospects compared with land-based opportunities, including oil sands and shale formations;
customer assessments of cost, geological opportunity and political stability in host countries;
worldwide supply of and demand for oil and natural gas;
the price and availability of alternative fuels;
the ability of The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (“OPEC”) to set and maintain production levels and pricing;
the level of production of non-OPEC countries;
the relative exchange rates for the U.S. dollar; and
various U.S. and international government policies regarding exploration and development of oil and gas reserves.
U.S. Markets. We are one of the largest suppliers of helicopter services in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, which is a major offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production region and one of the largest oil and gas aviation markets in the world. We operate from 11 bases in this region. Our client base in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico consists primarily of international, independent and major integrated oil and gas companies. In addition to the quality and location of our operating bases, our strengths in this region include our advanced proprietary flight-following systems, our maintenance operations and our emergency response SAR services.
We have four operating bases in Alaska, where we provide support for independent and major integrated oil and gas companies along the North Slope, summer flightseeing tours and support for inland utility operations. Despite the remote location of our Alaskan bases, they are strategically located to provide services to our customers. These bases frequently include crew accommodations, hangars and fuel systems, all of which can be otherwise difficult or expensive to secure and maintain in such remote locations.
Our air medical services operations are primarily located in the eastern U.S.
International Markets. We actively market our services globally and currently have customers in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, India, Suriname and the United Kingdom.
Brazil. Brazil has one of the largest deepwater offshore exploration and production areas in the world. In 2011, we acquired a 50% economic interest and 20% voting interest in Aeróleo. Aeróleo currently operates from a network of four operating bases located strategically in Brazil. Aeróleo’s main customers are Petrobras, CGG do Brasil Participipacoes Ltda. and Statoil Brazil Oleo E Gas Ltda.
Colombia. Sicher provides helicopter services to Colombia’s existing onshore and expanding offshore oil and gas market.
Suriname. We provide helicopter services to seismic and exploration and production companies in support of Suriname’s offshore oil and gas market.
United Kingdom. We lease helicopters and provide logistics and spare parts support to an operator in the United Kingdom serving the offshore oil and gas industry.
India. In India, we lease helicopters and provide logistics and spare parts support to an operator serving the offshore oil and gas industry.
Latin America. In addition to our operations in Brazil, Colombia and Suriname, we lease helicopters and provide logistics and other support to operators in Argentina and the Dominican Republic.
Seasonality
A significant portion of our operating revenues and profits related to oil and gas exploration, development and production activity is dependent on actual flight hours. The fall and winter months have fewer hours of daylight, particularly in Alaska, and

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flight hours are generally lower at these times. Prolonged periods of adverse weather in the fall and winter months, coupled with the effect of fewer hours of daylight, can adversely impact operating results. In general, the months of December through February in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and October through April in Alaska have more days of adverse weather conditions than the other months of the year. In the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, June through November is tropical storm season. During a tropical storm, we are unable to operate in the area of the storm. However, flight activity may increase immediately before and after a storm due to the evacuation and return of offshore workers. Our Alaska flightseeing operations are also seasonal with activity occurring only from late May until early September, and our firefighting support activities follow a similar seasonal pattern. There is less seasonality in our dry-leasing and air medical activities.
Customers and Contractual Arrangements
Our principal customers in the markets in which we operate are international, independent and major integrated oil and gas exploration, development and production companies. In the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, we also provide helicopter transportation services to BSEE, and in Alaska, we also provide flightseeing services to cruise line passengers. Our leasing customers are typically other helicopter operators that operate our leased helicopters under their operating certificates and retain the operating risk. These companies in turn provide helicopter transportation services primarily to oil and gas companies. As of December 31, 2016, approximately 5% of our helicopters were utilized in support of these leasing activities. Our air medical customers are typically hospitals to which we provide emergency response helicopter services.
During the year ended December 31, 2016, our top ten customers accounted for 82% of total revenues. During the year ended December 31, 2016, each of Anadarko, Petrobras and BSEE accounted for 10% or more of our total revenues. During the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, each of Anadarko and BSEE accounted for 10% or more of our total revenues.
We charter the majority of our helicopters primarily through master service agreements, subscription agreements, day-to-day charter arrangements, fixed-term noncancelable contracts and dry-leases. Master service agreements and subscription agreements typically require a fixed monthly fee plus incremental payments based on flight hours flown. These agreements have fixed terms ranging from one month to five years and generally may be canceled without penalty upon 30-90 days’ notice. Generally, these contracts do not commit our customers to acquire specific amounts of services or minimum flight hours and permit our customers to decrease the number of helicopters under contract with a corresponding decrease in the fixed monthly payments without penalty. Day-to-day charter arrangements require either a rate for each hour flown with a minimum number of hours to be charged or a daily fixed fee plus an hourly rate based on hours flown. Leases generally run from one to five years and may contain early cancellation provisions. Under these leases, we may provide only the equipment or provide additional services such as logistical and maintenance support, training services and flight and maintenance crews. The rate structure, as it applies to our contracts with oil and gas customers, typically contains terms that limit our exposure to changes in fuel costs. Air medical services are provided under contracts with hospitals that typically include a fixed monthly and hourly rate structure. With respect to flightseeing tours, block space on helicopters is allocated to cruise lines and seats are sold directly to customers.
Competitive Conditions
The helicopter industry is highly competitive. There are, however, factors that provide advantages and in some instances barriers to entry, particularly customer certification and access to appropriate facilities in strategic locations. Customers tend to rely heavily on existing relationships and seek operators with established safety records and knowledge of the operating environment.
We are one of the largest helicopter operators in the world with principal operations in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, Brazil, Suriname, Colombia and Alaska. In the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, we have many competitors, the three largest being Bristow Group Inc. (“Bristow”), PHI, Inc. (“PHI”) and Rotorcraft Leasing Company LLC. Some oil and gas customers in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico operate their own helicopter fleets in addition to smaller companies that offer services similar to ours. In Alaska, we compete against a large number of relatively small operators. In international markets, we have several major competitors depending on the region. Our primary competitors in Brazil consist of Lider Aviação Holding S.A., OMNI Táxi Aéreo Ltda., and Brazilian Helicopter Services Taxi Aéreo Ltda.
In air medical services, there are several major competitors with fleets dedicated to air medical operations including Air Methods Corporation, PHI and Air Medical Group Holdings. We compete against national and regional firms, and there is usually more than one competitor in each local market. In addition, we compete against hospitals that operate their own helicopters and, in some cases, against ground ambulances.
In most instances, an operator must have an acceptable safety record, demonstrated reliability and suitable equipment to bid for work. Among bidders meeting these criteria, customers typically make their final choice based on helicopter preference, aircraft availability, the quality and location of operating bases, customer service and price.

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Our leasing business competes against financial leasing companies such as Lease Corporation International (Aviation) Limited (“LCI”), Lobo Leasing Limited (“Lobo”), Macquarie Rotocraft Leasing Limited (“Macquarie”), Milestone Aviation Group Limited (“Milestone”) and Waypoint Leasing Limited (“Waypoint”).
Risks of Foreign Operations
We have activities worldwide, and for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, 31%, 21%, and 15%, respectively, of our operating revenues were derived from foreign activities.
Foreign operations are subject to inherent risks, which, if they materialize, could have a material adverse effect on our financial position and our results of operations. See Item 1A. Risk Factors - “We are subject to risks associated with our international operations” for more information.
Government Regulation
Regulatory Matters. Our operations are subject to significant federal, state and local regulations in the U.S., as well as international treaties and conventions and the laws of foreign jurisdictions where we operate our equipment or where the equipment is registered or operated. Our results of operations are dependent upon our ability to maintain compliance with all applicable laws in the jurisdictions in which we operate.
In the U.S. we hold the status of an air carrier under the relevant provisions of Title 49 of the United States Transportation Code (“Transportation Code”) and engage in the operating and leasing of helicopters in the U.S. and, as such, we are subject to various statutes and regulations. We are governed principally by the regulations of the United States Department of Transportation (“DOT”), including Part 298 registration as an On-Demand Air Taxi Operator, and the regulations of the FAA applicable to an FAA Part 135 Air Taxi certificate holder. Among other things, the DOT regulates our status as an air carrier, including our U.S. citizenship. The FAA regulates our flight operations and, in this respect, has jurisdiction over our personnel, helicopters, ground facilities and certain technical aspects of our operations. In addition to the FAA, the National Transportation Safety Board is authorized to investigate our helicopter accidents (if any) and to recommend improved safety standards. We are also subject to the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, because of the use of radio facilities in our operations.
Helicopters operating in the U.S. are subject to registration, and their owners are subject to citizenship requirements under the Federal Aviation Act. This Act generally requires that before a helicopter may be legally operated in the U.S., it must be owned by citizens of the U.S., which, in the case of a corporation, means a corporation: (i) organized under the laws of the U.S. or of a state, territory or possession thereof, (ii) of which at least 75% of its voting interests are owned or controlled by persons who are “U.S. citizens” (as defined in the Federal Aviation Act and regulations promulgated thereunder), and (iii) of which the president and at least two-thirds of the board of directors and managing officers are U.S. citizens. We have adopted provisions in our amended and restated Certificate of Incorporation to ensure compliance with the regulations of the FAA.
In Brazil, an operator must be licensed by the National Agency for Civil Aviation. Under applicable Brazilian law, in order to maintain its license, an operator must have Brazilian officers and be controlled by nationals of Brazil, meaning at least 80% of the operator’s voting shares are held by Brazilian nationals. The majority holder of voting shares in Aeróleo is a Brazilian national and therefore this subsidiary is currently controlled within the meaning of Brazil licensing requirements. Our ability to conduct our helicopter operating business in Brazil is dependent on our ability to maintain Aeróleo’s AOC.
We are subject to state and local laws and regulations including, but not limited to, significant state regulations for our emergency response SAR and air medical services. In addition, our international operations, primarily helicopter leasing and our joint ventures, are required to comply with the laws and regulations in the jurisdictions in which they conduct business.
Environmental Compliance. Our business is subject to international and U.S. federal, state and local laws and regulations relating to environmental protection and occupational safety and health, including laws that govern the discharge of oil and pollutants into navigable waters. If we fail to comply with these environmental laws and regulations, administrative, civil and criminal penalties may be imposed, and we may become subject to regulatory enforcement actions in the form of injunctions and cease and desist orders. We may also be subject to civil claims arising out of a pollution event. These laws and regulations may expose us to strict, joint and several liability for the conduct of or conditions caused by others or for our own acts even though these actions were in compliance with all applicable laws and regulations at the time they were performed. To date, such laws and regulations have not had a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
These laws include the federal Water Pollution Control Act, also known as the Clean Water Act, which imposes restrictions on the discharge of pollutants to the navigable waters of the U.S. In addition, because our operations generate and, in some cases, involve the transportation of hazardous wastes, we are subject to the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, which regulates the use, generation, transportation, treatment, storage and disposal of hazardous and certain non-hazardous wastes. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, referred to as CERCLA or the Superfund law, and certain comparable state laws, strict, joint and several liability can be imposed without regard to fault or the legality of the original

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conduct on certain classes of persons that contributed to the release of a hazardous substance into the environment. These persons include the owner and operator of a contaminated site where a hazardous substance release occurred and any company that transported, disposed of or arranged for the transport or disposal of hazardous substances, even from inactive operations or closed facilities that have been released into the environment. In addition, neighboring landowners or other third parties may file claims for personal injury, property damage and recovery of response cost. We currently own, lease, or operate properties and facilities that, in some cases, have been used for industrial activities for many years. Hazardous substances, wastes, or hydrocarbons may have been released on or under the properties owned or leased by us, or on or under other locations where such substances have been taken for disposal. In addition, some of these properties have been operated by third parties or by previous owners whose treatment, storage and disposal or release of hazardous substances, wastes, or hydrocarbons was not under our control. These properties and the substances disposed or released on them may be subject to CERCLA and analogous state laws. Under such laws, we could be required to remove previously disposed substances and wastes, remediate contaminated property, or perform remedial activities to prevent future contamination.
In addition, our customers in the oil and gas exploration, development and production industry are affected by environmental laws and regulations that restrict their activities (and have become stricter as a result of the Deepwater Horizon incident) and may result in reduced demand for our services.
We believe that our operations are currently in material compliance with all environmental laws and regulations. We do not expect that we will be required to make capital expenditures in the near future that are material to our financial position or operations to comply with environmental laws and regulations; however, because such laws and regulations are frequently changing and may impose stricter requirements, we cannot predict the ultimate cost of complying with these laws and regulations. The recent trend in environmental legislation and regulation is generally toward stricter standards, and it is our view that this trend is likely to continue.
We manage exposure to losses from the above-described laws and regulations through our efforts to use only well-maintained, well-managed and well-equipped facilities and equipment and our development of safety and environmental programs, including our insurance program. We believe these efforts will be able to accommodate all reasonably foreseeable environmental regulatory changes. There can be no assurance, however, that any future laws, regulations or requirements or that any discharge or emission of pollutants by us will not have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position or our results of operations.
Safety, Industry Hazards and Insurance
The safety of our passengers and the maintenance of a safe working environment for our employees is our number one operational priority. We believe we have a strong safety culture throughout our organization that is sponsored by our President and Chief Executive Officer, who is responsible for setting the tone at the top. We strive to exceed the stringent safety and performance audit standards set by aviation regulatory bodies and our customers.
Our safety department ensures that our operations comply with government regulations, customer safety requirements and safety standards within our organization, base operating procedures are standardized and our employees are properly trained. A key to maintaining our strong safety record is having highly qualified, experienced and well trained employees. We conduct training and develop, implement, monitor and continuously improve our safety programs to promote a safe working environment and minimize hazards.
We target zero accidents and injuries in the workplace. Helicopter operations are potentially hazardous and may result in incidents or accidents. Hazards such as adverse weather conditions, collisions, fire and mechanical failures may result in death or injury to personnel, damage to equipment and other environmental damage.
We have implemented a safety program that includes, among many other features, (i) transition and recurrent training using flight training devices, (ii) an FAA approved flight operational quality assurance program and (iii) health and usage monitoring systems (“HUMS”), which automatically monitor and report on vibrations and other anomalies on key components of certain helicopters in our fleet.
Employees
As of December 31, 2016, we employed 846 individuals, including 226 pilots and 225 mechanics. We consider our relations with our employees to be good. Certain of our employees in Brazil (approximately 30% of our total workforce) are covered by union or other collective bargaining agreements. If we are involved in any disputes over the terms of these collective bargaining agreements and are unable to negotiate acceptable contract terms with the unions that represent our employees, it could result in strikes, work stoppages or other slowdowns, higher labor costs or other conditions that could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

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Where You Can Find More Information
We are required to file annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements and other information with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Unless otherwise stated herein, these filings are not deemed to be incorporated by reference in this report. All of our filings with the SEC will be available once filed, free of charge, on our website, including our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, Proxy Statements and any amendments to those reports. These reports and amendments will be available on our website as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file the reports or amendments with the SEC. The reference to our website is not intended to incorporate the information on the website into this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Our filings will also be available at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. Information as to the operation of the SEC’s Public Reference Room can be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC maintains a website (www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information. In addition, our Corporate Governance and other policies, and the Board of Directors’ Audit Committee, Compensation Committee and Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee charters are available, free of charge, on our website or in print for stockholders.
ITEM 1A.
RISK FACTORS
Our business, results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, cash flow and prospects may be materially and adversely affected by numerous risks and uncertainties. Although it is not possible to predict or identify all such risks and uncertainties, they may include, but are not limited to, the risks and uncertainties described below. These risks and uncertainties represent some of the more critical risk factors that affect us, as well as the other information that has been provided in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Our business operations or actual results could also be similarly impacted by additional risks and uncertainties that are not currently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial to our operations.
Risk Factors Related to Our Customers and Contracts
Demand for many of our services is impacted by the level of activity in the offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production industry.
In the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, approximately 88%, 78% and 76%, respectively, of our operating revenues were generated by our services, including emergency response SAR services, to companies primarily engaged in offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production activities. Additionally, our leasing customers typically provide services to oil and gas companies in their respective local markets. As a result, demand for our services, and thereby our revenue, profitability and results of operations, are significantly impacted by levels of activity in the offshore oil and gas industry. These levels of activity have historically been volatile and the volatility is likely to continue in future periods. To varying degrees, activity levels in the offshore oil and gas industry are affected by prevailing oil and gas prices, expectations about future prices, price volatility and long-term trends in oil and gas prices. Historically, the prices for oil and gas, and consequently, the levels of activity in the offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production sectors, have been subject to wide fluctuations in response to changes in the supply of and demand for oil and gas, market uncertainty and a variety of additional factors beyond our control, such as:
general economic conditions;
actions of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and other oil producing countries to control prices or change production levels;
the price and availability of alternative fuels;
assessments of offshore drilling prospects compared with land-based opportunities that do not generally require our services;
the costs of exploration, development and production and delivery of oil and natural gas offshore;
expectations about future supply and demand for oil and gas;
availability and rates of discovery of new oil and natural gas reserves in offshore areas, as well as on land;
federal, state, local and international political conditions, and policies including those with respect to local content requirements and the exploration and development of oil and gas reserves;
uncertainty or instability resulting from an escalation or additional outbreak of armed hostilities or other crises in the Middle East or other geographic areas, or further acts of terrorism in the U.S. or elsewhere;
technological advancements affecting exploration, development and production of oil and gas and energy consumption;
weather conditions;
government regulation, including environmental regulation and drilling regulation, permitting and concessions;
regulation of drilling activities and the availability of drilling permits and concessions and environmental regulation; and

