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EX-31.1 - EXHIBIT 31.1 - Intelligent Buying, Inc.v307654_ex31-1.htm
EX-32.1 - EXHIBIT 32.1 - Intelligent Buying, Inc.v307654_ex32-1.htm
EX-32.2 - EXHIBIT 32.2 - Intelligent Buying, Inc.v307654_ex32-2.htm
EX-31.2 - EXHIBIT 31.2 - Intelligent Buying, Inc.v307654_ex31-2.htm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(D) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

 

for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011

 

Transition Report Under Section 13 or 15(D) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

 

for the transition period from _______________ to _______________

 

Commission File Number: 333-133327

 

INTELLIGENT BUYING, INC.

(Exact name of small Business Issuer as specified in its charter)

 

California   20-0956471
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or   (IRS Employer Identification No.)
organization)    
     
450 National Ave    
Mountain View, CA   94043
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

Issuer's telephone number, including area code: (650) 279-9954

 

n/a

Former address if changed since last report

 

Securities registered under Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act: None

 

Securities registered under Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act:

 

Common Stock, par value $0.001 per share

 

Check whether the issuer (1) filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No ¨

 

Check if there is no disclosure of delinquent filers in response to Item 405 of Regulation S-K contained in this form, and no disclosure will be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large Accelerated Filer ¨   Accelerated Filer ¨   Non-Accelerated Filer ¨ (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)   Smaller Reporting Company þ

  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

¨ Yes x No

 

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter (June 30, 2011)—No sale or bid data was available as of that date.

 

State the number of shares outstanding of the registrant's $.001 par value common stock as of the close of business on the latest practicable date (March 13, 2012):  5,889,533

 

Documents incorporated by reference: None.

 

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  

PART I 
     
ITEM 1. BUSINESS 1
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS 3
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS 3
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES 3
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS 3
ITEM 4. [REMOVED AND RESERVED] 3
     
PART II
     
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANTS COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES 3
ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA 4
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATION 4
ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK 9
ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA 9
ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE 10
ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES 10
ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION 11
     
PART III
     
ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE 11
     
ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION 12
ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS 13
ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE 14
ITEM 14 PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES 15
     
PART IV
     
ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES 17
     
SIGNATURES   18

 

 
 

 

FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (the “Report”), including ”Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Item 7 contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 regarding future events and the future results of Intelligent Buying, Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries (the “Company”) that are based on management’s current expectations, estimates, projections and assumptions about the Company’s business. Words such as “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “sees,” “estimates” and variations of such words and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions that are difficult to predict. Therefore, actual outcomes and results may differ materially from what is expressed or forecasted in such forward-looking statements due to numerous factors, including, but not limited to, those discussed in the “Risk Factors” section in Item 1A, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Item 7 and elsewhere in this Report as well as those discussed from time to time in the Company’s other Securities and Exchange Commission filings and reports. In addition, such statements could be affected by general industry and market conditions. Such forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this Report or, in the case of any document incorporated by reference, the date of that document, and we do not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this Report. If we update or correct one or more forward-looking statements, investors and others should not conclude that we will make additional updates or corrections with respect to other forward-looking statements.

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1.BUSINESS.

Background

 

Intelligent Buying, Inc. was incorporated in the State of California on March 22, 2004.  On March 22, 2004, the Company issued 10,000 shares of the Company’s common stock (an aggregate of 20,000 shares) to its founders, Eugene Malobrodsky and David Gorodyansky for a cash consideration of $200.  On March 22, 2006, the Company issued 1,250,000 shares of its Preferred Stock to each of Messrs. Malobrodsky and Gorodyansky (2,500,000 Preferred Shares in the aggregate) in exchange for the 20,000 shares of the Company’s common stock which had been previously issued.  Both prior to the exchange and at the time of the exchange, Messrs. Malobrodsky and Gorodyansky owned 100% of the stock of the Company. The decision to exchange their common shares for preferred shares was intended to enable them to maintain a particular percentage holding of the Company and enable them to maintain voting control over the Company. On September 16, 2010, all 2,500,00 shares of preferred stock were converted into 5,000,000 shares of common stock. Thereafter, no shares of preferred stock remained issued and outstanding.

 

Our Business Generally

 

The Company has been engaged since 2004 in the business of asset management and sales of high-end computerized networking equipment to emerging high technology companies.  The focus of the Company’s business is to facilitate the liquidation of high-end networking equipment and information technology assets by businesses which are ceasing operations and to resell these assets to evolving technology companies at a fraction of the original cost. The Company sells products which include servers with multiple CPU’s, web servers, desktop and laptop computers, enterprise level switching equipment and routers. In this respect, the Company provides a valuable service to both the financial stakeholders of the selling businesses and the purchasers.  

 

The Company is located in the heart of Silicon Valley and is therefore well-networked with venture capital firms which are the principal funding mechanism for the information technology industry.  Venture funds comprise the Company’s most important contact with business opportunities.  The principal categories of equipment sold by the Company comprise high-end switching and routing equipment. The manufacturers of equipment sold by the Company are generally also competitors for sales to the same buyers.  The Company also has a major focus on the evolving Voice Over Internet Protocol (“VOIP”) industry and seeks to become a major provider of switches, routers and related information technology for this industry.  To date, the principal focus of the Company has been Silicon Valley.  In the future, the Company intends to expand nationally, and ultimately, internationally.  

 

1
 

 

Our Market

 

Management believes that there exists a demand for networking, switching, routers and related information technology equipment in the world market.  We believe that the significant growth in the use of VOIP equipment will continue and will comprise a major part of our business for the foreseeable future.  While Silicon Valley is and has been our principal market, we see substantial demand for our products and services on the U.S. east coast and internationally, particularly in Asia and the ASEAN/India markets.

 

Market Description

 

The market for our products and services is highly-fragmented and there is presently no well-organized market for used information technology equipment and the re-marketing of the same.  In this respect, at this time our market niche is essentially a “cottage industry” and our goal is to become the major player in the industry in the same manner as eBay has become the major player in the online auction industry.  Our initial principal focus has been to work with the venture capital community as a vehicle for the orderly disposition of information technology equipment owned by companies which are or have ceased operations and to identify equipment which is required by emerging companies which have a need for this equipment.  While we cannot quantify the gross size of this market, our experience is that this market niche is substantial and that it is largely underserved by entities with a specific focus on it.  As the demand for high-quality information technology equipment grows, we believe that the demand for late-model used equipment will grow concurrently, if not at a faster pace.  We believe that the demand may grow the fastest in markets outside the United States where there is a strong market acceptance for second-hand equipment and the general demand for such equipment has been growing at a faster pace than in the U.S. markets due to extensive outsourcing by American industry.

 

Competition

 

Our primary competition is the original manufacturers of the equipment we sell such as Cisco, Sun Microsystems and the like.  Notwithstanding, we believe that we can work in concert with the manufacturers as a clearing house for excess products outside of their normal marketing channels. Our major competitive advantage is price, as our inventory is generally available to the public at prices which are substantially below the prices for new equipment.  Our inventory is also available for immediate delivery.  We do face competition from other online auction services such as eBay, Overstock.com and uBid.com.  While we believe that our services are superior to these competitors due to our specialized focus on the market, these entities have financial and other resources which are, and will for the foreseeable future be, significantly greater than ours.  We also face competition from many smaller entities and equipment retailers who have acted as brokers for the disposition of second-hand equipment.  Most of these entities deal primarily with local markets and have limited financial resources, which tend to restrict the size and scope of their operations. The Company does not rely upon a single large customer or a high concentration of a few customers. Rather, the Company serves and markets to the general public and relies upon a large number of individual customers to comprise its sales. While the Company does not have a strong reliance on any one or concentration of a few select customers, marketing to the consumer audience may create the need for advertising and marketing to the general public, which may require significant time and expense with no guaranteed return in sales or customers.

