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EX-32.2 - EXHIBIT 32.2 - Sutor Technology Group LTDv237167_ex32-2.htm

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

(Mark One)

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended: June 30, 2011

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from ____________ to _____________

Commission File No. 001-33959

SUTOR TECHNOLOGY GROUP LIMITED
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Nevada
87-0578370
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or
organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

No 8, Huaye Road
Dongbang Industrial Park
Changshu, 215534
People’s Republic of China
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(86) 512-52680988
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $0.001 per share
 
NASDAQ Capital Market

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act: None
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.   Yes ¨ No x
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.   Yes ¨ No x
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.                                              
Yes x No ¨
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).               
Yes ¨ No ¨
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.
¨
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large Accelerated Filer  o
Accelerated Filer   ¨
Non-Accelerated Filer  o (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company  x
 
Indicate by check mark whether registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).                       Yes o No x
 
As of December 31, 2010 (the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter), the aggregate market value of the shares of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates (based upon the closing sale price of such shares as reported on the NASDAQ Capital Market) was approximately $22 million. Shares of the registrant’s common stock held by each executive officer and director and by each person who owns 10% or more of the outstanding common stock have been excluded from the calculation in that such persons may be deemed to be affiliates of the registrant. This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily a conclusive determination for other purposes.
 
There were a total of 40,745,602 shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding as of October 10, 2011.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

None.

 
 

 

 
SUTOR TECHNOLOGY GROUP LIMITED

Annual Report on FORM 10-K
For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2011

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I
         
Item 1.
 
Business.
 
2
Item 1A.
 
Risk Factors.
 
11
Item 1B.
 
Unresolved Staff Comments.
 
22
Item 2.
 
Properties.
 
22
Item 3.
 
Legal Proceedings.
 
23
Item 4.
 
(Removed and Reserved).
 
23
         
PART II
         
Item 5.
 
Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
 
23
Item 6.
 
Selected Financial Data.
 
24
Item 7.
 
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
 
24
Item 7A.
 
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.
 
33
Item 8.
 
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.
 
33
Item 9.
 
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.
 
33
Item 9A.
 
Controls and Procedures.
 
33
Item 9B.
 
Other Information.
 
34
         
PART III
         
Item 10.
 
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.
 
34
Item 11.
 
Executive Compensation.
 
39
Item 12.
 
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.
 
41
Item 13.
 
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.
 
43
Item 14.
 
Principal Accounting Fees and Services.
 
45
 
PART IV
         
Item 15.
  
Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules.
  
45

 
 

 

Special Note Regarding Forward Looking Statements

In addition to historical information, this report contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. We use words such as “believe,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “project,” “target,” “plan,” “optimistic,” “intend,” “aim,” “will” or similar expressions which are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Such statements include, among others, those concerning market and industry segment growth and demand and acceptance of new and existing products; any projections of sales, earnings, revenue, margins or other financial items; any statements of the plans, strategies and objectives of management for future operations; and any statements regarding future economic conditions or performance, as well as all assumptions, expectations, predictions, intentions or beliefs about future events. You are cautioned that any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks and uncertainties, as well as assumptions, which, if they were to ever materialize or prove incorrect, could cause the results of the Company to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Potential risks and uncertainties include, among other things, factors such as:
 
 
·
Downturns in the steel industry;
 
·
Competition and competitive factors in the markets in which we compete;
 
·
Our heavy reliance on Shanghai Huaye;
 
·
Market perception of U.S. listed Chinese companies;
 
·
Fluctuations in our raw material costs;
 
·
General economic and business conditions in China and in the local economies in which we regularly conduct business, which can affect demand for our products and services; and
 
·
Changes in laws, rules and regulations governing the business community in China in general and the steel industry in particular.
 
Additional disclosures regarding factors that could cause our results and performance to differ from results or anticipated performance are discussed in Item 1A, “Risk Factors” included herein. All statements other than statements of historical fact are statements that could be deemed forward-looking statements. We assume no obligation and do not intend to update these forward-looking statements, except as required by law.

Use of Terms

Except as otherwise indicated by the context, references in this report to:
 
 
·
“Company,” “we,” “us” and “our” are to the combined business of Sutor Technology Group Limited, a Nevada corporation, and its subsidiaries: Changshu Huaye, Jiangsu Cold-Rolled, Ningbo Zhehua, Sutor BVI, and Sutor Technology PRC;
 
·
“Changshu Huaye” are to our wholly-owned subsidiary Changshu Huaye Steel Strip Co., Ltd., a PRC company;
 
·
“Jiangsu Cold-Rolled” are to our wholly-owned subsidiary Jiangsu Cold-Rolled Technology Co., Ltd., a PRC company;
 
·
“Ningbo Zhehua” are to our wholly-owned subsidiary Ningbo Zhehua Heavy Steel Pipe Manufacturing Co., Ltd., a PRC company;
 
·
“Shanghai Huaye” are to Shanghai Huaye Iron & Steel Group Co., Ltd., a PRC company of which Lifang Chen, our major shareholder and chief executive officer, and her husband Feng Gao, are 100% owners, and its subsidiaries;
 
·
“Sutor BVI” are to our wholly-owned subsidiary Sutor Steel Technology Co., Ltd., a BVI company;
 
·
“Sutor Technology PRC” are to our wholly-owned subsidiary Sutor Technology Co., Ltd., a PRC company;
 
·
“SEC” are to the United States Securities and Exchange Commission;
 
·
“Securities Act” are to the Securities Act of 1933, as amended;
 
·
“Exchange Act” are to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.
 
·
“China” and “PRC” are to People’s Republic of China;
 
·
“RMB” are to Renminbi, the legal currency of China; and
 
·
“U.S. dollar,” “$” and “US$” are to the legal currency of the United States.
 
 
1

 

PART I
 
ITEM 1.
BUSINESS.

Overview

We are one of the leading Chinese non-state-owned manufacturers of fine finished steel products. We utilize a variety of processes and technological methodologies to convert steel manufactured by third parties into fine finished steel products. Our product offerings are focused on higher margin, value-added finished steel products, specifically, hot-dip galvanized steel, or HDG steel, and prepainted galvanized steel, or PPGI. In addition, we produce acid pickled steel, or AP steel, and cold-rolled steel, which represent the least processed of our finished products.  Since November 2009, our product offerings have included welded steel pipe products. We use a large portion of our AP steel and cold-rolled steel to produce our HDG steel and PPGI products. Our vertical integration has allowed us to maintain more stable margins for our HDG steel and PPGI products.

We sell most of our products to customers who operate primarily in the solar energy, appliances, automobile, construction, infrastructure, medical equipment and water resource industries. Most of our customers are located in China. Our primary export markets are Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and South America.

Our manufacturing facilities, located in Changshu, China, have three HDG steel production lines, one PPGI production line, one AP steel production line and one cold-rolled steel line. Our current annual production capacity is approximately 700,000 metric tons, or MT, for HDG steel, 200,000 MT for PPGI, 500,000 MT for AP steel and 250,000 MT for cold-rolled steel. Ningbo Zhehua, our subsidiary located in Ningbo, currently has an annual capacity of 400,000 MT for welded steel pipe products.

History and Corporate Structure

We were incorporated on May 1, 1997 in the State of Nevada under the name Bronze Marketing, Inc. and changed our name to Sutor Technology Group Limited effective March 6, 2007 as a result of our reverse acquisition of Sutor BVI in February 2007. From inception until December 31, 2002, we engaged in the business of providing inventory financing to facilitate the marketing and sale of bronze sculptures and other artwork. The business was not successful and we discontinued our active business operations as of December 31, 2002. From December 31, 2002 until the reverse acquisition of Sutor BVI on February 1, 2007, we engaged in no active business operations.

On February 1, 2007, we acquired Sutor BVI through a share exchange transaction pursuant to which the shareholders of Sutor BVI transferred all capital stock of Sutor BVI to us in exchange for 85.2% ownership of our Company. Our acquisition of Sutor BVI was accounted for as a recapitalization effected by a share exchange, wherein Sutor BVI is considered the acquirer for accounting and financial reporting purposes. The assets and liabilities of the acquired entity have been brought forward at their book value and no goodwill has been recognized.

In November 2009, our subsidiary Changshu Huaye acquired 100% equity interest in Ningbo Zhehua for the total purchase price of RMB 45.2 million (approximately $6.6 million).

On February 24, 2010, we established Sutor Technology PRC as a wholly-owned subsidiary incorporated in China. We plan to consolidate all R&D activities into this subsidiary in the future.

 
2

 

The following chart reflects our organizational structure as of the date of this annual report:


Segment Information

Our three operating segments are categorized according to our three operating subsidiaries:
 
 
·
Changshu Huaye, which manufactures and sells HDG steel and PPGI products;
 
·
Jiangsu Cold-Rolled, which manufactures and sells HDG steel, AP steel and cold-rolled steel; and
 
·
Ningbo Zhehua, which manufactures and sells welded steel pipe products.
 
Changshu Huaye and Jiangsu Cold-Rolled are located adjacent to each other in Changshu, China and use largely the same management resources. Ningbo Zhehua is located in Ningbo, China. For additional information about each segment, see Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Result of Operations” and Note 13, “Segment Information” to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this annual report.

Our Products

Our current products include HDG steel, PPGI, AP steel, cold-rolled steel and welded steel pipe products. Our HDG steel and PPGI products are primarily manufactured by Changshu Huaye and our AP steel and cold-rolled steel products are primarily manufactured by Jiangsu Cold-Rolled. Jiangsu Cold-Rolled added two new HDG steel production lines and has manufactured HDG of both cold-rolled steel and hot-rolled steel since September 2008. Ningbo Zhehua manufactures our welded steel pipe products.

In 2008, we were certified ISO 9001:2008 for our quality management system, ISO 14001:2004 for our environmental management system, and GB/T28001-2001 for our occupational health and safety management system.

The following table set forth sales information about our product mix in last two fiscal years.

 
3

 

(All amounts, other than percentages, in millions of U.S. dollars)

   
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2011
   
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2010
 
Product
 
Revenue
   
% of Total
Revenue
   
Revenue
   
% of Total
Revenue
 
HDG Steel
  $ 251.9       58.4 %   $ 228.7       47.8 %
PPGI
    61.8       14.3 %     78.6       16.4 %
AP Steel
    34.3       8.0 %     40.3       8.4 %
Cold-Rolled Steel
    40.3       9.3 %     57.8       12.1 %
Welded Steel Pipe Products
    31.6       7.3 %     62.4       13.0 %
Other
    11.8       2.7 %     10.9       2.3 %
Total
  $ 431.7       100.0 %   $ 478.7       100.0 %

HDG Steel

Using a technology called hot-dip galvanizing, we manufacture corrosion-resistant and zinc-coated HDG steel in different dimensions and using different materials and specifications requested by our customers. HDG steel products are manufactured from steel substrate of cold-rolled or hot-rolled pickled coils by applying zinc to the surface of the material to enhance its corrosion protection. HDG steel products are principally used in the electrical household appliance and construction markets.

We produce not only common industrial specifications, but also extreme specifications that we believe only a few other large PRC state-owned steel manufacturers can produce. The following table compares our technical manufacturing capabilities for most of our products:

   
Width (mm)
   
Thickness (mm)
   
Galvanized Layer Weight (g/m2 )
 
Our Specification Scope
    700-1250       0.18-4.5       70-280  
Common Industrial Specification Scope
    700-1250       0.3-1.2       100-180  

We also are technologically capable of manufacturing more extreme specifications of up to 1300mm wide and 0.16mm thick HDG of cold-rolled steel. As a result, we maintain a competitive advantage in extreme specification technology in terms of thickness and the weight of the galvanized layer of our products. We have the flexibility to adjust production specifications to meet changes in market demand.