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the ability of oil and natural gas companies to generate funds or otherwise obtain capital required for offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production and their capital expenditures budgets.
Beginning in mid-2014, oil and natural gas prices decreased significantly and remained low, compared to recent historical averages, through 2016. This prolonged, significant downturn in oil and gas prices has adversely affected our revenue, profitability and results of operations. We cannot predict future oil and gas price movements. Any continuation of the lower oil and gas price environment or exacerbation thereof could further depress the level of helicopter activity in support of exploration and, to a lesser extent, production activity, which could have a material adverse effect on our revenue, profitability, financial condition, results of operations, cash flow and prospects. No assurance can be given that the recent decline of oil and gas prices will not continue to adversely affect offshore exploration or production operations, or that our operations will not continue to be adversely affected.
Additionally, the level of activity in offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production is affected by the relative economics of and resultant level of activity in land-based oil and gas exploration, development and production.  In recent years, there has been a significant focus on and increase in production from North American shale reservoirs, which has been facilited by hydraulic fracturing and other technologies.  The availability of more economical oil and gas reserves, including, if applicable, North American shale reservoirs, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We are in a cyclical business.
Our industry has historically been cyclical and is affected by the volatility of oil and gas price levels, fluctuations in government programs and spending and general economic conditions. There have been, and in the future may continue to be, periods of high demand followed by periods of low demand for our services. Changes in commodity prices can have a significant effect on demand for our services, and periods of low activity intensify price competition in the industry and could result in our helicopters being idle, or operating at reduced margins, for long periods of time. A prolonged significant downturn in oil and natural gas prices such as the one we are currently experiencing or increased regulation containing onerous compliance requirements is likely to cause a substantial decline in expenditures for exploration, development and production activity, which would result in a decline in demand and lower rates for our services. Similarly, the government agencies with which we do business could face budget cuts or limit spending, which would also result in a decline in demand and lower rates for our services. These changes could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
The implementation by our customers of cost-saving measures could reduce the demand for our services.
Oil and gas companies are continually seeking to implement measures aimed at cost savings, especially during times of depressed oil and gas pricing such as the one we are currently experiencing. In addition to curtailing exploration and development activities, measures taken by our customers to improve efficiencies and reduce costs may include reducing headcount, finding less expensive means for moving personnel offshore, changing rotations for personnel working offshore, pooling helicopter services among operators and requesting rate reductions or pricing concessions. Such measures are some, but not all, of the possible cost-saving initiatives that could result in reduced demand for or pricing of our helicopter transport services. In addition, customers may choose to establish their own helicopter operations or utilize other transportation alternatives, such as marine transport. The continued implementation of these kinds of cost-saving measures could reduce the demand for or pricing of our services and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We rely on a small number of customers for a significant share of our revenues, the loss of any of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We derive a significant portion of our revenues from a limited number of oil and gas exploration, development and production companies and government agencies. Specifically, services provided to Anadarko, Petrobras and BSEE accounted for 24%, 20% and 16% of our revenues, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2016. The portion of our revenues attributable to any single customer may change over time, depending on the level of activity by any such customer, our ability to meet the customer’s needs and other factors, many of which are beyond our control. The loss or reduction of business from any of our significant customers, if not offset by sales to new or existing customers, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Further, to the extent any of our customers or the customers of companies to whom we lease helicopters experience an extended period of operational or financial difficulty, we could face significant counterparty credit risk or such customers could terminate our services generally with the requirement to pay little or no liquidating damages. The occurrence of either of these events could significantly affect our revenues, liquidity, cash flows and results of operations.
Consolidation of and asset sales affecting our customer base could adversely affect demand for our services and reduce our revenues.
Many of our customers are international, independent and major integrated oil and gas exploration, development and production companies. In recent years, these companies have undergone substantial consolidation and engaged in sales of specific

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assets, and additional consolidation and asset sales are possible. Consolidation results in fewer companies to charter or contract for our services. In the event one of our customers combines with, or sells assets to, a company that is using the services of one of our competitors, the combined or successor company could decide to use the services of that competitor or another provider. Further, merger activity among both major and independent oil and natural gas companies affects exploration, development and production activity as the consolidated companies often put projects on hold while integrating operations. Consolidation may also result in an exploration and development budget for a combined company that is lower than the total budget of both companies before consolidation. Reductions in the budgets of oil and gas companies could adversely affect demand for our services that could result in a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our customers include U.S. government agencies that are dependent on budget appropriations, which may fluctuate and, as a result, limit their ability to use our services.
U.S. government agencies, consisting primarily of BSEE, are among our key customers and accounted for 16% of our revenues for the year ended December 31, 2016. Government agencies receive funding through budget appropriations, which are determined through the political process, and as a result, funding for the agencies with which we do business may fluctuate. In recent years, there has been increased Congressional scrutiny of discretionary program spending by the U.S. government in light of concerns over the size of the national debt and lawmakers have discussed the need to cut or impose caps on discretionary spending, which could result in budget cuts to federal agencies to which we provide services. If any of these agencies, and in particular BSEE, experience reductions in their budgets or if they change their spending priorities, their ability or willingness to spend on helicopter services may decline, and they may substantially reduce or cease using our services, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our industry is subject to intense competition.
The helicopter industry is highly competitive. Contracting for helicopter services is often done through a competitive bidding process among those operators having an acceptable safety record, demonstrated reliability, requisite equipment for the job and sufficient resources to provide coverage when primary equipment comes out of service for maintenance. Customers typically make their final choice based on aircraft availability, quality and location of facilities, customer service and price. If we are unable to satisfy the criteria to participate in bids or are otherwise unable to compete effectively, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.
In certain of our international markets where foreign regulations may require that contracts be awarded to local companies owned or controlled by nationals, we may participate in bids as a subcontractor or vendor to the local bidding company. These third party local bidding companies may not be able to win these bids for reasons unrelated to us, our safety record, reliability, or equipment. Accordingly, we may lose potential business, which may be significant, for reasons beyond our control.
We compete against a number of helicopter operators, including other major global helicopter operators such as Bristow and CHC Group Ltd. In the U.S., we face competition for business in the oil and gas industry from three major operators: Bristow, PHI and Rotorcraft Leasing Company, LLC. In our international markets, we also face competition from local operators in countries where foreign regulations may require that contracts be awarded to local companies owned or controlled by nationals or from operators that are more recognized in some of those markets. There can be no assurance that our competitors will not be successful in capturing a share of our present or potential customer base. We also face potential competition from customers that establish their own flight departments and smaller operators with access to capital that can expand their fleets and operate more sophisticated and costly equipment. In providing air medical transport services, we face competition from Air Medical Group Holdings, Air Methods Corporation, PHI and many other operators. In addition, helicopter leasing companies, such as LCI, Lobo, Macquarie, Milestone and Waypoint, provide offerings that compete with, and could capture a share of, our leasing opportunities to third parties. Our competitors with lower capital costs, including those that may enter bankruptcy and emerge with a more efficient capital structure and lower operating costs, may benefit from a competitive advantage permitting them to offer lease rates for helicopters and/or services that are more attractive than those we can be offer. For example, Milestone was acquired in January 2015 by GE Capital Aviation Services, a company with significant financial resources and a relatively lower cost of capital. We also compete with other providers of SAR, utility and flightseeing services in various markets.
Certain customer contracts are awarded through competitive processes that may require us to expend significant resources with no guaranty of recoupment.
Certain customers award contracts for chartering or other helicopter services through an aggressive competitive bidding process and intense negotiations. Customers typically make their final choice based on the best price for the required helicopter model that is available within the time frame mandated by their needs. In order to successfully compete in such processes and facilitate timely commencement of operations in compliance with customer requirements, we assume risks associated with the substantial time, money, and effort, including proposal development and marketing activities, required to prepare bids and proposals for contracts that may not be awarded to us or for processes that may be canceled prior to the execution of contracts.

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Due to the intense competition in our markets and increasing customer demand for shorter delivery periods, even in cases where customers are not utilizing a competitive bidding process, we might be required to begin implementation of a project before the corresponding order has been finalized. If we do not succeed in winning a bid or securing an opportunity for any reason, we may obtain little or no benefit from the expenditures associated with pursuing such opportunity and may be unable to recoup expended resources on future projects.
Our contracts generally can be terminated or downsized by our customers without penalty.
Many of our operating contracts and charter arrangements contain provisions permitting early termination by the customer for any reason, generally without penalty, and with limited notice requirements. In addition, many of our contracts do not commit our customers to acquire specific amounts of services and permit them to decrease the number of helicopters under contract with a corresponding decrease in the fixed monthly payments without penalty. These contract provisions may facilitate customer requests for rate reductions, pricing concessions and other favorable revisions to negotiated terms that may be available from our competitors, especially during a market downturn such as the one we are currently experiencing. As a result, you should not place undue reliance on the strength of our customer contracts or the terms of those contracts. The termination or modification of contracts by our significant customers or the decrease in such customers’ usage of our helicopter services could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our customers may shift risk to us.
We give to and receive from our customers indemnities relating to damages caused or sustained by us in connection with our operations. Our customers’ changing views on risk allocation may cause us to accept greater risk to win new business or may result in our losing business if we are not prepared to assume such risks. To the extent that we accept such additional risk, and seek to insure against it, if possible, our insurance premiums could rise. If we cannot insure against such additional risks or otherwise choose not to do so, we could be exposed to catastrophic losses in the event such risks are realized.
Our fixed operating expenses and long-term customer contracts could adversely affect our business under certain circumstances.
Our profitability is directly related to demand for our services. A significant portion of our operating expenses that are related to crew wages and benefits, insurance and maintenance programs are fixed and must be paid even when our helicopters are not actively servicing customers and generating income. A decrease in our revenues could therefore result in a disproportionate decrease in our earnings, as a substantial portion of our operating expenses would remain unchanged. Similarly, the discontinuation of any rebates, discounts or preferential financing terms offered to us by manufacturers or suppliers would have the effect of increasing our fixed expenses, and without a corresponding increase in our revenues, could negatively impact our results of operations.
Increases in supplier, fuel, labor, insurance, and other costs are typically passed through to our customers through rate increases where possible, including as a component of contract escalation charges. However, certain of our contracts are long-term in nature and may not have escalation or escalation may be tied to an index, which may not increase as rapidly as the associated costs. These escalations may not be sufficient or we may not be able to realize the full benefit therefrom during a market downturn to enable us to recoup increased costs in full thereby resulting in lower margins. There can be no assurance that we will be able to estimate costs accurately or recover increased costs by passing such costs on to our customers. Further, we may not be successful in identifying or securing cost escalations for other costs that may escalate during the applicable customer contract term. During a prolonged market downturn such as the one we are currently experiencing, we may not be able to realize the benefit of any such escalations as a result of customer pricing sensitivities, which could adversely impact the profitability of such contracts. In the event that we are unable to fully recover material costs that escalate during the terms of our customer contracts, the profitability of our customer contracts and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.
Risk Factors Related to Our Operations
Our operations involve a degree of inherent risk that may not be covered by our insurance or may increase our costs.
The operation of helicopters is subject to various risks, including catastrophic disasters, crashes, collisions, adverse weather conditions, mechanical failures or damage to our facilities, which may result in loss of life, personal injury and/or damage to property and equipment and the suspension of, or restriction in, our operations. Our helicopters have been involved in accidents in the past, some of which included loss of life, personal injury and property damage. We, or third parties operating our helicopters, may experience accidents or damage to our assets in the future. These risks could endanger the safety of both our and our customers’ personnel, equipment, cargo and other property, as well as the environment. If any of these events were to occur with equipment that we operate or lease to third parties, we could experience loss of revenue, termination of charter contracts, higher insurance rates and damage to our reputation and customer relationships. In addition, to the extent an accident occurs with a helicopter we operate or by assets supporting our operations, we could be held liable for resulting damages. The occurrence of any such incident could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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In addition, other operators may experience accidents or safety issues with a particular model of helicopter that we operate or lease. Where such an accident or safety issue with a particular model occurs, our customers, their employees or the unions to which our customer’s employees belong may refuse to use such model, a regulatory body may ground that particular model of helicopter or we may be forced to take such model out of service until the cause of the accident or concern is adequately addressed, any of which may result in a reduction of revenues and a loss of customers. While we seek to mitigate the financial impact of these risks and preserve our rights through commercial and other arrangements, such mitigation efforts may not be successful or available in all circumstances and our financial condition and results of operations may fluctuate from period to period as a result of incidents or our mitigation efforts. In addition, the market value of a helicopter model may be permanently reduced if such model were to be considered less desirable for future service, in which case the book value of inventory for such aircraft may be impaired. Most recently, in April 2016, an Airbus Helicopters H225 (also known as an EC225LP) model helicopter operated by another helicopter operator was involved in an accident in Norway. The helicopter was carrying eleven passengers and two crew members at the time of the accident. The accident resulted in thirteen fatalities. The cause of the accident is under investigation by the relevant authorities. The Accident Investigation Board Norway (“AIBN”) published preliminary reports that contained findings from the investigation into the accident in May and June 2016 and February 2017. Pursuant to a safety recommendation published by the AIBN, a number of regulatory authorities issued safety directives suspending operations, with limited exceptions, of all Airbus H225 and AS332L2 model helicopters registered in their jurisdictions, and a number of customers and operators voluntarily suspended operations of those two helicopter models. We own nine H225 helicopters, including five that are currently located in the U.S., three that are currently located in Brazil and one that is currently located in Norway.  All of our H225 helicopters are currently subject to operational suspension. As of December 31, 2016, the net book value of our H225 helicopters and related inventory of parts and equipment was $160.7 million. Any extended suspension or grounding of a particular helicopter model, such as the H225 and AS332L2, could increase the number of idle helicopters of such model, increase the supply of helicopters of such model available for sale and negatively impact the market value of that helicopter model. We cannot anticipate how long the suspension of H225 helicopter operations will last, the market receptivity of the H225 helicopter for future oil and gas operations if the operational suspension is lifted, the potential impact on residual values of these helicopters or how the suspension may affect the secondary market for this model.   Even if the suspension is lifted, our customers, their employees or the unions to which our customers’ employees belong may refuse to use such model. As a result, the impact of a long-term suspension could have material adverse impact on our results of operations or financial condition.
We carry insurance, including hull and liability, liability and war risk, general liability, workers’ compensation and other insurance customary in the industry in which we operate. Our insurance coverage is subject to deductibles and maximum coverage amounts, the aggregate impact of which could be material. Our insurance policies are also subject to compliance with certain conditions, the failure of which could lead to a denial of coverage as to a particular claim or the voiding of a particular insurance policy. We cannot ensure that our existing coverage will be sufficient to protect against all potential liabilities or the total amount of insured claims and liabilities, that we will be able to maintain our existing coverage in the future, or that our existing coverage can be renewed at commercially reasonable rates without a substantial increase in premiums. In addition, future terrorist activity, risks of war, accidents or other events could increase our insurance premiums. Even in cases where insurance covers the costs of repair due to damage to a helicopter, there may be a diminution in the value of the helicopter as result of it being less desirable for future service, which would likely not be covered by insurance. Furthermore, we are not generally insured for loss of profit, loss of use of our helicopters, business interruption or loss of flight hours. The loss, or limited availability, of our liability insurance coverage, inadequate coverage from our liability insurance or substantial increases in future premiums could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, liquidity, cash flows and results of operations. Any material liability not covered by insurance or for which third-party indemnification is not available, would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, liquidity, cash flows and results of operations.
Failure to maintain an acceptable safety record may have an adverse impact on our ability to attract and retain customers.
Our customers consider safety and reliability as two of the primary attributes in selecting a helicopter service provider. We must maintain a record of safety and reliability that is acceptable to, and in certain instances is contractually required by, our customers. In an effort to maintain an appropriate standard, we incur considerable costs to maintain the quality of our safety and training programs and our fleet of helicopters. For example, we have implemented a safety program that includes, among many other features, (i) transition and recurrent training using flight training devices, (ii) an FAA approved flight operational quality assurance program and (iii) HUMS, which automatically monitors and reports on vibrations and other anomalies on key components of certain helicopters in our fleet. In addition, many of our customers regularly conduct audits of our operations and safety programs. We cannot be assured that our safety program or our other efforts will provide an adequate level of safety, an acceptable safety record or satisfactory customer audit results. If we fail to maintain standards of safety and reliability that are satisfactory to our customers, our ability to retain current customers and attract new customers may be adversely affected. Moreover, accidents or similar disasters involving helicopters operated by us or by another helicopter operator could cause significant adverse publicity, impact customer confidence, lead to a reduction in customer contracts or result in the mandatory or voluntary grounding of our helicopters or other interruption of services to our customers, particularly if such accident or disaster were due to a safety fault in a helicopter model in our fleet. Our helicopters have been involved in accidents in the past, some of which have included loss of