 

Employees

 

As of December 31, 2011, the Company had three employees.

 

2
 

 

ITEM 1A.RISK FACTORS

Not required as the Company is a “smaller reporting company”.

 

ITEM 1B.UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None.

 

ITEM 2.PROPERTIES.

 

None.

 

ITEM 3.LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

As of December 31, 2011, the Company was not a party to any pending or threatened legal proceedings.

 

ITEM 4.[REMOVED AND RESERVED]

 

PART II

 

ITEM 5.        MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY; RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND SMALL BUSINESS ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Market Price

 

In 2010, our common stock was approved by FINRA to trade on the OTCBB under the symbol “INTB” on an unpriced basis. There has never been a quotation for the stock and it has yet to actively trade. Even if the common stock were quoted, there may never be substantial activity in such market, if there is substantial activity, such activity may not be maintained, and no prediction can be made as to what prices may prevail in such market.

 

Holders

 

As of March 13 2012, we have issued an aggregate of 5,889,533 shares of our common stock to approximately 39 stockholders of record. The issued and outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock were issued in accordance with the exemptions from registration afforded by Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933 and Regulation D promulgated under the Securities Act. 389,533 shares of the Company’s common stock were registered under a registration statement on Form SB-2 which was declared effective by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on January 15, 2008.

 

Options and Warrants

 

None of the shares of our common stock are subject to outstanding options or warrants.

 

Status of Outstanding Common Stock

 

As of December 31, 2011, 5,753,333 of our 5,889,533 issued and outstanding common shares are held by “affiliates” of the Company and the remaining shares are either registered or may be transferred subject to the requirements of Rule 144. We have not agreed to register any additional outstanding shares of our common stock under the Securities Act.

 

Dividends

 

We have not paid any dividends to date, and have no plans to do so in the immediate future.

 

3
 

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

None.

 

Purchases of Equity Securities

 

The Company has never purchased nor does it own any equity securities of any other issuer.

 

ITEM 6.SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

Year Ended  12/31/11   12/31/10   12/31/09 
Revenues  $42,966   $41,063   $59,624 
Net Income (Loss)  $(1,611)  $(2,015)  $1,046 
Net Income (Loss) Per Share, Basic and Diluted  $(0.00)  $(0.00)  $0.00)
Weighted Average No. Shares, Basic and Diluted   5,889,533    2,355.286    889,533 
Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)  $(683,716)  $(682,105)  $(680,090)
Total Assets  $451   $926   $9,172 
Total Liabilities  $14,317   $13,181   $19,412 

 

ITEM 7.      MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATION

 

Overview

 

The Company has been engaged since 2004 in the business of asset management and sales of high-end computerized networking equipment to emerging high technology companies.  The focus of the Company’s business is to facilitate the liquidation of high-end networking equipment and information technology assets by businesses which are ceasing operations and to resell these assets to evolving technology companies at a fraction of the original cost.   In this respect, the Company provides a valuable service to both the financial stakeholders of the selling businesses and the purchasers.

 

Our Company is subject to the risks and uncertainties frequently encountered by companies in the highly competitive market for information technology equipment as well as the uncertainty generally associated with the online auction market. These risks include the decline in demand for the Company’s inventory, unavailability of products at prices which will support the Company’s business plan, if at all, pricing compression in the market for new information technology equipment among major manufacturers, inability to provide appropriate service for products sold, lack of funds to purchase new inventory and inability to turn accounts receivable in a timely manner and the inability to maintain and increase the levels of traffic on our online services, among others.

 

4
 

 

Plan of Operations

 

a.       General

 

The extent of our operations over the next twelve (12) months will be determined by our ability to access and purchase new inventory on terms which are attractive in the market and consistent with our business plan.  As we expand our business, this will require a continuing access to additional capital, and there is no guarantee that we will be able to access such capital on terms acceptable to the Company, if at all.  While we cannot predict exactly what our level of activity will be over the next 12 months, past experience leads us to believe that available capital resources will not be adequate to fund working capital requirements for the 12-month period which commenced January 1, 2012.

 

We will attempt to not incur any cash obligations that we cannot satisfy with known resources, which are currently very limited.

 

The Company does not believe that period-to-period comparisons of its operating results are necessarily meaningful nor should they be relied upon as reliable indicators of future performance, thus making it difficult to accurately forecast quarterly and annual revenues and results of operations. In addition, our operating results are likely to fluctuate significantly from quarter to quarter, and year-to-year, as a result of several factors, many of which are outside our control, and any of which could materially harm our business. These factors include:

 

· fluctuations in the demand for high-end information technology equipment such as networking equipment and routers;

· the unpredictability of our success in any new revenue and cost reduction initiatives;

· inability to acquire new inventory on terms which will result in acceptable profit margins on sale;

· obsolescence of our inventory;

· changes in the level of traffic on our website; and

· fluctuations in marketing expenses and technology infrastructure costs.

 

Our revenues for the foreseeable future will remain primarily dependent on our ability to acquire inventory on a continuing basis and the demand for such information technology equipment in the marketplace and user traffic levels on our website. As aforesaid, future revenues are difficult to forecast. The Company may be unable to adjust spending quickly enough to offset any unexpected increase in demand for the product lines of the Company or a reduction in revenues in a particular quarter or year, which may materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

b.       Expansion Plans

 

Our initial activities were largely focused on the Silicon Valley market. Since Silicon Valley is the most important information technology market in the United States, we expect that this will be our principal market for the foreseeable future.   We hope to expand the scope of such activities to the U.S. east coast and thereafter, assuming that domestic operations are meeting our business plans, we would hope to expand internationally, with particular focus on Asia and the ASEAN/India markets.  This expansion will obviously be subject to our ability to access additional capital and establish contacts and recruit qualified personnel in the new markets.  The raising of such additional capital could be on a basis which is dilutive to our then-existing shareholder base.

 

c.       Current and Anticipated Expenses

    

The Company has embarked upon an effort to become a publicly-traded company and by doing so, has incurred and will continue to incur additional significant expenses for legal, accounting and related services. Once the Company becomes a public entity, subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, there will be ongoing expenses associated with the ongoing professional fees for accounting, legal and a host of other expenses for annual reports and proxy statements as well as costs to be incurred for (i) increased marketing and advertising to support any growth in sales for the Company; (ii) potential to hire additional personnel to manage and expand the Company's operations. Current monthly expenses to run the Company average approximately $5,000. Future monthly expenses will be largely dependent on available cash.

 

5
 

 

d.       Officers’ Compensation and Loans

 

Neither Mr. Malobrodsky nor Mr. Gorodyansky has received or accrued any compensation to date and has no written contract or any commitment to receive annual compensation. Messrs. Malobrodsky and Gorodyansky have agreed to forego any salary until such time as the Company has sufficient revenues therefore and/or receives sufficient outside financing.

 

In the past, our founders have advanced funds to the Company as required.  If, and when necessary, our founders may, at their sole option, advance funds to cover additional working capital as deemed necessary. These funds are not expected to exceed $100,000, will be evidenced by a non-interest bearing unsecured corporate note, and will be treated as loans to be repaid, if and when we have the financial resources to do so.