Sales of HDG steel products amounted to approximately 342,640 MT in fiscal year 2011, representing approximately 58.4% of our total revenue.  Currently, our HDG steel products are manufactured by Changshu Huaye and Jiangsu Cold-Rolled. Changshu Huaye produces only HDG of cold-rolled steel. Jiangsu Cold-Rolled added two new HDG steel production lines which are capable of galvanizing both hot-rolled and cold-rolled steel with both zinc and aluminum. These two new production lines became operational at the end of September 2008. The addition of the new production lines significantly expanded our production capacity of HDG steel, which increased production capacity from 300,000 MT per year to 700,000 MT per year.

With the new production lines, we offer HDG of hot-rolled steel, which we believe is more cost-efficient than production of HDG of cold-rolled steel because production of HDG steel products occurs directly on hot-rolled steel and, therefore, avoids the procedure of cold rolling hot-rolled steel. HDG of hot-rolled steel is generally thicker than HDG of cold-rolled steel with a specification range of 1.5mm to 4.5mm in terms of thickness.

PPGI Products

PPGI products are typically made to order based on customer specifications. Our PPGI products’ specification generally ranges from 700mm to 1250mm in width and from 0.2mm to 1.2mm in thickness. Our PPGI products are used mostly in solar energy, appliances and construction materials. We produce our PPGI by color-coating on HDG of cold-rolled steel and then coating them in various colors, including ivory white, ocean blue, pink and any other color according to customer requirements. Our PPGI production line is equipped with the latest twice baking and coating technology, which together with indirect heating, enhances the color coated layers adhesion to the galvanized zinc layer.

 
4

 

Sales of PPGI products amounted to approximately 61,620 MT in fiscal year 2011, representing approximately 14.3% of our total revenue. Through our vertical integration strategy, we currently self-supply approximately 27.0% of HDG of cold-rolled steel to our PPGI production.

AP Steel

Our AP steel production line became operative in September 2006. Acid pickling is a process that removes scales and oxides from the steel surface by pickling, cold rolling and annealing. AP steel products are used mostly as a raw material for cold-rolled steel strip, HDG steel, as well as components of automobile and manufacturing equipment. AP steel products come in several different dimensions and using different materials and different specifications.

Most of our AP steel products are used for our own production of HDG steel and full-hard cold-rolled steel. We also sell a small portion of our AP steel products to the market. In fiscal year 2011, our sales of AP steel products were approximately 112,396 MT, representing approximately 8.0% of our total revenue.

Full-Hard, Cold-rolled Steel Products

We commenced manufacturing of full-hard cold-rolled steel products in January 2007. Full-hard cold-rolled steel strips are treated in an annealing process and are used to produce HDG of cold-rolled steel. We produce full-hard cold-rolled steel strips through a reverse cold rolling mill.

We use most of the full-hard cold-rolled steel strips for our production of HDG of cold-rolled steel. The remaining undergoes the annealing process and is sold to the market. Our sales of full-hard cold-rolled steel products amounted to approximately 62,685 MT in fiscal year 2011, representing approximately 9.3% of our total revenue. In addition, approximately 78.0% of cold-rolled steel products were used for our own production.

Welded Steel Pipe Products

Our subsidiary Ningbo Zhehua has one advanced JCOE production line with characteristics of high forming accuracy and efficiency as well as balanced distribution of forming stress, for large-diameter, double-side, submerged-arc welded steel pipes, three US Lincoln production lines for spiral seam, double-side, submerged-arc welded steel pipes, and two REF production lines for roll-bending, double-side, submerged-arc welded steel pipes.  Ningbo Zhehua is specialized in manufacturing large-diameter, double-side, submerged-arc welded steel pipes and spiral seam steel pipes. The finished products are extensively used for oil and gas transmission, municipal water supply projects, sewage treatment projects, and piling.  Sales of welded steel pipe products amounted to approximately 40,541 MT in fiscal year 2011, representing approximately 7.3% of our total sales revenue.

Manufacturing

Our manufacturing facilities are located in Changshu and Ningbo, China. Our facilities in Changzhou currently have three HDG steel production lines, one PPGI production line, one AP steel production line and one cold-rolled steel line. Our facilities in Ningbo have six welded steel pipe production lines. Our current annual production capacity is approximately 700,000 MT for HDG steel, 200,000 MT for PPGI, 500,000 MT for AP steels, 250,000 MT for cold-rolled steel and 400,000 MT for welded steel pipe products.

We utilize modern automated production technology which is strictly maintained. There are generally only 15 workers on a continuous cold-rolled galvanizing line and 11 workers on the PPGI production line per shift. The chart below demonstrates our production process.

 
5

 


Raw Materials and Suppliers

The principal raw materials used in producing our products are steel coil, zinc, oil paint and acid. We source our raw materials from various suppliers, including our affiliate Shanghai Huaye which supplied approximately 60.0% of our raw materials in fiscal year 2011. We believe that our suppliers are sufficient to meet our present needs.

Steel coil accounted for approximately 90.0% of total production costs in fiscal year 2011. We generally purchase steel coil after receiving orders from customers and are generally able to pass on increased costs to customers. We purchase steel strips from Chinese companies, both state-owned enterprises and private companies. State-owned enterprises can ensure a consistent large supply, but do not react quickly to the fluctuations in prevailing market prices. Private companies normally react quickly to price changes, but are not as reliable as state-owned enterprises in terms of consistent supply. By sourcing raw materials from a combination of state-owned enterprises and private companies, we enjoy both a reliable source of raw materials and competitive prices.

Zinc is an important raw material for HDG of cold-rolled steel and accounted for approximately 2.0% of our total production costs of HDG steel in fiscal year 2011. We have established long-term relationships with several Chinese suppliers. We compare the prevailing domestic prices and choose the lower price and can generally pass price fluctuations onto customers. Zinc prices are closely guided by the London Metal Exchange quotation and are the most volatile among those of all of our raw materials.

Our global sourcing network is designed to ensure the highest quality-to-price ratio of the raw materials we purchase. Our internal specialists collect Chinese domestic and global market information every day and track domestic and global market price fluctuations closely, which allows us to react rapidly to any price changes.

Customers

We sell most of our steel products to customers who operate in the solar energy, appliances, automobile, construction, infrastructure, medical equipment and water resource industries.

 
6

 

Approximately 38.4% of our revenue was derived from Shanghai Huaye and its affiliates in fiscal year 2011. We currently do not have a long-term written contract with Shanghai Huaye and negotiate the terms of each transaction based on then current market condition. We believe such arrangement will afford us more flexibility and allow us to obtain more favorable prices based on the changing market. We believe we have a good relationship with Shanghai Huaye and expect Shanghai Huaye to remain as our major customer in the foreseeable future.  We plan to further expand our sales channel and increase our direct sales to end customers in the future. Other than Shanghai Huaye, none of our customers accounted for more than 10% of our total revenue in fiscal year 2011.

Sales and Marketing

China is our most important market. Domestic sales represented approximately 85.6% of our total revenue in fiscal year 2011. Within China, the biggest market for our products is eastern China, which includes Shanghai, Zhejiang and Jiangsu provinces. Since September 2004, we have exported our products to Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and South America. Our foreign sales accounted for approximately 11.2% and 14.4% of our total revenue in fiscal years 2010 and 2011, respectively.

Our sales network covers most provinces and regions in China. We are developing a diversified sales network which allows us to effectively market products and services to our customers. We sold approximately 61.6% of our products through our own sales and marketing department in fiscal year 2011. Our sales and marketing department consists of approximately 66 employees as of the date of this annual report.

Competition

Competition within the steel industry, both in China and worldwide, is intense. We compete with both large state-owned enterprises and smaller private companies. In addition, we also face competition from international steel manufacturers.

Even though the demand for fine finished steel products has increased in recent years, due to the over expansion of the total production capacity of HDG steel and PPGI products, supply for low-end HDG steel and PPGI products has outpaced demand. Due to the high requirements for production technology and equipment, we believe that demand for high-end HDG steel and PPGI market remains strong. Currently, only we and a few large state-owned enterprises are capable of producing high-end HDG steel and PPGI products in China.

Private steel product manufacturers in China generally focus on low-end products. Many of our competitors are much smaller than us and use older equipment and production techniques. In contrast, our products are aimed at the high-end markets so we attempt to manufacture them with superior quality and broader range of specifications. We use advanced manufacturing equipment that we have purchased from developed countries, such as France and Italy, and employ engineers and researchers who are experienced with different production techniques. This allows us to provide a broad array of products in terms of thickness, zinc layer weight and width of steel coil, which helps us target high-end customers whose manufacturing specifications are extreme. In addition, through cooperation with our strategic partners, we have also established a vertically integrated business model that provides processing, distribution and customized logistic solutions. We believe this business model is difficult to duplicate and very few private companies have this capability.

There are several state-owned steel manufacturers that produce comparable products to our products. As compared with those competitors, we believe we differentiate ourselves by the following:
 
 
·
We satisfy customers’ orders with shorter lead times and guarantee lead times for urgent orders, even very small orders, in as short as one or two days;
 
 
·
We have flexibility in sales arrangements and can take orders in a variety of sizes;
 
 
·
We operate more efficiently than our state-owned competitors and have lower total labor costs, therefore, lower product prices; and
 
 
·
We provide more customer-oriented services.
 
 
7

 

We also compete with international steel product manufacturers in the global market, such as Mitel Corporation and Posco Steel. As compared to our competitors in Europe, Korea and the United States, we believe we have lower production costs and can offer more competitive pricing. In addition, competitors in developing countries lag behind due to low product quality and limited product specification ranges. We began exporting our products in September 2004 and our products are now sold to Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and South America. Our export sales accounted for approximately 14.4% of our total sales for fiscal year 2011.

Our operating subsidiaries, Changshu Huaye and Jiangsu Cold-Rolled, are both located in Changshu, which provides us a transportation cost advantage. Changshu is situated in the eastern coastal part of China, the largest market for coated steel products in China. In addition, our affiliate Shanghai Huaye has a logistic center in Changshu port, which provides us with convenient and low cost transportation for both raw materials and finished products. Further, our subsidiary Ningbo Zhehua is located in Ningbo which is one of the largest and most important sea port cities in China with easy access to both domestic and international markets.

Research and Development

We believe that the development of new products and production methods is important to our success. We established our high-performance steel sheet research center in 2007 which was recognized as the “Jiangsu Province Foreign Invested Research Center” by the Jiangsu Science and Technology Bureau. As of June 30, 2011, we had approximately 100 research and development personnel and staff.

We recently set up Sutor Technology PRC, a wholly-owned subsidiary incorporated in China, and plan to consolidate all R&D activities into this subsidiary in the future. We plan to build a facility in the new subsidiary to be used solely for research and development of new products and technologies. We expect the new subsidiary will help attract talent and enhance our leading position in the fine processed steel industry in China. The new subsidiary is anticipated to enjoy preferential tax treatment when in full operation.

Intellectual Property

Our success depends, in part, on our ability to maintain and protect our proprietary technology and to conduct our business without infringing on the proprietary rights of others. We rely primarily on a combination of patents, trademarks and trade secrets, as well as employee and third-party confidentiality agreements, to safeguard our intellectual property. As of June 30, 2011, we held 36 patents and had 32 patent applications pending.

