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EXCEL - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - HORTON D R INC /DE/Financial_Report.xls
EX-32.2 - CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. - HORTON D R INC /DE/a2014930-10kexhibit322.htm
EX-12.1 - RATIO COMPUTATION - HORTON D R INC /DE/a2014930-10kexhibit121.htm
EX-31.2 - CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER PURSUANT TO SECTION 302(A) - HORTON D R INC /DE/a2014930-10kexhibit312.htm
EX-23.1 - CONSENT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM - HORTON D R INC /DE/a2014930-10kexhibit231.htm
EX-21.1 - SUBSIDIARIES OF D.R. HORTON, INC. - HORTON D R INC /DE/a2014930-10kexhibit211.htm
EX-31.1 - CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER PURSUANT TO SECTION 302(A) - HORTON D R INC /DE/a2014930-10kexhibit311.htm
EX-32.1 - CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. - HORTON D R INC /DE/a2014930-10kexhibit321.htm

 
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
FORM 10-K
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF
THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended September 30, 2014
Commission file number 1-14122
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
D.R. Horton, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
 (State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
75-2386963
 (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
301 Commerce Street, Suite 500, Fort Worth, Texas
 (Address of principal executive offices)
 
76102
 (Zip Code)
(817) 390-8200
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock, par value $.01 per share
 
New York Stock Exchange
5.750% Senior Notes due 2023
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes x    No ¨
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ¨ No x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes x     No ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes x     No ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer  x
 
Accelerated filer ¨
 
Non-accelerated filer  ¨(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
Smaller reporting company  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes ¨     No x
As of March 31, 2014, the aggregate market value of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $6,431,364,000 based on the closing price as reported on the New York Stock Exchange.
As of November 10, 2014, there were 371,786,765 shares of the registrant’s common stock, par value $.01 per share, issued and 364,586,694 shares outstanding.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the registrant’s definitive Proxy Statement for the 2015 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated herein by reference (to the extent indicated) in Part III.
 



D.R. HORTON, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
2014 ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
Page
 
 
 



PART I


ITEM 1.
BUSINESS

D.R. Horton, Inc. is the largest homebuilding company by volume in the United States. We construct and sell homes through our operating divisions in 27 states and 79 metropolitan markets of the United States, under the names of D.R. Horton, America’s Builder, Express Homes, Emerald Homes, Breland Homes, Regent Homes and Crown Communities. Our common stock is included in the S&P 500 Index and listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol “DHI.” Unless the context otherwise requires, the terms “D.R. Horton,” the “Company,” “we” and “our” used herein refer to D.R. Horton, Inc., a Delaware corporation, and its predecessors and subsidiaries.

Donald R. Horton began our homebuilding business in 1978 in Fort Worth, Texas. In 1991, we were incorporated in Delaware to acquire the assets and businesses of our predecessor companies, which were residential home construction and development companies owned or controlled by Mr. Horton. In 1992, we completed the initial public offering of our common stock. Our company expanded and diversified its operations geographically over the years by investing available capital into our existing homebuilding markets and into start-up operations in new markets, as well as by acquiring other homebuilding companies. Our product offerings across our operating markets are broad and diverse. Our homes range in size from 1,000 to more than 4,000 square feet and in price from $100,000 to more than $1,000,000. For the year ended September 30, 2014, we closed 28,670 homes with an average sales price of approximately $272,200.

Through our financial services operations, we provide mortgage financing and title agency services to homebuyers in many of our homebuilding markets. DHI Mortgage, our 100% owned subsidiary, provides mortgage financing services primarily to our homebuilding customers and generally sells the mortgages it originates and the related servicing rights to third-party purchasers. DHI Mortgage originates loans in accordance with purchaser guidelines and sells substantially all of its mortgage production shortly after origination. Our subsidiary title companies serve as title insurance agents by providing title insurance policies, examination and closing services, primarily to our homebuilding customers.

Our financial reporting segments consist of six homebuilding segments and a financial services segment. Our homebuilding operations are the most substantial part of our business, comprising approximately 98% of consolidated revenues, which totaled $8.0 billion in fiscal 2014. Our homebuilding operations generate most of their revenues from the sale of completed homes, with a lesser amount from the sale of land and lots. Approximately 90% of our home sales revenue in fiscal 2014 came from the construction and sale of single-family detached homes, with the remainder from attached homes, such as town homes, duplexes, triplexes and condominiums. Our financial services segment generates its revenues from originating and selling mortgages and collecting fees for title insurance agency and closing services.

In addition to our homebuilding and financial services operations, we have ancillary activities that are related to our homebuilding business and real estate holdings, but are not components of our core homebuilding operations. These include the activities of our captive insurance subsidiary and other insurance-related subsidiaries, subsidiaries that own rental properties and collect rental income, and subsidiaries that own income-producing assets such as non-residential real estate, mineral rights and other rights or assets. These ancillary activities and the related income or loss are not significant, either individually or in the aggregate.



1


Available Information

We make available, as soon as reasonably practicable, on our website, www.drhorton.com, all of our reports required to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). These reports can be found on the “Investor Relations” page of our website under “SEC Filings” and include our annual and quarterly reports on Form 10-K and 10-Q (including related filings in XBRL format), current reports on Form 8-K, beneficial ownership reports on Forms 3, 4, and 5, proxy statements and amendments to such reports. Our SEC filings are also available to the public on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov, and the public may read and copy any document we file at the SEC’s public reference room located at 100 F Street NE, Washington, D.C. 20549. Further information on the operation of the public reference room can be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. In addition to our SEC filings, our corporate governance documents, including our Code of Ethical Conduct for the Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and senior financial officers, are available on the “Investor Relations” page of our website under “Corporate Governance.” Our stockholders may also obtain these documents in paper format free of charge upon request made to our Investor Relations department.

Our principal executive offices are located at 301 Commerce Street, Suite 500, Fort Worth, Texas 76102 and our telephone number is (817) 390-8200. Information on or linked to our website is not incorporated by reference into this annual report on Form 10-K unless expressly noted.

OPERATING STRUCTURE AND PROCESSES

Following is an overview of our company's operating structure and the significant processes that support our business controls, strategies and performance.

Homebuilding Markets

Our homebuilding business began in the Dallas/Fort Worth area, which is still one of our largest local homebuilding operations and home to our corporate headquarters. We currently operate in 27 states and 79 markets, which provides us with geographic diversification in our homebuilding inventory investments and our sources of revenues and earnings. We believe our geographic diversification lowers our operational risks by mitigating the effects of local and regional economic cycles, and it also enhances our earnings potential by providing more diverse opportunities to invest in our business.



2


We conduct our homebuilding operations in the geographic regions, states and markets listed below, and we conduct our mortgage and title operations in many of these markets. Our homebuilding operating divisions are aggregated into six reporting segments, also referred to as reporting regions, which comprise the markets below. Our financial statements contain additional information regarding segment performance.
State
 
Reporting Region/Market 
 
State
 
Reporting Region/Market
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
East Region
 
 
 
South Central Region
Delaware
 
Northern Delaware
 
Louisiana
 
Baton Rouge
Georgia
 
Savannah
 
 
 
Lafayette
Maryland
 
Baltimore
 
Oklahoma
 
Oklahoma City
 
 
Suburban Washington, D.C.
 
Texas
 
Austin
New Jersey
 
North New Jersey
 
 
 
Dallas
 
 
South New Jersey
 
 
 
El Paso
North Carolina
 
Charlotte
 
 
 
Fort Worth
 
 
Fayetteville
 
 
 
Houston
 
 
Greensboro/Winston-Salem
 
 
 
Killeen/Temple/Waco
 
 
Jacksonville
 
 
 
Midland/Odessa
 
 
Raleigh/Durham
 
 
 
San Antonio
 
 
Wilmington
 
 
 
 
Pennsylvania
 
Philadelphia
 
 
 
Southwest Region
South Carolina
 
Charleston
 
Arizona
 
Phoenix
 
 
Columbia
 
 
 
Tucson
 
 
Greenville/Spartanburg
 
New Mexico
 
Albuquerque
 
 
Hilton Head
 
 
 
 
 
 
Myrtle Beach
 
 
 
West Region
Virginia
 
Northern Virginia
 
California
 
Bay Area
 
 
 
 
 
 
Central Valley
 
 
Midwest Region
 
 
 
Imperial Valley
Colorado
 
Colorado Springs
 
 
 
Los Angeles County
 
 
Denver
 
 
 
Riverside County
 
 
Fort Collins
 
 
 
Sacramento
Illinois
 
Chicago
 
 
 
San Bernardino County
Indiana
 
Northern Indiana
 
 
 
San Diego County
Minnesota
 
Minneapolis/St. Paul
 
 
 
Ventura County
 
 
 
 
Hawaii
 
Hawaii
 
 
Southeast Region
 
 
 
Maui
Alabama
 
Birmingham
 
 
 
Oahu
 
 
Huntsville
 
Nevada
 
Las Vegas
 
 
Mobile
 
 
 
Reno
 
 
Montgomery
 
Oregon
 
Portland
 
 
Tuscaloosa
 
Utah
 
Salt Lake City
Florida
 
Fort Myers/Naples
 
Washington
 
Seattle/Tacoma
 
 
Jacksonville
 
 
 
Vancouver
 
 
Lakeland
 
 
 
 
 
 
Melbourne/Vero Beach
 
 
 
 
 
 
Miami/Fort Lauderdale
 
 
 
 
 
 
Orlando
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pensacola/Panama City
 
 
 
 
 
 
Port St. Lucie
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tampa/Sarasota
 
 
 
 
 
 
Volusia County
 
 
 
 
 
 
West Palm Beach
 
 
 
 
Georgia
 
Atlanta
 
 
 
 
 
 
Augusta
 
 
 
 
 
 
Middle Georgia
 
 
 
 
Mississippi
 
Gulf Coast
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hattiesburg
 
 
 
 
Tennessee
 
Nashville
 
 
 
 


3


When evaluating new or existing homebuilding markets for purposes of capital allocation, we consider local, market-specific factors, including among others:
Economic conditions;
Employment levels and job growth;
Income level of potential homebuyers;
Local housing affordability and typical mortgage products utilized;
Market for homes at our targeted price points;
Availability of land and lots in desirable locations on acceptable terms;
Land entitlement and development processes;
Availability of qualified subcontractors;
New and secondary home sales activity;
Competition; and
Prevailing housing products, features, cost and pricing.

Economies of Scale

We are the largest homebuilding company in the United States in fiscal 2014 as measured by number of homes closed and revenues, and we are also one of the largest builders in many of the markets in which we operate. We believe that our national, regional and local scale of operations provides us with benefits that may not be available to the same degree to some other smaller homebuilders, such as:
Greater access to and lower cost of capital, due to our balance sheet strength and our lending and capital markets relationships;
Negotiation of volume discounts and rebates from national, regional and local materials suppliers and lower labor rates from certain subcontractors; and
Enhanced leverage of our general and administrative activities, which allow us flexibility to adjust to changes in market conditions and compete effectively in each of our markets.

Decentralized Homebuilding Operations

We view homebuilding as a local business; therefore, most of our direct homebuilding activities are decentralized, which provides flexibility to our local managers on operational decisions. At September 30, 2014, we had 37 separate homebuilding operating divisions, many of which operate in more than one market area. Generally, each operating division consists of a division president; a controller; land entitlement, acquisition and development personnel; a sales manager and sales and marketing personnel; a construction manager and construction superintendents; customer service personnel; a purchasing manager and office staff. We believe that our division presidents and their management teams, who are familiar with local conditions, generally have the best information on which to base many decisions regarding their operations. Our division presidents receive performance based compensation if they achieve targeted financial and operating metrics related to their operating divisions. Following is a summary of our homebuilding activities that are decentralized in our local operating divisions, and the control and oversight functions that are centralized in our regional and corporate offices:


4


Operating Division Responsibilities

Each operating division is responsible for:
Site selection, which involves
— A feasibility study;
— Soil and environmental reviews;
— Review of existing zoning and other governmental requirements;
— Review of the need for and extent of offsite work required to obtain project entitlements; and
— Financial analysis of the potential project;
Negotiating lot option, land acquisition and related contracts;
Obtaining all necessary land development and home construction approvals;
Selecting land development subcontractors and ensuring their work meets our contracted scopes;
Selecting building plans and architectural schemes;
Selecting construction subcontractors and ensuring their work meets our contracted scopes;
Planning and managing homebuilding schedules;
Developing and implementing local marketing and sales plans;
Determining the pricing for each house plan in a given community; and
Coordinating post-closing customer service and warranty repairs.