 

During fiscal year 2004, Sophia Malobrodsky made a non-interest-bearing loan advance to the Company, payable on demand, in the amount of $38,000.  On January 2, 2006, the Company agreed to exchange the outstanding balance of $38,000 for 253,333 shares of the Company’s common stock ($0.15 per share). While the Company was committed to issue these shares at January 2, 2006, these shares were not physically issued until March 22, 2006 because the Company needed to increase its authorized capital and engage a transfer agent in order to facilitate the physical issuance of the shares.

 

During fiscal year 2005, Ilya Perlov made a non-interest-bearing loan advance to the Company, payable on demand, in the amount of $3,000.  On January 2, 2006, the Company agreed to exchange the outstanding balance of $3,000 for 20,000 shares of the Company’s common stock ($0.15 per share). While the Company was committed to issue these shares at January 2, 2006, these shares were not physically issued until March 22, 2006 because the Company needed to increase its authorized capital and engage a transfer agent in order to facilitate the physical issuance of the shares.

 

On January 2, 2006, Ms. Malobrodsky and Mr. Perlov made demand for repayment of these obligations. At the time, the Company did not have the funds available for such repayment and the obligations were deemed to be in default. At that time, the Company had not completed its private placement and there was no guarantee that it would be completed on a timely basis, if at all. As a result, Ms. Malobrodsky agreed to exchange the outstanding balance of the outstanding loan advance ($38,000) owed by the Company to her for 253,333 shares of common stock and Mr. Perlov agreed to exchange the outstanding balance of the outstanding loan advance ($3,000) owed by the Company to him for 20,000 shares of common stock, both at an exchange rate of one share for each $0.15 of debt. The $0.15 per share conversion price was negotiated at that time on an arms-length basis between Ms. Malobrodsky, Mr. Perlov and the Company which took into account a number of factors, including but not limited to (a) the conversion of obligations which had priority over common equity to a common equity position which is pari-passu with all other equity holders; (b) the illiquidity of the Company at the time (as of December 31, 2005, the Company only had $2,197 cash); (c) the Company believed that the obligations to Ms. Malobrodsky and Mr. Perlov needed to be eliminated in order to complete any private placement of common equity and (d) the Company knew that the prospective investors in the private placement would not permit any of the proceeds of such offering to be utilized for payments to the noteholders. While the Company was committed to issue these shares at January 2, 2006, these shares were not physically issued until March 22, 2006 because the Company needed to increase its authorized capital and engage a transfer agent in order to facilitate the physical issuance of the shares. The shares issued to Ms. Malobrodsky and Mr. Perlov were valued at $.75 per share and the accounting treatment of the exchange was to debit Notes Payable and credit Common Stock par value and Additional Paid-In Capital.

 

While we cannot predict exactly what our level of activity will be over the next 12 months, past experience leads us to believe that available capital resources will not be adequate to fund working capital requirements for the 12-month period which commenced January 1, 2012.  We will therefore need to access additional capital through the issuance of additional equity and debt securities and other forms of outside funding, including additional loans from officers, directors and shareholders of the Company.  There is no assurance can be accomplished to the necessary extent, if at all. (See "Liquidity").

 

6
 

 

Liquidity

 

As of December 31, 2011, we had $451 in cash and no other assets and a negative net working capital of $13,866.

 

From its inception, the Company’s basic business model has been to serve the venture capital community and the information technology firms they fund for both the acquisition of information technology equipment at prices below the factory sale pricing and the disposition/liquidation of such equipment for purposes of recovery of capital investment.  The two aspects of this strategy have been (i) to purchase, at liquidation pricing, computer equipment owned by information technology firms which are either ceasing or reducing operations or are merging with other entities with a resulting duplication of equipment and (ii) to facilitate early stage information technology firms acquisition of computer equipment at prices which are less than the cost of new equipment.  Venture Capital Funds have been the Company’s target market as they are the principal source of funding for companies which would be most likely to utilize the Company’s services.  The key elements of the Company’s strategy are (i) identification of opportunities to acquire equipment, generally in connection with a liquidation of the assets of an information technology company; (ii) acquisition of equipment which has resale value at prices which will facilitate a margin of 40-50% on resale; (iii) access to capital to acquire equipment assets for resale; (iv) resale of the equipment through various channels in a manner which will facilitate a rapid turn-around of funding; (v) to reduce general and administrative expenses to not more than 15-20% of sales revenues and (vi) maintaining lines of communication with entities who would make decisions relating to equipment purchases and divestitures.  While all of the risk factors described in this registration statement apply, the Company believes that its most significant challenge to achievement of viable, long term profitability is access to capital.  The Company is essentially a cash business.  The Company can acquire equipment at the most favorable basis where it can pay cash at the point of purchase.  The Company believes that access to additional capital will enable it to purchase equipment on the most favorable basis and enable the Company to achieve margins within targeted ranges.  The Company’s operating expenses are reasonably predictable as literally all of its sales are on a cash basis through online or other auction-type channels.  Further, the Company’s operating expenses do not tend to vary in relationship to sales volume.  Therefore, the Company believes that as sales volume increases, so should its margin of profit.  Given its current cash position, the Company believes it is questionable whether it can manage expenditures to generate sufficient cash to support its operations for the next twelve months.  In this regard, the Company’ suffered a loss of $(1,611) for the twelve-month period ended December 31, 2011, while we had a negative net working capital at said date of $13,866.  For the twelve months ended December 31, 2011, the Company’s operating activities used $475 cash and the Company’s financing activities were cash neutral. The major strategic challenge facing the Company is therefore the funding of growth—most particularly, the ability to acquire more inventory for re-sale.  The Company believes that for the foreseeable future, the availability of equipment for purchase in its target markets will significantly exceed its financial resources and that the market for used information technology equipment, both in the U.S. and abroad, will continue to be strong and may even be growing.  While the Company believes that it may be able to access asset-based working capital lending, this would be limited in amount and would only support current liquidity and would not be a viable source of funding for longer term growth.  The Company believes that such funding can only achieved through sale of additional equity.  A critical element of success in raising such funding is the liquidity of the Company’s common stock.  The need for such liquidity is one of the principal reasons why the Company is seeking to become a reporting company and have its shares publicly-traded.  While there are no guarantees that it can be achieved, the Company believes that such funding can be accessed in amounts which will enable the Company to achieve growth in its sales and the achievement of long term profitability.

 

The potential exists that our available capital resources may not be adequate to fund our working capital requirements based upon our present level of operations for the 12-month period subsequent to January 1, 2012. A shortage of capital would affect our ability to fund our working capital requirements. If we require additional capital, funds may not be available on acceptable terms, if at all. In addition, if we raise additional capital through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities, the issuance of these securities could dilute existing shareholders. If funds are not available, this could materially adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

7
 

 

Historically, we have depended on loans from our principal shareholders and their families and acquaintances to provide us with working capital as required. We do not have any credit facilities or other commitments for debt or equity financing. No assurance can be given that financing, when needed, will be available. To date, we have had discussions with potential sources of additional funding, however, the Company does not currently have any firm commitment with respect thereto.  None of our shareholders is obligated to make any loans or advances to us and there can be no assurance that any of our shareholders will continue making loans or advances to us in the future.