All of our products are sold with the trademark of “,” which is known by Chinese and international clients. In August 2005, Shanghai Huaye agreed to transfer the trademark of “” to us without consideration. Such transfer was approved by the Trademark office of the State Administration for Industry and Commerce of China in August 2006. As a result, we have all the legal rights for the trademark, the term of which expires in July 2015.

All our key employees, especially engineers, have signed confidentiality and non-competition agreements with us. In addition, all our employees are obligated to protect our confidential information. Where appropriate for our business strategy, we will continue to take steps to protect our intellectual property rights.

Employees

As of June 30, 2011, we had approximately 660 full-time employees. Approximately 280 are employees of Changshu Huaye, approximately 170 are employees of Jiangsu Cold-Rolled and approximately 210 are employees of Ningbo Zhehua.

The following table sets forth the number of our full-time employees by function.

Function
 
Number of Employees
 
Manufacturing
  430  
General and administration
  64  
Marketing and sales
  66  
Research and development
  100  

 
8

 

We believe that we maintain a good working relationship with our employees and we have not experienced any significant labor disputes or any difficulty in recruiting staff for our operations. Our employees are not covered by a collective bargaining agreement. We have not experienced any work stoppages.

We are required under PRC law to make contributions to the employee benefit plans at specified percentages of the after-tax profit. In addition, we are required by the PRC law to cover employees in China with various type of social insurance. We believe that we are in material compliance with the relevant PRC laws.

Regulation

General Regulation of Business

As a producer of steel products in China, we are regulated by the national and local laws of the PRC.

We are subject to various governmental regulations related to environmental protection. The major environmental regulations applicable to us include: the Environmental Protection Law of the PRC, the Law of PRC on the Prevention and Control of Water Pollution, Implementation Rules of the Law of PRC on the Prevention and Control of Water Pollution, the Law of PRC on the Prevention and Control of Air Pollution, Implementation Rules of the Law of PRC on the Prevention and Control of Air Pollution, the Law of PRC on the Prevention and Control of Solid Waste Pollution, and the Law of PRC on the Prevention and Control of Noise Pollution.

We believe that we are in material compliance with all registrations and requirements for the issuance and maintenance of all licenses required by the governing bodies, and that all license fees and filings are current.

Taxation

On March 16, 2007, the National People’s Congress of China passed the Enterprise Income Tax Law, or the EIT Law, and on November 28, 2007, the State Council of China passed its implementing rules, both of which took effect on January 1, 2008. The EIT Law and its implementing rules impose a unified earned income tax, or EIT, rate of 25.0% on all domestic-invested enterprises and foreign invested enterprises, or FIEs, unless they qualify under certain limited exceptions.  Changshu Huaye is subject to an EIT of 15% from calendar years 2010 to 2012 because it qualifies as a high-tech enterprise for the calendar years 2010, 2011, 2012. Jiangsu Cold-Rolled’s tax holiday will expire at the end of 2011, and therefore, it is subject to an EIT rate of 12.5% in calendar year 2011 and will be subject to an EIT rate of 25% starting in calendar year 2012. Ningbo Zhehua and Sutor Technology PRC are subject to an EIT of 25% and have no preferential tax treatments.

In addition to the changes to the current tax structure, under the EIT Law, an enterprise established outside of China with “de facto management bodies” within China is considered a resident enterprise and will normally be subject to an EIT of 25% on its global income. The implementing rules define the term “de facto management bodies” as “an establishment that exercises, in substance, overall management and control over the production, business, personnel, accounting, etc., of a Chinese enterprise.” If the PRC tax authorities subsequently determine that we should be classified as a resident enterprise, then our organization’s global income will be subject to PRC income tax of 25%.  For detailed discussion of PRC tax issues related to resident enterprise status, see Item 1A, “Risk Factors – Risks Related to Doing Business in China – Under the New Enterprise Income Tax Law, we may be classified as a “resident enterprise” of China. Such classification will likely result in unfavorable tax consequences to us and our non-PRC stockholders.”

Foreign Currency Exchange

All of our sales revenue and expenses are denominated in RMB. Under the PRC foreign currency exchange regulations applicable to us, RMB is convertible for current account items, including the distribution of dividends, interest payments, trade and service-related foreign exchange transactions. Currently, our PRC operating subsidiaries may purchase foreign currencies for settlement of current account transactions, including payments of dividends to us, without the approval of the PRC State Administration of Foreign Exchange, or SAFE, by complying with certain procedural requirements.  Conversion of RMB for capital account items, such as direct investment, loan, security investment and repatriation of investment, however, is still subject to the approval of SAFE. In particular, if our PRC operating subsidiaries borrow foreign currency through loans from us or other foreign lenders, these loans must be registered with SAFE, and if we finance the subsidiaries by means of additional capital contributions, these capital contributions must be approved by certain government authorities, including the PRC Ministry of Commerce, or MOFCOM, or their respective local branches.  These limitations could affect our PRC operating subsidiaries’ ability to obtain foreign exchange through debt or equity financing.

 
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Dividend Distributions

Our revenues are earned by our PRC subsidiaries.  However, PRC regulations restrict the ability of our PRC subsidiaries to make dividends and other payments to their offshore parent company.  PRC legal restrictions permit payments of dividend by our PRC subsidiaries only out of their accumulated after-tax profits, if any, determined in accordance with PRC accounting standards and regulations.  Each of our PRC subsidiaries is also required under PRC laws and regulations to allocate at least 10% of our annual after-tax profits determined in accordance with PRC GAAP to a statutory general reserve fund until the amounts in such fund reaches 50% of its registered capital.  These reserves are not distributable as cash dividends. Our PRC subsidiaries have the discretion to allocate a portion of their after-tax profits to staff welfare and bonus funds, which may not be distributed to equity owners except in the event of liquidation.

In addition, under the EIT Law, the Notice of the State Administration of Taxation on Negotiated Reduction of Dividends and Interest Rates, which was issued on January 29, 2008, and the Notice of the State Administration of Taxation Regarding Interpretation and Recognition of Beneficial Owners under Tax Treaties, which became effective on October 27, 2009, dividends from our PRC operating subsidiaries paid to us through our subsidiaries may be subject to a withholding tax at a rate of 10%. Furthermore, the ultimate tax rate will be determined by treaty between the PRC and the tax residence of the holder of the PRC subsidiary.  Dividends declared and paid from before January 1, 2008 on distributable profits are grandfathered under the EIT Law and are not subject to withholding tax.

The Company intends on reinvesting profits, if any, and does not intend on making cash distributions of dividends in the near future.

Environmental Matters

Our manufacturing facilities are subject to various pollution control regulations with respect to noise, water and air pollution and the disposal of waste and hazardous materials. We are also subject to periodic inspections by local environmental protection authorities. Our operating subsidiaries have received certifications from the relevant PRC government agencies in charge of environmental protection indicating that their business operations are in material compliance with the relevant PRC environmental laws and regulations. We are not currently subject to any pending actions alleging any violations of applicable PRC environmental laws.

Seasonality

Our operating results and operating cash flows historically have not been subject to any significant seasonal variations. This pattern may change, however, as a result of new market opportunities or new product introductions.

Available Information

Our Internet website is at www.sutorcn.com. Our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, including exhibits, and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Sections 13(a) and 15(d) of the Exchange Act, are available free of charge on our website as soon as reasonably practicable after such reports are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. Copies of these reports may also be obtained free of charge by sending written requests to our Secretary, Sutor Technology Group Limited, No 8 Huaye Road, Dongbang Industrial Park, Changshu, China, 215534. The information posted on our website is not part of this or any other report we file with or furnish with the SEC. Investors can also read and copy any materials filed by us with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room which is located at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549. Information about the operation of the Public Reference Room can be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. Our filings can also be accessed at the SEC’s website: www.sec.gov.

 
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ITEM 1A.
RISK FACTORS.

RISKS RELATED TO OUR BUSINESS

We maintain a close business relationship with Shanghai Huaye and any disruption of this relationship or the financial stability of Shanghai Huaye could damage our business.

Our company and Shanghai Huaye, which is 100% owned by our majority shareholder, Chairperson and CEO, Lifang Chen and her husband Feng Gao, have a close business relationship.  Approximately 38.4% of our revenue was derived from Shanghai Huaye and its affiliates in fiscal year 2011, which distribute our products. In addition, a large portion of our raw materials were supplied by Shanghai Huaye in fiscal year 2011.  We believe that the larger size of Shanghai Huaye gives it greater bargaining power than us and our arrangement with Shanghai Huaye allows us to leverage its bargaining power and purchase raw materials at relatively lower purchase prices from suppliers. We do not have long-term written contracts with Shanghai Huaye.  In the past, Shanghai Huaye also has provided credit support on our behalf and guaranties for our benefit in connection with loans to us from third party lenders.

If our business relationship with Shanghai Huaye changes negatively or Shanghai Huaye’s financial condition deteriorates, this would harm our business in many ways.   We would be forced to rely on other third parties for raw materials and product distribution if Shanghai Huaye ceases to be a supplier of our raw materials and/or a distributor of our products at current levels.  We may not be able to negotiate terms with these third parties that are as favorable as our arrangements with Shanghai Huaye.  If this happens, our revenues could decrease, our production costs could increase and our profit margin could be strained.  In addition, a material adverse change in the financial condition and creditworthiness of Shanghai Huaye could impair our existing credit facilities and ability to obtain loans in the future.

Any decrease in the availability, or increase in the cost, of raw materials could materially affect our earnings.

Our operations depend heavily on the availability of various raw materials and energy resources, including steel coil, zinc, oil paint, electricity and natural gas. Steel coil has historically made up approximately 90.0% of our total cost of sales. The availability of raw materials and energy resources may decrease and their prices may fluctuate greatly. We purchase a large portion of our raw materials from our affiliate Shanghai Huaye and we have long-term relationships with several other suppliers. However, if Shanghai Huaye or any other important suppliers are unable or unwilling to provide us with raw materials on terms favorable to us, we may be unable to produce certain products. This could result in a decrease in profit and damage to our reputation in our industry. In the event our raw material and energy costs increase, we may not be able to pass these higher costs on to our customers in full or at all. Any increase in the prices for raw materials or energy resources could materially increase our costs and therefore lower our earnings.

Our industry is highly fragmented and competitive, and increased competition could reduce our operating income.

The steel manufacturing and processing business is highly fragmented and competitive. We compete with a number of other steel manufacturers and processors in China, on a region-by-region basis, and with foreign steel manufacturers on a worldwide basis. Our goal is to market our products to customers who demand the highest quality products and precision in the end product so we compete primarily on the precision and range of achievable tolerances, the quality of our products and the raw materials used in our products. We compete with companies of various sizes, some of which have more established brand names and relationships in certain markets we serve than we do. Increased competition could force us to lower our prices or offer services at a higher cost to us, which could reduce our margins and operating income.

A downturn or negative changes in the highly volatile steel industry will harm our business and profitability.

The steel industry as a whole is cyclical and pricing can be volatile as a result of general economic conditions, energy costs, labor costs, competition, import duties, tariffs and currency exchange rates. These macroeconomic factors have historically resulted in wide fluctuations in the steel industry both in China and globally. In our case, future economic downturns, stagnant economies or currency fluctuations in China or globally could decrease the demand for products or increase the amount of imports of steel into China, which could negatively impact our sales, margins and profitability.

 
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We may be exposed to potential risks relating to our internal controls over financial reporting and our ability to have the operating effectiveness of our internal controls attested to by our independent auditors.