Centralized Controls

We centralize many important risk elements of our homebuilding business through our regional and corporate offices. We have five separate homebuilding regional offices. Generally, each regional office consists of a region president, legal counsel, a chief financial officer and limited office support staff. Each of our region presidents and their management teams are responsible for oversight of the operations of a number of homebuilding operating divisions, including:
Review and approval of division business plans and budgets;
Review of all land and lot acquisition contracts;
Review of all business and financial analysis for potential land and lot inventory investments;
Oversight of land and home inventory levels;
Monitoring division financial and operating performance; and
Review of major personnel decisions and division incentive compensation plans.



5


Our corporate executives and corporate office departments are responsible for establishing our operational policies and internal control standards and for monitoring compliance with established policies and controls throughout our operations. The corporate office also has primary responsibility for direct management of certain key risk elements and initiatives through the following centralized functions:
Financing;
Cash management;
Allocation of capital;
Issuance and monitoring of inventory investment guidelines to our operating divisions;
Approval and funding of land and lot acquisitions;
Monitoring and analysis of margins, costs, profitability and inventory levels;
Risk and litigation management;
Environmental assessments of land and lot acquisitions;
Information technology systems;
Accounting and management reporting;
Income taxes;
Internal audit;
Public reporting and investor and media relations;
Administration of payroll and employee benefits;
Negotiation of national purchasing contracts;
Administration of customer satisfaction surveys and reporting of results; and
Approval of major personnel decisions and management incentive compensation plans.

Cost Controls

We control construction costs by designing our homes efficiently and by obtaining competitive bids for construction materials and labor. We also competitively bid and negotiate pricing from our subcontractors and suppliers based on the volume of services and products we purchase on a local, regional and national basis. We monitor our land development expenditures and construction costs versus budgets for each house and community, and we review our inventory levels, margins, expenses, profitability and returns for each operating market compared to both its business plan and our performance expectations.

We control overhead costs by centralizing certain accounting and administrative functions and by monitoring staffing and compensation levels. We review other general and administrative costs to identify efficiencies and savings opportunities in our operating divisions and our regional and corporate offices. We also direct many of our promotional activities toward local real estate brokers, which we believe is an efficient use of our marketing expenditures.



6


Land/Lot Acquisition and Inventory Management

We acquire land for use in our homebuilding operations after we have completed due diligence and generally after we have obtained the rights (known as entitlements) to begin development or construction work resulting in an acceptable number of residential lots. Before we acquire lots or tracts of land, we complete a feasibility study, which includes soil tests, independent environmental studies, other engineering work and financial analysis. We also evaluate the status of necessary zoning and other governmental entitlements required to develop and use the property for home construction. Although we purchase and develop land primarily to support our homebuilding activities, we may sell land and lots to other developers and homebuilders where we have excess land and lot positions.

We also enter into land/lot option contracts, in which we obtain the right, but generally not the obligation, to buy land or lots at predetermined prices on a defined schedule commensurate with anticipated home closings or planned development. Our option contracts generally are non-recourse, which limits our financial exposure to our earnest money deposited into escrow under the terms of the contract and any pre-acquisition due diligence costs we incur. This enables us to control land and lot positions with limited capital investment, which substantially reduces the risks associated with land ownership and development.

We directly acquire almost all of our land and lot positions. We are a party to a small number of joint ventures, all of which are consolidated in our financial statements.

We attempt to mitigate our exposure to real estate inventory risks by:
Managing our supply of land/lots controlled (owned and optioned) in each market based on anticipated future home closing levels;
Monitoring local market and demographic trends, housing preferences and related economic developments, including the identification of desirable housing submarkets based on the quality of local schools, new job opportunities, local growth initiatives and personal income trends;
Utilizing land/lot option contracts, where possible;
Seeking to acquire developed lots which are substantially ready for home construction, where possible;
Controlling our levels of investment in land acquisition, land development and housing inventory to match the expected housing demand in each of our operating markets;
Generally commencing construction of custom features or optional upgrades on homes under contract only after the buyer’s receipt of mortgage approval and receipt of satisfactory deposits from the buyer; and
Monitoring and managing the number of speculative homes (homes under construction without an executed sales contract) built in each subdivision.

Land Development and Home Construction

Substantially all of our land development and home construction work is performed by subcontractors. Subcontractors typically are selected after a competitive bidding process, and are retained for a specific subdivision or series of house plans pursuant to a contract that obligates the subcontractor to complete the scope of work at an agreed-upon price. We employ land development managers and construction superintendents to monitor land development and home construction activities, participate in major design and building decisions, coordinate the activities of subcontractors and suppliers, review the work of subcontractors for quality and cost controls and monitor compliance with zoning and building codes. In addition, our construction superintendents play a significant role in working with our homebuyers by assisting with option selection and home modification decisions, educating buyers on the construction process and instructing buyers on post-closing home maintenance.



7


Our home designs are selected or prepared in each of our markets to appeal to the tastes and preferences of local homebuyers in each community. We offer optional interior and exterior features to allow homebuyers to enhance the basic home design and to allow us to generate additional revenues from each home sold. We continually adjust our product offerings to address our customers’ expectations for affordability, home size and features. Construction time for our homes depends on the availability of labor, materials and supplies, the weather, the size of the home and other factors. We complete the construction of most homes within three to six months.

We typically do not maintain significant inventories of land development or construction materials, except for work in progress materials for active development projects and homes under construction. Generally, the construction materials used in our operations are readily available from numerous sources. We have contracts exceeding one year with certain suppliers of building materials that are cancelable at our option.

We are subject to governmental regulations that affect our land development and construction activities. At times, we have experienced delays because of the entitlement process, which is dependent upon receiving the proper approvals from municipalities that may not be adequately staffed.

Marketing and Sales

In most of our markets, we use the D.R. Horton, Emerald Homes and Express Homes brand names to market and sell our homes. Our D.R. Horton branded communities are the core of our business and account for the substantial majority of our home closings, focusing on the first time and first time move-up homebuyer. Our Emerald branded communities, introduced in fiscal 2013, appeal to buyers in search of higher-end move-up and luxury homes. Our Express branded communities were introduced in fiscal 2014 to accommodate a segment of entry-level buyers, whose focus is primarily on affordability. In several markets, we also use the Crown Communities, Breland Homes and Regent Homes brands, after we acquired their homebuilding operations. Crown and Breland's product offerings are similar to our D.R. Horton communities, and Regent's communities are similar to our Express Homes communities. Homes marketed under our Express Homes and Regent Homes brands together represented 5% of our fiscal 2014 home closings, and homes marketed under our Emerald Homes brand represented 2% of our fiscal 2014 home closings.

We market and sell our homes primarily through commissioned employees, and the majority of our home closings also involve an independent real estate broker. We typically conduct home sales from sales offices located in furnished model homes in each subdivision, and we generally do not offer our model homes for sale until the completion of a subdivision. Our sales personnel assist prospective homebuyers by providing floor plans and price information, demonstrating the features and layouts of model homes and assisting with the selection of options and other custom features. We train and inform our sales personnel as to the availability of financing, construction schedules, and marketing and advertising plans. As market conditions warrant, we may provide potential homebuyers with one or more of a variety of incentives, including discounts and free upgrades, to be competitive in a particular market.

We market our homes and communities to prospective homebuyers and real estate brokers through electronic media, including email, social networking sites and our company website, as well as brochures, flyers, newsletters and promotional events. We also use billboards, radio, television, magazine and newspaper advertising as necessary in each local market. We attempt to position our subdivisions in locations that are desirable to potential homebuyers and convenient to or visible from local traffic patterns, which helps to reduce advertising costs. Model homes play a substantial role in our marketing efforts, and we expend significant effort and resources to create an attractive atmosphere in our model homes.

We also build speculative homes in most of our subdivisions. These homes enhance our marketing and sales efforts to prospective homebuyers who are renters or who are relocating to these markets, as well as to independent brokers, who often represent homebuyers requiring a home within a short time frame. We determine our speculative homes strategy in each market based on local market factors, such as new job growth, the number of job relocations, housing demand and supply, seasonality, current sales contract cancellation trends and our past experience in the market. We maintain a level of speculative home inventory in each subdivision based on our current and planned sales pace, and we monitor and adjust speculative home inventory on an ongoing basis as conditions warrant. Speculative homes help to provide us with opportunities to compete effectively with existing homes available in the market and improve our profits and returns.


8



Sales Contracts and Backlog

Our sales contracts require an earnest money deposit which varies in amount across our markets and subdivisions. Additionally, customers are generally required to pay additional deposits when they select options or upgrade features for their homes. Our sales contracts include a financing contingency which permits customers to cancel and receive a refund of their deposit if they cannot obtain mortgage financing at prevailing or specified interest rates within a specified period. Our contracts may include other contingencies, such as the sale of an existing home. We either retain or refund customer deposits on canceled sales contracts, depending upon the applicable provisions of the contract or other circumstances.

Sales order backlog represents homes under contract but not yet closed at the end of the period. At September 30, 2014, the value of our backlog of sales orders was $2,858.8 million (9,888 homes), an increase of 29% from $2,210.1 million (8,205 homes) at September 30, 2013. The average sales price of homes in backlog was $289,100 at September 30, 2014, up 7% from the $269,400 average at September 30, 2013. Many of the contracts in our sales order backlog are subject to contingencies, such as those described above, which can result in cancellations. A portion of the contracts in backlog will not result in closings due to cancellations. As a percentage of gross sales orders, cancellations of sales contracts were 23% and 24% in fiscal 2014 and 2013, respectively.

The length of time between the signing of a sales contract for a home and delivery of the home to the buyer (closing) is generally from two to six months; therefore, substantially all of the homes in our sales backlog at September 30, 2014 are scheduled to close in fiscal year 2015. Further discussion of our backlog is provided in Item 7 “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” under Part II of this annual report on Form 10-K.

Customer Service and Quality Control

Our operating divisions are responsible for pre-closing quality control inspections and responding to customers’ post-closing needs. We believe that a prompt and courteous response to homebuyers’ needs during and after construction reduces post-closing repair costs, enhances our reputation for quality and service and ultimately leads to repeat and referral business from the real estate community and homebuyers. We typically provide our homebuyers with a ten-year limited warranty for major defects in structural elements such as framing components and foundation systems, a two-year limited warranty on major mechanical systems, and a one-year limited warranty on other construction components. The subcontractors who perform the actual construction also provide us with warranties on workmanship and are generally prepared to respond to us and the homeowner promptly upon request. In addition, some of our suppliers provide manufacturer’s warranties on specified products installed in the home.

Customer Mortgage Financing

We provide mortgage financing services principally to purchasers of our homes in the majority of our homebuilding markets through our 100% owned subsidiary, DHI Mortgage. DHI Mortgage assists in the sales transaction by coordinating the mortgage application, mortgage commitment and home closing processes to facilitate a timely and efficient home buying experience for our buyers. DHI Mortgage originates mortgage loans for a substantial portion of our homebuyers. During the year ended September 30, 2014, DHI Mortgage provided mortgage financing services for approximately 50% of our total homes closed, and approximately 88% of DHI Mortgage’s loan volume related to homes closed by our homebuilding operations. Most of our homebuilding divisions also work with a number of additional mortgage lenders that offer a range of mortgage financing programs to our homebuyers.

To limit the risks associated with our mortgage operations, DHI Mortgage originates loan products that we believe can be sold to third-party purchasers of mortgage loans. DHI Mortgage sells substantially all of the loans and their servicing rights to third-party purchasers shortly after origination with limited recourse provisions. DHI Mortgage centralizes most of its control and oversight functions, including those related to loan underwriting, quality control, regulatory compliance, secondary marketing of loans, hedging activities, accounting and financial reporting.



9



Title Services

Through our subsidiary title companies, we serve as a title insurance agent in selected markets by providing title insurance policies, examination and closing services primarily to our homebuilding customers. We currently assume little or no underwriting risk associated with these title policies.

Employees

At September 30, 2014, we employed 5,621 persons, of whom 1,364 were sales and marketing personnel, 1,499 were involved in construction, 1,662 were office personnel and 1,096 worked in mortgage and title operations. We believe that we have good relations with our employees.

Acquisitions

We routinely evaluate opportunities to profitably expand our operations, including potential acquisitions of other homebuilding or related businesses. In August 2012, we acquired the homebuilding operations of Breland Homes, which operates in Huntsville and Mobile, Alabama and along the coast of Mississippi. In October 2013, we acquired the homebuilding operations of Regent Homes, Inc., which operates in Charlotte, Greensboro and Winston-Salem, North Carolina. In May 2014, we acquired the homebuilding operations of Crown Communities, which operates in Georgia, South Carolina and eastern Alabama.