 

To meet commitments that are greater than 12 months in the future, we will have to operate our business in such a manner as produce positive cash flow and enhance our exposure in the market. There does not currently appear to be any other viable source of long-term financing except that management may consider various sources of debt and/or equity financing if same can be obtained on terms deemed reasonable to management.

 

Going Concern.  Our independent auditors have added an explanatory paragraph to their audit issued in connection with the financial statements for the period ended December 31, 2011, relative to our ability to continue as a going concern.  The Company’s total liabilities exceeded its total assets by $13,866. We had an accumulated deficit of $683,716 incurred through such date and recorded a loss of $1,611 for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011.  Because our auditors have issued a going concern opinion, there is substantial uncertainty we will continue operations in which case you could lose your investment.  Our auditors have issued a going concern opinion. This means that there is substantial doubt that we can continue as an ongoing business for the next 12 months. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the uncertainty about our ability to continue our business.

 

Results of Operations for Comparative Years Ended December 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010

 

The following table summarizes the results of operations during the twelve-month periods ended December 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010:

 

Line Item  12/31/11
(audited)
   12/31/10
(audited)
   Increase
(Decrease)
   Percentage
Increase
(Decrease)
 
                     
Sales  $42,966   $41,063   $1,903    4.63%
Net income (loss)   (1,611)   (2,015)   (404)   (20.05%)
Expenses   44,577    43,078    1,499    3.48%
Earnings (loss) per share of common stock   (0.00)   (0.00)   0.00    (n/a 

 

Comparisons between Cost of Sales Selling, Administrative and General Expenses for the twelve-month period ended December 31, 2011 and for the twelve-month period ended December 31, 2010 are as follows:

 

   12 Mos.
Ended
12/31/2011
   12 Mos. Ended
12/31/2010
 
Cost of Sales  $22,300   $9,153 
Ratio of Cost of Sales to Sales   51.9%   22.3%
Selling, General and Administrative Expenses  $22,277   $33,925 

 

8
 

 

We had a net loss of $1,611 for the twelve months ended December 31, 2011 as compared with a net loss of $2,015 for the twelve months ended December 31, 2010.  This improvement was largely due to an increase in sales and a small decrease in selling, general and administrative expenses.

 

The Company’s sales in any given period is significantly affected by the working capital the Company has available for the purchase of inventory.  The Company is known in Silicon Valley, California, as a liquidator of used computer equipment.  The principal source of the Company’s business leads are Venture Capital firms who have invested in information technology companies which have either ceased or reduced operations or have gone through a business combination which results in the surviving company having duplicative equipment.  The Company also generally monitors the information technology industry to identify target companies who might be in the market to liquidate to sell equipment.  The principal limitation on the Company’s ability to purchase equipment is the availability and access to funds to complete the purchase of inventory.  The Company’s sales are at least partially dependent on its ability to acquire inventory.  Simply put, without inventory, the Company has nothing to sell.  While the Company can technically act as a “middle-man” between the entity divesting equipment and the re-sale market without directly purchasing the equipment, it has found that it cannot achieve the margins on sales by so doing that it achieves by purchasing the equipment outright and acting as a principal on the re-sale as opposed to an agent

 

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We do not have any off balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity or capital expenditures or capital resources that is material to an investor in our securities.

 

Seasonality

 

Our operating results are not affected by seasonality.

 

Inflation

 

Our business and operating results are not affected in any material way by inflation.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

The Securities and Exchange Commission issued Financial Reporting Release No. 60, "Cautionary Advice Regarding Disclosure About Critical Accounting Policies" suggesting that companies provide additional disclosure and commentary on their most critical accounting policies. In Financial Reporting Release No. 60, the Securities and Exchange Commission has defined the most critical accounting policies as the ones that are most important to the portrayal of a company's financial condition and operating results, and require management to make its most difficult and subjective judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates of matters that are inherently uncertain. The nature of our business generally does not call for the preparation or use of estimates. Due to the fact that the Company does not have any operating business, we do not believe that we do not have any such critical accounting policies.

 

ITEM 7A.QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

As a “smaller reporting company” as defined by Item 10 of Regulation S-K, the Company is not required to provide information required by this Item.

 

ITEM 8.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

Set forth below are the audited financial statements for the Company for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 and the reports thereon of Paritz & Co.

 

9
 

 

INTELLIGENT BUYING, INC.

 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

INDEX

 

    Page Number
     
INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT   F-1
     
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS:    
     
Balance Sheets at December 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010   F-2
     
Statement of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010   F-3
     
Statement of Stockholders' Deficiency for period the from December 31, 2009 to December 31, 2011   F-4 
     
Statement of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010   F-5
     
Notes to Financial Statements for period ended December 31, 2011   F-6 to F-10

 

 
 

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

The Board of Directors and Shareholders

Intelligent Buying, Inc

Mountain View, CA

 

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Intelligent Buying, Inc. as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, and the related statements of operations, changes in shareholders’ equity (deficit) and cash flows for the years then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Intelligent Buying, Inc. as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, and the results of its operations, its cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that Intelligent Buying, Inc. will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1 to the financial statements, the Company has incurred operating losses since inception and has a net capital deficit at December 31, 2011, which raises substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plan in regards to these matters is also described in Note 1. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that may result from the outcome of these uncertainties.

 

Paritz & Company, P.A.

 

Paritz & Company, P.A.

Hackensack, New Jersey

March 14, 2012

  

F-1
 

 

INTELLIGENT BUYING, INC. 

 

BALANCE SHEET

 

   December 31, 2011
(Audited)
   December 31, 2010
(Audited)
 
CURRENT ASSETS          
Cash  $451   $926 
Accounts receivable          
Inventories          
TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS   451    926 
           
Property and equipment, net   -    - 
           
TOTAL ASSETS  $451   $926 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIENCY          
Accounts payable and accrued expenses  $7,359   $6,440 
Due to related party   6,958    6,741 
           
TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES   14,317    13,181 
           
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIENCY):          
Preferred stock, $.001 par value,        
Authorized – 25,000,000 shares          
Issued and outstanding – no shares   0     0 
Common stock, $.001 par value,          
Authorized – 50,000,000 shares          
Issued and outstanding – 5,889,533 shares   5,889    5,889 
Additional paid-in capital   663,961    663,961 
Accumulated deficit   (683,716)   (682,105)
TOTAL STOCKHOLDERS’ (DEFICIENCY)   (13,866)   (12,255)
           
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ (DEFICIENCY)  $451   $926 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

F-2
 

 

INTELLIGENT BUYING, INC.

 

STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND ACCUMULATED DEFICIT

 

   YEAR THEN ENDED DECEMBER 31 
   2011
(Audited)
   2010
(Audited)
 
         
SALES:          
Related Party  $18,400   $38,616 
Other   24,566    2,447 
TOTAL SALES   42,966    41,063 
           
COSTS AND EXPENSES:          
Cost of sales   22,300    9,153 
Selling, general and administrative   22,277    33,925 
TOTAL COSTS AND EXPENSES   44,577    43,078 
           
INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE TAXES   (1,611)   (2,015)
           
INCOME TAXES   -    - 
           
NET INCOME (LOSS)   (1,611)   (2,015)
           
ACCUMULATED DEFICIT- BEGINNING OF PERIOD   (682,105)   (680,090)
           
ACCUMULATED DEFICIT- END OF PERIOD  $(683,716)  $(682,105)
           
BASIC AND DILUTED NET INCOME (LOSS) PER COMMON SHARE  $(0.00)  $(0.00)
           
WEIGHTED AVERAGE NUMBER OF SHARES OUTSTANDING   5,889,533    2,355,286 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

F-3
 

 

 

INTELLIGENT BUYING, INC.