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life and property damage. We may experience similar accidents in the future. Failure to maintain an acceptable safety record may have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We may not be able to obtain work on acceptable terms covering some of our new helicopters, and some of our new helicopters may replace existing helicopters already under contract, which could adversely affect the utilization of our existing fleet.
As of December 31, 2016, we had placed orders for 12 new helicopters and have options to purchase an additional 10 helicopters. Many of our new helicopters may not be covered by customer contracts when they are placed into service, and we cannot assure you as to when we will be able to utilize these new helicopters or on what terms. The ability to place new helicopters into service is highly affected by activity in the offshore oil and gas market, which in turn is affected by oil and gas prices. To the extent our helicopters are covered by a customer contract, the typical duration of such contracts is generally too short to recover our full cost of purchasing the helicopter requiring us to seek frequent renewals and subjecting us to the risk that we will be unable to recoup our investment in the helicopter. Once a new helicopter is delivered to us, we generally spend between two and three months to install equipment and configure the helicopter to our specifications before we place it into service. As a result, there can be a significant delay between the delivery date for a new helicopter and when it begins to generate revenues for us. We also expect that some of our customers may request new helicopters in lieu of our existing helicopters, which could adversely affect the utilization of our existing fleet. Our inability to profitably deploy our aircraft could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operation.
The current excess capacity of our heavy helicopters is higher than in recent periods.  Our fleet’s excess helicopters include those that are not otherwise under customer contracts, undergoing maintenance, dedicated for charter activity or subject to operational suspension.  Although we take actions to minimize excess capacity, we expect a certain level of excess capacity at any given time in an aviation logistics business as a result of the evolving nature of customers’ needs.  As a result of the higher excess capacity, there may be some lag time before helicopters that are not under customer contracts are placed with other customers.  If we are not successful in securing sufficient new contracts, we could experience a decline in the near-term utilization of our medium and heavy helicopters that could impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our dependence on a small number of helicopter manufacturers poses a significant risk to our business and prospects.
Although our fleet includes equipment from all four of the major helicopter manufacturers, our current fleet expansion and replacement needs rely on three manufacturers. If any of the manufacturers with whom we contract face production delays due to, for example, natural disasters, labor strikes or unavailability of skilled labor, we may experience a significant delay in the delivery of previously ordered helicopters. During these periods, we may not be able to obtain additional helicopters with acceptable pricing, delivery dates or other terms. Delivery delays or our inability to obtain acceptable helicopters would adversely affect our revenues and profitability and jeopardize our ability to meet the demands of our customers and execute our business strategy. Furthermore, we may be required by regulatory authorities or voluntarily decide to temporarily or permanently remove certain helicopter models from service following certain incidents or accidents, thereby increasing our reliance on other models. The lack of availability of new helicopters resulting from a backlog in orders or unavailability of certain helicopter models for service could result in an increase in prices for certain types of used helicopters.
A shortfall in availability of aircraft components, parts and subsystems required for maintenance and repairs of our helicopters and supplier cost increases could adversely affect us.
In connection with required repairs and maintenance that we perform or are performed by others on our helicopters, we rely on seven key vendors (Leonardo-Finmeccanica Helicopters, Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, Airbus Helicopters Inc., Bell Helicopter Textron Inc., Pratt and Whitney Canada, Turbomeca USA, Inc. and Honeywell International) for the supply and overhaul of components on our helicopters. Consolidations involving suppliers could further reduce the number of alternative suppliers for us and increase the cost of components. These vendors have historically been the manufacturers of helicopter components and parts, and their factories tend to work at or near full capacity supporting the helicopter production lines for new equipment. This leaves little capacity for the production of parts requirements for maintenance of our helicopters. The tight production schedules, as well as new regulatory requirements, the availability of raw materials or commodities, or the need to upgrade parts or product recalls, can add to backlogs, resulting in key parts being in limited supply or available on an allocation basis. To the extent that these suppliers also supply parts for helicopters used by the U.S. military, parts delivery for our helicopters may be delayed during periods in which there are high levels of military operations. Our inability to perform timely repair and maintenance could result in our helicopters being underutilized and cause us to lose opportunities with existing or potential customers, each of which could have an adverse impact on our results of operations. Furthermore, our operations in remote or foreign locations, where delivery of these components and parts could result in additional costs or take a significant period of time, may also impact our ability to repair and maintain our helicopters. Although every effort is made to mitigate such impact by attempting to store nearby a sufficient amount of key, integral parts, a delay in delivery may pose a risk to our results of operations. In addition, supplier cost increases for critical helicopter components and parts can also adversely impact our results of operations. If we store too few of these parts, we could incur the type of maintenance and repair delays described above. On the other hand, if we store too many parts in remote locations, a portion of them could become unusable or obsolete, causing us to record impairment charges. Cost increases are

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passed on to our customers through rate increases where possible, including as a component of contract escalation charges. However, certain of our contracts are long-term in nature and may not have escalation or escalation may be tied to an index that may not increase as rapidly as the cost of parts. Further, we may not be able to realize the benefit of such escalation clauses during a market downturn, which could adversely impact the profitability of such contracts. In addition, as many of our helicopters are manufactured by two European-based companies, the cost of spare parts could be impacted by changes in currency exchange rates.
The operation of our fleet requires us to carry spare parts and other inventory to perform scheduled and unscheduled maintenance activity.  Changes in the aircraft model types or the timing of exit from model types of our fleet may result in spare parts and inventory levels in excess of those required to support our fleet over its remaining life.  Additionally, certain spare parts or inventory may become obsolete or dormant as a result of changes in the use of such parts on aircraft and maintenance needs.  These fleet changes or other external factors can result in impairment of spare part or inventory balances where we expect that excess, dormant or obsolete spare parts or inventory will not recover its carrying value through sales to third parties or disposal.
Our operations depend on facilities we use throughout the world that are subject to physical and other risks that could disrupt operations.
Our facilities could be damaged or our operations could be disrupted by a natural disaster, labor strike, war, political unrest, terrorist activity or a pandemic. We operate numerous bases in and along the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and we are particularly exposed to risk of loss or damage from hurricanes in that region. In addition, our operations in Alaska are at risk from earthquake activity. Although we have obtained property damage insurance, a major catastrophe such as a hurricane, earthquake or other natural disaster at any of our sites, or significant labor strikes, work stoppages, political unrest, war or terrorist activities in any of the areas where we conduct operations, could result in a prolonged interruption or stoppage of our business or material sub-parts of it. Any disruption resulting from these events could result in a loss of sales and customers. Our insurance may not adequately compensate us for any of these events, and, if not so covered, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We rely on the secondary helicopter market to dispose of our older aircraft and parts as part of our on-going fleet management efforts.
We manage our fleet by evaluating expected demand for helicopter services across global markets and the type of helicopters needed to meet this demand. As offshore oil and gas drilling and production globally moves to deeper water, more heavy and medium aircraft and newer technology aircraft may be required. As helicopters come off of current contracts or are replaced by newer models, our management evaluates our future needs for such helicopters against our ability to recover our remaining investments in these aircraft through sales into the aftermarket. We are dependent upon the secondary helicopter and parts market to dispose of our helicopters as our fleet continues to evolve to address changes in demand driven by customer needs. The number of helicopter sales and the amount of gains and losses recorded on these sales is unpredictable. The loss of our ability to dispose of helicopters and related equipment in the secondary market could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
The book value of our owned helicopters as reflected on our balance sheet is based on our practice of depreciating our helicopters over their expected useful life to the expected salvage value to be received for such helicopter at the end of that life.  From time to time, we disclose our net asset value, which is based, in large part, on the fair market value of our helicopters derived from a combination of available market data, utilization of estimates, application of significant judgment and assistance of valuation specialists, including values obtained from third party analysts. There is no assurance that either the book value or net asset value of any helicopter represents the amount that we could obtain from an unaffiliated third party in an arm’s length sale of the aircraft, and market factors will impact the need for any write-downs of the book value, any recorded gains or losses on helicopter sales and our ability to realize the estimated fair market value of our fleet. 
Any changes in the supply of, or demand for, helicopters could impact the secondary market. Industry conditions, including the global oil and gas market downturn we are currently experiencing, could result in a decline in demand for helicopters in that end market and a corresponding increase in idle helicopters. A global competitor filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in May 2016, and it has disclosed that, to date, it has obtained court approval to reject leases resulting in the return to lessors of 78 helicopters, to abandon five owned helicopters to its lenders and to restructure the lease and finance terms with respect to numerous other helicopters. This competitor has disclosed that it intends to emerge from bankruptcy with 100 fewer helicopters in its fleet than it had prior to filing for bankruptcy protection. This competitor’s efforts to reduce the size of its fleet are expected to increase the number of idle helicopters and could potentially increase the supply of helicopters available for sale and/or lease. These changes in supply could adversely impact helicopter rates and pricing of helicopters in the secondary market.
Following the April 2016 accident involving an Airbus H225 model helicopter operated by the global competitor referenced above, a number of regulatory authorities issued safety directives suspending operations, with limited exceptions, of all Airbus H225 and AS332L2 model helicopters registered in their jurisdictions, and a number of customers and operators voluntarily suspended operations of those two helicopter models. Any extended suspension or grounding of a particular helicopter model, such as the H225 and AS332L2, could increase the number of idle helicopters of such model, increase the supply of

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helicopters of such model available for sale, negatively impact the market value of that helicopter model and, under extreme circumstances, make them impossible to sell in whole. As of December 31, 2016, the net book value of our H225 helicopters and related inventory of parts and equipment was $160.7 million. Any negative impact on the demand for helicopters or increase in the supply of helicopters available for sale could impair our ability to dispose of helicopters and related equipment in the secondary market or reduce the amounts that we could obtain therefrom, reduce the market value of our owned helicopter fleet, or affect our ability to effectively manage the size and mix of our fleet, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
The market value of our helicopter fleet is dependent on a number of external factors.
The fair market value of each of our helicopters is dependent upon a variety of factors, including:
general economic and market conditions affecting the oil and gas industry, including the price of oil and gas and the level of oil and gas exploration, development and production;
the number of comparable helicopters servicing the market;
the types and sizes of comparable helicopters available for sale or lease;
the specific age and attributes of the helicopter;
demand for the helicopter in different industries; and
changes in regulation or competition from other air transport companies and other modes of transportation.
As a result of the prolonged market downturn that we are currently experiencing, the fair market value of our helicopters has declined in recent periods and may decline further in the future. A decline in helicopter values could result in asset impairment charges, breaches of loan covenants or lower proceeds upon helicopter sales, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.
The concentration of certain helicopter models in our fleet could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations should any problems specific to these particular models occur.
As of December 31, 2016, two helicopter models - the H225 heavy helicopter model and AW139 medium helicopter model - comprised approximately 63% of the net book value of our helicopter fleet.   If the market demand for either of these models declines, if either of these models experiences technical difficulties or if either of these models is involved in an operational incident, it could cause a diminution in value of the affected model.  In addition, the bankruptcy or shutdown of a helicopter operator or lessor with a large fleet of such helicopter models may result in an oversupply of such model being made available to the market, which could reduce the rates earned by, and/or the value of, such helicopter model.  Due to the high concentration of these models in our fleet, a significant decline in value of any of these models that is other than temporary could result in an impairment to the carrying value of our helicopter fleet. The occurrence of any of these events could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.
For example, the operation of our nine H225 helicopters is currently suspended following a recent accident involving this helicopter model operated by a competitor.  We cannot anticipate how long the suspension of H225 helicopter operations will last, the market receptivity of the H225 helicopter for future oil and gas operations, the potential impact on residual values of these helicopters or how the suspension may affect the secondary market for this model.   Even if the suspension is lifted, our customers, their employees or the unions to which our customer’s employees belong may refuse to use such model.  As a result, the impact of a long-term suspension could have material adverse impact on our results of operations or financial condition.
We derive revenue from non-wholly owned entities. If we are unable to maintain good relations with the other owners of such non-wholly owned entities, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.
Local regulatory requirements may require us to conduct our international operations using another operator’s AOC through non-wholly owned entities with local shareholders or through strategic alliances with foreign partners. We have in the past, and may in the future continue to, derive significant amounts of revenue from these entities. We depend to some extent upon good relations with our local shareholders to ensure profitable operations of our non-wholly owned entities. These shareholders may have interests that are not always aligned with ours and may not be required to provide any funding that these entities may require. Furthermore, certain shareholders’ agreements with local shareholders contain call arrangements that allow the local shareholder to elect to purchase our shares and/or require us to bear all of the losses of such entities. The calls are exercisable in certain circumstances, including liquidation and events of default. In the event shareholder disputes arise or we lose our interest in our non-wholly owned entities and/or find other local partners, it could negatively impact our revenues and profit sharing from such entities, and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We are highly dependent upon the level of activity in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico which is a mature exploration, development and production region.
For the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, our operating revenues derived from services provided to customers primarily engaged in oil and gas activities in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico represented approximately 62%, 66% and 67%,

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respectively, of our total operating revenues. The U.S. Gulf of Mexico is a mature exploration, development and production region that has undergone substantial seismic survey and exploration activity for many years. We cannot predict the levels of activity in this area. A large number of oil and gas properties in the region have already been drilled and additional prospects of sufficient size and quality could be more difficult to identify. Generally, the production from these mature oil and gas properties is declining and future production may decline to the point that such properties are no longer economically viable to operate, in which case our services with respect to such properties may no longer be needed. Oil and gas companies may not identify sufficient additional drilling sites to replace those that become depleted. If activity in oil and gas exploration, development and production in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico materially declines, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.
Any significant development impacting deepwater drilling in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico could adversely affect us.
We are highly dependent on offshore oil and gas activities in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. As a result of the well-publicized sinking of the Deepwater Horizon, a semi-submersible deepwater drilling rig operating in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico after an apparent blowout and fire resulting in a significant flow of hydrocarbons from the BP Plc. Macondo well, the U.S. Department of Interior temporarily imposed a moratorium on offshore drilling operations and issued new rules designed to improve drilling and workplace safety in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, BSEE, Office of National Resources Revenue and other regulatory agencies are expected to further issue new safety and environmental guidelines and regulations for drilling in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and other geographic regions, the result of which may increase the costs and regulatory burden of exploration, development and production, reduce the area of operations for offshore oil and gas activities and result in permitting delays. We are monitoring legislation and regulatory developments; however, it is difficult to predict the ultimate impact of any new guidelines, regulations or legislation. A prolonged suspension of drilling activity or permitting delays in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and other geographic locations in which we operate, new regulations and/or increased liability for companies operating in the offshore oil and gas sector, whether or not caused by a new incident in any region, could result in reduced demand for our services and may have a material adverse effect on our cash flows, business, financial condition and results of operations.
We are subject to risks associated with our international operations.
We operate and lease helicopters in international markets. During the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, approximately 31%, 21% and 15%, respectively, of our operating revenues were derived from our international operations. Our strategy contemplates growth in our international operations in the future. Our international operations are subject to a number of risks, including:
political conditions and events, including embargoes;
restrictive actions by U.S. and foreign governments, including those in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, India, Suriname and the United Kingdom, which could limit our ability to provide services in those countries;
fluctuations in currency exchange rates;
the imposition of withholding or other taxes on foreign income, tariffs or restrictions on foreign trade and investment;
adverse tax consequences;
limitations on repatriation of earnings or currency exchange controls and import/export quotas;
nationalization, expropriation, asset seizure, blockades and blacklisting;
limitations in the availability, amount or terms, of insurance coverage;
loss of contract rights and inability to adequately enforce contracts;
the lack of well-developed legal systems in some countries that could make it difficult for us to enforce contractual rights;
political, social and economic instability, war and civil disturbances or other risks that may limit or disrupt markets, such as terrorist attacks, piracy and kidnapping;
fluctuations in currency exchange rates, hard currency shortages and controls on currency exchange that affect demand for our services and our profitability;
potential noncompliance with a wide variety of laws and regulations, such as the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977 (the “FCPA”), and similar non-U.S. laws and regulations, including the U.K. Bribery Act 2010 (the “UKBA”) and Brazil’s Clean Companies Act (the “BCCA”);
labor strikes;
changes in general economic conditions;
adverse changes in foreign laws or regulatory requirements, including those with respect to flight operations and environmental protections; and
difficulty in staffing and managing widespread operations.
If we are unable to adequately address these risks, it may impact our ability to operate in certain international markets and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

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Our future growth may be impacted by our ability to expand into markets outside of our existing markets, which include the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, Brazil, Colombia and Alaska.
Our future growth will depend on our ability to expand into markets outside of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, Brazil, Colombia and Alaska. Expansion of our business depends on our ability to operate in these other regions and may be adversely affected by:
local regulations restricting foreign ownership of helicopter operators;
requirements to award contracts to local operators; and
the number and location of new drilling concessions granted by foreign governments.
We cannot predict the restrictions or requirements that may be imposed in the countries in which we operate or wish to operate. If we are unable to continue to operate or obtain and retain contracts in markets outside of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, Brazil, Colombia or Alaska, our future business, financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected and we may not be able to successfully grow our operations outside of these regions.
Our diversification efforts into other aviation services may prove unsuccessful.
Our business has traditionally been significantly dependent upon the level of offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production activity. The prolonged market downturn in the oil and gas industry that we are currently experiencing has negatively impacted our financial results and could continue to negatively impact our financial results in future periods. We consistently look for opportunities to diversify our operations. While diversification into other aviation services is intended to grow the business and offset the cyclical nature of oil and gas activities, we cannot be certain that the associated diversification benefits related to other services that we may offer in the future will be realized.
In order to support or grow our business, we may require additional capital in the future, which may not be available to us.
Our business is capital intensive, and to the extent we do not generate sufficient cash from operations, we will need to raise additional funds through bank financing and other public or private debt or equity financing to execute our strategy and make the capital expenditures required to operate our business. Adequate sources of capital funding may not be available when needed, or may not be available on favorable terms. The availability of financing may also be affected by oil and gas prices and exploration, development and production activity levels. If we raise additional funds by issuing equity or certain types of convertible debt securities, the holdings of our existing stockholders may be diluted. Further, if we raise additional debt financing, we will incur additional interest expense, the terms of such debt may be less favorable than our existing debt and we may be required to pledge our assets as security or be subjected to financial and/or operating covenants that affect our ability to conduct our business. Our ability to engage in any capital raising activities are subject to the restrictions in our existing debt instruments and in the Tax Matters Agreement. Refer to Part III, Item 13 “Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions-Agreements between SEACOR and Era Group Relating to the Separation- Tax Matters Agreement” for additional information. If our levels of funding are insufficient at any time in the future, or we are unable to conduct capital raising activities for any reason, we may be unable to acquire additional helicopters, take advantage of business opportunities or respond to competitive pressures, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
There are risks associated with our debt structure.
As of December 31, 2016, our indebtedness consisted of $144.8 million aggregate principal amount of our 7.750% senior unsecured notes due 2022 (the “7.750% Senior Notes”), $65.0 million of borrowings outstanding under the Revolving Credit Facility, $23.2 million of aggregate indebtedness outstanding under two promissory notes and $3.4 million of installment payments due to taxing authorities in Brazil. In addition, we had the ability to borrow up to an additional $120.2 million under our Revolving Credit Facility, after taking into account the financial ratios we are required to maintain under the facility as discussed in more detail below.
The agreements governing our Revolving Credit Facility and the indenture governing our 7.750% Senior Notes contain various covenants that limit our ability to, among other things:
make investments;
incur or guarantee additional indebtedness;
incur liens or pledge the assets of certain of our subsidiaries;
pay dividends or make investments;
enter into transactions with affiliates; and
enter into certain sales of all or substantially all of our assets, mergers and consolidations.
On October 27, 2016, we entered into a third amendment to our Revolving Credit Facility that, among other things, revised our maintenance covenants to provide additional flexibility, reduced the aggregate principal amount of the revolving loan commitments and added a condition to borrowing and a repayment mechanism in connection with excess cash amounts. Our Revolving Credit Facility, as amended, requires that we maintain a maximum senior secured leverage ratio, a minimum interest coverage ratio and a minimum ratio of the sum of the fair market value of mortgaged helicopters, accounts receivable and inventory