Acquisitions of homebuilding businesses can provide us with immediate land and home inventories, as well as control of additional land and lot positions through option contracts. In addition, employees may have specialized knowledge of local market conditions, including existing relationships with municipalities, land owners, developers, subcontractors and suppliers. These inventory positions and local market knowledge and relationships could take us several years to develop through our own start-up efforts. We seek to limit the risks associated with acquiring other companies by conducting extensive operational, financial and legal due diligence on each acquisition and by performing financial analysis to determine that each acquisition will have a positive impact on our earnings within an acceptable period of time.

Competition

The homebuilding industry is highly competitive. We compete with numerous other national, regional and local homebuilders for homebuyers, desirable properties, raw materials, skilled labor, employees, management talent and financing. We also compete with resales of existing and foreclosed homes and with the rental housing market. Our homes compete on the basis of quality, price, design, mortgage financing terms and location.

The competitors to our financial services businesses include other title companies and mortgage lenders, including national, regional and local mortgage bankers and other financial institutions. Some of these competitors are subject to fewer governmental regulations and have greater access to capital than we do, and some of them may operate with different lending criteria and may offer a broader array of financing and other products and services to consumers than we do.



10


Governmental Regulation and Environmental Matters

The homebuilding industry is subject to extensive and complex regulations. We and the subcontractors we use must comply with many federal, state and local laws and regulations, including zoning, density and development requirements, building, environmental, advertising, labor and real estate sales rules and regulations. These regulations and requirements affect substantially all aspects of our land development and home design, construction and sales processes in varying degrees across our markets. Our homes are inspected by local authorities where required, and homes eligible for insurance or guarantees provided by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) and the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) are subject to inspection by them. These regulations often provide broad discretion to the administering governmental authorities. In addition, our new housing developments may be subject to various assessments for schools, parks, streets, utilities and other public improvements.

Our homebuilding operations are also subject to an extensive variety of local, state and federal statutes, ordinances, rules and regulations concerning protection of health, safety and the environment. The particular environmental laws for each site vary greatly according to location, environmental condition and the present and former uses of the site and adjoining properties.

Our mortgage company and title insurance agencies must comply with extensive federal and state laws and regulations as administered by numerous federal and state government agencies. These include eligibility and other requirements for participation in the programs offered by the FHA, VA, Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae), Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae), Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). These laws and regulations also require compliance with consumer lending laws and other regulations governing disclosure requirements, prohibitions against discrimination and real estate settlement procedures. These laws and regulations subject our operations to regular, extensive examinations by the applicable agencies.

Seasonality

Although significant changes in market conditions have impacted our seasonal patterns in the past and could do so again in the future, we generally have more homes under construction, close more homes and have greater revenues and operating income in the third and fourth quarters of our fiscal year. The seasonal activity increases our working capital requirements for our homebuilding operations during our third and fourth fiscal quarters and increases our funding requirements for the mortgages we originate in our financial services segment at the end of these quarters. As a result of seasonal activity, our quarterly results of operations and financial position at the end of a particular fiscal quarter are not necessarily representative of the balance of our fiscal year.



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ITEM 1A.
RISK FACTORS

Discussion of our business and operations included in this annual report on Form 10-K should be read together with the risk factors set forth below. They describe various risks and uncertainties we are or may become subject to, many of which are difficult to predict or beyond our control. These risks and uncertainties, together with other factors described elsewhere in this report, have the potential to affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows, strategies or prospects in a material and adverse manner.

The homebuilding industry experienced a significant downturn from 2006 through 2011. Homebuilding industry conditions began to improve in fiscal 2012, and we have begun to see improvements in the general U.S. economy more recently. However, a subsequent deterioration in industry conditions or general economic conditions could adversely affect our business or financial results.

We experienced one of the most severe housing downturns in U.S. history from 2006 through 2011. During this downturn, we experienced significant reductions in our home sales and homebuilding revenues, and we incurred substantial asset impairments and write-offs. Since fiscal 2012, our results and other national data indicate that the overall demand for new homes has improved. Also, more recently we have seen an improvement in U.S. economic conditions. However, industry conditions vary across our operating markets, and the mortgage lending environment remains restrictive. Weakening economic conditions and a deterioration in industry conditions could adversely affect our business and financial results.

The homebuilding industry is cyclical and affected by changes in economic, real estate or other conditions that could adversely affect our business or financial results.

The homebuilding industry is cyclical and is significantly affected by changes in general and local economic and real estate conditions, such as:
employment levels;
availability of financing for homebuyers;
interest rates;
consumer confidence;
levels and prices of new homes for sale and alternatives to new homes, including foreclosed homes, homes held for sale by investors and speculators, other existing homes and rental properties;
demographic trends; and
housing demand.

Adverse changes in these general and local economic conditions or deterioration in the broader economy could have a negative impact on our business and financial results. Also, changes in these economic conditions may affect some of our regions or markets more than others. If adverse conditions affect any of our larger markets, they could have a proportionately greater impact on us than on some other homebuilding companies.

In recent years, concerns regarding the U.S. government’s fiscal policies and economic stimulus actions have created uncertainty in the financial markets and caused volatility in interest rates, which has impacted business and consumer confidence. Federal government actions related to economic stimulus, taxation and spending levels, borrowing limits, potential government shutdowns, the implementation of federal healthcare legislation and the related political debates, conflicts and compromises associated with such actions may negatively impact the financial markets and consumer confidence and spending, which could hurt the U.S. economy and the housing market. Such events could adversely affect our homebuilding and financial services businesses and operating results.



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Weather conditions and natural disasters, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, volcanic activity, droughts and floods, can harm our homebuilding business. These can delay our development work, home construction and home closings, adversely affect the cost or availability of materials or labor or damage homes under construction. The climates and geology of many of the states in which we operate, including California, Florida, Texas and other coastal areas, where we have some of our larger operations, present increased risks of adverse weather or natural disasters.

Deployments of U.S. military personnel to foreign regions, terrorist attacks, other acts of violence or threats to national security and any corresponding response by the United States or others, or related domestic or international instability, may cause an economic slowdown in the markets where we operate, which could adversely affect our homebuilding business.

Public health issues such as a major epidemic or pandemic could adversely affect our business. The U.S. and other countries have experienced, and may experience in the future, outbreaks of contagious diseases that affect public perception of health risk. In the event of a widespread, prolonged, actual or perceived outbreak of a contagious disease, our operations could be negatively impacted by a reduction in customer traffic or other factors which could reduce demand for new homes.

If we experience any of the foregoing, potential customers may be less willing or able to buy our homes. In the future, our pricing and product strategies may also be limited by market conditions. We may be unable to change the mix of our home offerings, reduce the costs of the homes we build, offer more affordable homes or satisfactorily address changing market conditions in other ways without adversely affecting our profit margins. In addition, cancellations of home sales contracts in backlog may increase if homebuyers do not honor their contracts due to any of the factors discussed above.

Our financial services business is closely related to our homebuilding business, as it originates mortgage loans principally to purchasers of the homes we build. A decrease in the demand for our homes because of the foregoing matters will also adversely affect the financial results of this segment of our business. An increase in the default rate on the mortgages we originate may adversely affect our ability to sell the mortgages or the pricing we receive upon the sale of mortgages or may increase our recourse obligations for previous originations. We establish reserves related to mortgages we have sold; however, actual future obligations related to these mortgages could differ significantly from our current estimated amounts.

Constriction of the credit markets could limit our ability to access capital and increase our costs of capital.

During the housing downturn, the credit markets constricted and reduced some sources of liquidity that were previously available to us. Consequently, we focused on maintaining positive operating cash flow, and we relied principally on our cash on hand to meet our working capital needs and repay outstanding indebtedness during those years. There likely will be periods in the future when financial market upheaval will increase our cost of capital or limit our ability to access the public debt markets or obtain bank financing.

We have a revolving credit facility, which currently provides committed loan financing through September 7, 2019 in an amount totaling $975 million. Also, our mortgage subsidiary utilizes a $300 million mortgage repurchase facility to finance the majority of the loans it originates. The capacity of the facility can be increased up to $400 million subject to the availability of additional commitments. The mortgage repurchase facility must be renewed annually and currently expires on February 27, 2015. We expect to renew and extend the term of the mortgage repurchase facility with similar terms prior to its maturity. Adverse changes in market conditions could make the renewal of these facilities more difficult or could result in an increase in the cost of the facilities or a decrease in the committed amounts. Such changes affecting our mortgage repurchase facility may also make it more difficult or costly to sell the mortgages that we originate.

We believe that our existing cash resources, our revolving credit facility and our mortgage repurchase facility provide sufficient liquidity to fund our near-term working capital needs and debt obligations. We regularly assess our projected capital requirements to fund future growth in our business, repay our longer-term debt obligations, and support our other general corporate and operational needs, and we regularly evaluate our opportunities to raise additional capital. As market conditions permit, we may issue new debt or equity securities through the public capital markets or obtain additional bank financing to fund our projected capital requirements or provide additional liquidity. Adverse changes in economic, homebuilding or capital market conditions could negatively affect our business, liquidity and financial results.


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Reductions in the availability of mortgage financing and the liquidity provided by government-sponsored enterprises, the effects of government programs, a decrease in our ability to sell mortgage loans on attractive terms or an increase in mortgage interest rates could adversely affect our business or financial results.

Since the housing downturn, the mortgage lending industry has experienced significant change and contraction. Credit requirements have tightened and investor demand for mortgage loans and mortgage-backed securities has been predominantly limited to securities backed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or Ginnie Mae. As a result, it remains difficult for some potential buyers to finance their home purchases. Further tightening of credit requirements could adversely affect our business or financial results.

We believe that the liquidity provided by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and Ginnie Mae to the mortgage industry has been very important to the housing market. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have required substantial injections of capital from the federal government and may require additional government support in the future. There has been ongoing discussion by the government with regard to the long term structure and viability of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. These discussions include the downsizing of their portfolios as well as the tightening of guidelines for their loan products. In addition, increased lending volume and losses insured by the FHA have resulted in a reduction of its insurance fund. Any reduction in the availability of the financing or insuring provided by these institutions could adversely affect interest rates, mortgage availability and sales of new homes and mortgage loans. The FHA insures mortgage loans that generally have lower credit requirements and is an important source for financing the sale of our homes. In recent years, more restrictive guidelines have been placed on FHA insured loans, affecting minimum down payment and availability for condominium financing. Also in recent years, the FHA has raised the premium charged to borrowers for insuring loans, which has increased the cost of FHA financing. Additional future restrictions or premium increases may negatively affect the availability or affordability of FHA financing, which could adversely affect our ability to sell homes.

While the use of down payment assistance programs by our homebuyers has decreased significantly, some of our customers still utilize 100% financing through programs offered by the VA and United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). These government-sponsored loan programs are subject to changes in regulations, lending standards and government funding levels. There can be no assurances that these programs or other programs will continue to be available in our homebuilding markets or that they will be as attractive to our customers as the programs currently offered, which could negatively affect our sales.

The mortgage loans originated by our financial services operations are generally sold to third-party purchasers. During fiscal 2014, approximately 71% of our mortgage loans were sold to four major financial institutions and the largest concentration of total loans sold to one institution was 28%. On an ongoing basis, we seek to establish loan purchase arrangements with multiple institutions. If we are unable to sell mortgage loans to purchasers on attractive terms, our ability to originate and sell mortgage loans at competitive prices could be limited, which would negatively affect our profitability.

Even if potential customers do not need financing, changes in the availability of mortgage products may make it more difficult for them to sell their current homes to potential buyers who need financing.

Mortgage rates are currently low as compared to most historical periods. If interest rates increase, the costs of owning a home will be affected, which could result in a decline in the demand for our homes.

The risks associated with our land and lot inventory could adversely affect our business or financial results.

Inventory risks are substantial for our homebuilding business. There are risks inherent in controlling, owning and developing land. If housing demand declines, we may not be able to build and sell homes profitably in some of our communities, and we may not be able to fully recover the costs of some of the land and lots we own. Also, the values of our owned undeveloped land, building lots and housing inventories may fluctuate significantly due to changes in market conditions. As a result, our deposits for lots controlled under option or similar contracts may be put at risk, we may have to sell homes or land for a lower profit margin or we may have to record inventory impairment charges on our developed and undeveloped land and lots. A significant deterioration in economic or homebuilding industry conditions may result in substantial inventory impairment charges.


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Homebuilding is subject to home warranty and construction defect claims in the ordinary course of business that can be significant.

We are subject to home warranty and construction defect claims arising in the ordinary course of our homebuilding business. We rely on subcontractors to perform the actual construction of our homes, and in many cases, to select and obtain construction materials. Despite our detailed specifications and monitoring of the construction process, our subcontractors occasionally use improper construction processes or defective materials in the construction of our homes. When we find these issues, we repair them in accordance with our warranty obligations. We spend significant resources to repair items in homes we have sold to fulfill the warranties we issued to our homebuyers. Additionally, we are subject to construction defect claims which can be costly to defend and resolve in the legal system. Warranty and construction defect matters can also result in negative publicity in the media and on the internet, which can damage our reputation and adversely affect our ability to sell homes.