 

STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIENCY)

 

   ——Common Stock——   ——-Preferred Stock—-             
                             
       $.001       $.001   Additional         
       Par       Par   Paid-In   Accumulated     
   Shares   Value   Shares   Value   Capital   Deficit   Total 
                             
Balance December 31, 2009   889,533   $889    2,500,000   $2,500   $666,461   $(680,090)  $(10,240)
Conversion of                                   
Preferred Stock   5,000,000   $5,000    (2,500,000)  $(2,500)  $(2,500)        
                                    
Net income                            (2,015)   (2,015)
                                    
Balance December 31, 2010   5,889,533   $5,889       $   $663,961   $(682,105)  $(12,255)
                                    
Net income                            (1,611)   (1,611))
                                    
Balance December 31, 2011   5,889,533   $5,889       $   $663,961   $(683,716)  $(13,866)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

F-4
 

 

INTELLIGENT BUYING, INC.

 

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

   YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 
   2011   2010 
         
OPERATING ACTIVITIES:          
Net income (loss)  $(1,611)  $(2,015)
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:          
Depreciation and amortization          
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts receivable   -    5,000 
Inventory   -    2,500 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   919      
Taxes Payable   217    (3,175)
NET CASH PROVIDED BY (USED) IN OPERATING ACTIVITIES   (475)   2,310 
           
FINANCING ACTIVITIES:          
Repayments from related party   -    (3,056)
NET CASH PROVIDED BY FINANCING ACTIVITIES   -    (3,056)
           
INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH   (475)   (746)
           
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS – BEGINNING OF PERIOD   926    1,672 
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS – END OF PERIOD   451   $926 
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURES OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION:          

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

F-5
 

 

INTELLIGENT BUYING, INC.

 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

DECEMBER 31, 2011

(AUDITED)

 

1.  SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Business description

 

The financial statements presented are those of Intelligent Buying, Inc. (the “Company”).  The Company was incorporated under the laws of the State of California on March 22, 2004 and is in the business of acquiring high-end computer and networking equipment from resellers and end-users and then reselling this equipment at discounted prices.

 

Uses of estimates in the preparation of financial statements

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of net revenue and expenses during each reporting period.  Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company recognizes revenue on a gross basis when it is realized or realizable and earned.  The Company considers revenue realized or realizable and earned when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the product has been shipped or the services have been provided to the customer, the sales price is fixed or determinable and collectability is reasonably assured.  The Company reduces revenue for estimated customer returns, rotations and sales rebates when such amounts are estimable.  When not estimable, The Company defers revenue until the product is sold to the end customer.  The Company does not provide support on products sold unless a separate agreement for installation and setup has been entered into.  The revenue from such an agreement would be reported separately as fee income if and when such services are performed, completed and accepted by the customer.

 

Comprehensive income

 

SFAS No. 130, "Reporting Comprehensive Income," establishes standards for the reporting and display of comprehensive income and its components in financial statements. SFAS No. 130 requires that all items required to be recognized under accounting standards as components of comprehensive income be reported in a financial statement with the same prominence as other financial statements. Comprehensive income consists of net earnings, the net unrealized gains or losses on available-for-sale marketable securities, foreign currency translation adjustments, minimum pension liability adjustments and unrealized gains and losses on financial instruments qualifying for hedge accounting and is presented in the accompanying Consolidated Statement of Shareholders' Equity in accordance with SFAS No. 130.During the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, the Company did not have any components of comprehensive income (loss) to report.

 

F-6
 

 

 

INTELLIGENT BUYING, INC.

 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

DECEMBER 31, 2011

(AUDITED)

 

Net loss per share

 

Authoritative guidance on Earnings per Share requires dual presentation of basic and diluted earnings or loss per share (“EPS”) for all entities with complex capital structures and requires a reconciliation of the numerator and denominator of the basic EPS computation to the numerator and denominator of the diluted EPS computation.  Basic EPS excludes dilution; diluted EPS reflects the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock or resulted in the issuance of common stock that then shared in the earnings of the entity.

 

Basic loss per share is computed by dividing net loss applicable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period.  Diluted loss per share reflects the potential dilution that could occur if dilutive securities and other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock or resulted in the issuance of common stock that then shared in the earnings of the Company, unless the effect is to reduce a loss or increase earnings per share.

 

Stock-based compensation

 

The Company has adopted the FASB standard on Share-Based Payment, which addresses the accounting for share-based payment transactions. The standard eliminates the ability to account for share-based compensation transactions using old standards, and generally requires instead that such transactions be accounted and recognized in the statement of operations based on their fair value. The standard is effective for public companies that file as small business issuers as of the first interim or annual reporting period that begins after December 15, 2005.  Depending upon the number of and terms for options that may be granted in future periods, the implementation of this standard could have a significant non-cash impact on results of operations in future periods

 

During the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, there were no stock options granted or outstanding.

 

Fair value of financial instruments.    We value our financial assets and liabilities on a recurring basis using the fair value hierarchy established in Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures.

 

ASC 820 describes three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value, as follows:

 

Level 1 input, which include quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities;

 

Level 2 inputs, which include observable inputs other than Level 1 inputs, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the asset or liability; and

 

Level 3 inputs, which include unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the underlying asset or liability. Level 3 assets and liabilities include those whose fair value measurements are determined using pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar valuation techniques, as well as significant management judgment or estimation.

 

F-7
 

 

INTELLIGENT BUYING, INC.

 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

DECEMBER 31, 2011

(AUDITED)

 

Recently Issued and Adopted Accounting Standards

 

In May 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") 2011-04, Fair Value Measurement, which amends the fair value guidance in ASC 820, thereby completing the joint project to achieve substantially converged fair value measurement and disclosure requirements for U.S. GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards ("IFRS"). The new guidance changes some fair value measurement principles (such as extending the Level 1 prohibition of blockage discounts to Levels 2 and 3 in the fair value hierarchy) and expands disclosure requirements, primarily for Level 3 measurements. This update will be effective for us the first quarter of 2012, applied prospectively with no early adoption permitted. We do not anticipate the requirements of the update will have any significant impact on our financial position, operating results or cash flows.

 

In June 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-05, Presentation of Comprehensive Income. This ASU prohibits equity statement presentation of other comprehensive income, requiring instead either a single continuous operating statement or two separate, but consecutive, statements of net income and other comprehensive income. The new guidance does not change which components of comprehensive income are recognized in net income or other comprehensive income, or when an item of other comprehensive income must be reclassified to net income. Also, the earnings-per-share computation based on net income does not change.

 

In December 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-12, Deferral of the Effective Date for Amendments to the Presentation of Reclassifications of Items Out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income in Accounting Standards Update No. 2011-05, in order to redeliberate the portion of the earlier ASU relating to presentation of reclassifications from other comprehensive income. Both updates are required for us the first quarter of 2012, applied retrospectively.