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to total funded and committed debt, each of these ratios as defined in the Revolving Credit Facility. Failure to comply with these covenants is an event of default under the facility, and therefore, our ability to borrow under our Revolving Credit Facility is dependent on and limited by our ability to comply with such covenants. Refer to Note 8 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information.
If we experience reduced operating revenues, our ability to utilize our Revolving Credit Facility may be limited or we may require additional investments in our capital stock to maintain our financial ratio within applicable limits. Any inability to borrow under our Revolving Credit Facility could have a material adverse effect on our ability to make capital expenditures, our results of operations and our liquidity. Further, failure to maintain the financial ratios required under our Revolving Credit Facility would constitute an event of default, allowing the lenders under our Revolving Credit Facility to declare the entire balance of any and all sums payable under the facility immediately due and payable, which in turn would permit the holders of our 7.750% Senior Notes to accelerate maturity of the 7.750% Senior Notes.
Our ability to meet our debt service obligations and refinance our indebtedness, including any future debt that we may incur, will depend upon our ability to generate cash in the future from operations, financings or asset sales, which are subject to general economic conditions, industry cycles, seasonality and other factors, some of which may be beyond our control. If we cannot repay or refinance our debt as it becomes due, we may be forced to sell assets or take other disadvantageous actions, including reducing financing in the future for working capital, capital expenditures and general corporate purposes or dedicating an unsustainable level of our cash flow from operations to the payment of principal and interest on our indebtedness. Any failure to repay or refinance may also permit the lenders who hold such debt to accelerate amounts due, which would potentially trigger default or acceleration of our other debt. In addition, our ability to withstand competitive pressures and to react to changes in our industry could be impaired.
Our future debt levels and the terms of any future indebtedness we may incur may contain restrictive covenants and limit our liquidity and our ability to obtain additional financing and pursue acquisitions and joint ventures or purchase new helicopters. Tight credit conditions could limit our ability to secure additional financing, if required, due to difficulties accessing the credit and capital markets.
Any downgrade in the credit ratings for our public debt securities could limit our ability to obtain future financing, increase our borrowing costs and adversely affect the market price of our outstanding debt securities, or otherwise impair our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Credit rating agencies continually review our corporate ratings and ratings for our public debt securities. Credit rating agencies also evaluate the industries in which we and our affiliates operate as a whole and may change their credit rating for us based on their overall view of such industries. There can be no assurance that any rating assigned to our currently outstanding public debt securities will remain in effect for any given period of time or that any such ratings will not be lowered, suspended or withdrawn entirely by a rating agency if, in that rating agency’s judgment, circumstances so warrant.
A downgrade of our credit ratings could, among other things:
limit our access to the capital markets or otherwise adversely affect the availability of other new financing on favorable terms, if at all;
result in more restrictive covenants in agreements governing the terms of any future indebtedness that we may incur;
increase our cost of borrowing;
adversely affect the market price of our 7.750% Senior Notes; and
impair our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Upon a change of control, holders of our 7.750% Senior Notes will have the right to require us to purchase their notes, which could have certain adverse ramifications.
Upon a “Change of Control Trigger Event” (as defined in the indenture governing our 7.750% Senior Notes), each holder of our 7.750% Senior Notes will have the right to require us to purchase any or all of that holder’s notes at a price of 101% of the principal amount of their notes plus accrued and unpaid interest. If, due to lack of cash, legal or contractual impediments, or otherwise, we fail to discharge these obligations, such failure could constitute an event of default under such notes, which could in turn constitute a default under our other outstanding debt agreements, including our Revolving Credit Facility. Moreover, the existence of these purchase obligations may, in certain circumstances, discourage a sale or takeover of us or the removal of our incumbent directors.
We are exposed to credit risks.
We are exposed to credit risk on trade receivables from the unexpected loss in cash and earnings when a customer cannot meet its obligation to us or when the value of security provided declines. Customer credit risk is further exacerbated during times of depressed oil prices, like that we are currently experiencing. In addition to collection risk, we are exposed to the risk of potential

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contractual termination in the event that a customer voluntarily or involuntarily seeks relief from creditors upon becoming insolvent or unable to repay its debts as they become due and the risk of customers seeking to renegotiate contracts on terms more beneficial to the customer. To mitigate trade credit risk, we have developed credit policies and procedures that are designed to monitor and limit exposure to credit risk on our receivables. Such policies include the review, approval and monitoring of new customers, annual credit evaluations and credit limits. However, there can be no assurance that such procedures will effectively limit our credit risk and avoid losses, and, if not effective, such credit risks could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
In addition, we are exposed to credit risk on our financial investments and instruments that are dependent upon the ability of our counterparties to fulfill their obligations to us. We manage credit risk by entering into arrangements with established counterparties that possess investment grade credit ratings and by monitoring our concentration risk with counterparties on an ongoing basis and through the establishment of credit policies and limits, which are applied in the selection of counterparties.
Our global operations are subject to foreign currency, interest rate, fixed-income, equity and commodity price risks.
We are exposed to currency fluctuations and exchange rate risks. A significant portion of our unfunded capital purchase obligations are denominated in foreign currencies and, although some of these risks may be hedged, fluctuations could significantly impact our cost of purchase and, as a result, our financial condition and results of operation. We purchase some of our helicopters and helicopter parts from foreign manufacturers and maintain operations in foreign countries, which results in portions of our revenues and expenses being denominated in foreign currencies. We attempt to minimize our exposure to currency exchange risk by contracting the majority of our services in U.S. dollars. As a result, a strong U.S. dollar may increase the local cost of our services that are provided under the U.S. dollar denominated contracts, which may reduce demand for our services in foreign countries. Generally, we do not enter into hedging transactions to protect against exchange risks related to our gross revenue or operating expenses.
In addition, currency fluctuations could result in particular helicopter models becoming less expensive for our competitors, which could lead to excess helicopter capacity and increased competition, in turn jeopardizing both pricing and utilization of our equipment. Such currency fluctuations could also impact residual values for certain helicopters priced in foreign currencies.
Because we maintain our financial statements in U.S. dollars, our financial results are vulnerable to fluctuations in the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies, primarily the euro and the Brazilian real. Changes in exchange rates could cause significant changes in our financial position or results of operations.
We operate in countries with foreign exchange controls, including Brazil and India. These controls may limit our ability to repatriate funds from our international operations or otherwise convert local currencies into U.S. dollars. These limitations could adversely affect our ability to access cash from these operations and our liquidity.
Difficult economic and financial conditions could have a material adverse effect on us.
The financial results of our business are both directly and indirectly dependent upon economic conditions throughout the world, which in turn can be impacted by conditions in the global financial markets. These factors are outside our control and changes in circumstances are difficult to predict. Uncertainty about global economic conditions may lead businesses to postpone spending in response to tighter credit and reductions in income or asset values, which may lead many lenders and institutional investors to reduce, and in some cases, cease to provide, funding to borrowers. Weak economic activity may lead government customers to cut back on services. Factors such as interest rates, availability of credit, inflation rates, economic uncertainty, regulatory and tax changes, trade barriers, commodity prices, currency exchange rates and controls, national and international political circumstances (including wars, terrorist acts or security operations) and the failure of lenders participating in our Revolving Credit Facility to fulfill their commitments and obligations under such facility could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and the value of our assets.
As experienced in recent years, a slowdown in economic activity can reduce worldwide demand for energy and result in an extended period of lower oil and natural gas prices. A prolonged reduction in oil and natural gas prices, like that we are currently experiencing, depresses the activity levels of oil and gas companies, which in turn reduces demand for our services. Moreover, weakness in the offshore oil and gas industry adversely impacts the financial position of our customers and the customers of those operators to whom we lease helicopters, which, in turn, may cause them to fail to pay amounts owed to us in a timely manner or at all. Perceptions of a long-term depression of oil and natural gas prices may also further reduce or defer major expenditures by oil and gas companies given the long-term nature of many large-scale development projects. Prolonged weak economic conditions and/or reduced oil and natural gas prices may result in a corresponding decline in the demand for our services and an increase in the volatility of our stock price, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Weather and seasonality can impact our results of operations.

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A significant portion of our revenues is dependent on actual flight hours, which may be impacted by prolonged periods of adverse weather conditions. During the fall and winter months, weather conditions are generally more extreme, with periods of poor visibility, high winds and heavy precipitation in some areas. As a result, oil and gas exploration, development and production activity in areas such as Alaska decreases in winter months. In addition, although some of our helicopters are equipped to fly at night, operations servicing offshore oil and gas transport of passengers and other non-emergency operations are generally conducted during daylight hours. During winter months, there are fewer daylight hours, particularly in Alaska. As a result of adverse weather conditions and lack of daylight, our flight hours, and therefore revenues, tend to decline in the winter months.
Our operations in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico may also be adversely affected by weather. Tropical storm season runs from June through November. Tropical storms and hurricanes limit our ability to operate our helicopters in the proximity of a storm, reduce oil and gas exploration, development and production activity, could result in the incurrence of additional expenses to secure equipment and facilities and may require us to evacuate our aircraft, personnel and equipment out of the path of a storm. In addition, a significant portion of our facilities are located along the coast of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and extreme weather may cause substantial damage to such properties. Despite our efforts to prepare for storms and secure our equipment, we may suffer damage to our helicopters or our facilities, which may impact our ability to provide our services. Any negative impact as a result of adverse weather conditions or the seasonality of our operations may severely and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We may undertake one or more significant corporate transactions that may not achieve their intended results, may result in unforeseeable risks to our business and may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
We continuously evaluate the acquisition of operating businesses and assets and may in the future undertake one or more significant transactions. Any such transaction could be material to our business and could take any number of forms, including mergers, joint ventures and the purchase of equity interests. The consideration for such transactions may include, among other things, cash, common stock or equity interests in us or our subsidiaries, or a contribution of equipment to obtain equity interests. Further, if we were to complete such an acquisition, disposition, investment or other strategic transaction, we may require additional debt or equity financing, which could result in a significant increase in our amount of debt and our debt service obligations or the number of outstanding shares of our Common Stock, thereby diluting holders of our Common Stock outstanding prior to such acquisition. We also routinely evaluate the benefits of disposing of certain of our assets. Such dispositions could take the form of asset sales, mergers or sales of equity interests.
These strategic transactions may not achieve their intended results and may present significant risks, such as insufficient revenues to offset liabilities assumed, potential loss of significant revenues and income streams, increased or unexpected expenses, inadequate return of capital, regulatory or compliance issues, impairment of intangible assets such as goodwill that may be acquired, the triggering of certain covenants in our debt instruments (including accelerated repayment) and unidentified issues not discovered in due diligence. In addition, such transactions could distract management from current operations. As a result of the risks inherent in such transactions, we cannot guarantee that any such transaction will ultimately result in the realization of its anticipated benefits or that it will not have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our inability to attract and retain qualified personnel could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Loss of the services of key management personnel at our corporate and regional headquarters without being able to attract personnel of equal ability could have a material adverse effect on our business. The skills, experience and industry contacts of our senior management significantly benefit our operations and administration. The failure to attract, retain and properly motivate the members of our senior management team and other key employees, or to find suitable replacements for them in the event of death, ill health or their desire to pursue other professional opportunities, could have a material adverse effect on business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our ability to attract and retain qualified pilots, mechanics and other highly skilled personnel is likewise an important factor in our future success. Many of our customers require pilots with very high levels of flight experience. In addition, the maintenance of our helicopters requires mechanics that are trained and experienced in servicing particular makes and models of helicopters. The market for these highly skilled personnel is competitive and we cannot be certain that we will be successful in attracting and retaining qualified personnel in the future. Some of our pilots, mechanics and other highly skilled personnel, as well as those of our competitors, are members of the U.S. military reserves who have been, or could be, called to active duty. If significant numbers of such personnel are called to active duty, it would reduce the supply of such workers and likely increase our labor costs. In addition, if we enter into new markets, obtain additional customer contracts, experience an increase in the demand for our services, add new helicopter models to our fleet or experience a sudden change in demand for a specific model of aircraft, we may be required to hire additional pilots, mechanics and other flight-related personnel, which we may not be able to do on a timely or cost-effective basis. Our failure to attract and retain qualified personnel could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Labor problems could adversely affect us.

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All of our employees in Brazil (representing approximately 30% of our employees) are represented under collective bargaining or union agreements. Any disputes over the terms of these agreements or our potential inability to negotiate acceptable contracts with the unions that represent our employees under these agreements could result in strikes, work stoppages or other slowdowns by the affected workers. Our U.S. employees are not currently represented by a collective bargaining agreement. However, we cannot assure you that our employees will not unionize in the future. Periodically, certain groups of our employees may consider entering into such an agreement.
If our unionized workers engage in a strike, work stoppage or other slowdown, other employees elect to become unionized, existing labor agreements are renegotiated, or future labor agreements contain terms that are unfavorable to us, we could experience a disruption of our operations or higher ongoing labor costs, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Adverse results of legal proceedings could have a material adverse effect on us.
We are currently and may in the future be subject to a variety of legal proceedings and claims that arise out of the ordinary conduct of our business. Results of legal proceedings cannot be predicted with certainty. Irrespective of their merits, legal proceedings may be both lengthy and disruptive to our operations and may cause significant expenditure and diversion of management attention. We may be faced with significant monetary damages or injunctive relief and, should we fail to prevail in any matters brought against us, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Negative publicity may adversely impact us.
Media coverage and public statements that insinuate improper actions by us or relate to accidents or other issues involving the safety of our helicopters or operations, regardless of their factual accuracy or truthfulness, may result in negative publicity, litigation or governmental investigations by regulators. Specifically, accidents involving any aircraft operated by us or another operator could cause substantial adverse publicity affecting us or our industry generally and could lead to the perception that our aircraft are not safe or reliable.
Addressing negative publicity and any resulting litigation or investigations may distract management, increase costs and divert resources. Further, negative publicity may have an adverse impact on our reputation, our customer relationships and the morale of our employees, which could adversely affect our cash flows, business, financial condition and results of operations.
Failure to develop or implement new technologies could affect our results of operations.
Many of the helicopters that we operate are characterized by changing technology, introductions and enhancements of models of helicopters and services and shifting customer demands, including technology preferences. Our future growth and financial performance will depend in part upon our ability to develop, market and integrate new services and to accommodate the latest technological advances and client preferences. In addition, the introduction of new services or technologies, such as unmanned aerial vehicles, that compete with our services could result in our revenues decreasing over time. If we are unable to upgrade our operations or fleet with the latest technological advances in a timely manner, or at all, our business, financial condition and results of operations could suffer. Furthermore, any disruption to computers, communication systems or other technical equipment used by us and our fleet could significantly impair our ability to operate our business efficiently and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We rely on information technology, and if we are unable to protect against service interruptions, data corruption, cyber-based attacks or network security breaches, our operations could be disrupted and our business could be negatively affected.
We rely on information technology networks and systems to process, transmit and store electronic and financial information; to capture knowledge of our business; to coordinate our business across our operation bases and to communicate with our aircraft, within our company and externally with customers, suppliers, partners and other third parties. These information technology systems, some of which are managed by third parties, may be susceptible to damage, disruptions or shutdowns, hardware or software failures, power outages, computer viruses, cyber attacks, telecommunication failures, user errors, lack of support or catastrophic events and we may experience such damages, interruptions, malfunctions or security breaches in the future. Our systems may also be older generations of software which are unable to perform as effectively as, and fail to communicate well with, newer systems.
Our information technology systems are becoming increasingly integrated. If our information technology systems were to suffer severe damage, disruption or shutdown and our business continuity plans do not effectively resolve the issues in a timely manner, we could experience business disruptions, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations and on the ability of management to align and optimize technology to implement business strategies. In addition, cyber attacks could lead to potential unauthorized access and disclosure of confidential information, and data loss and corruption. There is no assurance that we will not experience these service interruptions or cyber attacks in the future. Further, as the frequency, scope and sophistication of cyber attacks continue to evolve, we may be required to expend additional resources