As directed by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the SEC adopted rules requiring public companies to include a report of management on the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting in their annual reports and, for companies that are not small reporting companies, the independent registered public accounting firm auditing a company’s financial statements to attest to and report on the operating effectiveness of such company’s internal controls. Our management had previously identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting in fiscal years 2008 and 2009. Although our management believes that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of June 30, 2011, we can provide no assurance that we will comply with all of the requirements imposed thereby and we will receive a positive attestation from our independent auditors in the future, when required. In the event we identify significant deficiencies or material weaknesses in our internal controls that we cannot remediate in a timely manner or we are unable to receive a positive attestation from our independent auditors with respect to our internal controls, investors and others may lose confidence in the reliability of our financial statements.

If we become directly subject to the recent scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity involving U.S.-listed Chinese companies, we may have to expend significant resources to investigate and resolve the matter which could harm our business operations, stock price and reputation and could result in a loss of your investment in our stock, especially if such matter cannot be addressed and resolved favorably.

Recently, U.S. public companies that have substantially all of their operations in China, particularly companies like us which have completed so-called reverse merger transactions, have been the subject of intense scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity by investors, financial commentators and regulatory agencies, such as the SEC. Much of the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity has centered around financial and accounting irregularities and mistakes, a lack of effective internal controls over financial accounting, inadequate corporate governance policies or a lack of adherence thereto and, in many cases, allegations of fraud.  As a result of the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity, the publicly traded stock of many U.S. listed Chinese companies has sharply decreased in value and, in some cases, has become virtually worthless.  Many of these companies are now subject to shareholder lawsuits, SEC enforcement actions and are conducting internal and external investigations into the allegations.  It is not clear what effect this sector-wide scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity will have on our Company, our business and our stock price.  If we become the subject of any unfavorable allegations, whether such allegations are proven to be true or untrue, we will have to expend significant resources to investigate such allegations and/or defend our Company.  This situation will be costly and time consuming and distract our management from growing our company.  If such allegations are not proven to be groundless, our Company and business operations may be severely and adversely affected and your investment in our stock could be rendered worthless.

We may be unable to fund the substantial ongoing capital and maintenance expenditures that our operations require.

Our operations are capital intensive and our business strategy may require additional substantial capital investment. We require capital for building new production lines, acquiring new equipment, maintaining the condition of our existing equipment and complying with environmental laws and regulations. We plan to fund our capital expenditures from operating cash flow and our credit facilities and may require additional debt or equity financing. We cannot assure you, however, that financing will be available or, if financing is available, it may result in increased interest and amortization expense, increased leverage, dilution and decreased income available to fund further expansion. In addition, future debt financings may limit our ability to withstand competitive pressures and render us more vulnerable to economic downturns. If we are unable to fund our capital requirements, we may be unable to implement our business plan, and our financial performance may suffer.

 
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Our level of indebtedness may make it more difficult for us to fulfill all of our debt obligations and may reduce the amount of cash available for maintaining and growing our operations, which could have an adverse effect on our revenues.

Our major source of liquidity is borrowing through short-term bank and private loans. Our total debt under existing loans as of June 30, 2011 was approximately $119.1 million, of which approximately $95.5 million are short-term loans to non-related third parties. We expect to renew our short-term loans when they become due, our inability to renew these loans upon maturity may cause us working capital constraints. This substantial indebtedness could also impair our financial condition and our ability to fulfill all of our debt obligations, especially during a downturn in our business, in the industry in which we operate or in the general economy. Our indebtedness and the incurrence of any new indebtedness could (i) make it more difficult for us to satisfy our existing obligations, which could in turn result in an event of default on such obligations, (ii) require us to seek other sources of capital to finance cash used in operating activities, thereby reducing the availability of cash for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions, general corporate purposes or other purposes, (iii) impair our ability to obtain additional financing in the future for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions, general corporate purposes or other purposes; (iv) diminish our ability to withstand a downturn in our business, the industry in which we operate or the economy generally, (v) limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the industry in which we operate, or (vi) place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to competitors that have proportionately less debt. If we are unable to meet our debt service obligations, we could be forced to restructure or refinance our indebtedness, seek additional equity capital or sell assets.

We may be unable to obtain financing or sell assets on satisfactory terms, or at all, which could cause us to default on our debt service obligations and be subject to foreclosure on such loans. Additionally, we could incur additional indebtedness in the future and, if new debt is added to our current debt levels, the risks above could intensify.

Unexpected equipment failures may damage our business due to production curtailments or shutdowns.

Our manufacturing processes are extremely specialized and depend on critical pieces of equipment, such as air knife machines, welding tools and apparatus, color-coating machines, roll mills, ABB roll and tension knives. This machinery is highly specialized and cannot be repaired or replaced without significant expense and time delay. On occasion, our equipment may be out of service as a result of unanticipated failures which may result in material plant shutdowns or periods of reduced production. Interruptions in production capabilities will inevitably increase production costs and reduce our sales and earnings. In addition to equipment failures, our facilities are also subject to the risk of catastrophic loss due to unanticipated events such as fires, explosions or adverse weather conditions. Furthermore, any interruption in production capability may require us to make large capital expenditures to remedy the situation, which could have a negative effect on our profitability and cash flows. Although we have business interruption insurance, we cannot provide any assurance that the insurance will cover all losses that we experience as a result of the equipment failures. In addition, longer-term business disruption could result in a loss of customers. If this were to occur, our future sales levels, and therefore our profitability, could be adversely affected.

Our revenue will decrease if there is less demand for construction materials or electrical household appliances.

Our products often serve as important components in construction materials and electrical household appliances. Therefore, we are subject to the general changes in economic conditions affecting the construction and household appliance segments of the economy. Demand for our products is typically affected by a number of economic factors, including, but not limited to, consumer interest rates, consumer confidence, retail trends, sales of existing homes, and the level of mortgage financing. If there is a decline in economic activity in China and the other markets in which we operate or a decrease of sales of construction materials and electrical household appliances, demand for our products and our revenue will likewise decrease.

Environmental regulations impose substantial costs and limitations on our operations.

We are subject to various national and local environmental laws and regulations in China concerning issues such as air emissions, wastewater discharges, and solid waste management and disposal. These laws and regulations can restrict or limit our operations and expose us to liability and penalties for non-compliance. While we believe that our facilities are in material compliance with all applicable environmental laws and regulations, the risks of substantial unanticipated costs and liabilities related to compliance with these laws and regulations are an inherent part of our business. It is possible that future conditions may develop, arise or be discovered that create new environmental compliance or remediation liabilities and costs. While we believe that we can comply with existing environmental legislation and regulatory requirements and that the costs of compliance have been included within budgeted cost estimates, compliance may prove to be more limiting and costly than anticipated.

 
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If our customers and/or the ultimate consumers of products that use our products successfully assert product liability claims against us due to defects in our products, our operating results may suffer and our reputation may be harmed.

Our products are widely applied in the manufacturing of many products, including electrical household appliances, medical instruments and large industrial equipment. Significant property damage, personal injuries and even death can result from malfunctioning products. If our products are not properly manufactured or installed and/or if people are injured as a result of our products, we could be subject to claims for damages based on theories of product liability and other legal theories in some jurisdictions in which our products are sold. The costs and resources to defend such claims could be substantial and, if such claims are successful, we could be responsible for paying some or all of the damages. We do not have product liability insurance. The publicity surrounding these sorts of claims is also likely to damage our reputation, regardless of whether such claims are successful. Any of these consequences resulting from defects in our products would hurt our operating results and stockholder value.

We might fail to adequately protect our intellectual property and third parties may claim that our products infringe upon their intellectual property.

As part of our business strategy, we intend to accelerate our investment in new technologies in an effort to strengthen and differentiate our product portfolio and make our manufacturing processes more efficient. As a result, we believe that the protection of our intellectual property will become increasingly important to our business. Currently, we have 36 patents and 32 patent applications pending. We expect to rely on a combination of patents, trade secrets, trademarks and copyrights to provide protection in this regard, but this protection might be inadequate. For example, our pending or future patent applications might not be approved or, if allowed, they might not be of sufficient strength or scope. Conversely, third parties might assert that our technologies infringe their proprietary rights. In either case, litigation could result in substantial costs and diversion of our resources, and whether or not we are ultimately successful, the litigation could hurt our business and financial condition.

Expansion of our business may strain our management and operational infrastructure and impede our ability to meet any increased demand for our fine finished steel products.

Our growth strategy includes growing our operations by meeting the anticipated growth in demand for existing products, introducing new product offerings, and identifying and acquiring or investing in suitable candidates on acceptable terms. In 2009, we acquired a 100% ownership interest in Ningbo Zhehua. In addition, our subsidiary, Jiangsu Cold-Rolled, has recently completed construction of several new production lines and has been put into operation, but lacks a proven operational history. Over time, we may acquire or make investments in other providers of products that complement our business and other companies in our industry. Growth in our business may place a significant strain on our personnel, management, financial systems and other resources. Our business growth also presents numerous risks and challenges, including:
 
 
·
our ability to successfully and rapidly expand sales to potential customers in response to potentially increasing demand;
 
 
·
our ability to integrate and retain key management, sales, research and development, production and other personnel;
 
 
·
our ability to incorporate the acquired products or capabilities into our offerings from an engineering, sales and marketing perspective;
 
 
·
integration and support pre-existing supplier, distribution and customer relationships;
 
 
·
adverse effects on our reported operating results due to possible write-down of goodwill associated with acquisitions;
 
 
·
potential disputes with sellers of acquired businesses, technologies, services, products and potential liabilities;
 
 
·
the costs associated with such growth, which are difficult to quantify, but could be significant; and
 
 
·
rapid technological change.
 
To accommodate this growth and compete effectively, we may need to obtain additional funding to improve information systems, procedures and controls and expand, train, motivate and manage existing and additional employees. Funding may not be available in a sufficient amount or on favorable terms, if at all. If we are not able to manage these activities and implement these strategies successfully to expand to meet any increased demand, our operating results could suffer.

 
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We depend heavily on key personnel, and turnover of key employees and senior management could harm our business.

Our future business and results of operations depend in significant part upon the continued contributions of our key technical and senior management personnel, including Lifang Chen, our Chief Executive Officer, and Yongfei Jiang, our Chief Financial Officer. They also depend in significant part upon our ability to attract and retain additional qualified management, technical, marketing and sales and support personnel for our operations. If we lose a key employee, if a key employee fails to perform in his or her current position, or if we are not able to attract and retain skilled employees as needed, our business could suffer. Significant turnover in our senior management could significantly deplete our institutional knowledge held by our existing senior management team. We depend on the skills and abilities of these key employees in managing the manufacturing, technical, marketing and sales aspects of our business, any part of which could be harmed by turnover in the future.

Changes in our effective tax rate or tax liability may have an adverse effect on our results of operations.

Because we are a U.S. company with operating subsidiaries in China and we engage in international sales, we are subject to federal and state tax in the U.S., state and local tax in China and other foreign jurisdictions. Significant judgment is required in determining our worldwide provision for income taxes. In the ordinary course of our business, there are some transactions where the ultimate tax determination is uncertain. Additionally our calculations of income taxes are based on our interpretations of applicable tax laws in the jurisdictions in which we file. Although we believe our tax estimates are appropriate, there is no assurance that the final determination of our income tax liability will not be materially different than what is reflected in our income tax provisions and accruals. We are also subject to the periodic examination of our income tax returns by tax authorities. The outcomes from these examinations may have an adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition. Furthermore, our provision for income tax could increase as we expand our international operations, adopt new products, implement changes to our operating structure or undertake intercompany transactions in light of acquisitions, changing tax laws, and our current and anticipated business and operational requirements. Should additional taxes be assessed as a result of new legislation, an audit or litigation; or if our effective tax rate should change as a result of changes in federal, international or state and local tax laws, there could be a material adverse effect on our income tax provision and results of operations.