 

 In September 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-08, Testing Goodwill for Impairment, giving entities the option to determine qualitatively whether they can bypass the two-step goodwill impairment test in ASC 350-20, Intangibles, Goodwill and Other. Under the new guidance, if an entity chooses to perform a qualitative assessment and determines that it is more likely than not (more than 50% likelihood) that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, it would then perform Step 1 of the annual goodwill impairment test and, if necessary, proceed to Step 2. Otherwise, no further evaluation would be necessary. Each reporting period, the entity may choose which reporting units, if any, will use the qualitative assessment for goodwill impairment testing. This update will be effective for us for any 2012 goodwill impairment tests, with early adoption permitted. We do not anticipate the requirements of the update will have any significant impact on our financial position, operating results or cash flows, as we currently apply the existing Step 1 test for our single-reporting unit business.

 

F-8
 

 

INTELLIGENT BUYING, INC.

 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

DECEMBER 31, 2011

(AUDITED)

 

Inventories

 

Inventories, consisting of computer and networking equipment, are valued at the lower of cost (first-in, first-out basis) or market (replacement cost).

 

2.  INCOME TAXES

 

The Company recognizes deferred income tax liabilities and assets for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in the financial statements or tax returns.  Under this method, deferred tax liabilities and assets are determined based on the differences between the financial statement carrying amounts and the tax basis of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates in effect in the years in which the differences are expected to reverse.

 

The Company recorded no income taxes for the year ended December 31, 2011 due to the use of available net operating loss carryforwards. For the year ended December 31, 2010, the Company incurred a net loss and no tax provision was required.

 

Net operating loss carry forwards of approximately $684,000 at December 31, 2011 are available to offset future taxable income, if any, and expire in 2027.  This results in a net deferred tax asset, assuming an effective tax rate of 34% of approximately $232,000 at December 31, 2011.  A valuation allowance in the same amount has been provided to reduce the deferred tax asset, as realization of the asset is not assured.

 

3.  STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIENCY)

 

Preferred stock

 

At December 31, 2011, the Company had no shares of its preferred stock issued and outstanding. Previously issued preferred shares were converted according to their terms into 5,000,000 shares of common stock on September 16, 2010.

 

Common stock

 

At December 31, 2010, the Company had 5,889,533 shares of its common stock issued and outstanding. These shares comprised 273,333 shares issued on March 22, 2006 in exchange for certain Notes Payable (see Note 2, above), 500,000 shares issued on April 1, 2006 in consideration for certain financial advisory services and 116,200 shares issued on March 31, 2006 in connection with a private placement of common shares.  Dividends may be paid on outstanding shares of common stock as declared by the Board of Directors. Each share of common stock is entitled to one vote.

 

F-9
 

 

INTELLIGENT BUYING, INC.

 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

DECEMBER 31, 2011

(AUDITED)

 

4.  ACCOUNTS PAYABLE AND ACCRUED EXPENSES

 

Accounts payable and accrued expenses consist of the following:

 

   DECEMBER 31 
   2011   2010 
American Express  $5,372   $5,324 
Other payables- less than 5%   1,987    1,116 
           
   $7,359   $6,440 

 

5.  RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

The Company sells to Anchorfree Wireless, Inc, and AFNCA, Inc., the companies are controlled by the principal shareholders of the Company.  During the year ended December 31, 2011, approximately 43% of sales were to Anchorfree Wireless, Inc, and AFNCA. During the year ended December 31, 2010, the company had 94% of sales to Anchorfree. As of December 31, 2011 and 2010, Anchorfree Wireless, Inc and AFNCA, Inc was not indebted to the Company for sales made in the ordinary course of business.

 

6.  GOING CONCERN

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared in conformity with generally accepted accounting principle, which contemplate continuation of the Company as a going concern.  However, The Company has a negative net working capital of $ 13,866 as of December 31 2011 and net loss of ($1,611) and ($2,015) for years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010. The Company currently has limited liquidity, and has not completed its efforts to establish a stabilized source of revenues sufficient to cover operating costs over an extended period of time.

 

Management anticipates that the Company will be dependent, for the near future, on additional investment capital to fund operating expenses. There are no assurances that the Company will be successful in this or any of its endeavors or become financially viable and continue as a going concern.

 

F-10
 

 

ITEM 9.           CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

  

None.

 

ITEM 9A.    CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.

 

(a) Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Our principal executive and principal financial officers have evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rules 13a - 15(e) and 15d - 15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), as of the end of the period covered by this annual report.  They have concluded that, based on such evaluation, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of December 31, 2011.

 

 (b) Management's Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Overview

 

Internal control over financial reporting as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) refers to the process designed by, or under the supervision of, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, and effected by our board of directors, management and other personnel, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America.  Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting for the Company.

 

Internal control over financial reporting cannot provide absolute assurance of achieving financial reporting objectives because of its inherent limitations.  Internal control over financial reporting is a process that involves human diligence and compliance and is subject to lapses in judgment and breakdowns resulting from human failures.  Internal control over financial reporting also can be circumvented by collusion or improper management override.  Because of such limitations, there is a risk that material misstatements may not be prevented or detected on a timely basis by internal control over financial reporting.  However, these inherent limitations are known features of the financial reporting process.  Therefore, it is possible to design into the process safeguards to reduce, though not eliminate, this risk.

 

Management has utilized the framework set forth in the report entitled "Internal Control — Integrated Framework" published by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations ("COSO") of the Treadway Commission to evaluate the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting and utilized the additional guidance contained in the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission in Internal Control over Financial Reporting - Guidance for Smaller Public Companies.   A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

 

Management's Assessment

 

This annual report does not include an attestation report of the Company's registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management's report was not subject to attestation by the Company's registered public accounting firm pursuant to temporary rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

10
 

 

For the year ended December 31, 2011, our management has reassessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting and has determined that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective due to the lack of segregation of duties to ensure that the information required to be disclosed by the Company under the Exchange Act was recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Exchange Act and accumulated and communicated to the Company's Management, including the Principal Executive Officer and the Principal Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Remediation Plan

 

Given the Company’s limited financial resources and limited business activities, Company Management has determined that there is nothing that the Company can do at this time to remedy the lack of segregation of duties identified above without adding increased staff and overhead. Management is sensitive to this issue and intends to take appropriate action when the Company’s financial resources permit. In addition, Management will continue to review and make necessary changes to the overall design of our internal control environment.

 

(c) Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

There have not been any changes in the Company's internal control over financial reporting (as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act) during the fiscal period to which this report relates that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company's internal control over financial reporting.  

 

ITEM 9B.         OTHER INFORMATION

 

None

 

PART III

 

ITEM 10.        DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Significant Employees

 

The following table sets forth information with respect to our directors and executive officers. Other than these persons, there are no significant employees.

 

Name   Age   Position
         
Eugene Malobrodsky   30   Chief Executive Officer, Secretary and Director
         
David Gorodyansky   30   President, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer and Director

 

David Gorodyansky.   Founded Intelligent Buying Inc. in 2004.  From August 2001 through May 2002, he served as a Sr. Strategy Manager with Fulcrum Management.  In May 2002, he commenced the business which was the predecessor of Intelligent Buying, Inc. as a partnership with Eugene Malobrodsky.  This business became Intelligent Buying, Inc. in March 2004 and he has continued as Director and President of Intelligent Buying through the present date.  David is a member of the Society of Competitive Intelligence Professionals and an advisor on the Technology Expert Council to Gavin Newsom, the mayor of San Francisco.  He was also is the Co-Founder and currently serves as President of AnchorFree Wireless Inc., which operates Wi-Fi networks in San Francisco and Palo Alto, California.