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to continue to modify or enhance our protective measures or to investigate and remediate any vulnerabilities to cyber attacks. A security breach may also lead to potential claims from third parties or employees.
Significant increases in fuel costs can have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Fuel is essential to the operation of our helicopters and to our ability to carry out our transport services and is a key component of our operating expenses. High fuel costs can increase the cost of operating our helicopters. Any increased fuel costs may negatively impact our net sales, margins, operating expenses and results of operations. Although during times of high fuel costs in the past we have been able to pass along a significant portion of the increased costs to our customers, we cannot assure you that we will be able to do so in the future if a prolonged period of high fuel costs occurs. To the extent there is a significant increase in fuel costs that we are unable to pass on to our customers, it may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Risk Factors Relating to Regulations
If we do not restrict the amount of foreign ownership of our Common Stock, we may fail to remain a U.S. citizen, lose our status as a U.S. air carrier and be prohibited from operating helicopters in the U.S., which would adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Since we hold the status of a U.S. air carrier under the regulations of both the U.S. DOT and the FAA and we engage in the operating and leasing of helicopters in the U.S., we are subject to regulations pursuant to the Transportation Code and other statutes (collectively, “Aviation Acts”). The Transportation Code requires that certificates to engage in air transportation be held only by citizens of the U.S. as that term is defined in the relevant section of the Transportation Code. That section requires: (i) that our president and two-thirds of our board of directors and other managing officers be U.S. citizens; (ii) that at least 75% of our outstanding voting stock be owned by U.S. citizens; and (iii) that we must be under the actual control of U.S. citizens. Further, our helicopters operating in the U.S. must generally be registered in the U.S. In order to register such helicopters under the Aviation Acts, we must be owned or controlled by U.S. citizens. Although our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws contain provisions intended to ensure compliance with the provisions of the Aviation Acts, failure to maintain compliance would result in the loss of our air carrier status, prohibit us from operating helicopters in the U.S. and would adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We are subject to governmental regulation that limits foreign ownership of helicopter companies.
We are subject to governmental regulation that limits foreign ownership of helicopter companies in favor of domestic ownership. Failure to comply with regulations and requirements for local ownership in the various markets in which we operate, and may operate in the future, may subject our helicopters to deregistration or impoundment. If required levels of local ownership are not met or maintained, joint ventures in which we have significant investments could also be prohibited from operating within these countries. Deregistration of our helicopters or helicopters operated by our joint venture partners for any reason, including foreign ownership in excess of permitted levels, would have a material adverse effect on our ability to conduct operations within these markets. We cannot assure you that there will be no changes in aviation laws, regulations, required levels of local ownership, or administrative requirements or the interpretations thereof, that could restrict or prohibit our ability to operate in certain regions. Any such restriction or prohibition on our ability to operate may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, as amended, provides the federal government with broad discretion in regulating the leasing of offshore resources for the production of oil and gas.
We currently derive a significant portion of our revenues from services we provide in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico in support of offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production activity. As such, we are subject to the U.S. government’s exercise of authority under the provisions of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act restricts the availability of offshore oil and gas leases by requiring certain lease conditions, such as the implementation of safety and environmental protections, the preparation of spill contingency plans and air quality standards for certain pollutants, the violation of any of which could result in a potential court injunction curtailing operations and lease cancellations. The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act also requires that all pipelines operating on or across the outer continental shelf provide open and nondiscriminatory access to shippers. These provisions could adversely impact exploration and production activity in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. If activity in oil and gas exploration, development and production in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico declines, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.
We are subject to tax and other legal compliance risks, including anti-corruption statutes, the violation of which may adversely affect our business and operations.
As a global business, we are subject to complex laws and regulations in the U.S. and other countries in which we operate. These laws and regulations relate to a number of aspects of our business, including import and export controls, the payment of

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taxes, employment and labor relations, fair competition, data privacy protections, securities regulation, anti-money laundering, anti-corruption, economic sanctions and other regulatory requirements affecting trade and investment. The application of these laws and regulations to our business is often unclear and may sometimes conflict. Compliance with these laws and regulations may involve significant costs or require changes in our business practices that result in reduced revenue and profitability. A failure to comply could also result in significant fines, damages and other criminal sanctions against us, our officers, employees, joint venture partners or strategic partners, prohibitions or additional requirements on the conduct of our business and damage to our reputation. Further, we could be charged with wrongdoing for any violation of such laws and regulations by our agents, local partners or joint ventures, even though such parties may not be subject to the applicable statutes or may not operate under our control. Failure by us or one of our joint ventures or strategic partners to comply with applicable export and trade practice laws could result in civil or criminal penalties and suspension or termination of export privileges. Certain violations of law could also result in suspension or debarment from government contracts. We incur additional legal compliance costs associated with our global regulations and the changes in laws or regulations and related interpretations and other guidance could result in higher expenses and payments. Uncertainty relating to such laws or regulations may also affect how we conduct our operations and structure our investments and could limit our ability to enforce our rights.
In many foreign countries, particularly those with developing economies, it may be customary for others to engage in business practices that are prohibited by laws such as the FCPA, the U.K. Bribery Act and the BCCA in Brazil, an anti-bribery law that is similar to the FCPA and U.K. Bribery Act. Although we have implemented policies and procedures designed to ensure compliance with these laws, there can be no assurance that all of our employees, contractors, agents and business partners will not take action in violation of our internal policies and applicable law and any such violation could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Environmental regulation and liabilities, including new or developing laws and regulations, may increase our costs of operations and adversely affect us.
Our operations are subject to international and U.S. federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations that impose limitations on the discharge of pollutants into the environment and establish standards for the treatment, storage, recycling and disposal of toxic and hazardous wastes. The nature of our business requires that we use, store and dispose of materials that are subject to environmental regulation. Environmental laws and regulations change frequently, which makes it difficult for us to predict their cost or impact on our future operations. Liabilities associated with environmental matters could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Further, we could be exposed to strict, joint and several liability for cleanup costs, natural resource damages and other damages as a result of our conduct that was lawful at the time it occurred or the conduct of, or conditions caused by, prior operators or other third parties. Any failure by us to comply with applicable environmental laws and regulations may result in governmental authorities taking action against us that could adversely impact our operations and financial condition. Such actions may include the:
issuance of administrative, civil and criminal penalties;
denial or revocation of permits or other authorizations;
imposition of limitations on our operations; and
performance of site investigatory, remedial or other corrective actions.
In addition, our customers in the oil and gas exploration, development and production industry are affected by environmental laws and regulations that restrict their activities (and have become stricter as a result of the Deepwater Horizon incident) and may result in reduced demand for our services.
Environmental laws and regulations change frequently, requiring us to devote a substantial amount of capital and other resources for compliance. In recent years, governments have increasingly focused on climate change, carbon emissions and energy use. Laws and regulations that curb the use of conventional energy, or require the use of renewable fuels or renewable sources of energy-such as wind or solar power, could result in a reduction in demand for hydrocarbon-based fuels such as oil and natural gas. In addition, governments could pass laws, regulations or taxes that increase the cost of fuel, thereby impacting both demand for our services and also our cost of operations. More stringent environmental laws, regulations or enforcement policies could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Actions taken by government agencies, such as the Department of Commerce, the Department of Transportation and the FAA, could increase our costs and prohibit or reduce our ability to operate successfully.
Our industry is regulated by various laws and regulations in the jurisdictions in which we operate. The scope of such regulation includes infrastructure and operational issues relating to helicopters, maintenance, spare parts and route flying rights as well as safety and security requirements. We cannot fully anticipate all changes that might be made to the laws and regulations to which we are subject or the possible impact of such changes. These changes could subject us to additional costs and restrictions.

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U.S. Our operations are highly regulated by several U.S. government regulatory agencies.  For example, as a certified air carrier, we are subject to regulations promulgated by the DOT and the FAA. The FAA regulates our flight operations and imposes requirements with respect to personnel, aircraft, ground facilities and other aspects of our operations, including:
certification and reporting requirements;
inspections;
maintenance standards;
personnel training standards; and
maintenance of personnel and aircraft records.  
The Department of Transportation can review our economic fitness to continue our operations, both presently and if a substantial change occurs to our management, ownership or capital structure, among other things. The Department of Commerce, through its International Traffic in Arms Regulations, regulates our imports and exports of aircraft (through leases and sales) as well as parts sales to international customers and the use of certain regulated technology in domestic and international airspace. If we fail to comply with these laws and regulations, or if these agencies develop concerns over our operations, we could face administrative, civil and/or criminal penalties.   In addition, we may become subject to regulatory actions that could suspend, curtail or significantly modify our operations.  A suspension or substantial curtailment of our operations or any substantial modification of our current operations may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Brazil. Aeróleo, a Brazilian company 50% owned by us, operates in Brazil. To operate helicopters in Brazil, an operator must be licensed by the National Agency for Civil Aviation. Under applicable Brazilian law, in order to maintain its license, an operator must have Brazilian officers and be “controlled” by nationals of Brazil, meaning that at least 80% of such operator’s voting shares are held by Brazilian nationals. The majority holder of voting shares in Aeróleo is a Brazilian national and therefore Aeróleo is considered “controlled” within the meaning of Brazil licensing requirements. Any change in the national status of the majority shareholder in Aeróleo and/or in the nationality of the officers of this subsidiary could affect the licenses of Aeróleo. Our ability to conduct our helicopter operating business in Brazil is dependent on our ability to maintain Aeróleo’s licenses and AOC. If we are unable to maintain such licenses and AOC, we will be prevented from performing flying operations in Brazil.
Other Countries and Regulations. Our operations in other jurisdictions are regulated to various degrees by the governments of such jurisdictions and must be conducted in compliance with those regulations and, where applicable, in accordance with our air service licenses and AOC. Such regulations may require us to obtain a license to operate in that country, favor local companies or require operating permits that can only be obtained by locally registered companies and may impose other nationality requirements. In such cases, we partner with local persons, but there is no assurance regarding which foreign governmental regulations may be applicable in the future to our helicopter operations and whether we would be able to comply with them.
The revocation of any of the licenses discussed above or the termination of any of our relationships with local parties could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Changes in effective tax rates, taxation of our foreign subsidiaries or adverse outcomes resulting from examination of our tax returns could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our future effective tax rates could be adversely affected by changes in tax laws, both domestically and internationally, or the interpretation or application thereof.  From time to time, the U.S. Congress and foreign, state and local governments consider legislation that could increase our effective tax rate or the effective tax rates of our consolidated affiliates. We cannot determine whether, or in what form, legislation will ultimately be enacted or what the impact of any such legislation would have on our profitability. If these or other changes to tax laws are enacted, our profitability could be negatively impacted.
Our future effective tax rates could also be adversely affected by changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities, changes in the mix of earnings in countries with differing statutory tax rates, the ultimate repatriation of earnings from foreign subsidiaries to the U.S., or by changes in tax treaties, regulations, accounting principles or interpretations thereof in one or more countries in which we operate. In addition, we are subject to the potential examination of our income tax returns by the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) and other tax authorities where we file tax returns. We regularly assess the likelihood of adverse outcomes resulting from these examinations to determine the adequacy of our provision for income taxes. There can be no assurance that such examinations will not have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We are subject to many different forms of taxation in various jurisdictions throughout the world, which could lead to disagreements with tax authorities regarding the application of tax laws.
We are subject to many different forms of taxation including, but not limited to, income tax, withholding tax and payroll-related taxes. Tax law and administration are extremely complex and often require us to make subjective determinations. The tax authorities in the various jurisdictions where we conduct business might not agree with the determinations that are made by us with respect to the application of tax law. Such disagreements could result in lengthy legal disputes and, ultimately, in the payment

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of substantial funds to the government authorities of foreign and local jurisdictions where we carry on business or provide goods or services, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our estimate of tax related assets, liabilities, recoveries and expenses incorporates significant assumptions. These assumptions include, but are not limited to, the tax laws in various jurisdictions, the effect of tax treaties between jurisdictions, taxable income projections, and the benefits of various restructuring plans. To the extent that such assumptions differ from actual results, we may have to record additional income tax expenses and liabilities.
Risk Factors Relating to Our Common Stock
Our stock price may fluctuate significantly.
The trading price of our Common Stock may be volatile and subject to wide price fluctuations in response to various factors, including:
market conditions in the broader stock market;
commodity prices, including oil and gas prices;
actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly financial condition and results of operations;
introduction of new equipment or services by us or our competitors;
grounding of all or a portion of our fleet;
issuance of new or changed securities analysts’ reports or recommendations;
sales, or anticipated sales, of large blocks of our stock;
additions or departures of key personnel;
regulatory or political developments;
litigation and governmental investigations; and
changing economic conditions.
The market for our Common Stock has historically experienced and may continue to experience significant price and volume fluctuations similar to those experienced by the broader stock market in recent years. Generally, the fluctuations experienced by the broader stock market have affected the market prices of securities issued by many companies for reasons unrelated to their operating performance and may adversely affect the price of our Common Stock. In addition, our announcements of our quarterly operating results, changes in general conditions in the economy or the financial markets and other developments affecting us, our affiliates or our competitors could cause the market price of our Common Stock to fluctuate substantially.
If securities analysts or industry analysts downgrade our Common Stock, publish negative research or reports or fail to publish reports about our business, the price and trading volume of our Common Stock could decline.
The trading market for our Common Stock will be influenced by the research and reports that industry or securities analysts publish about us, our business and our market. If one or more analysts adversely change their recommendation regarding our Common Stock or our competitors’ stock, our share price would likely decline. If one or more analysts cease coverage of us or fail to publish reports on us regularly, we could lose visibility in the financial markets which in turn could cause our share price or trading volume to decline.
We limit foreign ownership of our company, which could reduce the price of our Common Stock and cause owners of our Common Stock who are not U.S. persons to lose their voting rights.
Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides that persons or entities that are not “citizens of the U.S.” (as defined in the Federal Aviation Act of 1958) shall not collectively own or control more than 24.9% of the voting power of our outstanding capital stock (the “Permitted Foreign Ownership Percentage”) and that, if at any time persons that are not citizens of the U.S. nevertheless collectively own or control more than the Permitted Foreign Ownership Percentage, the voting rights of our outstanding voting capital stock in excess of the Permitted Foreign Ownership Percentage owned by stockholders who are not citizens of the U.S. shall automatically be reduced. These voting rights will be reduced pro rata among the holders of voting shares who are not citizens of the U.S. to equal the Permitted Foreign Ownership Percentage based on the number of votes to which the underlying voting securities are entitled. Shares held by persons who are not citizens of the U.S. may lose their associated voting rights and be redeemed as a result of these provisions. These restrictions may also have a material adverse impact on the liquidity or market value of our Common Stock because holders may be unable to transfer our Common Stock to persons who are not citizens of the U.S.
We have not paid dividends on our Common Stock historically and may not pay any cash dividends on our Common Stock for the foreseeable future.
We have not paid cash dividends historically, nor do we expect to pay cash dividends on our Common Stock in the foreseeable future.
Risk Factors Relating to Our Operation as a Public Company

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For as long as we are an emerging growth company, we will be exempt from certain reporting requirements, including those relating to accounting standards and disclosure about our executive compensation, that apply to other public companies.
Under the JOBS Act, we are classified as an emerging growth company, which is defined as a company with annual gross revenues of less than $1 billion, that has been a public reporting company for a period of less than five years, and that does not have a public float of $700 million or more in securities held by non-affiliated holders. For as long as we are an emerging growth company, unlike other public companies, unless we elect not to take advantage of applicable JOBS Act provisions, we will not be required to (i) provide an auditor’s attestation report on management’s assessment of the effectiveness of our system of internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, (ii) comply with any new or revised financial accounting standards applicable to public companies until such standards are also applicable to private companies under Section 102(b)(1) of the JOBS Act, (iii) comply with any new requirements adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the “PCAOB”), such as the proposed requirements for mandatory audit firm rotation or a supplement to the auditor’s report in which the auditor would be required to provide additional information about the audit and the financial statements of the issuer, (iv) comply with any new audit rules adopted by the PCAOB after April 5, 2012 unless the SEC determines otherwise, (v) provide certain disclosure regarding executive compensation required of larger public companies or (vi) hold stockholder advisory and other votes on executive compensation. We cannot predict if investors will find our Common Stock less attractive if we choose to continue to rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our Common Stock less attractive as a result of the relaxed reporting requirements applicable to emerging growth companies, there may be a less active trading market for our Common Stock and our stock price may be more volatile.
As noted above, under the JOBS Act, emerging growth companies can delay adopting new or revised accounting standards that have different effective dates for public and private companies until such time as those standards apply to private companies. We have elected not to take advantage of such extended transition period. This election is irrevocable pursuant to Section 107 of the JOBS Act. Unless our public float exceeds $700 million or our annual revenues exceed $1 billion before then, Era Group will cease to be an emerging growth company no later than December 31, 2018.
The cost of compliance or failure to comply with the Exchange Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and the NYSE requirements may adversely affect our business.
We are subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) and certain provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.  In addition, we are now subject to other reporting and corporate governance requirements, including the requirements of the NYSE, and when we are no longer considered an emerging growth company pursuant to the JOBS Act (which will be no later than December 31, 2018 unless our public float exceeds $700 million or our annual revenues exceed $1 billion before such date), we will become subject to additional requirements under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, including the requirement to provide an auditor’s attestation report on management’s assessment of the effectiveness of our system of internal controls over financial reporting. These requirements impose significant compliance obligations upon us and may place a strain on our systems and resources. The Exchange Act requires that we file annual and current reports with respect to our business and financial condition. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires that we maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal controls over financial reporting. The failure to comply with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act may result in investors losing confidence in the reliability of our financial statements (which may result in a decrease in the trading price of our Common Stock), prevent us from providing the required financial information in a timely manner (which could materially and adversely impact our business, financial condition, the trading price of our Common Stock and our ability to access capital markets, if necessary), prevent us from otherwise complying with the standards applicable to us as an independent, publicly-traded company and subject us to adverse regulatory consequences.
We have identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting which could, if not remediated, adversely affect our ability to report our financial condition and results of operations in a timely and accurate manner, investor confidence in our company and, as a result, the value of our common stock.
We are required to report on the effectiveness of internal controls over financial reporting and include in this Annual Report on Form 10-K management’s assessment of the effectives of such controls. As described in Part II Item 9A “Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting,” in connection with this evaluation, management identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting related to the existence and proper classification of property and equipment. A “material weakness” is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. As a result of such material weakness, our management concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting were not effective as of December 31, 2016.
We are in the process of remediating this material weakness, but our remediation efforts are not complete. There can be no assurance as to when the remediation plan will be fully implemented, whether it will be implemented as currently contemplated and described under Part II Item 9A, or whether the remediation efforts will be successful. As we continue to evaluate and work