Ms. Lifang Chen’s association with Shanghai Huaye could pose a conflict of interest.

Ms. Lifang Chen, our chairman and beneficial owner of 74.5% of our common stock, also beneficially owns 100% of Shanghai Huaye, which is a major distributor of our products and provider of our raw materials. As a result, conflicts of interest may arise from time to time. We will attempt to resolve any such conflicts of interest in our favor. Our officers and directors are accountable to us and our shareholders as fiduciaries, which requires that such officers and directors exercise good faith and integrity in handling our affairs.

We may be exposed to liabilities under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, and any determination that we violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act could have a material adverse effect on our business.

We are subject to the Foreign Corrupt Practice Act, or FCPA, and other laws that prohibit improper payments or offers of payments to foreign governments and their officials and political parties by U.S. persons and issuers as defined by the statute for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. We have operations, agreements with third parties and make sales in China, which may experience corruption. Our activities in China create the risk of unauthorized payments or offers of payments by one of the employees, consultants, sales agents or distributors of our company, because these parties are not always subject to our control. It is our policy to implement safeguards to discourage these practices by our employees. Also, our existing safeguards and any future improvements may prove to be less than effective, and the employees, consultants, sales agents or distributors of our Company may engage in conduct for which we might be held responsible. Violations of the FCPA may result in severe criminal or civil sanctions, and we may be subject to other liabilities, which could negatively affect our business, operating results and financial condition. In addition, the government may seek to hold our Company liable for successor liability FCPA violations committed by companies in which we invest or that we acquire.

 
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RISKS RELATED TO DOING BUSINESS IN CHINA

Adverse changes in political and economic policies of the PRC government could impede the overall economic growth of China, which could reduce the demand for our products and damage our business.

We conduct substantially all of our operations and generate most of our revenue in China. Accordingly, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects are affected significantly by economic, political and legal developments in China. The PRC economy differs from the economies of most developed countries in many respects, including:
 
 
·
a higher level of government involvement;
 
·
a early stage of development of the market-oriented sector of the economy;
 
·
a rapid growth rate;
 
·
a higher level of control over foreign exchange; and
 
·
the allocation of resources.
 
As the PRC economy has been transitioning from a planned economy to a more market-oriented economy, the PRC government has implemented various measures to encourage economic growth and guide the allocation of resources. While these measures may benefit the overall PRC economy, they may also have a negative effect on us.

Although the PRC government has in recent years implemented measures emphasizing the utilization of market forces for economic reform, the PRC government continues to exercise significant control over economic growth in China through the allocation of resources, controlling the payment of foreign currency-denominated obligations, setting monetary policy and imposing policies that impact particular industries or companies in different ways.

Any adverse change in economic conditions or government policies in China could have a material adverse effect on the overall economic growth in China, which in turn could lead to a reduction in demand for our services and consequently have a material adverse effect on our business and prospects.

Uncertainties with respect to the PRC legal system could limit the legal protections available to you and us.

We conduct substantially all of our business through our operating subsidiaries in the PRC. Our operating subsidiaries are generally subject to laws and regulations applicable to foreign investments in China and, in particular, laws applicable to foreign-invested enterprises. The PRC legal system is based on written statutes, and prior court decisions may be cited for reference but have limited precedential value. Since 1979, a series of new PRC laws and regulations have significantly enhanced the protections afforded to various forms of foreign investments in China. However, since the PRC legal system continues to rapidly evolve, the interpretations of many laws, regulations and rules are not always uniform and enforcement of these laws, regulations and rules involve uncertainties, which may limit legal protections available to you and us. In addition, any litigation in China may be protracted and result in substantial costs and diversion of resources and management attention. In addition, most of our executive officers and directors are residents of China and not of the United States, and substantially all the assets of these persons are located outside the United States. As a result, it could be difficult for investors to affect service of process in the United States or to enforce a judgment obtained in the United States against our Chinese operations and subsidiaries.

If we are found to have failed to comply with applicable laws, we may incur additional expenditures or be subject to significant fines and penalties.

Our operations are subject to PRC laws and regulations applicable to us. However, many PRC laws and regulations are uncertain in their scope, and the implementation of such laws and regulations in different localities could have significant differences. In certain instances, local implementation rules and/or the actual implementation are not necessarily consistent with the regulations at the national level. Although we strive to comply with all the applicable PRC laws and regulations, we cannot assure you that the relevant PRC government authorities will not later determine that we have not been in compliance with certain laws or regulations.

In addition, our facilities and products are subject to many laws and regulations. Our failure to comply with these and other applicable laws and regulations in China could subject us to administrative penalties and injunctive relief, as well as civil remedies, including fines, injunctions and recalls of our products. It is possible that changes to such laws or more rigorous enforcement of such laws or with respect to our current or past practices could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition. Further, additional environmental, health or safety issues relating to matters that are not currently known to management may result in unanticipated liabilities and expenditures.

 
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The PRC government exerts substantial influence over the manner in which we must conduct our business activities.

The PRC government has exercised and continues to exercise substantial control over virtually every sector of the Chinese economy through regulation and state ownership. Our ability to operate in China may be harmed by changes in its laws and regulations, including those relating to taxation, import and export tariffs, environmental regulations, land use rights, property and other matters. We believe that our operations in China are in material compliance with all applicable legal and regulatory requirements. However, the central or local governments of the jurisdictions in which we operate may impose new, stricter regulations or interpretations of existing regulations that would require additional expenditures and efforts on our part to ensure our compliance with such regulations or interpretations.

Accordingly, government actions in the future, including any decision not to continue to support recent economic reforms and to return to a more centrally planned economy or regional or local variations in the implementation of economic policies, could have a significant effect on economic conditions in China or particular regions thereof and could require us to divest ourselves of any interest we then hold in Chinese properties or joint ventures.

Restrictions on currency exchange may limit our ability to receive and use our sales effectively.

The majority of our revenues will be settled in RMB and U.S. dollars, and any future restrictions on currency exchanges may limit our ability to use revenue generated in RMB to fund any future business activities outside China or to make dividend or other payments in U.S. dollars. Although the Chinese government introduced regulations in 1996 to allow greater convertibility of the RMB for current account transactions, significant restrictions still remain, including primarily the restriction that foreign-invested enterprises may only buy, sell or remit foreign currencies after providing valid commercial documents, at those banks in China authorized to conduct foreign exchange business. In addition, conversion of RMB for capital account items, including direct investment and loans, is subject to governmental approval in China, and companies are required to open and maintain separate foreign exchange accounts for capital account items. We cannot be certain that the Chinese regulatory authorities will not impose more stringent restrictions on the convertibility of the RMB.

Fluctuations in exchange rates could adversely affect our business and the value of our securities.

The value of our common stock will be indirectly affected by the foreign exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and RMB and between those currencies and other currencies in which our revenues may be denominated. Appreciation or depreciation in the value of the RMB relative to the U.S. dollar would affect our financial results reported in U.S. dollar terms without giving effect to any underlying change in our business or results of operations. Fluctuations in the exchange rate will also affect the relative value of any dividend we issue that will be exchanged into U.S. dollars, as well as earnings from, and the value of, any U.S. dollar-denominated investments we make in the future.

Since July 2005, the RMB has no longer been pegged to the U.S. dollar. Although the People’s Bank of China regularly intervenes in the foreign exchange market to prevent significant short-term fluctuations in the exchange rate, the RMB may appreciate or depreciate significantly in value against the U.S. dollar in the medium to long term. Moreover, it is possible that in the future PRC authorities may lift restrictions on fluctuations in the RMB exchange rate and lessen intervention in the foreign exchange market.

Very limited hedging transactions are available in China to reduce our exposure to exchange rate fluctuations. To date, we have not entered into any hedging transactions. While we may enter into hedging transactions in the future, the availability and effectiveness of these transactions may be limited, and we may not be able to successfully hedge our exposure at all. In addition, our foreign currency exchange losses may be magnified by PRC exchange control regulations that restrict our ability to convert RMB into foreign currencies.

Sometimes we may need to import some of our raw materials and major equipment. In the event that the U.S. dollars appreciate against RMB, our costs will increase. If we cannot pass the resulting cost increases on to our customers, our profitability and operating results may suffer. In addition, since our sales to international customers are growing rapidly, we are increasingly subject to the risk of foreign currency depreciation.

 
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Restrictions under PRC law on our PRC subsidiaries’ ability to make dividends and other distributions could materially and adversely affect our ability to grow, make investments or acquisitions that could benefit our business, pay dividends to you, and otherwise fund and conduct our business.

Substantially all of our revenues are earned by our PRC subsidiaries. However, PRC regulations restrict the ability of our PRC subsidiaries to make dividends and other payments to its offshore parent company. PRC legal restrictions permit payments of dividends by our PRC subsidiaries only out of their accumulated after-tax profits, if any, determined in accordance with PRC accounting standards and regulations. Our PRC subsidiaries are also required under PRC laws and regulations to allocate at least 10% of their annual after-tax profits determined in accordance with PRC generally accepted accounting principles to a statutory general reserve fund until the amounts in said fund reaches 50% of our registered capital. Allocations to these statutory reserve funds can only be used for specific purposes and are not transferable to us in the form of loans, advances, or cash dividends. Any limitations on the ability of our PRC subsidiary to transfer funds to us could materially and adversely limit our ability to grow, make investments or acquisitions that could be beneficial to our business, pay dividends and otherwise fund and conduct our business.

You may have difficulty enforcing judgments against us.

We are a Nevada holding company and most of our assets are located outside of the United States. Almost all of our operations are conducted in the PRC. In addition, most of our directors and officers are nationals and residents of countries other than the United States. A substantial portion of the assets of these persons is located outside the United States. As a result, it may be difficult for you to effect service of process within the United States upon these persons. It may also be difficult for you to enforce in U.S. courts judgments on the civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal securities laws against us and our officers and directors, most of whom are not residents in the United States and the substantial majority of whose assets are located outside of the United States. In addition, there is uncertainty as to whether the courts of the PRC would recognize or enforce judgments of U.S. courts. Although the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments are generally provided for under the PRC Civil Procedures Law, courts in China may recognize and enforce foreign judgments in accordance with the requirements of the PRC Civil Procedures Law based on treaties between China and the country where the judgment is made or on reciprocity between jurisdictions. China does not have any treaties or other arrangements that provide for the reciprocal recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments with the United States. In addition, according to the PRC Civil Procedures Law, courts in the PRC will not enforce a foreign judgment against us or our directors and officers if they decide that the judgment violates basic principles of PRC law or national sovereignty, security or the public interest. So it is uncertain whether a PRC court would enforce a judgment rendered by a court in the United States.
 
Failure to comply with PRC regulations relating to the establishment of offshore special purpose companies by PRC residents may subject our PRC resident stockholders to personal liability, limit our ability to acquire PRC companies or to inject capital into our PRC subsidiaries, limit our PRC subsidiaries’ ability to distribute profits to us or otherwise materially adversely affect us.