Based on the large number of homes we have sold over the years, our potential liabilities related to warranty and construction defect claims are significant. As a consequence, we maintain product liability insurance, and we seek to obtain indemnities and certificates of insurance from subcontractors covering claims related to their workmanship and materials. We establish warranty and other reserves for the homes we sell based on historical experience in our markets and our judgment of the qualitative risks associated with the types of homes built. Because of the uncertainties inherent to these matters, we cannot provide assurance that our insurance coverage, our subcontractor arrangements and our reserves will be adequate to address all of our future warranty and construction defect claims. Contractual indemnities can be difficult to enforce, we may be responsible for applicable self-insured retentions and some types of claims may not be covered by insurance or may exceed applicable coverage limits. Additionally, the coverage offered by and the availability of product liability insurance for construction defects is limited and costly. We have responded to increases in insurance costs and coverage limitations by increasing our self-insured retentions and claim reserves. There can be no assurance that coverage will not be further restricted or become more costly. If costs to resolve our future warranty and construction defect claims exceed our estimates, our financial results and liquidity could be adversely affected.

Supply shortages and other risks related to acquiring land, building materials and skilled labor could increase our costs and delay deliveries.

The homebuilding industry has from time to time experienced significant difficulties that can affect the cost or timing of construction, including:
difficulty in acquiring land suitable for residential building at affordable prices in locations where our potential customers want to live;
shortages of qualified subcontractors;
reliance on local subcontractors, manufacturers and distributors who may be inadequately capitalized;
shortages of materials; and
volatile increases in the cost of materials, particularly increases in the price of lumber, drywall and cement, which are significant components of home construction costs.

These factors may cause us to take longer or incur more costs to build our homes and adversely affect our revenues and margins. If the level of new home demand increases significantly in future periods, the risk of shortages in residential lots, labor and materials available to the homebuilding industry could increase in some markets where we operate.

We are required to obtain performance bonds, the unavailability of which could adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows.

We often are required to provide surety bonds to secure our performance or obligations under construction contracts, development agreements and other arrangements. Our ability to obtain surety bonds primarily depends upon our credit rating, financial condition, past performance and other factors, including the capacity of the surety market and the underwriting practices of surety bond issuers. The ability to obtain surety bonds also can be impacted by the willingness of insurance companies to issue performance bonds for construction and development activities. If we are unable to obtain surety bonds when required, our results of operations and cash flows could be adversely affected.


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Increases in the costs of owning a home could prevent potential customers from buying our homes and adversely affect our business or financial results.

Significant expenses of owning a home, including mortgage interest and real estate taxes, generally are deductible expenses for an individual’s federal, and in some cases state, income taxes, subject to various limitations under current tax law and policy. If the federal government or a state government changes its income tax laws, as has been discussed from time to time, to eliminate or substantially modify these income tax deductions, the after-tax cost of owning a new home would increase for many of our potential customers. The loss or reduction of homeowner tax deductions, if such tax law changes were enacted without offsetting provisions, could adversely affect demand for and sales prices of new homes.

In addition, increases in property tax rates by local governmental authorities, as experienced in some areas in response to reduced federal and state funding, could adversely affect the amount of financing our potential customers could obtain or their desire to purchase new homes.

Our business and financial results could be adversely affected by significant inflation, higher interest rates or deflation.

Inflation can adversely affect us by increasing costs of land, materials and labor. In addition, significant inflation is often accompanied by higher interest rates, which have a negative impact on housing demand. In a highly inflationary environment, depending on industry and other economic conditions, we may be precluded from raising home prices enough to keep up with the rate of inflation, which could reduce our profit margins. Moreover, with inflation, the costs of capital increase and the purchasing power of our cash resources can decline. Current or future efforts by the government to stimulate the economy may increase the risk of significant inflation and its adverse impact on our business or financial results.

Alternatively, a significant period of deflation could cause a decrease in overall spending and borrowing levels. This could lead to a further deterioration in economic conditions, including an increase in the rate of unemployment. Deflation could also cause the value of our inventories to decline or reduce the value of existing homes below the related mortgage loan balance, which could potentially increase the supply of existing homes and have a negative impact on our results of operations.

Governmental regulations and environmental matters could increase the cost and limit the availability of our development and homebuilding projects and adversely affect our business or financial results.

We are subject to extensive and complex regulations that affect land development and home construction, including zoning, density restrictions, building design and building standards. These regulations often provide broad discretion to the administering governmental authorities as to the conditions we must meet prior to development or construction being approved, if approved at all. We are subject to determinations by these authorities as to the adequacy of water or sewage facilities, roads or other local services. New housing developments may also be subject to various assessments for schools, parks, streets and other public improvements. In addition, in many markets government authorities have implemented no growth or growth control initiatives. Any of these can limit, delay or increase the costs of development or home construction.

We are also subject to a significant number and variety of local, state and federal laws and regulations concerning protection of health, safety, labor standards and the environment. The impact of environmental laws varies depending upon the prior uses of the building site or adjoining properties and may be greater in areas with less supply where undeveloped land or desirable alternatives are less available. These matters may result in delays, may cause us to incur substantial compliance, remediation, mitigation and other costs, and can prohibit or severely restrict development and homebuilding activity in environmentally sensitive regions or areas. Government agencies also routinely initiate audits, reviews or investigations of our business practices to ensure compliance with these laws and regulations, which can cause us to incur costs or create other disruptions in our business that can be significant.

The subcontractors we rely on to perform the actual construction of our homes are also subject to a significant number of local, state and federal laws and regulations, including laws involving matters that are not within our control. If the subcontractors who construct our homes fail to comply with all applicable laws, we can suffer reputational damage, and may be exposed to possible liability.


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We are also subject to an extensive number of laws and regulations because our common stock and debt securities are publicly traded in the capital markets. These regulations govern our communications with our shareholders and the capital markets, our financial statement disclosures and our legal processes, and they also impact the work required to be performed by our independent registered public accounting firm and our legal counsel. Changes in these laws and regulations, including the subsequent implementation of rules by the administering government authorities, can require us to incur additional compliance costs, and such costs can be significant.

Governmental regulation of our financial services operations could adversely affect our business or financial results.

Our financial services operations are subject to a significant number of federal, state and local laws and regulations, any of which may limit our ability to provide mortgage financing or title services to potential purchasers of our homes. These include eligibility requirements for participation in federal loan programs, compliance with consumer lending laws and other regulations governing disclosure requirements, prohibitions against discrimination, real estate settlement procedures and foreclosure and servicing policies. Additionally, the turmoil caused by the significant number of defaults and resulting foreclosures during the housing downturn has encouraged consumer lawsuits and the investigation of financial services industry practices by various governmental authorities. These governmental inquiries could result in changes in regulations and in the practices of the financial services and homebuilding industries, and they could adversely affect the costs and financial results of financial services and homebuilding companies.

In July 2010, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act) was enacted, providing for a number of new requirements related to residential mortgage lending practices. In 2011, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) was created to regulate consumer protection with regard to financial products and services. In January 2014, the CFPB implemented rules regarding the creation and definition of a “Qualified Mortgage” (QM). These rules created standards for lender practices regarding assessing borrowers’ ability to repay, and limitations on certain fees and incentive arrangements. Additional rules regarding loan estimates, closing disclosures and fees are scheduled to be implemented in August 2015. The effect of these rules on our homebuilding and financial services businesses have yet to be determined, and could affect the availability and cost of mortgage credit.

We have substantial amounts of consolidated debt and may incur additional debt; our debt obligations and our ability to comply with related covenants, restrictions or limitations could adversely affect our financial condition.

As of September 30, 2014, our consolidated debt was $3.7 billion, and we had $522.4 million principal amount of our debt maturing before the end of fiscal 2015. The indentures governing our senior notes do not restrict the incurrence of future unsecured debt by us or our homebuilding subsidiaries or the incurrence of secured or unsecured debt by our financial services subsidiaries, and the agreement governing our revolving credit facility and our senior note indentures allow us to incur a substantial amount of future unsecured debt. Such instruments also permit us and our homebuilding subsidiaries to incur significant amounts of additional secured debt.

Possible consequences. The amount and the maturities of our debt could have important consequences. For example, they could:
require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to payment of our debt and reduce our ability to use our cash flow for other operating or investing purposes;
limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, the changes in our business;
limit our ability to obtain future financing for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions, debt service requirements or other requirements;
place us at a competitive disadvantage to the extent that we have more debt than some of our competitors; and
make us more vulnerable to downturns in our business or general economic conditions.



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In addition, the magnitude of our debt and the restrictions imposed by the instruments governing these obligations expose us to additional risks, including:

Dependence on future performance. Our ability to meet our debt service and other obligations and the financial covenants under our revolving credit and mortgage repurchase facilities will depend, in part, upon our future financial performance. Our future results are subject to the risks and uncertainties described in this report. Our revenues and earnings vary with the level of general economic activity in the markets we serve. Our businesses are also affected by financial, political, business and other factors, many of which are beyond our control. The factors that affect our ability to generate cash can also affect our ability to raise additional funds for these purposes through the sale of debt or equity, the refinancing of debt or the sale of assets. Changes in prevailing interest rates may affect our ability to meet our debt service obligations, because borrowings under our revolving credit facility and mortgage repurchase facility bear interest at floating rates.

Revolving credit facility. Our revolving credit facility contains financial covenants requiring the maintenance of a minimum level of tangible net worth, a maximum allowable ratio of debt to tangible net worth and a borrowing base restriction if our ratio of debt to tangible net worth exceeds a certain level. A failure to comply with these requirements could allow the lending banks to terminate the availability of funds under our revolving credit facility or cause any outstanding borrowings to become due and payable prior to maturity. The agreement governing our revolving credit facility and the indentures governing our senior notes impose restrictions on the ability of the Company and the guarantors to incur debt secured by certain assets.

Mortgage repurchase facility and other restrictions. The mortgage repurchase facility for our mortgage subsidiary requires the maintenance of a minimum level of tangible net worth, a maximum allowable ratio of debt to tangible net worth and a minimum level of liquidity by our mortgage subsidiary. A failure to comply with these requirements could allow the lending banks to terminate the availability of funds to our mortgage subsidiary or cause their debt to become due and payable prior to maturity. Any difficulty experienced in complying with these covenants could make the renewal of the facility more difficult or costly.

In addition, although our financial services business is conducted through subsidiaries that are not restricted by our indentures or revolving credit facility, the ability of our financial services subsidiaries to provide funds to our homebuilding operations would be restricted in the event such distribution of funds would cause an event of default under the mortgage repurchase facility or if an event of default had occurred under this facility. Moreover, our right to receive assets from these subsidiaries upon their liquidation or recapitalization will be subject to the prior claims of the creditors of these subsidiaries. Any claims we may have to funds from our financial services subsidiaries would be subordinate to subsidiary indebtedness to the extent of any security for such indebtedness and to any indebtedness otherwise recognized as senior to our claims.

Changes in debt ratings. Our senior unsecured debt is currently rated below investment grade. Any lowering of our debt ratings could make accessing the public capital markets or obtaining additional credit from banks more difficult and/or more expensive.

Change of control purchase options and change of control default. Upon the occurrence of both a change of control and a ratings downgrade event, each as defined in the indentures governing $2.3 billion principal amount of our senior notes as of September 30, 2014, we will be required to offer to repurchase such notes at 101% of their principal amount, together with all accrued and unpaid interest, if any. Moreover, a change of control (as defined in our revolving credit facility) would constitute an event of default under our revolving credit facility, which could result in the acceleration of the repayment of any borrowings outstanding under our revolving credit facility, a requirement to cash collateralize all letters of credit outstanding thereunder and the termination of the commitments thereunder. If repayment of more than $50 million outstanding under our revolving credit facility was accelerated, and such acceleration was not rescinded or such indebtedness was not satisfied, in either case within 30 days, an event of default would result under the indentures governing our senior notes, entitling the trustee for the notes or holders of at least 25 percent in principal amount of the relevant series of notes then outstanding to declare all such notes to be due and payable immediately. If repayment of the borrowings under our revolving credit facility or of our senior notes was accelerated, we can give no assurance that we would have sufficient funds to pay the amounts owed.


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Homebuilding and financial services are very competitive industries, and competitive conditions could adversely affect our business or financial results.

The homebuilding industry is highly competitive. Homebuilders compete not only for homebuyers, but also for desirable properties, financing, raw materials and skilled labor. We compete with local, regional and national homebuilders, often within larger subdivisions designed, planned and developed by such homebuilders. We also compete with existing home sales, foreclosures and rental properties. The competitive conditions in the homebuilding industry can negatively affect our sales volumes, selling prices and incentive levels, reduce our profit margins, and cause impairments in the value of our inventory or other assets. Competition can also affect our ability to acquire suitable land, raw materials and skilled labor at acceptable prices or terms, or cause delays in the construction of our homes.