29



to improve our internal controls, management may determine to take additional measures to address this material weakness or determine to modify its remediation plan.
Until our remediation plan is fully implemented, our management will continue to devote time and attention to these efforts. If we do not complete our remediation in a timely fashion, or at all, or if our remediation plan is inadequate, there will be an increased risk that we will be unable to timely file future periodic reports with the SEC and that our future consolidated financial statements could contain errors that will be undetected. If we are unable to report our results in a timely and accurate manner, we may not be able to comply with the applicable covenants in our financing arrangements and may be required to seek amendments or waivers under these financing arrangements, which could adversely impact our liquidity and financial condition. The existence of a material weakness in the effectiveness of our internal controls could also affect our ability to obtain financing or could increase the cost of any financing we obtain. The identification of the material weakness could also cause investors to lose confidence in the reliability of our financial statements and could result in a decrease in the value of our common stock.
Provisions in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, amended and restated bylaws and Delaware law may discourage, delay or prevent a change of control of our company or changes in our management.
Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and bylaws include certain provisions that could have the effect of discouraging, delaying or preventing a change of control of our company or changes in our management. Such provisions include, among other things:
restrictions on the ability of our stockholders to fill a vacancy on the board of directors;
restrictions related to the ability of non-U.S. citizens owning our Common Stock;
our ability to issue preferred stock with terms that the board of directors may determine, without stockholder approval, which could be used to significantly dilute the ownership of a hostile acquirer;
the absence of cumulative voting in the election of directors which may limit the ability of minority stockholders to elect directors; and
advance notice requirements for stockholder proposals and nominations, which may discourage or deter a potential acquirer from soliciting proxies to elect a particular slate of directors or otherwise attempting to obtain control of us.
These provisions in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and bylaws may discourage, delay or prevent a transaction involving a change in control of our company that is in the best interest of our stockholders. Even in the absence of a takeover attempt, the existence of these provisions may adversely affect the prevailing market price of our Common Stock if they are viewed as discouraging future takeover attempts.
Risk Factors Relating to the Spin-off
If there is a determination that the Spin-off is taxable for U.S. federal income tax purposes because the facts, assumptions, representations or undertakings underlying the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) ruling or tax opinion are incorrect or for any other reason, then SEACOR, its stockholders that are subject to U.S. federal income tax and Era Group could incur significant U.S. federal income tax liabilities.
In connection with the Spin-off, SEACOR received a private letter ruling from the IRS, together with an opinion of Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP, tax counsel to SEACOR, substantially to the effect that, among other things, the separation qualifies as a transaction that is tax-free for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Section 355 of the Internal Revenue Code. The ruling and opinion rely on certain facts, assumptions, representations and undertakings from SEACOR and us regarding the past and future conduct of the companies’ respective businesses and other matters. If any of these facts, assumptions, representations or undertakings are incorrect or not otherwise satisfied, SEACOR and its stockholders may not be able to rely on the ruling or the opinion and could be subject to significant tax liabilities. Notwithstanding the private letter ruling and opinion of tax counsel, the IRS could determine on audit that the separation is taxable if it determines that any of these facts, assumptions, representations or undertakings are not correct or have been violated or if it disagrees with the conclusions in the opinion that are not covered by the private letter ruling, or for other reasons, including as a result of certain significant changes in the stock ownership of SEACOR or us after the separation. If the separation is determined to be taxable, SEACOR, its stockholders that are subject to U.S. federal income tax and Era Group could incur significant U.S. federal income tax liabilities.
Prior to the separation, we entered into the Tax Matters Agreement with SEACOR, which governs the parties’ respective rights, responsibilities and obligations with respect to taxes, tax attributes, the preparation and filing of tax returns, the control of audits and other tax proceedings and assistance and cooperation in respect of tax matters. Taxes relating to or arising out of the failure of certain of the transactions described in the private letter ruling request and the opinion of tax counsel to qualify as a tax-free transaction for U.S. federal income tax purposes will be borne by SEACOR, except, in general, if such failure is attributable to our action or inaction or SEACOR’s action or inaction, as the case may be, or any event (or series of events) involving our assets or stock or the assets or stock of SEACOR, as the case may be, in which case the resulting liability will be borne in full by us or SEACOR, respectively.

30



Our obligations under the Tax Matters Agreement are not limited in amount or subject to any cap. Further, even if we are not responsible for tax liabilities of SEACOR and its subsidiaries under the Tax Matters Agreement, we nonetheless could be liable under applicable tax law for such liabilities if SEACOR were to fail to pay them. If we are required to pay any liabilities under the circumstances set forth in the Tax Matters Agreement or pursuant to applicable tax law, the amounts may be significant.
ITEM 1B.
UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.
ITEM 2.
PROPERTIES
Our executive offices are located in Houston, Texas, and we maintain our U.S. Gulf of Mexico regional headquarters in Lake Charles, Louisiana, where we coordinate operations for the entire U.S. Gulf of Mexico, manage the support of our worldwide operations, and house our primary maintenance facility and training center. We maintain additional bases in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico near key offshore development sites as well. We maintain multiple operating bases in Alaska, including two seasonal locations to support flightseeing activity. Additionally, we maintain a regional headquarters in Rio de Janeiro and multiple operating bases in Brazil and a regional headquarters in Bogotá and multiple operating bases in Colombia. The majority of the bases from which we operate are leased. Medical services are typically provided from customer-owned facilities.
Our principal physical properties are helicopters, which are more fully described in Item 1 - “Equipment and Services” above.
ITEM 3.
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
In the normal course of our business, we become involved in various litigation matters including, among other things, claims by third parties for alleged property damages and personal injuries. Management has used estimates in determining our potential exposure to these matters and has recorded reserves in our financial statements related thereto as appropriate. It is possible that a change in our estimates related to these exposures could occur, but we do not expect any such changes in estimated costs would have a material effect on our consolidated financial position or results of operations. See Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - “Contingencies.”
ITEM 4.
MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.

31




EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT
Officers of Era Group serve at the pleasure of the Board of Directors. The name, age and offices held by each of the executive officers of Era Group as of March 3, 2017 were as follows:
Name
 
Age
 
Position
Christopher S. Bradshaw
 
40
 
President and Chief Executive Officer since November 2014 and Chief Financial Officer from October 2012 to September 2015. Mr. Bradshaw was appointed a director of the Company in February 2015. He served as the Company’s Acting Chief Executive Officer from August 2014 to November 2014. From 2009 until 2012, Mr. Bradshaw served as Managing Partner and Chief Financial Officer of U.S. Capital Advisors LLC, an independent financial advisory firm. Prior to co-founding U.S. Capital Advisors, he was an energy investment banker at UBS Securities LLC, Morgan Stanley & Co., and PaineWebber Incorporated. Additionally, Mr. Bradshaw is an officer and director of certain Era Group joint ventures and subsidiaries.
Shefali A. Shah
 
45
 
Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary since March 2014. Ms. Shah served as our Acting General Counsel and Corporate Secretary from February 2013 through February 2014.  From June 2006 to January 2013, Ms. Shah held several positions with Comverse Technology, Inc., including Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary. Prior thereto, Ms. Shah was an associate at Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP from September 2002 to May 2006 and Hutchins, Wheeler & Dittmar, P.C. from September 1996 to September 2002.
Andrew L. Puhala
 
47
 
Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer since September 2015. From January 2013 to September 2015, Mr. Puhala served as the Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of American Electric Technologies, and from October 2011 to September 2012, he served as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of AccessESP. Between 1996 and 2011, Mr. Puhala served in several finance, accounting, treasury and tax roles at Baker Hughes Incorporated including Vice President Finance - Corporate Development, Vice President Finance - Middle East, Division Controller - Centrilift and Assistant Treasurer.
Stuart Stavley
 
44
 
Senior Vice President, Operations and Fleet Management since October 2014. From October 2012 to October 2014, Mr. Stavley served as the Company’s Senior Vice President - Fleet Management, and from October 2010 to October 2012, he served as Vice President - Fleet Management. From September 2008 through October 2010, he served as the Company’s Director of Technical Services and from September 2005 through September 2008 as the Company’s Director of Maintenance. He began with the Company in 1993 and prior to September 2005 also served as Chief Inspector and Field AMT.
Paul White
 
42
 
Senior Vice President, Commercial since October 2014. From October 2012 to October 2014, Mr. White served as the Company’s Senior Vice President - Domestic, and from August 2010 to October 2012, he served as Vice President, General Manager Gulf of Mexico. Mr. White served as the Company’s General Manager of Era Training Center LLC from September 2008 to August 2010 and the Company’s Director of Training from 2007 to 2010. Previously Mr. White served in various roles for the Company including Pilot, Check Airman, Senior Check Airman and Assistant Chief Pilot CFR Part 135.
Jennifer Whalen
 
43
 
Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer since August 2013. From April 2012 to August 2013, Ms. Whalen served as the Company’s Controller. From August 2007 to March 2012, Ms. Whalen served in several capacities at nLIGHT Photonics Corporation, including as Director of Accounting. Prior to these roles, Ms. Whalen served as the Manager of Accounting at InFocus Corporation for just over two years. Ms. Whalen started her career in the assurance practice with PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP.
 

32



PART II
ITEM 5.
MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
Market for Our Common Stock
Our Common Stock trades on the NYSE under the trading symbol “ERA.” The table below shows the high and low sale prices for our Common Stock during each quarter in the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015. 
 
 
HIGH
 
LOW
Year Ended December 31, 2016
 
 
 
 
Fourth quarter
 
$
17.20

 
$
7.22

Third quarter
 
10.68

 
6.92

Second quarter
 
11.58

 
7.90

First quarter
 
11.76

 
7.03

Year Ended December 31, 2015
 
 
 
 
Fourth quarter
 
18.49

 
9.09

Third quarter
 
20.59

 
14.21

Second quarter
 
24.60

 
19.05

First quarter
 
24.35

 
19.34

On March 3, 2017, the last reported sale price of our Common Stock on the NYSE was $13.56 per share.
Holders of Record
As of March 3, 2017, there were 169 holders of record of our Common Stock.
Dividends
We have not paid cash dividends and do not currently intend to pay cash dividends on our Common Stock. We intend to retain all available funds and any future earnings to reduce debt and fund the development and growth of our business. Our Revolving Credit Facility and 7.750% Senior Notes limit our ability to pay dividends. Future agreements we may enter into, including with respect to any future debt we may incur, may also further limit or restrict our ability to pay dividends. Any future determination to pay dividends will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will take into account:
restrictions in our Revolving Credit Facility, 7.750% Senior Notes and other debt instruments outstanding at that time;
general economic and business conditions;
our financial condition and results of operations;
our capital requirements and the capital requirements of our subsidiaries;
the ability of our operating subsidiaries to pay dividends and make distributions to us; and
such other factors as our Board of Directors may deem relevant.

33



Company Purchases of Equity Securities
The following table presents information regarding our repurchases of shares of our Common Stock on a monthly basis during the fourth quarter of 2016:
 
 
Total Number of Shares Repurchased
 
Average Price Paid Per
Share
 
Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs
 
Maximum Value of Shares that May Yet be Purchased Under the Plans or Programs(1)
October 1, 2016 - October 31, 2016
 

 
$

 

 
$
22,934,076

November 1, 2016 - November 30, 2016
 

 
$

 

 
$
22,934,076

December 1, 2016 - December 31, 2016
 

 
$

 

 
$
22,934,076

_______________
(1)
On August 14, 2014, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $25.0 million in value of our Common Stock from time to time at the discretion of a committee of our Board of Directors. As of December 31, 2016, $22.9 million of authority remained unutilized and available for purchases of our Common Stock at the discretion of a committee of our Board of Directors comprised of the Non-Executive Chairman, the Audit Committee Chairman and our President and Chief Executive Officer.
Performance Graph
The following graph shows a comparison from January 31, 2013 through December 31, 2016 of the cumulative total return for our Common Stock, the Standard & Poor’s 500 Stock Index (“S&P 500 Index”), the Standard & Poor’s Oil & Gas Equipment Select Industry Index and our peer group(1). The graph assumes that $100 was invested at the market close on January 31, 2013, the date trading of our Common Stock commenced on the NYSE following the spin-off from SEACOR.
era-1231201_chartx36984a04.jpg
_______________
(1)
Index of Bristow Group Inc., CHC Group Ltd., Gulfmark Offshore Inc., Hornbeck Offshore Services Inc., PHI Inc., SEACOR and Tidewater Inc.

34



This performance graph shall not be deemed “filed” for purposes of Section 18 of the Exchange Act, or otherwise subject to liabilities under that Section, and shall not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any filing of Era Group under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Exchange Act, except as shall be expressly set forth by specific reference in such filing.
ITEM 6.
SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, our selected historical consolidated financial data (in thousands, except per share data). Such financial data should be read in conjunction with “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
Statements of Operations Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating revenues
 
$
247,228

 
$
281,837

 
$
331,222

 
$
298,959

 
$
272,921

Operating income (loss)
 
(3,369
)
 
24,294

 
42,651

 
46,163

 
32,051

Net income (loss) attributable to Era Group Inc.
 
(7,978
)
 
8,705

 
17,117

 
18,705

 
7,787

Earnings (Loss) Per Common Share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
$
(0.39
)
 
$
0.42

 
$
0.84

 
$
0.88

 
$
(0.03
)
Diluted
 
$
(0.39
)
 
$
0.42

 
$
0.84

 
$
0.88

 
$
(0.03
)
Statement of Cash Flows Data – provided by (used in):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating activities
 
$
58,504

 
$
44,456

 
$
78,286

 
$
64,371

 
$
13,915

Investing activities
 
(12,774
)
 
(22,807
)
 
(93,872
)
 
(43,459
)
 
(114,765
)
Financing activities
 
(32,986
)
 
(46,026
)
 
26,127

 
(1,508
)
 
32,634

Effects of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
 
(164
)
 
(2,120
)
 
(1,009
)
 
426

 
599

Capital expenditures
 
(39,200
)
 
(60,050
)
 
(106,732
)
 
(110,105
)
 
(112,986
)
Balance Sheet Data (at period end):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
 
$
26,950

 
$
14,370

 
$
40,867

 
$
31,335

 
$
11,505

Total assets
 
955,173

 
1,004,351

 
1,017,174

 
958,583

 
937,564

Long-term debt, less current portion
 
230,139

 
264,479

 
282,118

 
279,391

 
276,948

Total equity
 
468,417

 
471,303

 
460,364

 
436,061

 
275,285


35



ITEM 7.
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
Overview
We are one of the largest helicopter operators in the world and the longest serving helicopter transport operator in the U.S., which is our primary area of operations. Our helicopters are primarily used to transport personnel to, from and between offshore oil and gas production platforms, drilling rigs and other installations. In the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, approximately 62%, 66% and 67%, respectively, of our total operating revenues were earned in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. In the year ended December 31, 2016, approximately 31% of total operating revenues were earned in international locations. We currently have customers in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, India, Suriname and the United Kingdom.
The primary users of our helicopter services are international, independent and major integrated oil and gas exploration, development and production companies, national oil companies and BSEE. In the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, approximately 88%, 78% and 76%, respectively, of our operating revenues were derived from helicopter services, including emergency response SAR services, provided to customers primarily engaged in offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production activities. Additionally, our leasing customers typically provide services oil and gas companies in their respective local markets. As such, our results are tied to the level of activity in the offshore oil and gas industry. In addition to serving the oil and gas industry, we provide air medical services, utility services and Alaska flightseeing tours, among other activities.
As of December 31, 2016, we owned or operated a total of 136 helicopters, consisting of 13 heavy helicopters, 49 medium helicopters, 33 light twin engine helicopters and 41 light single engine helicopters. We also owned two AW189 heavy helicopters that were delivered during the fourth quarter of 2016 but not placed in service as of December 31, 2016. As of December 31, 2016, we had commitments to purchase an additional 12 new helicopters consisting of seven heavy helicopters and five light twin helicopters. The heavy helicopters are scheduled to be delivered in 2017 through 2019, and the delivery dates for the light twin helicopters have not been determined. In addition, we had outstanding options to purchase up to an additional 10 heavy helicopters. If these options were exercised, the helicopters would be scheduled for delivery in 2019 and 2020.
Lines of Service
Offshore Oil and Gas. The offshore oil and gas market is highly cyclical with demand linked to the price of oil and gas, which tends to fluctuate depending on many factors, including global economic activity, levels of inventory and overall demand. In addition to the price of oil and gas, the availability of acreage and local tax incentives or disincentives and requirements for maintaining interests in leases affect activity levels in the oil and gas industry. Price levels for oil and gas by themselves can cause additional fluctuations by inducing changes in consumer behavior.
For the last ten years, we have provided transportation services to government inspectors of offshore installations, drilling rigs and platforms. This contract was renewed in October 2016 and is expected to run through September 2021.
Brazil is among the most important markets for offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production activity world-wide. We participate in this market through our consolidated joint venture, Aeróleo.
We also provide emergency response SAR services in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico.
Dry-Leasing. We enter into lease arrangements for our helicopters with operators primarily located in international markets such as Argentina, the United Kingdom and India. The helicopters are contracted to local helicopter operators, which often prefer to lease helicopters rather than purchase them. Leasing affords us the opportunity to access new markets without significant initial infrastructure investment and generally without ongoing operating risk.
Other Activities and Services. In order to diversify sources of our earnings and cash flow, we deploy a number of helicopters in support of other industries and activities, such as air medical services and flightseeing. In the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, approximately 6%, 7% and 9% of our operating revenues were generated by these other activities and services. We supply helicopters, pilots and mechanics to hospitals and manage helicopters on their behalf. We also provide Alaska summer flightseeing tours and support inland utility operations in Alaska such as firefighting, mining, power line and pipeline survey activities. During 2016, we launched our UAS services and entered into an alliance to provide UAS services with Total Safety, the world's premier provider of industrial inspection and integrated safety solutions.
We have also developed services for the helicopter industry that we believe complement our core activities. We hold a 50% interest in Dart, an international sales and manufacturing organization focused on after-market helicopter parts and accessories. We also hold a 50% interest in Era Training, which provides classroom instruction, flight simulator, helicopter and other training to our employees and third parties.
Market Outlook