Our ability to conduct foreign-exchange activities in the PRC is subject to uncertainties surrounding the interpretation of SAFE regulations, one of which is Circular 75. Under the Notice on Relevant Issues in the Foreign Exchange Control over Financing and Return Investment Through Special Purpose Companies by Residents Inside China (as amended and supplemented, “Circular 75”), PRC residents must register with a local branch of SAFE (1) before they establish or gain control of an overseas special purpose vehicle, or SPV, for the purpose of overseas equity financing (including convertible debt financing); (2) when they contribute their assets or equity interests in a domestic enterprise to an SPV or engage in overseas financing after contributing assets or equity interests to an SPV; and (3) when their SPV undergoes a material change outside of China, such as a change in share capital or merger or acquisition. If any PRC resident who holds stock in an SPV fails to make the required SAFE registration and make any amended registration, the onshore PRC subsidiaries of that offshore company may be prohibited from distributing their profits and the proceeds from any reduction in capital, share transfer or liquidation to the offshore SPV. Failure to comply with the SAFE registration and amendment registration requirements described above could result in liability for evading PRC laws applicable to foreign exchange restrictions.
 
 
18

 

We have advised our shareholders who are PRC residents, as defined in Circular 75, to register with the relevant branch of SAFE, as currently required, in connection with their equity interests in us and our acquisitions of equity interests in our PRC subsidiaries. However, we cannot provide any assurances that their existing registrations have fully complied with, and they have made all necessary amendments to their registration to fully comply with, all applicable registrations or approvals required by Circular 75. Moreover, because of uncertainty over how Circular 75 will be interpreted and implemented, and how or whether SAFE will apply it to us, we cannot predict how it will affect our business operations or future strategies. For example, our present and prospective PRC subsidiaries’ ability to conduct foreign exchange activities, such as the remittance of dividends and foreign currency-denominated borrowings, may be subject to compliance with Circular 75 by our PRC resident beneficial holders. In addition, such PRC residents may not always be able to complete the necessary registration procedures required by Circular 75. We also have little control over either our present or prospective direct or indirect shareholders or the outcome of such registration procedures. A failure by our PRC resident beneficial holders or future PRC resident shareholders to comply with Circular 75, if SAFE requires it, could subject these PRC resident beneficial holders to fines or legal sanctions, restrict our overseas or cross-border investment activities, limit our subsidiaries’ ability to make distributions or pay dividends or affect our ownership structure, which could adversely affect our business and prospects.

Under the New Enterprise Income Tax Law, we may be classified as a “resident enterprise” of China. Such classification will likely result in unfavorable tax consequences to us and our non-PRC stockholders.

On March 16, 2007, the National People’s Congress of China passed the EIT Law and on November 28, 2007, the State Council of China passed its implementing rules, both of which took effect on January 1, 2008. Under the EIT Law, an enterprise established outside of China with “de facto management bodies” within China is considered a “resident enterprise,” meaning that it can be treated in a manner similar to a Chinese enterprise for enterprise income tax purposes. The implementing rules of the EIT Law define de facto management as “substantial and overall management and control over the production and operations, personnel, accounting, and properties” of the enterprise.

On April 22, 2009, the State Administration of Taxation issued the Notice Concerning Relevant Issues Regarding Cognizance of Chinese Investment Controlled Enterprises Incorporated Offshore as Resident Enterprises pursuant to Criteria of de facto Management Bodies, or the Notice, further interpreting the application of the EIT Law and its implementation against non-Chinese enterprise or group controlled offshore entities. Pursuant to the Notice, an enterprise incorporated in an offshore jurisdiction and controlled by a Chinese enterprise or group will be classified as a “domestically incorporated resident enterprise” if (i) its senior management in charge of daily operations reside or perform their duties mainly in China; (ii) its financial or personnel decisions are made or approved by bodies or persons in China; (iii) its substantial assets and properties, accounting books, corporate chops, board and shareholder minutes are kept in China; and (iv) at least half of its directors with voting rights or senior management often resident in China. A resident enterprise would be subject to an enterprise income tax rate of 25% on its worldwide income and its non-PRC stockholders would be subject to a withholding tax at a rate of 10% when dividends are paid to such non-PRC stockholders. However, it remains unclear as to whether the Notice is applicable to an offshore enterprise incorporated by a Chinese natural person. Nor are detailed measures on enforcement of PRC tax against non-domestically incorporated resident enterprises are available. Therefore, it is unclear how tax authorities will determine tax residency based on the facts of each case.

We may be deemed to be a resident enterprise by Chinese tax authorities. If the PRC tax authorities determine that we are a “resident enterprise” for PRC enterprise income tax purposes, a number of unfavorable PRC tax consequences could follow. First, we may be subject to the enterprise income tax at a rate of 25% on our worldwide taxable income as well as PRC enterprise income tax reporting obligations. In our case, this would mean that income such as interest on financing proceeds and non-China source income would be subject to PRC enterprise income tax at a rate of 25%. Second, although under the EIT Law and its implementing rules dividends paid to us from our PRC subsidiary would qualify as “tax-exempt income,” we cannot guarantee that such dividends will not be subject to a 10% withholding tax, as the PRC foreign exchange control authorities, which enforce the withholding tax, have not yet issued guidance with respect to the processing of outbound remittances to entities that are treated as resident enterprises for PRC enterprise income tax purposes. Finally, it is possible that future guidance issued with respect to the new “resident enterprise” classification could result in a situation in which a 10% withholding tax is imposed on dividends we pay to our non-PRC stockholders and with respect to gains derived by our non-PRC stockholders from transferring our shares. We are actively monitoring the possibility of “resident enterprise” treatment for the 2010 tax year and are evaluating appropriate organizational changes to avoid this treatment, to the extent possible.

 
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If we were treated as a “resident enterprise” by PRC tax authorities, we would be subject to taxation in both the U.S. and China, and our PRC tax may not be creditable against our U.S. tax.

We face uncertainty from China’s Circular on Strengthening the Administration of Enterprise Income Tax on Non-Resident Enterprises' Share Transfer, or Circular 698, that was released in December 2009 with retroactive effect from January 1, 2008.

The Chinese State Administration of Taxation released a circular on December 15, 2009 that addresses the transfer of shares by nonresident companies, generally referred to as Circular 698. Circular 698, which is effective retroactively to January 1, 2008, may have a significant impact on many companies that use offshore holding companies to invest in China. Circular 698, which provides parties with a short period of time to comply with its requirements, indirectly taxes foreign companies on gains derived from the indirect sale of a Chinese company. Where a foreign investor indirectly transfers equity interests in a Chinese resident enterprise by selling the shares in an offshore holding company, and the latter is located in a country or jurisdiction where the effective tax burden is less than 12.5% or where the offshore income of his, her, or its residents is not taxable, the foreign investor is required to provide the tax authority in charge of that Chinese resident enterprise with the relevant information within 30 days of the transfers. Moreover, where a foreign investor indirectly transfers equity interests in a Chinese resident enterprise through an abuse of form of organization and there are no reasonable commercial purposes such that the corporate income tax liability is avoided, the PRC tax authority will have the power to re-assess the nature of the equity transfer in accordance with PRC’s “substance-over-form” principle and deny the existence of the offshore holding company that is used for tax planning purposes. There is uncertainty as to the application of Circular 698. For example, while the term "indirectly transfer" is not defined, it is understood that the relevant PRC tax authorities have jurisdiction regarding requests for information over a wide range of foreign entities having no direct contact with China. It is also unclear, in the event that an offshore holding company is treated as a domestically incorporated resident enterprise, whether Circular 698 would still be applicable to transfer of shares in such offshore holding company. Moreover, the relevant authority has not yet promulgated any formal provisions or formally declared or stated how to calculate the effective tax in the country or jurisdiction and to what extent and the process of the disclosure to the tax authority in charge of that Chinese resident enterprise. In addition, there are not any formal declarations with regard to how to decide “abuse of form of organization” and “reasonable commercial purpose,” which can be utilized by us to balance if our Company complies with the Circular 698. If Circular 698 is determined to be applicable to us based on the facts and circumstances around such share transfers, we may become at risk of being taxed under Circular 698 and we may be required to expend valuable resources to comply with Circular 698 or to establish that we should not be taxed under Circular 698, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

The disclosures in our reports and other filings with the SEC and our other public pronouncements are not subject to the scrutiny of any regulatory bodies in the PRC.  Accordingly, our public disclosure should be reviewed in light of the fact that no governmental agency that is located in China where all of our operations and business are located have conducted any due diligence on our operations or reviewed or cleared any of our disclosure.

We are regulated by the SEC and our reports and other filings with the SEC are subject to SEC review in accordance with the rules and regulations promulgated by the SEC under the Securities Act and the Exchange Act.  Unlike public reporting companies whose operations are located primarily in the United States, however, all of our operations are located in China.  Since all of our operations and business takes place in China, it may be more difficult for the Staff of the SEC to overcome the geographic and cultural obstacles that are present when reviewing our disclosure.  These same obstacles are not present for similar companies whose operations or business take place entirely or primarily in the United States. Furthermore, our SEC reports and other disclosure and public pronouncements are not subject to the review or scrutiny of any PRC regulatory authority.  For example, the disclosure in our SEC reports and other filings are not subject to the review of the CSRC, a PRC regulator that is tasked with oversight of the capital markets in China.  Accordingly, you should review our SEC reports, filings and our other public pronouncements with the understanding that no local regulator has done any due diligence on our company and with the understanding that none of our SEC reports, other filings or any of our other public pronouncements has been reviewed or otherwise been scrutinized by any local regulator.

 
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RISKS RELATED TO THE MARKET FOR OUR STOCK

Certain of our stockholders hold a significant percentage of our outstanding voting securities.

Ms. Lifang Chen, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, is the beneficial owner of approximately 74.5% of our outstanding voting securities. As a result, she possesses significant influence and can elect a majority of our board of directors and authorize or prevent proposed significant corporate transactions. Her ownership and control may also have the effect of delaying or preventing a future change in control, impeding a merger, consolidation, takeover or other business combination or discourage a potential acquirer from making a tender offer.

Although publicly traded, the trading market in our common stock has been substantially less liquid than the average trading market for a stock quoted on the Nasdaq Stock Market and this low trading volume may adversely affect the price of our common stock.

Our common stock started trading on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol “SUTR” in February 2008. The trading volume of our common stock has been comparatively low to other companies listed on Nasdaq. Limited trading volume will subject our shares of common stock to greater price volatility and may make it difficult for you to sell your shares of common stock at a price that is attractive to you.

Certain provisions of our Articles of Incorporation may make it more difficult for a third party to effect a change- in-control.

Our articles of incorporation authorize the board of directors to issue up to 1,000,000 shares of preferred stock. The preferred stock may be issued in one or more series, the terms of which may be determined at the time of issuance by the board of directors without further action by the stockholders. These terms may include voting rights including the right to vote as a series on particular matters, preferences as to dividends and liquidation, conversion rights and redemption rights provisions. The issuance of any preferred stock could diminish the rights of holders of our common stock, and therefore could reduce the value of such common stock. In addition, specific rights granted to future holders of preferred stock could be used to restrict our ability to merge with, or sell assets to, a third party. The ability of the board of directors to issue preferred stock could make it more difficult, delay, discourage, prevent or make it more costly to acquire or effect a change-in-control, which in turn could prevent the stockholders from recognizing a gain in the event that a favorable offer is extended and could materially and negatively affect the market price of our common stock.

The market price of our common stock is volatile, leading to the possibility of its value being depressed at a time when you want to sell your holdings.