The competitors to our financial services businesses include other title companies and mortgage lenders, including national, regional and local mortgage bankers and other financial institutions. Some of these competitors are subject to fewer governmental regulations and have greater access to capital than we do, and some of them may operate with different lending criteria than we do. These competitors may offer a broader or more attractive array of financing and other products and services to potential customers than we do.

Our homebuilding and financial services businesses compete with other companies across all industries to attract and retain highly skilled and experienced employees, managers and executives. Competition for the services of these individuals will likely increase as business conditions improve in the homebuilding and financial services industries or in the general economy. If we are unable to attract and retain key employees, managers or executives, our business could be adversely affected.

We cannot make any assurances that our growth strategies or acquisitions will be successful or not expose us to additional risks.

We have primarily focused on internal growth in recent years by increasing our investments in land, lot and home inventories in our existing homebuilding markets. We have also expanded our business through selected investments in new geographic markets. Investments in land, lots and home inventories can expose us to risks of economic loss and inventory impairments if housing conditions weaken or if we are unsuccessful in implementing our growth strategies.

Additionally, we acquired the homebuilding operations of one company in fiscal 2012 and two companies in fiscal 2014, and we may make strategic acquisitions of other companies or their assets in the future. Such acquisitions have similar risks as our other investments in land, lots and home inventories, but they also require the integration of the acquired operations and management. We can give no assurance that we will be able to successfully identify, acquire and integrate strategic acquisitions in the future. Acquisitions can result in dilution to existing stockholders if we issue our common stock as consideration, or reduce our liquidity or increase our debt if we fund them with cash. In addition, acquisitions can expose us to valuation risks, including the risk of writing off goodwill or impairing inventory and other assets related to such acquisitions. The risk of goodwill and asset impairments increases during a cyclical housing downturn when our profitability may decline, as evidenced by the goodwill and asset impairment charges we recognized during the most recent downturn.

Our deferred income tax assets may not be fully realizable.

As of September 30, 2014, we had deferred income tax assets, net of deferred tax liabilities, of $596.1 million, against which we provided a valuation allowance of $31.1 million. The realization of all or a portion of our deferred income tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income during the statutory carryforward periods and in the jurisdictions in which the related temporary differences become deductible. We have provided a valuation allowance against a portion of our net deferred income tax assets because it is more likely than not that a portion of our state net operating loss (NOL) carryforwards will not be realized because the NOL carryforward periods in some states are too brief to realize the related deferred tax assets. The accounting for deferred income taxes is based upon estimates of future results. A housing industry downturn or other adverse situations that negatively affect our future taxable income could result in the need for us to record a larger valuation allowance against our net deferred income tax assets. Differences between the anticipated and actual outcomes of these future tax consequences could have a material impact on our consolidated results of operations or financial position. Changes in tax laws also affect actual tax results and the valuation of deferred income tax assets. Specifically, a decrease in income tax rates would result in a decrease in our deferred tax assets and a corresponding charge to income tax expense.


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Our business could be adversely affected by the loss of key personnel.

We rely on our key personnel to effectively operate and manage our homebuilding and financial services businesses. Specifically, our success depends heavily on the performance of our homebuilding division and region presidents and their management teams, our financial services management team, our corporate office management teams and our executive officers. These key personnel have significant experience and skills in the homebuilding and financial services industries, as well as leadership and management abilities that are important to our success. Effective September 30, 2014, our President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) retired, and our Chief Operating Officer was named as successor effective October 1, 2014. Our former CEO will provide consulting services to us for three years under a consulting agreement. We seek to have succession plans for events such as this retirement when we lose the services of our key personnel. However, if we lose the services of key personnel and our succession planning and implementation efforts are unsuccessful, our business could be adversely affected.

Negative publicity could adversely affect our reputation as well as our business, financial results and stock price.

Unfavorable media related to our industry, company, brands, marketing, personnel, operations, business performance, or prospects may affect our stock price and the performance of our business, regardless of its accuracy or inaccuracy. The speed at which negative publicity can be disseminated has increased dramatically with the capabilities of electronic communication, including social media outlets, websites, blogs, or newsletters. Our success in maintaining, extending and expanding our brand image depends on our ability to adapt to this rapidly changing media environment. Adverse publicity or negative commentary from any media outlets could damage our reputation and reduce the demand for our homes, which would adversely affect our business.

Information technology failures and data security breaches could harm our business.

We use information technology and other computer resources to carry out important operational and marketing activities and to maintain our business records. These information technology systems are dependent upon global communications providers, web browsers, telephone systems and other aspects of the Internet infrastructure that have experienced security breaches, cyber-attacks, significant systems failures and electrical outages in the past. A material breach in the security of our information technology systems or other data security controls could include the theft or release of customer, employee or company data. In February 2012, we experienced a software security breach by unknown external sources in our Internet Loan Prequalification System. We investigated the breach with the assistance of information technology security experts and with local and federal law enforcement. Our investigations produced no evidence that any of our customers’ data was actually accessed or exported from our systems. A security breach such as the one we experienced, a significant and extended disruption in the functioning of our information technology systems or a breach of any of our data security controls could damage our reputation and cause us to lose customers, adversely impact our sales and revenue and require us to incur significant expense to address and remediate or otherwise resolve these kinds of issues. The release of confidential information as a result of a security breach may also lead to litigation or other proceedings against us by affected individuals or business partners, or by regulators, and the outcome of such proceedings, which could include penalties or fines, could have a significant negative impact on our business. We may also be required to incur significant costs to protect against damages caused by these information technology failures or security breaches in the future. We routinely utilize information technology security experts to assist us in our evaluations of the effectiveness of the security of our information technology systems, and we regularly enhance our security measures to protect our systems and data. However, we cannot provide assurances that a security breach, cyber-attack, data theft or other significant systems or security failures will not occur in the future, and such occurrences could have a material and adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations or financial position.


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ITEM 1B.
UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.


ITEM 2.
PROPERTIES

In addition to our inventories of land, lots and homes, we own office buildings totaling approximately 620,000 square feet, and we lease approximately 550,000 square feet of office space under leases expiring through December 2019. These properties are located in our various operating markets to house our homebuilding and financial services operating divisions and our regional and corporate offices.

We own approximately 261,000 acres held as long-term land investments. We use these properties to conduct ranching and agricultural activities.



ITEM 3.
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

We are involved in lawsuits and other contingencies in the ordinary course of business. While the outcome of such contingencies cannot be predicted with certainty, we believe that the liabilities arising from these matters will not have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows. However, to the extent the liability arising from the ultimate resolution of any matter exceeds our estimates reflected in the recorded reserves relating to such matter, we could incur additional charges that could be significant.


ITEM 4.
MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.


21


PART II


ITEM 5.
MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Our common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the symbol “DHI.” The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, the range of high and low sales prices for our common stock, as reported by the NYSE, and the quarterly cash dividends declared per common share.
 
Year Ended September 30, 2014
 
Year Ended September 30, 2013
 
High
 
Low
 
Declared
Dividends
 
High
 
Low
 
Declared
Dividends
1st Quarter
$
22.35

 
$
17.60

 
$

 
$
22.32

 
$
17.71

 
$
0.1875

2nd Quarter
25.06

 
20.20

 
0.0375

 
25.56

 
20.02

 

3rd Quarter
24.83

 
21.06

 
0.0375

 
27.75

 
19.94

 

4th Quarter
25.23

 
19.99

 
0.0625

 
23.20

 
17.52

 


As of November 10, 2014, the closing price of our common stock on the NYSE was $23.43, and there were approximately 448 holders of record.

Cash dividends of $0.1875 per common share declared during the first quarter of fiscal 2013 included a quarterly cash dividend of $0.0375 per share and an additional cash dividend of $0.15 per share. The cash dividend of $0.15 per share was in lieu of and accelerated the payment of all quarterly dividends that would have otherwise paid in calendar year 2013. The declaration of future cash dividends is at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend upon, among other things, our future earnings, cash flows, capital requirements, financial condition and general business conditions.

The information required by this item with respect to equity compensation plans is set forth under Item 12 of this annual report on Form 10-K and is incorporated herein by reference.

During fiscal years 2014, 2013 and 2012, we did not sell any equity securities that were not registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

Effective August 1, 2014, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $100 million of our common stock effective through July 31, 2015. All of the $100 million authorization was remaining at September 30, 2014, and no common stock has been repurchased subsequent to September 30, 2014.


22



Stock Performance Graph

The following graph illustrates the cumulative total stockholder return on D.R. Horton common stock for the last five fiscal years through September 30, 2014, compared to the S&P 500 Index and the S&P 500 Homebuilding Index. The comparison assumes a hypothetical investment in D.R. Horton common stock and in each of the foregoing indices of $100 at September 30, 2009, and assumes that all dividends were reinvested. Shareholder returns over the indicated period are based on historical data and should not be considered indicative of future shareholder returns. The graph and related disclosure in no way reflect our forecast of future financial performance.


Comparison of Five-Year Cumulative Total Return
Among D.R. Horton, Inc., S&P 500 Index and S&P 500 Homebuilding Index




 
Year Ended September 30,
 
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
D.R. Horton, Inc. 
$
100.00

$
98.75

$
81.37

$
187.52

$
178.34

$
189.47

S&P 500 Index
$
100.00

$
110.16

$
111.42

$
145.08

$
173.14

$
207.30

S&P 500 Homebuilding Index
$
100.00

$
92.77

$
66.13

$
182.87

$
185.19

$
200.49


This performance graph shall not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into our SEC filings and should not constitute soliciting material or otherwise be considered filed under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.


23


ITEM 6.
SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following selected consolidated financial data are derived from our Consolidated Financial Statements. The data should be read in conjunction with Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” Item 1A, “Risk Factors,” Item 8, “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data,” and all other financial data contained in this annual report on Form 10-K. These historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in the future.
 
Year Ended September 30,
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
 
 
(In millions, except per share data)
 
 
Operating Data:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Revenues:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Homebuilding
$
7,858.5

 
$
6,085.9

 
$
4,236.2

 
$
3,549.6

 
$
4,309.7

Financial Services
166.4

 
173.4

 
117.8

 
87.2

 
90.5

Inventory and land option charges
85.2

 
31.1

 
6.2

 
45.4

 
64.7

Gross profit — Homebuilding
1,589.9

 
1,232.4

 
743.8

 
526.3

 
682.1

Income (loss) before income taxes:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Homebuilding
768.8

 
592.3

 
203.7

 
(7.0
)
 
78.1

Financial Services
45.4

 
65.5

 
39.2

 
19.1

 
21.4

Income tax expense (benefit) (1) (2)
280.7

 
195.1

 
(713.4
)
 
(59.7
)
 
(145.6
)
Net income
533.5

 
462.7

 
956.3

 
71.8

 
245.1

Net income per share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
1.57

 
1.44

 
3.01

 
0.23

 
0.77

Diluted
1.50

 
1.33

 
2.77

 
0.23

 
0.77

Cash dividends declared per common share
0.1375

 
0.1875

 
0.15

 
0.15

 
0.15

 
September 30,
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
(In millions)
Balance Sheet Data:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Cash and cash equivalents and marketable securities (3)
$
661.8

 
$
977.4

 
$
1,384.8

 
$
1,068.1

 
$
1,645.0

Inventories
7,700.5

 
6,197.4

 
4,165.2

 
3,449.7

 
3,449.0

Total assets
10,202.5

 
8,856.4

 
7,248.2

 
5,358.4

 
5,938.6

Notes payable (4)
3,682.8

 
3,509.0

 
2,493.1

 
1,704.6

 
2,171.8

Total equity
5,119.7

 
4,061.4

 
3,594.7

 
2,623.5

 
2,622.9

___________________
(1)
The income tax benefit in fiscal 2012 reflects a $753.2 million reduction of our deferred tax asset valuation allowance during the year. The income tax benefit in fiscal 2011 was due to receiving a favorable result from the Internal Revenue Service on a ruling request concerning capitalization of inventory costs, and the income tax benefit in fiscal 2010 resulted from a tax law change regarding net operating loss (NOL) carrybacks.
(2)
At September 30, 2013 we recorded an out-of-period adjustment which increased both our deferred income taxes and the valuation allowance on our deferred income taxes by $23.9 million. The out-of-period adjustment had no impact on our statement of operations during fiscal 2013. Had deferred income taxes related to the state NOL carryforwards of each of our legal entities been reflected at state specific tax rates as of September 30, 2012, our deferred income taxes would have increased by $31.6 million and the corresponding valuation allowance on our deferred income taxes would have increased by $37.6 million. This would have resulted in a decrease in our income tax benefit of $6.0 million in fiscal 2012, which would have reversed and decreased our income tax expense by $6.0 million in fiscal 2013. The unadjusted amounts from fiscal 2012 were not material to our financial statements for fiscal 2012, and the out-of-period adjustment recorded in fiscal 2013 was not material to our financial statements for fiscal 2013.
(3)
Cash balances of our captive insurance subsidiary, which are expected to be used to pay future anticipated legal claims, have been correctly presented within cash and cash equivalents rather than other assets as classified in prior years. These balances were $40.9 million, $39.1 million, $37.9 million and $38.0 million at September 30, 2013, 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.
(4)
Notes payable includes both homebuilding notes payable and the amount outstanding on our mortgage repurchase facility.