36



The offshore oil and gas market is highly cyclical with demand linked to the price of oil and gas. The prices of oil and gas are critical factors in our customers’ investment and spending decisions. The price of crude oil has declined significantly since mid-2014 and remains depressed compared to recent historical averages primarily due to increased global supply of crude oil and a less optimistic forecast of worldwide economic growth. The decline in the price of oil has negatively impacted the cash flow of our customers and has led them to reduce capital and operational expenditures from prior levels, including reductions related to offshore exploration, development and production activities. Although our customers typically base their capital expenditure budgets on their long-term commodity price expectations, many of our customers have significantly reduced capital spending plans and taken measures to reduce costs. We have experienced customer contract cancellations and decreased fleet utilization in the current environment as some of our customers have decreased the number of helicopters on contract or canceled their contract upon limited notice. Moreover, even where such contractual cancellation rights may not exist, our customers have sought to cancel or renegotiate other terms and conditions in our contracts to address their current challenges. In addition, the current adverse economic conditions may increase the ongoing credit risk exposure with respect to the accounts receivable balances owed to us by our customers.
Based on our recent experience and discussions with our customers about their helicopter transport needs, we anticipate continued demand for our services at recently experienced levels as the oil and gas markets recover. We generate a vast majority of our operating revenue from contracts supporting our oil and gas customers’ offshore production operations, which have long-term transportation requirements. Production activities are typically less cyclical than the exploration and development activities because production platforms remain in place over the long-term and are relatively unaffected by economic cycles, as the marginal cost of lifting a barrel of oil once a platform is in operation is low. If there are further declines in the price of oil and gas, or if current price levels are maintained for an extended period, there could be a delay or cancellation of planned offshore projects impacting our operations in future periods.
The remainder of our oil and gas revenue primarily comes from transporting personnel to and from offshore drilling rigs. Deepwater activity continues to be a significant segment of the global offshore oil and gas markets and typically involves significant capital investment and multi-year development plans. Such projects are generally underwritten by the oil and gas companies using relatively conservative assumptions relating to oil and gas prices. Although these projects are considered to be less susceptible to short-term fluctuations in the price of oil and gas compared to shorter cycle projects, persistently low crude oil prices have caused these companies to reevaluate their future capital expenditures in regards to deepwater projects and have resulted in the rescaling, delay or cancellation of planned offshore projects, which could impact our operations in future periods.
We are exposed to foreign currency exchange risk primarily through our euro-denominated capital commitments and our Brazilian operations, where we receive a portion of our revenues and incur expenses in the Brazilian real. Two of the large helicopter OEMs are headquartered in Europe and price many of their helicopters in euros. Fluctuations in the value of the U.S. dollar against the euro affects the amount of our unfunded commitments in U.S. dollar terms. Although the strength of the U.S. dollar has made the acquisition of euro-denominated helicopter models less expensive for us in recent years, the weakness of the euro also makes such acquisitions less expensive for our competitors and potential competitors, which could lead to excess helicopter capacity and increased competition and jeopardize both pricing and utilization of our equipment. Fluctuations in the value of the euro could also destabilize residual values for certain euro-denominated helicopters. Additionally, the strengthening of the U.S. dollar may impact the credit risk of, and the ability to make payments to us in U.S. dollars by, our foreign customers that set rates and receive their revenues in other currencies.
We believe that we are well positioned to address the near term challenges. Our liquidity levels provide a stable foundation in the current market environment and will permit us to, together with operational efficiency improvements benefitting us and our customers, maintain and improve our customer relationships and competitive position.
Recent Developments
Amendment to the Revolving Credit Facility
On October 27, 2016, we entered into a third amendment to our Revolving Credit Facility that, among other things, revised our maintenance covenants to provide additional flexibility, reduced the aggregate principal amount of the revolving loan commitments to $200.0 million and added a condition to borrowing and a repayment mechanism in connection with excess cash amounts (see “Liquidity and Capital Resources” below).
Competitor Bankruptcy
A global competitor filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in May 2016, and it has disclosed that, to date, it has obtained court approval to reject leases resulting in the return to lessors of 78 helicopters, to abandon five owned helicopters to its lenders and to restructure the finance and lease terms with respect to numerous other helicopters. This competitor has disclosed that it intends to emerge from bankruptcy with 100 fewer helicopters in its fleet than it had prior to filing for bankruptcy protection, including the elimination of all but two owned H225 helicopters. The significant fleet reduction by this competitor could potentially

37



increase the available supply of helicopters. These changes in supply could impact helicopter rates and pricing of helicopters in the secondary market. We cannot predict the extent of such an impact on us.
Suspension of H225 and AS332 L2 Operations
In April 2016, an Airbus Helicopters H225 (also known as an EC225LP) model helicopter operated by the global competitor referenced above was involved in an accident in Norway. The helicopter was carrying eleven passengers and two crew members. The accident resulted in thirteen fatalities. The Accident Investigation Board Norway (“AIBN”) published preliminary reports that contained findings from the investigation into the accident in May and June 2016 and February 2017. Pursuant to a safety recommendation published by the AIBN, a number of regulatory authorities issued safety directives suspending operations, with limited exceptions, of all Airbus H225 and AS332 L2 model helicopters registered in their jurisdictions, and a number of customers and operators voluntarily suspended operations of those two helicopter models. On October 7, 2016, the European Aviation Safety Agency issued an Airworthiness Directive which provides for additional maintenance and inspection requirements to allow these helicopters to return to service. On December 9, 2016, the Federal Aviation Administration in the United States issued an Alternative Means of Compliance (“AMOC”) which also provides for additional maintenance and inspection requirements to allow these helicopters to return to service in the United States. However, the Civil Aviation Authorities in Norway and the United Kingdom, the major European markets for the H225, have not allowed the helicopters to return to service. Since the accident, we believe that H225 helicopters have only returned to service in oil and gas missions in a few countries in Asia.
We own nine H225 helicopters, including five that are currently located in the U.S., three that are currently located in Brazil and one that was operating in Norway under a lease that was rejected in the Chapter 11 bankruptcy case referenced above. As of December 31, 2016, the net book value of our H225 helicopters and related inventory of parts and equipment was $160.7 million. During this suspension of H225 helicopter operations, we expect to utilize other heavy and medium helicopters to service our operations.  Although we do not expect the near-term impact of the suspension to be material to our financial condition or results of operations, at this time we cannot predict how long the suspension of H225 helicopter operations will last, the market receptivity of the H225 helicopter for future oil and gas operations, the potential impact on residual values of these helicopters and the impact a long-term suspension could have on our operating results or financial condition.
Excess Capacity
The current excess capacity of our heavy helicopters is higher than in recent years.  Our fleet’s excess helicopters include those that are not otherwise under customer contracts, undergoing maintenance, dedicated for charter activity or subject to operational suspension.  Although we take actions to minimize excess capacity, we expect a certain level of excess capacity at any given time in an aviation logistics business as a result of the evolving nature of customers’ needs. Our operating revenues were negatively impacted as a result of the higher excess capacity which continued through the end of 2016. Through fleet management initiatives, participation in competitive bids and pursuit of additional opportunities, we are focused on maximizing the utilization of our fleet and mitigating the excess capacity in our heavy helicopters. If we are not successful in securing sufficient new projects, we may experience a decline in the near-term utilization of our helicopters that may impact our financial results in 2017 and beyond.
Fleet Developments and Capital Commitments
In recent years, we have continued to focus on the modernization of our fleet and the standardization of equipment. Oil and gas companies typically require modern helicopters that offer enhanced safety features and greater performance. In response to this demand, we have transformed our fleet significantly. Since the beginning of 2005, we have added 139 helicopters, disposed of 125 helicopters and reduced the average age of our owned fleet from 17 years to 12 years. We spent $39.2 million, $60.1 million and $106.7 million to acquire helicopters and other equipment in the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively, primarily for heavy and medium helicopters, spare helicopter parts and building improvements.
As of March 1, 2017, we had unfunded commitments of $115.6 million, primarily pursuant to agreements to purchase helicopters, consisting of five AW189 heavy helicopters, two S92 heavy helicopters and five AW169 light twin helicopters. The AW189 helicopters and S92 helicopters are scheduled to be delivered in 2017 through 2019. Delivery dates for the AW169 helicopters have not been determined. Approximately $102.1 million of these commitments (inclusive of deposits paid on options not yet exercised) may be terminated without further liability other than aggregate liquidated damages of $2.5 million. In addition, we had outstanding options to purchase up to an additional ten AW189 helicopters. If these options were exercised, the helicopters would be delivered in 2019 and 2020.
Components of Revenues and Expenses
We derive our revenues primarily from operating and leasing our equipment, and our profits depend on our cost of capital, the acquisition costs of assets, our operating costs and our reputation.

38



Operating revenues recorded under U.S. Gulf of Mexico, Alaska and International are primarily generated from offshore oil and gas exploration, development and production activities and, in Alaska, include revenues from utility services. These revenues are typically earned through a combination of fixed monthly fees plus an incremental charge based on flight hours flown. Charter revenues are typically earned through either a combination of a daily fixed fee plus a charge based on hours flown or an hourly rate with a minimum number of hours to be charged daily.
Operating revenues recorded under dry-leasing are generated from leases to third-party operators where we are not responsible for the operation of the helicopters. For certain of these leases, we also provide crew training, management expertise, and logistical and maintenance support. Leases typically call for a fixed monthly fee only, but may also include an additional charge based on flight hours flown and/or the level of personnel support. The majority of our dry-leasing revenues have been generated by helicopters deployed internationally.
Operating revenues for emergency response SAR services are earned through a fixed monthly fee plus an incremental charge for flight hours flown, and charter revenues are typically earned through an hourly rate with a minimum number of hours to be charged daily.
Operating revenues recorded under air medical services include revenues from management services to hospitals. Operating revenues are earned through a fixed monthly fee plus an incremental charge for flight hours flown.
Operating revenues recorded under flightseeing are generated on a per passenger basis.
The aggregate cost of our operations depends primarily on the size and asset mix of the fleet. Our operating costs and expenses are grouped into the following categories:
personnel (includes wages, benefits, payroll taxes, savings plans, subsistence and travel);
repairs and maintenance (primarily routine activities and hourly charges for power-by-the-hour (“PBH”) maintenance contracts that cover helicopter refurbishments and engine and major component overhauls that are performed in accordance with planned maintenance programs);
insurance (including the cost of hull and liability insurance premiums and loss deductibles);
fuel;
leased-in equipment (includes the cost of leasing helicopters and equipment); and
other (primarily base expenses, property, sales and use taxes, communication costs, freight expenses, and other).
We engage a number of third-party vendors to maintain the engines and certain components on some of our helicopter models under PBH maintenance contracts. These programs require us to pay for the maintenance service ratably over the contract period, typically based on actual flight hours. PBH providers generally bill monthly based on hours flown in the prior month, the costs being expensed as incurred. In the event we place a helicopter in a program after a maintenance period has begun, it may be necessary to pay an initial buy-in charge based on hours flown since the previous maintenance event. This buy-in charge is normally recorded as a prepaid expense and amortized as an operating expense over the remaining PBH contract period. If a helicopter is sold or otherwise removed from a program before the scheduled maintenance work is carried out, we may be able to recover part of our payments to the PBH provider, in which case we record a reduction to operating expense. We also incur repairs and maintenance expense through vendor arrangements whereby we obtain repair quotes and authorize service through a repair order process. 
Our policy of expensing all repair costs as incurred may result in operating expenses varying substantially when compared with a prior year or prior quarter if a disproportionate number of repairs, refurbishments or overhauls are undertaken. This variation can be exacerbated by the timing of entering or exiting third-party PBH programs and the timing of vendor credits.
For helicopters that we lease to third parties under arrangements whereby the customer assumes operational responsibility, we often provide maintenance and parts support but generally we incur no other material operating costs. In most instances, our leases require clients to procure adequate insurance, but we purchase contingent hull and liability coverage to mitigate the risk of a client’s coverage failing to respond. In some instances, we provide training and other services to support our lease customers.

39



Results of Operations
 
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
 
(in thousands)
 
%
 
(in thousands)
 
%
 
(in thousands)
 
%
Operating revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
United States
 
$
171,121

 
69

 
$
222,465

 
79

 
$
281,869

 
85

Foreign
 
76,107

 
31

 
59,372

 
21

 
49,353

 
15

Total operating revenues
 
247,228

 
100

 
281,837

 
100

 
331,222

 
100

Costs and expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Personnel
 
69,889

 
28

 
68,775

 
25

 
74,807

 
23

Repairs and maintenance
 
45,875

 
19

 
53,603

 
19

 
64,072

 
19

Insurance and loss reserves
 
6,253

 
3

 
6,127

 
2

 
9,656

 
3

Fuel
 
12,860

 
5

 
13,069

 
5

 
25,534

 
8

Leased-in equipment
 
1,091

 

 
992

 

 
1,138

 

Other
 
33,895

 
14

 
28,915

 
10

 
29,166

 
9

Total operating expenses
 
169,863

 
69

 
171,481

 
61

 
204,373

 
62

Administrative and general
 
36,206

 
15

 
42,812

 
15

 
43,987

 
13

Depreciation and amortization
 
49,315

 
20

 
47,337

 
17

 
46,312

 
14

Total costs and expenses
 
255,384

 
104

 
261,630

 
93

 
294,672

 
89

Gains on asset dispositions
 
4,787

 
2

 
5,953

 
2

 
6,101

 
2

Goodwill impairment
 

 

 
(1,866
)
 
(1
)
 

 

Operating income (loss)
 
(3,369
)
 
(2
)
 
24,294

 
8

 
42,651

 
13

Other income (expense):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest income
 
741

 

 
1,191

 

 
540

 

Interest expense
 
(17,325
)
 
(7
)
 
(13,526
)
 
(5
)
 
(14,778
)
 
(4
)
Derivative losses, net
 

 

 
(18
)
 

 
(944
)
 

Foreign currency gains (losses), net
 
7

 

 
(2,590
)
 
(1
)
 
(2,377
)
 
(1
)
Gain on debt extinguishment
 
518

 

 
1,617

 
1

 

 

Gain on sale of FBO
 

 

 
12,946

 
5

 

 

Note receivable impairment
 

 

 

 

 
(2,457
)
 
(1
)
Other, net
 
69

 

 
45

 

 
(4
)
 

Total other income (expense)
 
(15,990
)
 
(7
)
 
(335
)
 

 
(20,020
)
 
(6
)
Income (loss) before income tax expense and equity earnings
 
(19,359
)
 
(9
)
 
23,959

 
8

 
22,631

 
7

Income tax expense (benefit), net
 
(3,357
)
 
(1
)
 
14,117

 
5

 
8,285

 
3

Income (loss) before equity earnings
 
(16,002
)
 
(8
)
 
9,842

 
3

 
14,346

 
4

Equity earnings (losses), net of tax
 
1,092

 

 
(1,943
)
 
(1
)
 
2,675

 
1

Net income (loss)
 
(14,910
)
 
(8
)
 
7,899

 
2

 
17,021

 
5

Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interest in subsidiary
 
6,932

 
3

 
806

 

 
96

 

Net income (loss) attributable to Era Group Inc.
 
$
(7,978
)
 
(5
)
 
$
8,705

 
2

 
$
17,117

 
5



40



Operating Revenues by Service Line. The following table sets forth our operating revenues by service line for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014.
 
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
 
(in thousands)
 
%
 
(in thousands)
 
%
 
(in thousands)
 
%
Operating revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Oil and gas:(1)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
U.S. Gulf of Mexico
 
$
135,407

 
55
 
$
166,234

 
59

 
$
199,563

 
60

Alaska
 
4,592

 
2
 
18,548

 
7

 
29,982

 
9

International
 
63,089

 
26
 
18,972

 
7

 
3,115

 
1

Total oil and gas
 
203,088

 
83
 
203,754

 
73

 
232,660

 
70

Dry-leasing
 
13,205

 
5
 
40,757

 
14

 
46,645

 
14

SAR
 
17,297

 
7
 
19,600

 
7

 
22,563

 
7

Air medical services
 
7,923

 
3
 
7,938

 
3

 
11,098

 
3

Flightseeing
 
5,715

 
2
 
7,041

 
2

 
6,989

 
2

FBO(2)
 

 
 
2,760

 
1

 
11,665

 
4

Eliminations
 

 
 
(13
)
 

 
(398
)
 

Total operating revenues
 
$
247,228

 
100
 
$
281,837

 
100

 
$
331,222

 
100

_______________
(1)
Primarily oil and gas activities, but also includes revenues from utility services such as firefighting.
(2)
We sold our FBO on May 1, 2015.
Year Ended December 31, 2016 compared with Year Ended December 31, 2015
Operating Revenues. Operating revenues were $34.6 million lower in the twelve months ended December 31, 2016 (the “Current Year”) compared to the twelve months ended December 31, 2015 (the “Prior Year”).
Operating revenues from oil and gas operations in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico were $30.8 million lower in the Current Year. Operating revenues from medium helicopters were $16.8 million lower primarily due to lower utilization and lower average rates. Operating revenues from heavy helicopters were $8.1 million lower primarily due to fewer helicopters on contract and lower average rates. Operating revenues from light twin and single engine helicopters were $3.8 million and $1.6 million lower, respectively, primarily due to lower utilization. Miscellaneous revenues were $0.5 million lower primarily due to reduced part sales.
Operating revenues from oil and gas operations in Alaska were $14.0 million lower in the Current Year primarily due to lower utilization.
Operating revenues from international oil and gas operations were $44.1 million higher in the Current Year. International revenues increased by $44.2 million due to the consolidation of Aeróleo effective October 1, 2015, by $4.9 million due to new contracts in Suriname and by $0.9 million due to higher utilization in Colombia. These increases were partially offset by a decrease of $5.9 million in Brazil primarily due to lower utilization during the period in which Aeroleo’s revenues were consolidated in both years.
Revenues from dry-leasing activities were $27.6 million lower in the Current Year. Dry-leasing revenues decreased by $21.4 million due to the consolidation of Aeróleo, by $6.4 million due to contracts that ended and by $1.5 million due to the bankruptcy of a customer. These decreases were partially offset by increases of $1.0 million due to new leases and $0.5 million due to lease return charges.
Operating revenues from SAR activities were $2.3 million lower in the Current Year primarily due to fewer subscribers and reduced charter activity.
Operating revenues from air medical services were consistent with the Prior Year. Revenues decreased by $0.7 million primarily due to a contract that ended in March 2015, partially offset by increases of $0.5 million due to increased part sales and $0.2 million due to increased flight hours.
Operating revenues from flightseeing activities were $1.3 million lower in the Current Year primarily due to unfavorable weather conditions which resulted in a shorter flightseeing season and increased flight cancellations.
Operating revenues from our fixed base operations (“FBO”) were $2.8 million lower in the Current Year due to the sale of the FBO on May 1, 2015.