The market price of our common stock is volatile, and this volatility may continue. Numerous factors, many of which are beyond our control, may cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate significantly. These factors include:
  
 
·
our earnings releases, actual or anticipated changes in our earnings, fluctuations in our operating results or our failure to meet the expectations of financial market analysts and investors;
 
·
changes in financial estimates by us or by any securities analysts who might cover our stock;
 
·
speculation about our business in the press or the investment community;
 
·
significant developments relating to our relationships with our customers or suppliers;
 
·
stock market price and volume fluctuations of other publicly traded companies and, in particular, those that are in the steel industries;
 
·
customer demand for our products;
 
·
investor perceptions of the steel industries in general and our company in particular;
 
·
the operating and stock performance of comparable companies;
 
·
general economic conditions and trends;
 
·
major catastrophic events;
 
·
announcements by us or our competitors of new products, significant acquisitions, strategic partnerships or divestitures;
 
·
changes in accounting standards, policies, guidance, interpretation or principles;
 
·
loss of external funding sources;
 
·
sales of our common stock, including sales by our directors, officers or significant stockholders; and
 
 
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·
additions or departures of key personnel.
 
Securities class action litigation is often instituted against companies following periods of volatility in their stock price. This type of litigation could result in substantial costs to us and divert our management’s attention and resources. Moreover, securities markets may from time to time experience significant price and volume fluctuations for reasons unrelated to operating performance of particular companies. For example, in July 2008, the securities markets in the United States, China and other jurisdictions experienced the largest decline in share prices since September 2001. These market fluctuations may adversely affect the price of our common stock and other interests in our company at a time when you want to sell your interest in us.

We do not intend to pay dividends for the foreseeable future.

For the foreseeable future, we intend to retain any earnings to finance the development and expansion of our business, and we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock. Accordingly, investors must be prepared to rely on sales of their common stock after price appreciation to earn an investment return, which may never occur. Investors seeking cash dividends should not purchase our common stock. Any determination to pay dividends in the future will be made at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on our results of operations, financial condition, contractual restrictions, restrictions imposed by applicable law and other factors our board deems relevant.

ITEM 1B.
UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.

Not Applicable.

ITEM 2.
PROPERTIES.

There is no private land ownership in China. Individuals and companies are permitted to acquire land use right for special purposes. Changshu Huaye and Jiangsu Cold-rolled currently have land use rights to six parcels of land located in Dongbang Town, Changshu, China with approximately 360,000 square meters in aggregate, consisting of manufacturing facilities, office buildings and land reserved for future expansion. The land use rights for these properties will expire in 2054. This period may be renewed at the expiration of the initial and any subsequent terms. Granted land use rights are transferable and may be used as security for borrowings and other obligations. We have fully paid the land use fees. Some of our real property is subject to lien to secure certain bank loans.

Ningbo Zhehua leased a factory building located in the Ningbo Camel Machinery & Electronics Industrial Park, Ningbo, China. The lease has a term of 10 years which will expire on August 31, 2013.

We have three principal facilities: Changshu Huaye, Jiangsu Cold-Rolled and Ningbo Zhehua. Changshu Huaye and Jiangsu Cold-Rolled are located in Dongbang Industrial park, Changshu, China and Ningbo Zhehua is located in Ningbo, China. Changshu Huaye was established in January 2003 and started operation in June 2004, with an annual production capacity of 300,000 MT of HDG of cold-rolled steel and 200,000 MT of PPGI. In fiscal year 2011, the capacity utilization rates for the HDG production line and PPGI production line were approximately 71.6% and 33.4%, respectively. Jiangsu Cold-Rolled was established in August 2003 and its AP steel production line started operation in September 2006 with an annual production capacity of 500,000 MT. The cold-rolled steel production line started operation in January 2007 and has an annual production capacity of 250,000 MT. In fiscal year 2011, the capacity utilization rates for the AP steel production line and cold-rolled steel production line were approximately 79.5% and 115.7%, respectively. Jiangsu Cold-Rolled constructed two new HDG steel production lines with annual manufacturing capacity of 400,000 MT which became operational at the end of September 2008. As of June 30, 2011, their capacity utilization rate was approximately 49.1%. The new HDG steel production lines are capable of galvanizing both hot-rolled and cold-rolled steel with both zinc and aluminum, allowing us to better meet the needs of our customers and minimizing any excess capacity strains on our current HDG steel production lines. Ningbo Zhehua was established in 2004. It has one JCOE production line for large-diameter, double-side, submerged-arc welded steel pipes, three US Lincoln production lines for spiral seam, double-side, submerged-arc welded steel pipes and two REF production lines for roll-bending, double-side, submerged-arc welded steel pipes. In fiscal year 2011, the average utilization rate of our weld steel pipe production lines were approximately 10.4%.

We believe that all our properties have been adequately maintained, are generally in good condition, and are suitable and adequate for our business.

 
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ITEM 3.
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.

From time to time, we may become involved in various lawsuits and legal proceedings which arise in the ordinary course of business.  However, litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties, and an adverse result in these or other matters may arise from time to time that may harm our business.  We are currently not aware of any such legal proceedings or claims that we believe will have a material adverse affect on our business, financial condition or operating results.

ITEM 4.
(REMOVED AND RESERVED).

PART II
 
ITEM 5.
MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES.

Market Information

Our common stock is quoted on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol “SUTR.”

The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, the high and low closing prices of our common stock.  These prices reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission, and may not represent actual transactions.

   
Closing Bid Prices(1)
 
   
High
   
Low
 
Year Ended June 30, 2011
           
1st Quarter
  $ 2.14     $ 1.64  
2nd Quarter
    2.26       1.78  
3rd Quarter
    2.36       1.61  
4th Quarter
    1.73       1.10  
                 
Year Ended June 30, 2010
               
1st Quarter
  $ 4.31     $ 2.85  
2nd Quarter
    3.42       2.35  
3rd Quarter
    4.00       2.80  
4th Quarter
    3.09       1.98  

(1) The above table sets forth the range of high and low closing prices per share of our common stock as reported by www.quotemedia.com for the periods indicated.

Approximate Number of Holders of Our Common Stock

As of October 10, 2011, there were approximately 12 holders of record of our common stock.  This number excludes the shares of our common stock owned by stockholders holding stock under nominee security position listings.

Dividend Policy

We have never declared dividends or paid cash dividends. Our board of directors will make any future decisions regarding dividends. We currently intend to retain and use any future earnings for the development and expansion of our business and do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the near future.

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

See Item 12, “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters — Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans.”

 
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Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

We have not sold any equity securities during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2011 that were not previously disclosed in a quarterly report on Form 10-Q or a current report on Form 8-K that was filed during the 2011 fiscal year.

Purchases of Equity Securities

No repurchases of our common stock were made during the fourth quarter of the 2011 fiscal year.

ITEM 6.
SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA.

Not Applicable.

ITEM 7.
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

The following management’s discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and the notes thereto and the other financial information appearing elsewhere in this report. In addition to historical information, the following discussion contains certain forward-looking information. See “Special Note Regarding Forward Looking Statements” above for certain information concerning those forward looking statements. Our financial statements are prepared in U.S. dollars and in accordance with U.S. GAAP.

Overview

We are one of the leading Chinese non-state-owned manufacturers of fine finished steel products. We utilize a variety of processes and technological methodologies to convert steel manufactured by third parties into fine finished steel products. Our product offerings are focused on higher-margin, value-added finished steel products, specifically, HDG steel and PPGI products. In addition, we produce AP steel and cold-rolled steel, which represent the least processed of our finished products.  As a result of our acquisition of Ningbo Zhehua in November 2009, our product offerings have included welded steel pipe products. We use a large portion of our AP steel and cold-rolled steel to produce our HDG steel and PPGI products. Our vertical integration has allowed us to maintain more stable margins for our HDG steel and PPGI products.

We sell most of our products to customers who operate primarily in the solar energy, appliances, automobile, construction, infrastructure, medical equipment and water resource industries. Most of our customers are located in China. Our primary export markets are Europe, the Middle East, Asia and South America.

Our manufacturing facilities, located in Changshu, China, have three HDG steel production lines, one PPGI production line, one AP steel production line and one cold-rolled steel line. Our current annual production capacity is approximately 700,000 MT for HDG steel, 200,000 MT for PPGI, 500,000 MT for AP steel and 250,000 MT for cold-rolled steel. Ningbo Zhehua, our subsidiary located in Ningbo, currently has an annual capacity of 400,000 MT for welded steel pipe products.

Revenue

Our revenue is generated from sales of our HDG steel, PPGI, AP steel and cold-rolled steel products. As a result of our acquisition of Ningbo Zhehua, we also generate revenue from sales of steel pipe products, such as longitudinally welded steel pipes and spiral welded steel pipes. Our revenue has historically been affected by sales volume, sales price of our products and our product mix.

We have three reportable business segments: Changshu Huaye, Jiangsu Cold-Rolled and Ningbo Zhehua, which are our three principal manufacturing facilities.  Changshu Huaye manufactures HDG steel and PPGI products.  In fiscal years 2011 and 2010, Changshu Huaye generated revenue of approximately $185.3 million and $217.6 million, which represented approximately 42.9% and 45.5% of our total revenue, respectively.  Jiangsu Cold-Rolled manufactures AP steel, cold-rolled steel and HDG steel products. Jiangsu Cold-Rolled generated revenue of approximately $214.9 million and $198.6 million in fiscal years 2011 and 2010, which represented approximately 49.8% and 41.5% of our total revenue, respectively. Ningbo Zhehua manufactures steel pipe products.  In fiscal years 2011 and 2010, Ningbo Zhehua generated revenue of approximately $31.5 million and $62.5 million, which represented approximately 7.3% and 13.1% of our total revenue, respectively. A substantial portion of our products are sold through our affiliate Shanghai Huaye, which also supplies to us a significant portion of our raw materials. Approximately 38.4% of our revenue was derived from Shanghai Huaye and its affiliates in fiscal year 2011, as compared to approximately 51.0% last year. We expanded our own sales channel this year in effort to gain more market share. At the same time, we continue to take advantage of Shanghai Huaye’s extensive sales network and to build brand value.

 
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Cost of Revenue

Cost of revenue includes direct costs to manufacture our products, including the cost of raw materials, labor, overhead, energy cost, handling charges, and other expenses associated with the manufacture and delivery of product. Direct costs of manufacturing are generally highest when we first introduce a new product due to higher start-up costs and higher raw material costs. As production volume increases, we typically improve manufacturing efficiencies and are able to strengthen our purchasing power by buying raw materials in greater quantities.

In fiscal year 2011, approximately $237.3 million of raw material procurement was conducted through Shanghai Huaye and its affiliates.  Due to the size of Shanghai Huaye and the economy of scale, it has stronger bargaining power than we do and our arrangement with Shanghai Huaye allows us to purchase raw materials at relatively lower prices than we could obtain from suppliers ourselves.

Gross Profit and Gross Margin

Gross profit is equal to the difference between our revenue and the cost of revenue.  Gross margin is equal to gross profit divided by revenue.  In fiscal year 2011, gross margin for domestic and international sales were approximately 8.1% and 17.2%, respectively. On a segment basis, Changshu Huaye, Jiangsu Cold-Rolled and Ningbo Zhehua’s gross margins were approximately 13.5%, 5.3% and 13.7%, respectively.

To gain market penetration, we price our products at levels that we believe are competitive. We continually strive to improve manufacturing efficiencies and reduce our production costs in order to offer superior products and services at competitive prices. General economic conditions, the cost of raw materials, and supply and demand of fine finished steel products within our markets influence sales prices. Our high-end, value-added products, such as the PPGI products, generally tend to have higher profit margins.