24


ITEM 7.
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS


Results of Operations — Fiscal Year 2014 Overview

During fiscal 2014, demand for new homes reflected stable to moderately improved trends across most of our operating markets. The significant increases in new home prices that occurred in many markets during fiscal 2013 moderated during fiscal 2014, as new home prices became less affordable to some buyers and as the supply of new homes increased. While most of our operating markets are relatively stable, we see varying levels of strength in new home demand and home prices across our markets, with demand in each market generally reflecting the relative strength of each market’s economy, as measured by job growth, household incomes, household formations and consumer confidence.

Our position as the largest and most geographically diverse builder in the United States provides a strong platform for us to compete for new home sales. Over the past two years, we significantly increased our land, lot and home inventories by $3.5 billion across our markets, while maintaining a strong balance sheet and liquidity position. In fiscal 2013, we introduced our Emerald Homes brand to expand our product offerings to include more move-up and luxury homes. In fiscal 2014, we introduced our Express Homes brand to offer more affordable homes for entry-level buyers, who we believe have been under-served in the new home market recently. Both of these new offerings are being introduced across our operating markets over the next year, which will significantly broaden our product diversity.

In fiscal 2014, the number and value of our net sales orders increased 18% and 27%, respectively, compared to the prior year, and the number of homes closed and home sales revenues increased 19% and 30%, respectively. We generated pre-tax income of $814.2 million in fiscal 2014, compared to $657.8 million in fiscal 2013 and $242.9 million in fiscal 2012. These results reflect the improved housing market conditions over the past two years and strong performance from our homebuilding and financial services operations. We believe our business is well-positioned to continue to grow profitably due to our broad geographic operating base and product offerings, our increased inventory position of finished lots, land and homes and our strong balance sheet and liquidity. We are focused on operating each of our communities to optimize the returns on our inventory investments by effectively managing our product offerings, home prices, incentives, sales pace, profit margins and inventory levels.

We believe that housing demand in our individual operating markets is tied closely to each market’s economy; therefore, we expect that housing market conditions will vary across our markets. The U.S. economy continues to slowly improve, which we expect will allow slow to moderate overall growth in housing demand, concentrated in markets where job growth is occurring. The pace and sustainability of new home demand and our future results could be negatively affected by weakening economic conditions, decreases in the level of employment and housing demand, decreased home affordability, significant increases in mortgage interest rates or tightening of mortgage lending standards.


25


Strategy

During fiscal 2014, demand for new homes has been relatively stable across most of our operating markets, with varying levels of strength in demand and home prices across our individual markets based on local economic conditions. We have used our liquidity and balance sheet flexibility to provide the capital to increase our investments in housing and land inventory, expand our product offerings, geographically expand our operations and opportunistically pursue business acquisitions. Our operating strategy is focused on leveraging our strong financial and competitive position to generate strong profitability, improve cash flows and increase our returns on our inventory investments. Our operating strategy includes the following initiatives:
Maintaining a strong cash balance and overall liquidity position, and controlling our level of debt.
Allocating and actively managing our inventory investments across our operating markets to diversify our geographic risk and optimize returns.
Offering new home communities that appeal to a broad range of entry-level, move-up and luxury homebuyers based on consumer demand in each market.
Modifying product offerings, sales pace, home prices and sales incentives as necessary in each of our markets to meet consumer demand, align with finished lot supply and construction activity and optimize returns on inventory investments and cash flows.
Entering into option purchase contracts to control land and finished lots, where possible, to mitigate the risk of land ownership.
Investing in land, land development and opportunistic acquisitions of homebuilding companies in desirable markets, while controlling the level of land and lots we own in each of our markets relative to the local new home demand.
Managing our inventory of homes under construction relative to demand in each of our markets, including starting construction on unsold homes to capture new home demand, monitoring the number and aging of unsold homes and aggressively marketing unsold, completed homes in inventory.
Controlling the cost of goods purchased from both vendors and subcontractors.
Improving the efficiency of our land development, construction, sales and other key operational activities.
Controlling our selling, general and administrative (SG&A) expense infrastructure to match production levels.

Our operating strategy has produced positive results in recent years and in fiscal 2014. However, we cannot provide any assurances that the initiatives listed above will continue to be successful, and we may need to adjust components of our strategy to meet future market conditions. We expect that our operating strategy will allow us to increase our profitability while maintaining a strong balance sheet and liquidity position in fiscal 2015.


26


Key Results

Key financial results as of and for our fiscal year ended September 30, 2014, as compared to fiscal 2013, were as follows:

Homebuilding Operations:
Homebuilding revenues increased 29% to $7.9 billion.
Homes closed increased 19% to 28,670 homes, and the average closing price of those homes increased 9% to $272,200.
Net sales orders increased 18% to 29,709 homes, and the value of net sales orders increased 27% to $8.3 billion.
Sales order backlog increased 21% to 9,888 homes, and the value of sales order backlog increased 29% to $2.9 billion.
Home sales gross margins increased 50 basis points to 21.3%.
Inventory and land option charges were $85.2 million, compared to $31.1 million.
Homebuilding SG&A expenses decreased as a percentage of homebuilding revenues by 10 basis points to 10.6%.
Homebuilding pre-tax income increased 30% to $768.8 million, compared to $592.3 million.
Homebuilding cash totaled $632.5 million, compared to $954.2 million.
Homebuilding inventories totaled $7.7 billion, compared to $6.2 billion.
Homes in inventory totaled 20,600, compared to 17,000.
Owned and controlled lots totaled 183,500, compared to 180,900.
Homebuilding debt was $3.3 billion, consistent with the prior year.
Gross homebuilding debt to total capital was 39.4%, improving from 44.6%. Net homebuilding debt to total capital was 34.5%, improving from 36.3%.

Financial Services Operations:
Total financial services revenues, net of recourse and reinsurance expenses, decreased 4% to $166.4 million.
Financial services pre-tax income decreased 31% to $45.4 million.

Consolidated Results:
Consolidated pre-tax income increased 24% to $814.2 million, compared to $657.8 million.
Net income increased 15% to $533.5 million, compared to $462.7 million.
Diluted earnings per share increased 13% to $1.50, compared to $1.33.
Total equity was $5.1 billion, compared to $4.1 billion.



27


Results of Operations — Homebuilding

Our operating segments are our 37 homebuilding operating divisions, which we aggregate into six reporting segments. These reporting segments, which we also refer to as reporting regions, have homebuilding operations located in the following states:
 
East:
 
Delaware, Georgia (Savannah only), Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Virginia
 
Midwest:
 
Colorado, Illinois, Indiana and Minnesota
 
Southeast:
 
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi and Tennessee
 
South Central:
 
Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas
 
Southwest:
 
Arizona and New Mexico
 
West:
 
California, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington

Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2014 Compared to Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2013

The following tables and related discussion set forth key operating and financial data for our homebuilding operations by reporting segment as of and for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013.
 
 
Net Sales Orders (1)
 
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
 
Net Homes Sold
 
Value (In millions)
 
Average Selling Price
 
 
2014
 
2013
 
%
Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
%
Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
%
Change
East
 
3,867
 
2,624
 
47
 %
 
$
1,074.2

 
$
723.6

 
48
 %
 
$
277,800

 
$
275,800

 
1
%
Midwest
 
1,413
 
1,480
 
(5
)%
 
514.9

 
503.2

 
2
 %
 
364,400

 
340,000

 
7
%
Southeast
 
8,529
 
7,408
 
15
 %
 
2,164.4

 
1,759.2

 
23
 %
 
253,800

 
237,500

 
7
%
South Central
 
9,707
 
8,074
 
20
 %
 
2,144.5

 
1,683.1

 
27
 %
 
220,900

 
208,500

 
6
%
Southwest
 
1,298
 
1,381
 
(6
)%
 
285.2

 
288.9

 
(1
)%
 
219,700

 
209,200

 
5
%
West
 
4,895
 
4,153
 
18
 %
 
2,125.4

 
1,609.0

 
32
 %
 
434,200

 
387,400

 
12
%
 
 
29,709
 
25,120
 
18
 %
 
$
8,308.6

 
$
6,567.0

 
27
 %
 
$
279,700

 
$
261,400

 
7
%

 
 
Sales Order Cancellations
 
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
 
Cancelled Sales Orders
 
Value (In millions)
 
Cancellation Rate (2)
 
 
2014
 
2013
 
2014
 
2013
 
2014
 
2013
East
 
1,106
 
807
 
$
288.2

 
$
207.6

 
22
%
 
24
%
Midwest
 
271
 
248
 
97.0

 
79.1

 
16
%
 
14
%
Southeast
 
2,955
 
2,369
 
701.2

 
513.1

 
26
%
 
24
%
South Central
 
3,136
 
2,794
 
686.8

 
547.7

 
24
%
 
26
%
Southwest
 
517
 
738
 
104.6

 
141.6

 
28
%
 
35
%
West
 
1,072
 
795
 
471.5

 
290.1

 
18
%
 
16
%
 
 
9,057
 
7,751
 
$
2,349.3

 
$
1,779.2

 
23
%
 
24
%
______________
(1)
Net sales orders represent the number and dollar value of new sales contracts executed with customers (gross sales orders), net of cancelled sales orders.
(2)
Cancellation rate represents the number of cancelled sales orders divided by gross sales orders.


28


Net Sales Orders

The value of net sales orders increased 27%, to $8,308.6 million (29,709 homes) in 2014 from $6,567.0 million (25,120 homes) in 2013, with significant increases in four of our six regions. The increases in sales order value in those regions were primarily due to increases in volume as we have expanded our operations and increased our market share in many of our markets over the past year. To a lesser extent and to varying degrees, increases in selling prices also contributed to the value of net sales orders in each region.

The number of net sales orders increased 18% and the average price of our net sales orders increased 7% to $279,700 during 2014 compared to 2013. The largest percentage increase in net sales orders occurred in our East region, reflecting the positive impact of our recent acquisitions of the homebuilding operations of Regent Homes and Crown Communities, which contributed 714 net sales orders to the East region in 2014. Crown Communities also contributed 508 net sales orders to the Southeast region in 2014. The decreases in net sales orders that occurred in our Midwest and Southwest regions were primarily due to decreases in sales orders in our Minnesota, Colorado, Phoenix and Albuquerque markets. We believe our business is well positioned for the future; however, our future sales volumes will depend on the economic strength of each of our operating markets and our ability to successfully implement our operating strategies in each market.

 
 
Sales Order Backlog
 
 
As of September 30,
 
 
Homes in Backlog
 
Value (In millions)
 
Average Selling Price
 
 
2014
 
2013
 
%
Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
%
Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
%
Change
East
 
1,451
 
782
 
86
 %
 
$
416.7

 
$
226.3

 
84
 %
 
$
287,200

 
$
289,400

 
(1
)%
Midwest
 
527
 
456
 
16
 %
 
191.3

 
159.4

 
20
 %
 
363,000

 
349,600

 
4
 %
Southeast
 
2,901
 
2,810
 
3
 %
 
790.7

 
703.7

 
12
 %
 
272,600

 
250,400

 
9
 %
South Central
 
3,358
 
2,697
 
25
 %
 
791.7

 
595.8

 
33
 %
 
235,800

 
220,900

 
7
 %
Southwest
 
425
 
475
 
(11
)%
 
96.0

 
96.1

 
 %
 
225,900

 
202,300

 
12
 %
West
 
1,226
 
985
 
24
 %
 
572.4

 
428.8

 
33
 %
 
466,900

 
435,300

 
7
 %
 
 
9,888
 
8,205
 
21
 %
 
$
2,858.8

 
$
2,210.1

 
29
 %
 
$
289,100

 
$
269,400

 
7
 %

Sales Order Backlog

Sales order backlog represents homes under contract but not yet closed at the end of the period. Many of the contracts in our sales order backlog are subject to contingencies, including mortgage loan approval and buyers selling their existing homes, which can result in cancellations. A portion of the contracts in backlog will not result in closings due to cancellations. The largest percentage increase in our sales order backlog occurred in our East region, reflecting the positive impact of our recent acquisitions of the homebuilding operations of Regent Homes and Crown Communities, which contributed 377 homes to our East region backlog at September 30, 2014. Crown Communities also contributed 305 homes to our Southeast region backlog at September 30, 2014.