 

Eugene Malobrodsky, Founded Intelligent Buying Inc. in 2004 and was active in initially funding and growth of the company.  From September 2000 through August 2001, he served as Information Technology Director of Web Ever, Inc.  From September 2001 through June 2002, he served as Sales Man fr[ager for Unix Surplus.  In May 2002, he commenced the business which was the predecessor of Intelligent Buying, Inc. as a partnership with David Gorodyansky.  This business became Intelligent Buying, Inc. in March 2004 and he has continued as Director, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and Secretary of Intelligent Buying through the present date.  He is currently in charge of technical operations and strategy planning.  He also currently serves as a Senior Vive President of AnchorFree Wireless, Inc., which operates Wi-Fi networks in San Francisco and Palo Alto, California.

 

11
 

 

Messrs. Gorodyansky and Malobrodsky currently each devote approximately five to ten hours per week to the business of Intelligent Buying, Inc.

 

Family Relationships

 

There are no family relationships among our directors or officers.

 

Audit Committee and Audit Committee Financial Expert

 

We do not currently have an audit committee financial expert, nor do we have an audit committee. Our entire board of directors, which currently consists of Messrs Malobrodsky and Gordyansky, handle the functions that would otherwise be handled by an audit committee. We do not currently have the capital resources to pay director fees to a qualified independent expert who would be willing to serve on our board and who would be willing to act as an audit committee financial expert. As our business expands and as we appoint others to our board of directors we expect that we will seek a qualified independent expert to become a member of our board of directors. Before retaining any such expert our board would make a determination as to whether such person is independent.

 

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance.

 

Section 16(a) of the Securities Act of 1934 requires the Company's officers and directors, and greater than 10% stockholders, to file reports of ownership and changes in ownership of its securities with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Copies of the reports are required by SEC regulation to be furnished to the Company. Based on management's review of these reports during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011, all reports required to be filed were filed on a timely basis.

 

Code of Ethics

 

Our board of directors has adopted a code of ethics that our officers, directors and any person who may perform similar functions is subject to. Currently, Messrs Malobrodsky and Gordyansky are our only officers and directors, therefore, they are the only persons subject to the Code of Ethics. If we retain additional officers in the future to act as our principal financial officer, principal accounting officer, controller or persons serving similar functions, they would become subject to the Code of Ethics. The Code of Ethics does not indicate the consequences of a breach of the code. If there is a breach, the board of directors would review the facts and circumstances surrounding the breach and take action that it deems appropriate, which action may include dismissal of the employee who breached the code. Currently, since Messrs Malobrodsky and Gordyansky serve as the only directors and officers, they are responsible for reviewing their own conduct under the Code of Ethics and determining what action to take in the event of his own breach of the Code of Ethics.

 

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION.

 

The following table sets forth information concerning all cash and non-cash compensation awarded to, earned by or paid to our officers for services during the last three fiscal years in all capacities to us, our subsidiaries and predecessors. No executive officer received compensation of $100,000 or more in any of the last three fiscal years.

 

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Summary Compensation Table

 

                        Non-     Non-              
                              Equity     qualified              
 Name and                     Stock      Option      Incentive Plan     Deferred     All Other        
Principal           Salary      Bonus      Awards     Awards      Compensation     Compensation      Compensation     Total   
Position    Year       ($)      ($)      ($)     ($)      Earnings ($)     Earnings ($)     ($)       ($)  
Eugene     2009     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0  
Malobrodsky     2010     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0  
CEO, Secretary And Director     2011     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0  
David                                                        
Gorodyansky     2009     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0  
President,     2010     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0  
COO, CFO and     2011     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0  
Director                                                        

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year End

 

None of our executive officers received any equity awards, including, options, restricted stock or other equity incentives, during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011.

 

Additional Narrative Disclosures

 

All of our employees, including our executive officers, are employed at will and none of our employees has entered into an employment agreement with us. We do not have any bonus, deferred compensation or retirement plan.

 

Director Compensation

 

We have no standard arrangements in place to compensate our directors for their service as directors or as members of any committee of directors. In the future, if we retain non-employee directors, we may decide to compensate them for their service to us as directors and members of committees.

 

ITEM 12.      SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

The following table sets forth information regarding beneficial ownership of our common stock as of March 13, 2012 (i) by each person who is known by us to beneficially own more than five percent of our common stock; (ii) by each of our officers and directors; and (iii) by all of our officers and directors as a group:

 

      Amount & Nature of     Percent  
  Name & Address of       Beneficial     of  
Title of Class     Beneficial Owner   Office, If Any   Ownership1     Class(2)  
Common Stock $0.001 par value   Altitude Group, LLC (1) 2264 82nd Street Brooklyn, NY 11214   5% holder     500,000       8.49 %
Common Stock $0.001 par value   Eugene Malobrodsky 450 National Ave Mountain View, CA 94043   CEO, Secretary And Director     2,500,000       42.45 %
Common Stock $0.001 par value   David Gorodyansky 450 National Ave Mountain View, CA 94043   President, COO, CFO and Director     2,500,000       42.45 %
Common Stock $0.001 par value     All officers and directors as a group (2 persons named above)       5,000,000       84.90 %

  

 

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(1)Altitude Group, LLC is controlled by Michael Kreizman, M.D.
(2)Based on 5,889,533 shares of our Common Stock outstanding as of March 13, 2012. 

 

Beneficial Ownership is determined in accordance with Rule 13d-3 of the Securities and Exchange Commission and generally includes voting or investment power with respect to securities. Each of the beneficial owners listed above has direct ownership of and sole voting power and investment power with respect to the shares of our common stock.  For each Beneficial Owner above, any options exercisable within 60 days have been included in the denominator.

  

Changes in Control

 

We do not currently have any arrangements which if consummated may result in a change of control of our Company.  

 

ITEM 13.    CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

Certain Relationships and Transactions with Related Persons

 

Eugene Malobrodsky and David Gorodyansky, the sole officers and directors of the Company, are Senior Vice President and President, respectively, of AnchorFree Wireless, Inc., a related company. For the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, AnchorFree Wireless, Inc. accounted for approximately 43% and 94% of the Company’s sales, respectively. Sophia Malobrodsky, a shareholder of the company holding approximately 4% of the Company’s issued and outstanding common stock is the mother of Eugene Malobrodsky, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer.  Royce Diener, an owner of 4,000 shares of common stock of the Company is the father of the Company’s counsel, Robert L. B. Diener.

 

As of December 31, 2011, the Company owes approximately $6,958 to AnchorFree Wireless, Inc., a company controlled by the principal shareholders and officers of the Company. These amounts represent short-term advances in the ordinary course of business and fluctuate significantly. This amount will be used to offset future purchases by AnchorFree Wireless, Inc.

 

CERTAIN TRANSACTIONS

 

1. On March 22, 2004, the Company issued 10,000 shares of common stock to each of the Company’s founders, Eugene Malobrodsky and David Gorodyansky for a cash consideration of $200.  At the time, the founders became the sole shareholders of the Company.

 

2. During fiscal year 2004, Sophia Malobrodsky made a non-interest-bearing loan advance to the Company, payable on demand, in the amount of $38,000.  On January 2, 2006. the Company agreed to exchange the outstanding balance of $38,000 for 253,333 shares of the Company’s common stock ($0.15 per share). While the Company was committed to issue these shares at January 2, 2006, these shares were not physically issued until March 22, 2006 because the Company needed to increase its authorized capital and engage a transfer agent in order to facilitate the physical issuance of the shares.