41



Operating Expenses. Operating expenses were $1.6 million lower in the Current Year. Repairs and maintenance expenses were $7.7 million lower due to a decrease of $4.7 million related to the timing of repairs, a net increase of $4.5 million in PBH buyout credits and a $3.2 million decrease in PBH expense resulting from reduced flight hours; these decreases were partially offset by a $1.8 million increase related to the correction of immaterial accounting errors, $2.3 million reduction in vendor credits and an increase of $0.7 million due to the consolidation of Aeróleo. Fuel expense was $0.2 million lower due to a reduction of $4.6 million resulting from fewer flight hours in the U.S. and the sale of the FBO on May 1, 2015, partially offset by an increase of $4.3 million due to the consolidation of Aeróleo. Other operating expenses were $5.0 million higher primarily due to the consolidation of Aeróleo. Personnel costs were $1.1 million higher primarily due to an increase of $8.8 million resulting from the consolidation of Aeróleo, partially offset by a decrease of $7.7 million resulting from reduced headcount and cost-control initiatives in the U.S.
Administrative and General. Administrative and general expenses were $6.6 million lower in the Current Year. Compensation expenses were $2.3 million lower primarily due to a $4.2 million decrease resulting from reduced headcount and incentive compensation in the U.S., partially offset by an increase of $1.8 million resulting from the consolidation of Aeróleo. Bad debt expenses were $1.4 million lower primarily due to a $0.8 million bad debt reserve recorded in the Prior Year and a $0.8 million bad debt recovery in the Current Year. Shared service expenses were $0.6 million lower due to the end of the Amended and Restated Transition Services Agreement (“TSA”) with SEACOR in June 2015. Other administrative and general expenses were $2.4 million lower due to decreases of $3.2 million in the U.S. resulting from cost cutting measures and lower professional services fees, partially offset by increases of $0.8 million resulting from the consolidation of Aeróleo.
Depreciation and Amortization. Depreciation and amortization expense was $2.0 million higher in the Current Year due to an increase of $2.4 million resulting from the addition of new heavy helicopters, a base expansion project and additional information technology infrastructure required as a result of the transition of related services previously provided by SEACOR, partially offset by a decrease of $0.2 million resulting from the correction of immaterial accounting errors.
Gains (Losses) on Asset Dispositions, Net.  Gains on asset dispositions were $1.2 million lower in the Current Year. During the Current Year, we sold or otherwise disposed of two hangars in Alaska and nine helicopters for total proceeds of $28.0 million resulting in net gains of $5.0 million, and we disposed of spare parts and other equipment for total proceeds of $0.6 million resulting in net losses of $0.2 million. During the Prior Year, we sold or otherwise disposed of 18 helicopters and other equipment for total consideration of $36.5 million, including cash proceeds of $25.3 million, resulting in net gains of $6.0 million including $0.7 million related to the early buy-out of two helicopter leases by a customer.
Goodwill Impairment. We recorded a goodwill impairment of $1.9 million during the Prior Year resulting from a decline in the price of crude oil and our stock price and a prolonged downturn in the oil and gas market.
Operating Income (Loss). Operating loss as a percentage of revenues was 2% in the Current Year compared to operating income as a percentage of revenues of 8% in the Prior Year. Excluding gains on asset sales, operating loss as a percentage of revenues was 3% in the Current Year compared to operating income as a percentage of revenues of 7% in the Prior Year. The decrease in operating income as a percentage of revenues was primarily due to reduced revenues, the consolidation of Aeróleo and increased depreciation expense.
Interest Income. Interest income was $0.5 million lower in the Current Year primarily due to the early buy-out of helicopter leases by a customer in the Prior Year.
Interest Expense. Interest expense was $3.8 million higher in the Current Year primarily due to decreased capitalized interest of $5.6 million and a $0.5 million write off of previously capitalized financing costs due to the reduction of the total commitment amount of our Revolving Credit Facility, partially offset by savings of $2.3 million due to the cumulative repurchases of our 7.750% Senior Notes.
Foreign Currency Gains (Losses), net. Foreign currency losses were $2.6 million in the Prior Year primarily due to the weakening of the euro resulting in losses on our euro-denominated balances and realized losses on settled forward currency contracts.
Gain on Debt Extinguishment. Gains on debt extinguishment were $0.5 million in the Current Year due to the repurchase of $5.0 million of our 7.750% Senior Notes. Gains on debt extinguishment were $1.6 million in the Prior Year due to the repurchase of $50.2 million of our 7.750% Senior Notes.
Gain on Sale of FBO. The sale of the FBO in the Prior Year resulted in cash proceeds of $14.3 million and a pre-tax gain of $12.9 million.
Income Tax Expense (Benefit). Income tax benefit was $3.4 million in the Current Year compared to expense of $14.1 million in the Prior Year. The decrease in expense was primarily due to a taxable net loss and a $0.5 million benefit resulting from the correction of errors in our prior year tax provision in the Current Year as well as the write-off of a deferred tax asset related

42



to the consolidation of Aeróleo and a nonrecurring charge to deferred taxes related to the transfer of a helicopter to Hauser Investments Limited (“Hauser”) in the Prior Year.
Equity Earnings (Losses), Net of Tax. Equity earnings, net of tax, were $1.1 million in the Current Year compared to losses of $1.9 million in the Prior Year. The increase in equity earnings was primarily due to increased earnings from our Dart joint venture in the Current Year.
Year Ended December 31, 2015 compared with Year Ended December 31, 2014
Operating Revenues. Operating revenues were $49.4 million lower for the year ended December 31, 2015 compared with the year ended December 31, 2014.
Operating revenues from oil and gas operations in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico were $33.3 million lower in 2015 due to an overall decline in the demand for helicopter services. Operating revenues from medium helicopters were $26.5 million lower primarily due to lower utilization and lower average rates. Operating revenues from heavy helicopters were $3.7 million lower primarily due to lower utilization. Operating revenues from single engine helicopters and light twin engine helicopters were $2.0 million and $1.4 million lower, respectively, primarily due to reduced fleet count.
Operating revenues from oil and gas operations in Alaska were $11.4 million lower in 2015. Operating revenues from medium and single engine helicopters were $9.5 million and $0.2 million lower, respectively, primarily due to lower utilization and lower average rates. Operating revenues from light twin helicopters were $1.4 million lower primarily due to lower utilization. Miscellaneous revenues were $0.4 million lower primarily due to reduced rebillable expenses.
Operating revenues from international oil and gas operations were $15.9 million higher due to the consolidation of Aeróleo in the fourth quarter of 2015.
Revenues from dry-leasing activities were $5.9 million lower in 2015 primarily due to decreases of $7.4 million related to contracts that ended, $1.7 million related to the change to accrual basis accounting for recognizing revenue from a customer in India in 2014, $0.7 million related to foreign currency fluctuations and $0.7 million due to a combination of fewer flight hours and lower rates. These decreases were partially offset by increased cash collections of $4.6 million from Aeróleo prior to its consolidation.
Operating revenues from SAR activities were $3.0 million lower in 2015 primarily due to the end of a subscriber contract and reduced flight activity.
Operating revenues from air medical services were $3.2 million lower in 2015 primarily due to contracts that ended during and subsequent to 2014.
Operating revenues from flightseeing activities in 2015 were consistent with 2014.
Operating revenues from FBO activities were $8.9 million lower due to the sale of the FBO on May 1, 2015.
Operating Expenses. Operating expenses were $32.9 million lower in 2015. Fuel expenses were $12.5 million lower primarily due to a $13.7 million decrease related to reduced flight hours, lower average fuel prices and the sale of the FBO, partially offset by an increase of $1.2 million due to the consolidation of Aeróleo. Repairs and maintenance expenses were $10.5 million lower primarily due to decreases of $5.6 million related to the timing of repairs, $3.5 million in PBH expenses related to reduced flight hours and $2.1 million related to vendor credits, partially offset by an increase of $0.7 million due to the consolidation of Aeróleo. Personnel expenses were $6.0 million lower primarily due to a decrease of $9.9 million related to reduced headcount, travel costs and temporary staffing, partially offset by an increase of $3.9 million due to the consolidation of Aeróleo. Insurance and loss reserves were $3.5 million lower primarily due to a decrease of $4.0 million related to lower premiums, good experience credits and reduced activity, partially offset by an increase of $0.5 million due to the consolidation of Aeróleo. Other operating expenses were $0.3 million lower primarily due to reduced rebillable expenses, partially offset by increases related to the consolidation of Aeróleo and maintenance projects at our base locations.
Administrative and General. Administrative and general expenses were $1.2 million lower in 2015. Compensation and employee costs were $4.3 million lower primarily due to a decrease of $5.2 million related to severance expenses from changes in senior management in 2014 and reduced headcount in 2015, partially offset by an increase of $0.9 million related to the consolidation of Aeróleo. Shared service expenses were $2.5 million lower due to a reduction in fees and the termination of the TSA with SEACOR in June 2015. Professional service expenses were $2.4 million higher primarily due to the consolidation of Aeróleo and increased audit and legal fees. Bad debt expense was $1.8 million higher primarily due to unpaid amounts from a customer in Brazil and the absence of a benefit from the recovery of a reserved account receivable in 2014. Information technology and communication expenses were $1.4 million higher due to the transition of such services from SEACOR.
Depreciation and Amortization. Depreciation expense was $1.0 million higher primarily due to the completion of a base expansion project and additional helicopters placed in service.

43



Gains on Asset Dispositions. Gains on asset dispositions were $0.1 million lower in 2015. During 2015, we sold or otherwise disposed of 18 helicopters and other equipment for total consideration of $36.5 million, including cash proceeds of $25.3 million, resulting in gains of $5.2 million. In addition, we entered into a sales-type lease for two helicopters resulting in gains of $0.7 million. During 2014, we sold three helicopters and other equipment for proceeds of $7.1 million and recognized gains of $6.1 million.
Goodwill Impairment. We recorded a goodwill impairment of $1.9 million during 2015 resulting from a decline in the price of crude oil and our stock price and a prolonged downturn in the oil and gas markets.
Operating Income. Operating income as a percentage of revenues was 8% in 2015 compared to 13% in 2014. Excluding gains on asset dispositions discussed above, operating income as a percentage of revenues was 7% in 2015 compared to 11% in 2014. The decrease in operating income as a percentage of revenues was driven primarily by the decrease in operating revenues and the impairment of goodwill.
Interest Income. Interest income was $0.7 million higher primarily due to the consolidation of Aeróleo and interest earned on sales-type leases.
Interest Expense. Interest expense was $1.3 million lower primarily due to increased capitalized interest and interest savings related to the repurchase of $50.2 million of our 7.750% Senior Notes.
Derivative Losses, net. Derivative losses, net, were less than $0.1 million in 2015. Unrealized derivative losses of $0.9 million in 2014 were primarily due to the revaluation to market of forward currency contracts.
Foreign Currency Gains (Losses), net. Foreign currency losses of $2.6 million in 2015 and $2.4 million in 2014 were primarily due to the strengthening of the U.S. dollar, resulting in losses on our euro denominated balances and realized losses on settled forward currency contracts.
Gain on Debt Extinguishment. Gain on debt extinguishment was $1.6 million in 2015 related to the repurchase of $50.2 million of our 7.750% Senior Notes.
Gain on Sale of FBO. Net cash proceeds from the sale of the FBO were $14.3 million during 2015 resulting in a pre-tax gain of $12.9 million.
Note Receivable Impairment. Note receivable impairments were $2.5 million during 2014 related to a probable loss of a note receivable.
Income Tax Expense. Income tax expense was $5.8 million higher in 2015 primarily due to the write-off of a deferred tax asset related to the consolidation of Aeróleo and a nonrecurring charge to deferred taxes related to the acquisition of and transfer of a helicopter to Hauser.
Equity Earnings (Losses), net of tax. Equity losses, net of tax, were $1.9 million in 2015 compared to equity earnings of $2.7 million in 2014. The difference is primarily due to the sale in 2014 of our 51% interest in Lake Palma, S.L. (“Lake Palma”) for a gain of $1.5 million, net of tax, and the absence of earnings from Lake Palma of $0.5 million. In addition, we recorded losses from Dart of $1.6 million in 2015 compared to earnings of $0.9 million in 2014.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Our ongoing liquidity requirements arise primarily from working capital needs, meeting our capital commitments (including the purchase of helicopters and other equipment) and the repayment of debt obligations. In addition, we may use our liquidity to fund acquisitions or to make other investments. Sources of liquidity are cash balances, cash flows from operations and borrowings under our Revolving Credit Facility, and, from time to time, we may secure additional liquidity through the issuance of equity or debt.
On December 7, 2012, we completed the offering of our 7.750% Senior Notes and used the net proceeds from the offering to repay $190.0 million of borrowings outstanding under our prior $200.0 million senior secured revolving credit facility (the “Prior Credit Facility”). On March 31, 2014, we entered into our Revolving Credit Facility through an amendment to the Prior Credit Facility. On October 27, 2016, we entered into a third amendment to our Revolving Credit Facility that, among other things, revised our maintenance covenants to provide additional flexibility, reduced the aggregate principal amount of the revolving loan commitments from $300.0 million to $200.0 million and added a condition to borrowing and a repayment mechanism in connection with excess cash amounts. The Revolving Credit Facility now allows us to borrow up to $200.0 million, with a sub-limit of up to $50.0 million for letters of credit, and includes an “accordion” feature which, if exercised, and subject to agreement by the lenders and the satisfaction of certain conditions, would increase total commitments by up to $100.0 million.
As amended, our Revolving Credit Facility requires that we maintain a senior secured leverage ratio which ratio may not be greater than 3.00:1.00 for each fiscal quarter ending during the period from September 30, 2016 to March 31, 2017, 3.25:1.00

44



for the fiscal quarter ending June 30, 2017 and 3.50:1.00 for each fiscal quarter ending thereafter, maintain a minimum interest coverage ratio covenant of 1.75:1.00 for each fiscal quarter ending during the period from September 30, 2016 to September 30, 2017 and 1.50:1:00 for each fiscal quarter ending thereafter, and maintain an asset coverage ratio with respect to the fair market value of our mortgaged helicopters and secured accounts receivable and inventory to funded and committed secured debt, with certain carve-outs, of 2.00:1.00, among other items. As of December 31, 2016, we were in compliance with these covenants.
During the year ended December 31, 2016, we repaid $37.0 million previously borrowed under our Revolving Credit Facility using cash flows from operations and proceeds from helicopter and other equipment dispositions. We also borrowed $12.0 million to make progress payments on S92 helicopters and final payments on AW189 helicopters. As of December 31, 2016, the amount of additional borrowings available to us under the Revolving Credit Facility was $120.2 million.
During the year ended December 31, 2015, we borrowed $60.0 million under our Revolving Credit Facility in order to make progress payments on S92 and AW189 helicopters and to repurchase a portion of our 7.750% Senior Notes. We also repaid $55.0 million previously borrowed under our Revolving Credit Facility using cash flows from operations, proceeds from helicopter sales and the sale of the FBO.
During the year ended December 31, 2014, we borrowed $30.0 million under our Revolving Credit Facility in order to make progress payments on S92 helicopters.
As of March 1, 2017, we had unfunded capital commitments of $115.6 million, primarily pursuant to agreements to purchase 12 helicopters. Approximately $16.1 million is payable in 2017, with the remaining commitments payable through 2019. The non-cancellable portion of our helicopter commitments payable in 2017 is $12.0 million. We also had $1.3 million of deposits paid on options not yet exercised. We may terminate $102.1 million of these commitments (inclusive of deposits paid on options not yet exercised) without further liability to us other than aggregate liquidated damages of $2.5 million. In addition, we had outstanding options to purchase up to an additional ten AW189 helicopters. If these options were exercised, the helicopters would be delivered beginning in 2019 through 2020. We expect to finance the remaining acquisition costs through a combination of cash on hand, cash provided by operating activities and borrowings under our Revolving Credit Facility.
Summary of Cash Flows 
 
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
 
(in thousands)
Cash provided by (used in):
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating activities
 
$
58,504

 
$
44,456

 
$
78,286

Investing activities
 
(12,774
)
 
(22,807
)
 
(93,872
)
Financing activities
 
(32,986
)
 
(46,026
)
 
26,127

Effect of exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents
 
(164
)
 
(2,120
)
 
(1,009
)
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
 
$
12,580

 
$
(26,497
)
 
$
9,532


45



Operating Activities
Cash flows provided by operating activities increased by $14.0 million during the year ended December 31, 2016 compared to the year ended December 31, 2015. Cash flows provided by operating activities decreased by $33.8 million during the year ended December 31, 2015 compared to the year ended December 31, 2014. The components of cash flows provided by operating activities during the years ended December 31, 2016,