29


 
 
Homes Closed and Home Sales Revenue
 
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
 
Homes Closed
 
Value (In millions)
 
Average Selling Price
 
 
2014
 
2013
 
%
Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
%
Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
%
Change
East
 
3,537
 
2,505
 
41
 %
 
$
948.0

 
$
667.8

 
42
 %
 
$
268,000

 
$
266,600

 
1
%
Midwest
 
1,342
 
1,449
 
(7
)%
 
483.0

 
471.3

 
2
 %
 
359,900

 
325,300

 
11
%
Southeast
 
8,743
 
6,807
 
28
 %
 
2,158.0

 
1,520.4

 
42
 %
 
246,800

 
223,400

 
10
%
South Central
 
9,046
 
7,609
 
19
 %
 
1,948.6

 
1,520.8

 
28
 %
 
215,400

 
199,900

 
8
%
Southwest
 
1,348
 
1,605
 
(16
)%
 
285.2

 
327.7

 
(13
)%
 
211,600

 
204,200

 
4
%
West
 
4,654
 
4,180
 
11
 %
 
1,981.9

 
1,516.8

 
31
 %
 
425,800

 
362,900

 
17
%
 
 
28,670
 
24,155
 
19
 %
 
$
7,804.7

 
$
6,024.8

 
30
 %
 
$
272,200

 
$
249,400

 
9
%

Home Sales Revenue

Revenues from home sales increased 30%, to $7,804.7 million (28,670 homes closed) in 2014 from $6,024.8 million (24,155 homes closed) in 2013. During the current year, home sales revenues increased in most of our regions as we have expanded our operations and increased our market share in many of our markets.

The number of homes closed in fiscal 2014 increased 19% from 2013 due to increases in four of our six regions. The most significant percentage increase occurred in our East region, reflecting the positive impact of our recent acquisitions of the homebuilding operations of Regent Homes and Crown Communities, which contributed 676 closings to the East region in 2014. Crown Communities also contributed 508 closings to the Southeast region in 2014. Excluding the impact of Crown Communities, the increase in homes closed in our Southeast region was primarily due to increases in our Jacksonville and Atlanta markets. In our South Central region, the highest percentage increases in homes closed occurred in our Fort Worth, Dallas and Houston markets. The increase in our West region was primarily due to increases in our Bay Area, Portland and Sacramento markets. The decrease in home closings in our Southwest region was primarily due to weak demand in the Phoenix market compared to a year ago, and in our Midwest region the decrease was attributable to our Colorado and Chicago markets.

The average selling price of homes closed during 2014 was $272,200, up 9% from the $249,400 average in 2013. The level of home price increases began to moderate during fiscal 2014, a trend we expect will continue in future periods. We are focused on managing our product offerings, home prices, incentives, sales pace, profit margins and inventory levels in each community in a manner that will optimize the returns on our inventory investments.


Homebuilding Operating Margin Analysis
 
 
Percentages of
Related Revenues
 
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
 
2014
 
2013
Gross profit — Home sales
 
21.3
 %
 
20.8
 %
Gross profit — Land/lot sales and other
 
17.7
 %
 
16.7
 %
Effect of inventory and land option charges on total homebuilding gross profit
 
(1.1
)%
 
(0.5
)%
Gross profit — Total homebuilding
 
20.2
 %
 
20.3
 %
Selling, general and administrative expense
 
10.6
 %
 
10.7
 %
Interest expense
 
 %
 
0.1
 %
Other (income)
 
(0.2
)%
 
(0.2
)%
Homebuilding pre-tax income
 
9.8
 %
 
9.7
 %


30



Home Sales Gross Profit

Gross profit from home sales increased 33%, to $1.7 billion in 2014, from $1.3 billion in 2013, and increased 50 basis points, to 21.3% as a percentage of home sales revenues. Approximately 40 basis points of the increase in the home sales gross profit percentage resulted from the average selling price of our homes closed increasing by more than the average home cost, 20 basis points of the increase resulted from a decrease in the amortization of capitalized interest and property taxes as a percentage of homes sales revenues and 10 basis points of the increase resulted from lower costs for warranty and construction defect claims as a percentage of home sales revenue. Partially offsetting these increases was a 20 basis point decrease from purchase accounting adjustments related to the acquisitions of Crown Communities and Regent Homes.

Our gross profit margins during fiscal 2013 and throughout the first half of fiscal 2014 benefited significantly from favorable market conditions that allowed us to increase sales prices across most of our markets, while we limited increases in construction costs. Our gross profit margins also benefited from reduced interest amortized to cost of sales as our average borrowing costs declined. The increases in our average sales prices moderated in the second half of fiscal 2014, and we expect future price increases will continue to moderate, while our construction costs will likely increase. Also, we have and will continue to manage the sales pace in each of our communities by adjusting the pricing, incentives and product mix to optimize the returns on our inventory investments. These factors caused our gross profit margins in the third and fourth quarters of fiscal 2014 to decline as compared to the prior year quarters and to the first two quarters of fiscal 2014. Gross profit margins in future periods could be lower than fiscal 2014 levels.

Land Sales and Other Revenues

Land sales and other revenues were $53.8 million in fiscal 2014, compared to $61.1 million in 2013. We generally purchase land and lots with the intent to build and sell homes on them. However, we occasionally purchase land that includes commercially zoned parcels that we typically sell to commercial developers, and we may also sell residential lots or land parcels to manage our land and lot supply. Land and lot sales occur at unpredictable intervals and varying degrees of profitability. Therefore, the revenues and gross profit from land sales fluctuate from period to period. Revenues in fiscal 2013 included revenue of $20.0 million from a long-term construction project for which we served as the general contractor. As of September 30, 2014, we had $26.4 million of land held for sale that we expect to sell in the next twelve months.

Inventory and Land Option Charges

During fiscal 2014, we reviewed the performance and outlook for all of our land inventories and communities each quarter for indicators of potential impairment and performed detailed impairment evaluations and analyses when necessary. As of September 30, 2014, we performed detailed impairment evaluations of communities with a combined carrying value of $359.8 million, and we recorded impairment charges of $18.1 million during the fourth quarter to reduce the carrying value of impaired communities to their estimated fair value. Total impairment charges during fiscal 2014 and 2013 were $75.2 million and $21.3 million, respectively.

Of the total impairment charges in fiscal 2014, $49.3 million occurred in our Midwest region, primarily related to communities in Chicago that were purchased predominantly in 2004 through 2007 and had been previously impaired. During the third quarter of fiscal 2014, we reduced home prices and identified land parcels we intend to sell in these Chicago communities in an effort to increase sales pace, reduce inventories and improve cash flows and returns. In contrast to most of our markets, the Chicago housing market remains weak with sales absorptions and returns in these communities performing below our expectations given the size of our investments.

Also during fiscal 2014, $17.7 million of impairment charges occurred in our East region. These impairments primarily related to long-held inactive and underperforming projects in the suburban Washington, D.C. market that we intend to sell to reduce inventories and improve cash flows and returns.



31


As we manage our inventory investments across our operating markets to optimize returns and cash flows, we may modify our pricing and incentives, construction and development plans or land sale strategies in individual active communities and land held for development, which could result in the affected communities being evaluated for potential impairment. Also, if housing or economic conditions are weak in specific markets in which we operate, or if conditions weaken in the broader economy or homebuilding industry, we may be required to evaluate additional communities for potential impairment. These evaluations could result in additional impairment charges.

During fiscal 2014 and 2013, we wrote off $10.0 million and $9.8 million, respectively, of earnest money deposits and pre-acquisition costs related to land option contracts that are expected to be terminated. At September 30, 2014, outstanding earnest money deposits associated with our portfolio of land and lot option purchase contracts totaled $58.7 million.

Selling, General and Administrative (SG&A) Expense

SG&A expense from homebuilding activities increased 28% to $834.2 million in 2014 from $649.9 million in 2013. As a percentage of homebuilding revenues, SG&A expense decreased 10 basis points, to 10.6% in 2014 from 10.7% in 2013.

Employee compensation and related costs represented 64% and 65% of SG&A costs in 2014 and 2013, respectively. These costs increased by 26%, to $536.9 million in 2014 from $425.2 million in 2013, mainly due to an increase in our number of employees and an increase in incentive compensation related to the increase in profitability in many of our divisions in the current year as compared to the prior year. Our homebuilding operations employed approximately 4,525 and 3,600 employees at September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

Variances in our homebuilding SG&A expense as a percentage of revenues can occur due to fluctuations in revenue, profit levels and our stock price. Our awards of performance based units to executive management are accounted for as liability awards and are measured quarterly with changes in value recorded in compensation expense within SG&A. Changes in our stock price and our performance compared to our peer group can cause significant changes in the value of these awards and in our compensation expense. Compensation expense related to these liability awards was $9.1 million and $8.8 million, during fiscal 2014 and 2013, respectively.

We attempt to control our SG&A costs while ensuring that our infrastructure adequately supports our operations; however, we cannot make assurances that we will be able to maintain or improve upon the current SG&A expense as a percentage of revenues.

Interest Incurred

Comparing fiscal 2014 with 2013, interest incurred increased 8% to $185.8 million, due to an 18% increase in our average debt. Interest incurred in the current year increased by a lower percentage than the increase in our average debt as a result of a decrease in the average interest rate of our debt as compared to the prior year.

We capitalize interest costs incurred to inventory during active development and construction (active inventory). Capitalized interest is charged to cost of sales as the related inventory is delivered to the buyer. During a portion of fiscal 2013, our active inventory was lower than our debt level and therefore a portion of the interest incurred was reflected as interest expense. However, since the third quarter of fiscal 2013, our active inventory has exceeded our debt level, and all interest incurred has been capitalized to inventory. As a result, no interest was expensed during fiscal 2014, compared to $7.1 million during 2013. Interest amortized to cost of sales declined to 2.0% of total home and land/lot and other cost of sales in fiscal 2014 from 2.3% in fiscal 2013 due to the growth in our active inventory relative to our debt balance and a decrease in the average interest rate on our outstanding debt. We do not expect interest amortized to cost of sales as a percentage of total home and land/lot cost of sales to decline as significantly in future periods.



32


Other Income

Other income, net of other expenses, included in our homebuilding operations was $13.1 million in fiscal 2014, compared to $14.9 million in 2013. Other income consists of interest income, rental income, income from insurance related activities, income associated with other income-producing assets, and various other types of ancillary income, gains, expenses and losses not directly associated with our core homebuilding operations. The activities that result in this ancillary income or loss are not significant, either individually or in the aggregate.

Acquisitions

In October 2013, we acquired the homebuilding operations of Regent Homes, Inc. for $34.5 million in cash. Regent Homes operates in Charlotte, Greensboro and Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The assets acquired included approximately 240 homes in inventory, 300 lots and control of approximately 600 additional lots through option contracts. We also acquired a sales order backlog of 213 homes valued at $31.1 million. Subsequent to the acquisition, Regent Homes closed 463 homes and generated home sales revenues of $69.4 million during fiscal 2014.

In May 2014, we acquired the homebuilding operations of Crown Communities for $209.6 million in cash. Crown Communities operates in Georgia, South Carolina and eastern Alabama. The assets acquired included approximately 640 homes in inventory, 2,350 lots and control of approximately 3,400 additional lots through option contracts. We also acquired a sales order backlog of 431 homes valued at $113.6 million. Subsequent to the acquisition, Crown Communities closed 721 homes and generated home sales revenues of $187.7 million during fiscal 2014.


33


Homebuilding Results by Reporting Region
 
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
 
2014
 
2013
 
 
Homebuilding
Revenues
 
Homebuilding
Pre-tax Income (Loss) (1)
 
% of
Revenues
 
Homebuilding
Revenues
 
Homebuilding
Pre-tax Income (1)
 
% of
Revenues
 
 
(In millions)
East
 
$
954.7

 
$
45.2

 
4.7
 %
 
$
686.3

 
$
48.3

 
7.0
%
Midwest
 
483.5

 
(9.5
)
 
(2.0
)%
 
471.5

 
38.9

 
8.3
%
Southeast
 
2,167.0

 
218.0

 
10.1
 %
 
1,520.7

 
148.4

 
9.8
%
South Central
 
1,971.2

 
208.0

 
10.6
 %
 
1,526.2

 
149.0

 
9.8
%
Southwest
 
285.2

 
25.5

 
8.9
 %
 
327.7

 
26.3

 
8.0
%
West
 
1,996.9

 
281.6

 
14.1
 %
 
1,553.5

 
181.4

 
11.7
%
 
 
$
7,858.5

 
$
768.8

 
9.8
 %
 
$
6,085.9

 
$
592.3

 
9.7
%
______________
(1)
Expenses maintained at the corporate level consist primarily of interest and property taxes, which are capitalized and amortized to cost of sales or expensed directly, and the expenses related to operating our corporate office. The amortization of capitalized interest and property taxes is allocated to each segment based on the segment’s revenue, while those expenses associated with the corporate office are allocated to each segment based on the segment’s inventory balances.