 

During fiscal year 2005, Ilya Perlov made a non-interest-bearing loan advance to the Company, payable on demand, in the amount of $3,000.  Mr. Perlov is an employee of the Company. On January 2, 2006. the Company agreed to exchange the outstanding balance of $3,000 for 20,000 shares of the Company’s common stock ($0.15 per share). While the Company was committed to issue these shares at January 2, 2006, these shares were not physically issued until March 22, 2006 because the Company needed to increase its authorized capital and engage a transfer agent in order to facilitate the physical issuance of the shares.

 

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On January 2, 2006, Ms. Malobrodsky and Mr. Perlov made demand for repayment of these obligations. At the time, the Company did not have the funds available for such repayment and the obligations were deemed to be in default. At that time, the Company had not completed its private placement and there was no guarantee that it would be completed on a timely basis, if at all. As a result, Ms. Malobrodsky agreed to exchange the outstanding balance of the outstanding loan advance ($38,000) owed by the Company to her for 253,333 shares of common stock and Mr. Perlov agreed to exchange the outstanding balance of the outstanding loan advance ($3,000) owed by the Company to him for 20,000 shares of common stock, both at an exchange rate of one share for each $0.15 of debt. The $0.15 per share conversion price was negotiated at that time on an arms-length basis between Ms. Malobrodsky, Mr. Perlov and the Company which took into account a number of factors, including but not limited to (a) the conversion of obligations which had priority over common equity to a common equity position which is pari-passu with all other equity holders; (b) the illiquidity of the Company at the time (as of December 31, 2005, the Company only had $2,197 cash); (c) the Company believed that the obligations to Ms. Malobrodsky and Mr. Perlov needed to be eliminated in order to complete any private placement of common equity and (d) the Company knew that the prospective investors in the private placement would not permit any of the proceeds of such offering to be utilized for payments to the noteholders. While the Company was committed to issue these shares at January 2, 2006, these shares were not physically issued until March 22, 2006 because the Company needed to increase its authorized capital and engage a transfer agent in order to facilitate the physical issuance of the shares. The shares issued to Ms. Malobrodsky and Mr. Perlov were valued at $.75 per share and the accounting treatment of the exchange was to debit Notes Payable and credit Common Stock par value and Additional Paid-In Capital.

 

3. On April 1, 2006, the company issued 500,000 shares of common stock to Altitude Group, LLC pursuant to the terms of a Financial Services Agreement entered into by the Company on said date. The term of the Agreement is for a period commencing March 22, 2006 and ending on March 21, 2008 and may only be extended upon the mutual written agreement of the Parties. In consideration for Altitude providing the services set forth in the Agreement, the Company was obligated to issue to Altitude 500,000 shares of the Company’s Common Stock of the Company. The Company has valued the services provided and to be provided by Altitude as $375,000 which was recorded as an expense in the Company’s quarter ended June 30, 2006. This valuation was determined in accordance with FASB 123—Accounting for Stock-based Compensation.

 

4. On March 22, 2006, the Company exchanged 1,250,000 shares of its preferred stock for the 10,000 shares of common stock held by each of the Company’s founders, Eugene Malobrodsky and David Gorodyansky. The 20,000 common shares exchanged by the founders were originally purchased for $200 cash. 

 

5. On September 16, 2010, all 2,500,00 shares of preferred stock were converted into 5,000,000 shares of common stock. Thereafter, no shares of preferred stock remained issued and outstanding

 

Director Independence

 

The Board of Directors is currently composed of 2 members, Mr. Malobrodsky and Mr. Gorodyansky. None of our directors are “independent” directors, as that term is defined under the Nasdaq listing standards.

 

ITEM 14.PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES.

 

AUDIT FEES

 

The aggregate fees billed by our auditors, Paritz & Co., for professional services rendered for the audit of our annual financial statements for fiscal year ended December 31, 2011 and review our interim financial statements for the first, second and third quarters of 2012 will be approximately $4,500. The aggregate fees billed by our auditors for professional services rendered for the audit of our annual financial statements for fiscal year ended December 31, 2010 were approximately $4,500.

 

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AUDIT-RELATED FEES

 

During the last two fiscal years, no fees were billed or incurred for assurance or related services by our auditors that were reasonably related to the audit or review of financial statements reported above.

 

TAX FEES

 

There were no tax preparation fees billed for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2011 or 2010.

 

ALL OTHER FEES

 

During the last two fiscal years, no other fees were billed or incurred for services by our auditors other than the fees noted above. Our board, acting as an audit committee, deemed the fees charged to be compatible with maintenance of the independence of our auditors.

 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRE-APPROVAL POLICIES

 

We do not have a separate audit committee. Our full board of directors performs the functions of an audit committee. Before an independent auditor is engaged by us to render audit or non-audit services, our board of directors pre-approves the engagement. Board of directors pre-approval of audit and non-audit services will not be required if the engagement for the services is entered into pursuant to pre-approval policies and procedures established by our board of directors regarding our engagement of the independent auditor, provided the policies and procedures are detailed as to the particular service, our board of directors is informed of each service provided, and such policies and procedures do not include delegation of our board of directors' responsibilities under the Exchange Act to our management. Our board of directors may delegate to one or more designated members of our board of directors the authority to grant pre-approvals, provided such approvals are presented to the board of directors at a subsequent meeting. If our board of directors elects to establish pre-approval policies and procedures regarding non-audit services, the board of directors must be informed of each non-audit service provided by the independent auditor. Board of directors pre-approval of non-audit services, other than review and attest services, also will not be required if such services fall within available exceptions established by the SEC. For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011, 100% of audit-related services, tax services and other services performed by our independent auditors were pre-approved by our board of directors.

 

Our board has considered whether the services described above under the caption "All Other Fees", which are currently none, is compatible with maintaining the auditor's independence.

 

The board approved all fees described above.

 

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PART IV

 

Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

 

The following documents are filed as part of this 10-K:

 

1.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

The following documents are filed in Part II, Item 8 of this annual report on Form 10-K:

 

·Report of Paritz & Co., Independent Registered Certified Public Accounting Firm

 

·Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2011 and 2010

 

·Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010

 

·Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity for the period from December 31, 2009 to December 31, 2011

 

·Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010

 

·Notes to Financial Statements

 

2.  FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

All financial statement schedules have been omitted as they are not required, not applicable, or the required information is otherwise included.

 

3.  EXHIBITS

 

The exhibits listed below are filed as part of or incorporated by reference in this report.

 

Exhibit No.   Identification of Exhibit
     
31.1.   Certification of the Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
     
31.2.   Certification of the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
     
32.1   Certification of the Chief Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
     
32.2   Certification of the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

    Intelligent Buying, Inc.
    (Registrant)
     
  By  
    /s/ Eugene Malobrodsky
     
    Eugene Malobrodsky
    Chief Executive Officer
     
  Date  
    March 28, 2012
     
  By  
    /s/ Eugene Malobrodsky
     
    David Gorodyansky
    Chief Financial Officer and Principal Accounting Officer
     
  Date  
    March 28, 2012

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following person on behalf of the registrant and in the capacity and on the date indicated.

 

  By  
    /s/ Eugene Malobrodsky
     
    Eugene Malobrodsky
    Chief Executive Officer and Director
     
  Date  
    March 28, 2012
  By  
    /s/ David Gorodyansky
     
    David Gorodyansky
    Chief Financial Officer, Principal Accounting Officer and Director
     
  Date  
    March 28, 2012

 

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