East Region — Homebuilding revenues increased 39% in 2014 compared to 2013, primarily due to an increase in the number of homes closed in our Charlotte market due to our acquisition of Regent Homes in October 2013, which added 463 closings to the fiscal 2014 results. The region also benefited from our acquisition of Crown Communities in May 2014, which added 213 closings to the region's fiscal 2014 results. The region generated pre-tax income of $45.2 million in 2014, compared to $48.3 million in 2013. Fiscal 2014 pre-tax income was reduced by inventory impairment charges of $17.7 million, primarily in our suburban Washington, D.C. market. Gross profit from home sales as a percentage of home sales revenue (home sales gross profit percentage) decreased 120 basis points in fiscal 2014, compared to fiscal 2013, largely due to purchase accounting adjustments for the two acquisitions. As a percentage of homebuilding revenues, SG&A expenses decreased by 70 basis points in 2014 due to the increase in revenues.

Midwest Region — Homebuilding revenues increased 3% in 2014 compared to 2013, due to an increase in the average selling price of homes closed, while the number of homes closed decreased, particularly in our Denver market. The region generated a pre-tax loss of $9.5 million in 2014, compared to pre-tax income of $38.9 million in 2013, largely due to $49.3 million of inventory impairments, primarily in our Chicago market. Home sales gross profit percentage increased 110 basis points in fiscal 2014, compared to fiscal 2013. The region's home sales gross profit percentages in both years were impacted by the timing of resolving construction defect claims and the receipt of insurance recoveries related to construction defect claims, most of which related to our Denver market. As a percentage of homebuilding revenues, SG&A expenses increased by 110 basis points in fiscal 2014.

Southeast Region — Homebuilding revenues increased 43% in 2014 compared to 2013, due to an increase in the number of homes closed as well as an increase in the average selling price in the majority of the region’s markets. The increase in home closings in our Jacksonville, Atlanta, Orlando and South Florida markets contributed most to the overall increase in homebuilding revenues in the region. The region also benefited from our acquisition of Crown Communities in May 2014, which added 508 homes closed to the region's fiscal 2014 results. The region generated pre-tax income of $218.0 million in 2014, compared to $148.4 million in 2013, primarily as a result of increases in revenues. Home sales gross profit percentage increased 50 basis points in fiscal 2014, compared to fiscal 2013. As a percentage of homebuilding revenues, SG&A expenses decreased by 10 basis points in fiscal 2014.


34


South Central Region — Homebuilding revenues increased 29% in 2014 compared to 2013, due to an increase in the number of homes closed, as well as an increase in the average selling price in the majority of the region’s markets. The increase in home closings in our Fort Worth, Dallas and Houston markets contributed most to the overall increase in homebuilding revenues in the region. The region generated pre-tax income of $208.0 million in 2014, compared to $149.0 million in 2013, primarily as a result of increases in revenues. Home sales gross profit percentage increased 10 basis points in fiscal 2014, compared to fiscal 2013. As a percentage of homebuilding revenues, SG&A expenses decreased by 40 basis points in fiscal 2014 due to the increase in revenues.

Southwest Region — Homebuilding revenues decreased 13% in 2014 compared to 2013, primarily due to a decrease in the number of homes closed in our Phoenix market. The region generated pre-tax income of $25.5 million in 2014, compared to $26.3 million in 2013. Home sales gross profit percentage increased 300 basis points in fiscal 2014, compared to fiscal 2013. The increase was largely due to a reimbursement of development costs received from a municipality as part of a settlement during fiscal 2014, which related to a community that was completed in a prior year, as well as a decrease in expenses related to construction defect settlements. As a percentage of homebuilding revenues, SG&A expenses increased by 240 basis points in fiscal 2014 due to the decrease in revenues.

West Region — Homebuilding revenues increased 29% in 2014 compared to 2013, due to an increase in the average selling price of homes closed as well as an increase in the number of homes closed. The increase in home closings and average selling price in our northern California markets contributed most to the overall increase in homebuilding revenues in the region. The region generated pre-tax income of $281.6 million in 2014, compared to $181.4 million in 2013, primarily as a result of increases in revenues. Home sales gross profit percentage increased 120 basis points in fiscal 2014, compared to fiscal 2013. As a percentage of homebuilding revenues, SG&A expenses decreased by 10 basis points in fiscal 2014 compared to the prior year.


35


Inventories, Land and Lot Position and Homes in Inventory

We routinely enter into land/lot option contracts to purchase land or finished lots at predetermined prices on a defined schedule commensurate with planned development or anticipated new home demand. We also purchase undeveloped land that generally is vested with the rights to begin development or construction work, and we plan and coordinate the development of our land into residential lots for use in our homebuilding business. We significantly increased our investments in land and lot acquisition and land development across all of our market regions in fiscal 2012 and 2013 to expand our operations as market conditions improved. In 2014, we slowed the growth of our land and lot inventories and increased our housing inventories to capture an increased share of new home demand and generate higher returns on our land investments. We manage our inventory of owned land and lots and homes under construction relative to demand in each of our markets, including starting construction on unsold homes to capture new home demand, monitoring the number and aging of unsold homes and aggressively marketing our unsold, completed homes in inventory.

Our inventories at September 30, 2014 and 2013 are summarized as follows:
 
 
September 30, 2014
 
 
Construction in Progress and Finished Homes
 
Residential Land/Lots Developed and Under Development
 
Land Held
for Development
 
Land Held
for Sale
 
Total Inventory
 
 
(In millions)
East
 
$
419.0

 
$
360.5

 
$
50.6

 
$
12.6

 
$
842.7

Midwest
 
252.9

 
211.2

 
13.3

 
0.2

 
477.6

Southeast
 
980.9

 
849.1

 
103.9

 
9.1

 
1,943.0

South Central
 
813.9

 
908.4

 
18.8

 
1.4

 
1,742.5

Southwest
 
137.2

 
132.7

 
23.0

 

 
292.9

West
 
830.6

 
1,220.6

 
115.7

 
2.5

 
2,169.4

Corporate and unallocated (1)
 
106.8

 
117.5

 
7.5

 
0.6

 
232.4

 
 
$
3,541.3

 
$
3,800.0

 
$
332.8

 
$
26.4

 
$
7,700.5


 
 
September 30, 2013
 
 
Construction in Progress and Finished Homes
 
Residential Land/Lots Developed and Under Development
 
Land Held
for Development
 
Land Held
for Sale
 
Total Inventory
 
 
(In millions)
East
 
$
293.5

 
$
359.7

 
$
80.3

 
$
9.4

 
$
742.9

Midwest
 
182.3

 
208.6

 
21.3

 

 
412.2

Southeast
 
677.2

 
674.8

 
147.2

 
9.3

 
1,508.5

South Central
 
610.3

 
785.0

 
47.6

 
0.7

 
1,443.6

Southwest
 
124.6

 
108.4

 
29.4

 

 
262.4

West
 
545.8

 
994.0

 
113.8

 
14.6

 
1,668.2

Corporate and unallocated (1)
 
64.3

 
84.7

 
10.6

 

 
159.6

 
 
$
2,498.0

 
$
3,215.2

 
$
450.2

 
$
34.0

 
$
6,197.4

__________
(1)
Corporate and unallocated inventory consists primarily of capitalized interest and property taxes.


36


Our land and lot position and homes in inventory at September 30, 2014 and 2013 are summarized as follows:
 
 
September 30, 2014
 
 
Land/Lots
Owned (1)
 
Lots Controlled
Under
Land and Lot
Option Purchase
Contracts (2)
 
Total
Land/Lots
Owned and
Controlled
 
Homes
in
Inventory (3)
East
 
13,700

 
7,100

 
20,800

 
2,600
Midwest
 
5,000

 
1,000

 
6,000

 
1,100
Southeast
 
36,500

 
21,400

 
57,900

 
6,400
South Central
 
39,200

 
23,300

 
62,500

 
6,600
Southwest
 
6,300

 
1,500

 
7,800

 
1,000
West
 
23,900

 
4,600

 
28,500

 
2,900
 
 
124,600

 
58,900

 
183,500

 
20,600
 
 
68
%
 
32
%
 
100
%
 
 

 
 
September 30, 2013
 
 
Land/Lots
Owned (1)
 
Lots Controlled
Under
Land and Lot
Option Purchase
Contracts (2)
 
Total
Land/Lots
Owned and
Controlled
 
Homes
in
Inventory (3)
East
 
14,700

 
5,600

 
20,300

 
1,900
Midwest
 
5,600

 
1,900

 
7,500

 
1,000
Southeast
 
34,200

 
22,600

 
56,800

 
5,400
South Central
 
41,000

 
16,700

 
57,700

 
5,300
Southwest
 
6,600

 
1,400

 
8,000

 
1,100
West
 
24,500

 
6,100

 
30,600

 
2,300
 
 
126,600

 
54,300

 
180,900

 
17,000
 
 
70
%
 
30
%
 
100
%
 
 
__________

(1)
Land/lots owned include approximately 32,400 and 32,500 owned lots that are fully developed and ready for home construction at September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively. Land/lots owned also include land held for development representing 14,000 and 21,700 lots at September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively.
(2)
The total remaining purchase price of lots controlled through land and lot option purchase contracts at September 30, 2014 and 2013 was $2.0 billion and $1.9 billion, respectively, secured with $58.7 million and $42.4 million in earnest money deposits. Our lots controlled under land and lot option purchase contracts exclude approximately 2,200 and 2,800 lots at September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively, representing lots controlled under lot option contracts for which we do not expect to exercise our option to purchase the land or lots, but the underlying contracts have yet to be terminated. We have reserved the deposits related to these contracts.
(3)
Homes in inventory include approximately 1,500 and 1,300 model homes at September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively. Approximately 11,200 and 9,000 of our homes in inventory were unsold at September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively. At September 30, 2014, approximately 3,900 of our unsold homes were completed, of which approximately 600 homes had been completed for more than six months. At September 30, 2013, approximately 3,000 of our unsold homes were completed, of which approximately 600 homes had been completed for more than six months.


37


Results of Operations — Financial Services

Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2014 Compared to Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2013

The following tables set forth key operating and financial data for our financial services operations, comprising DHI Mortgage and our subsidiary title companies, for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013:
 
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
Number of first-lien loans originated or brokered by DHI Mortgage for D.R. Horton homebuyers
 
14,213

 
13,514

 
5
%
Number of homes closed by D.R. Horton
 
28,670

 
24,155

 
19
%
DHI Mortgage capture rate
 
50
%
 
56
%
 
 

Number of total loans originated or brokered by DHI Mortgage for D.R. Horton homebuyers
 
14,297

 
13,566

 
5
%
Total number of loans originated or brokered by DHI Mortgage
 
16,177

 
15,806

 
2
%
Percentage of loan volume from D.R. Horton homebuyers
 
88
%
 
86
%
 
 

Loans sold by DHI Mortgage to third parties
 
15,806

 
15,601

 
1
%

 
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
 
 
 
 
(In millions)
 
 
Loan origination fees
 
$
20.0

 
$
21.4

 
(7
)%
Sale of servicing rights and gains from sale of mortgage loans
 
99.6

 
112.5

 
(11
)%
Recourse benefit (expense)
 
2.2

 
(0.5
)
 

Sale of servicing rights and gains from sale of mortgage loans, net
 
101.8

 
112.0

 
(9
)%
Other revenues
 
9.9

 
10.1

 
(2
)%
Reinsurance expense
 
(0.2
)
 
(0.1
)
 
100
 %
Other revenues, net
 
9.7

 
10.0

 
(3
)%
Total mortgage operations revenues
 
131.5

 
143.4

 
(8
)%
Title policy premiums, net
 
34.9

 
30.0

 
16
 %
Total revenues
 
166.4

 
173.4

 
(4
)%
General and administrative expense
 
131.2

 
116.4

 
13
 %
Interest and other (income)
 
(10.2
)
 
(8.5
)
 
20
 %
Financial services pre-tax income
 
$
45.4

 
$
65.5

 
(31
)%

Financial Services Operating Margin Analysis
 
 
Percentages of
Financial Services Revenues (1)
 
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
 
2014
 
2013
Recourse and reinsurance (benefit) expense
 
(1.2
)%
 
0.3
 %
General and administrative expense
 
79.8
 %
 
66.9
 %
Interest and other (income)
 
(6.2
)%
 
(4.9