We implemented a vertical integration strategy where we use our own AP steel and cold-rolled steel products as raw materials for HDG steel and PPGI products. We believe our vertically integrated operations will allow us to provide customers with one-stop services, build customer loyalty, and maintain stable operating margins.

Operating Expenses

Our operating expenses primarily consist of general and administrative expenses and selling expenses.

General and Administrative Expenses

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of compensation and benefits for our general management, finance and administrative staff, professional and advisory fees, bad debts reserves, and other expenses incurred in connection with general corporate purposes. We expect most components of our general and administrative expenses will increase as our business grows and as we incur increased costs as a public company.

Selling Expenses

Selling expenses consist primarily of compensation and benefits for our sales and marketing staff, sales commissions, the cost of advertising, promotional and travel activities, transportation expenses, after-sales support services and other sales related costs.

Our selling expenses are generally affected by the amount of international sales and our sales to unrelated parties. The transportation costs for our international sales are generally higher than domestic sales.  In addition, when we sell products to Shanghai Huaye and its affiliates, Shanghai Huaye generally arranges and bears the cost of transportation. In contrast, when we sell products to customers other than Shanghai Huaye, we generally bear the transportation costs, but we are able to charge a higher price.

 
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Provision for Income Taxes

Sutor Technology Group Limited is subject to United States federal income tax at a tax rate of 34%. Sutor BVI was incorporated in the British Virgin Islands and, under the current laws of the British Virgin Islands, is not subject to income taxes.

The EIT Law gives existing FIEs a five-year grandfather period during which they can continue to enjoy their existing preferential tax treatments. Changshu Huaye is subject to an EIT of 15% from calendar years 2010 to 2012 because it qualifies as a high-tech enterprise for the calendar years 2010, 2011 and 2012. Changshu Huaye paid EIT at the 25% tax rate for the period between July and December 2010 and the Company expects to receive a refund on the over-paid portion of the EIT. Jiangsu Cold-Rolled is subject to EIT of 12.5% for the calendar years 2009, 2010 and 2011. Jiangsu Cold-Rolled will be subject to an EIT of 25% for the calendar year 2012 and beyond. Ningbo Zhehua and Sutor Technology PRC are subject to an EIT of 25% and have no preferential tax treatments. See Item 1, “Business – Regulation – Taxation” for a detailed description of the EIT Law and tax regulations applicable to our Chinese subsidiaries.

Reportable Operating Segments

As a result of the acquisition of Ningbo Zhehua, we now have three reportable operating segments which are categorized based on manufacturing facilities – Changshu Huaye, Jiangsu Cold-Rolled and Ningbo Zhehua. Changshu Huaye manufactures and sells HDG steel and PPGI products. Jiangsu Cold-Rolled manufactures and sells AP steel, cold-rolled steel and HDG steel. Ningbo Zhehua manufactures and sells steel pipe products. Changshu Huaye and Jiangsu Cold-Rolled are adjacent to each other and use largely the same management resources. Ningbo Zhehua is located in Ningbo, China. See Note 13, “Segment Information” to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report.

Results of Operations

Comparison of Fiscal Years Ended June 20, 2011 and June 30, 2010

The following table sets forth key components of our results of operations for the periods indicated, both in dollars and as a percentage of our net sales.

(All amounts, other than percentages, in thousands of U.S. dollars)

   
June 30, 2011
   
June 30, 2010
 
   
Amount
   
Percentage
of Revenue
   
Amount
   
Percentage
of Revenue
 
Revenue:
  $             $          
Revenue from unrelated parties
    266,127       61.6 %     234,634       49.0 %
Revenue from related parties
    165,570       38.4 %     244,054       51.0 %
Total
    431,697       100 %     478,688       100.0 %
Cost of Revenue:
                               
Cost of revenue from unrelated parties
    240,848       55.8 %     216,663       45.3 %
Cost of revenue from related parties
    150,397       34.8 %     229,217       47.9 %
Total
    391,245       90.6 %     445,880       93.1 %
Gross Profit
    40,452       9.4 %     32,808       6.9 %
Operating Expenses
                               
Selling expense
    7,504       1.8 %     8,066       1.7 %
General and administrative expense
    7,814       1.8 %     6,358       1.3 %
Total Operating Expenses
    15,318       3.6 %     14,425       3.0 %
Income from Operations
    25,134       5.8 %     18,383       3.9 %
Other Income (Expense)
                               
Interest income
    902       0.2 %     1,106       0.2 %
Other income
    159       0.0 %     448       0.1 %
Interest expense
    (7,971 )     (1.8 )%     (5,841 )     (1.2 )%
Other expense
    (789 )     (0.2 )%     (367 )     (0.1 )%
Total Other Income (Expense)
    (7,699 )     (1.8 )%     (4,653 )     (1.0 )%
Income Before Taxes
    17,435       4.0 %     13,730       2.9 %
Provision for income taxes
    (3,429 )     (0.8 )%     (2,404 )     (0.5 )%
Net Income
  $ 14,005       3.2 %   $ 11,326       2.4 %

 
26

 

Revenue. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2011, revenue was $431.7 million compared to $478.7 million last year, a decrease of approximately 9.8%. Total sales volume in tons decreased approximately 18.6% in fiscal year 2011 as compared to the same period last year, which reflected the Company’s continuing efforts to exit the lower-margin steel trading business and optimize its product mix, leading to improved profit margins. The impact of the lower sales volumes on revenue was partially offset by an increase of approximately 10.8% in overall average selling price.

The following table sets forth revenue by geography and the percentage of our total revenue and total revenue by business segments for fiscal years 2011 and 2010.

(All amounts, other than percentages, in thousands of U.S. dollars)

   
June 30, 2011
   
June 30, 2010
 
   
Amount
   
Percentage
of Revenue
   
Amount
   
Percentage
of Revenue
 
Geographic Data:
                       
China
  $ 369,507       85.6 %   $ 425,009       88.8 %
Other Countries
    62,190       14.4 %     53,679       11.2 %
                                 
Segment Data:
                               
Changshu Huaye
  $ 185,304       42.9 %   $ 217,631       45.5 %
Jiangsu Cold-Rolled
    214,868       49.8 %     198,564       41.5 %
Ningbo Zhehua
    31,525       7.3 %     62,493       13.0 %

On a geographic basis, revenue generated from outside of China was $62.2 million, or 14.4% of total revenue, for fiscal year 2011, as compared to $53.7 million, or 11.2% of total revenue, for fiscal year 2010. The increase was mainly attributable to our efforts to expand product penetration into new markets, increase brand recognition and foster acceptance of our products in the international markets.

On a segment basis, after eliminating intercompany sales, revenue contributed by Changshu Huaye decreased to $185.3 million for fiscal year 2011, a decrease of $32.3 million, or 14.8%, from $217.6 million in fiscal year 2010. Due to increasing market demand, we produced more advanced PPGI products in fiscal year 2011 which resulted in decrease of sales volume and revenue, but an increase in our gross margin. In addition, more HDG steel products were produced at Jiangsu Cold-Rolled to take advantage of its newer production lines which generally have lower production costs. As a result, the overall production volume at Changshu Huaye was reduced during fiscal year 2011.

After eliminating the inter-company sales, revenues contributed by Jiangsu Cold-Rolled were $214.9 million for fiscal year 2011, an increase of $16.3 million from $198.6 million last year, mainly as a result of higher sales volume and the increased output of our 400,000 MT HDG production lines.

Revenues contributed by Ningbo Zhehua were $31.5 million for fiscal year 2011, a decrease of approximately $31.0 million from $62.5 million in fiscal year 2010, primarily resulting from our strategic decision to reduce its lower-margin steel trading businesses and focus on higher-margin production businesses.

In terms of sales to related parties as compared with sales to unrelated parties, our direct sales to unrelated parties in fiscal year 2011 increased $31.5 million, or 13.4%, to $266.1 million from $234.6 million in fiscal year 2010.

 
27

 

Cost of revenue.  Cost of revenue decreased $54.7 million, or 12.3%, to $391.2 million in fiscal year 2011 from $445.9 million in fiscal year 2010.  As a percentage of revenue, cost of revenue decreased to 90.6% in fiscal year 2011 from 93.1% last year. Decreased cost of revenue was mainly due to the decreased sales volume.

Gross profit and gross margin. Gross profit increased $7.7 million to $40.5 million in fiscal year 2011 from $32.8 million in fiscal year 2010.  Gross profit as a percentage of revenue (gross margin) was 9.4% in fiscal year 2011, as compared to 6.9% in fiscal year 2010.  The increased gross margin mainly resulted from increased international sales volume and increased sales volume of higher margin products by Changshu Huaye. In addition, improved capacity utilization at Jiangsu Cold Rolled, which reduced the average cost of production, combined with the elimination of the lower margin steel trading business of Ningbo Zhehua, also contributed to the increase in gross margin. Finally, higher average selling prices year-over-year also improved gross margin.

On a segment basis, gross margin for Changshu Huaye increased to 13.5% in fiscal year 2011 from 10.4% last year, mainly because it produced and sold more higher-margin advanced PPGI products and exported more products in fiscal year 2011 than the same period last year.  Gross margin for Jiangsu Cold-Rolled increased to 5.3% in fiscal year 2011 from 4.1% last year, mainly due to the higher capacity utilization of the new HDG production lines and higher average selling prices. Gross margin for Ningbo Zhehua increased to 13.7% in fiscal year 2011, as compared to 4.8% in fiscal year 2010, mainly because we reduced our lower-margin steel trading business.

Total operating expenses. Our total operating expenses increased approximately $0.9 million to $15.3 million in fiscal year 2011 from $14.4 million in fiscal year 2010. As a percentage of revenue, our total operating expenses increased to 3.5% in fiscal year 2011 from 3.0% in fiscal year 2010.

Selling expenses. Our selling expenses decreased approximately $0.6 million to $7.5 million in fiscal year 2011, from $8.1 million in fiscal year 2010. As a percentage of revenue, our selling expenses remained stable at approximately 1.7% of total revenue in fiscal year 2011. The dollar decrease of selling expenses was primarily due to effective cost control measures and lower international shipping costs.

General and administrative expenses.  General and administrative expenses increased $1.5 million, or 22.9%, to $7.8 million, or 1.8% of revenue, in fiscal year 2011, from $6.4 million, or 1.3% of revenue, in fiscal year 2010. Higher general and administrative expenses were primarily due to higher bad debt allowance of approximately $1.7 million resulting from more direct sales and higher office expenses of $0.7 million for fiscal year 2011 than the same period last year. During fiscal year 2011, we relocated our headquarters into a new office building to prepare for anticipated future business needs.

Interest expense. Our interest expense increased $2.2 million to $8.0 million in fiscal year 2011, from $5.8 million in fiscal year 2010. As a percentage of revenue, our interest expenses increased to 1.8% in fiscal year 2011, from 1.2% in fiscal year 2010.  The increase in interest expense was mainly attributable to the increase in benchmark interest rates. From October 2010 and continuing through the end of the 2011 fiscal year, China Central Bank raised its one-year lending interest rate by 1.0%, or 20.0% increase as compared with the interest rate during the 2010 fiscal year.

Provision for income taxes. We incurred income tax expense of $3.4 million in fiscal year 2011 as compared to $2.4 million last year, partially due to the higher taxable income.

Net income. Net income, without including the foreign currency translation adjustment, increased $2.7 million, or approximately 23.9%, to $14.0 million in fiscal year 2011, from $11.3 million in fiscal year 2010, as a cumulative result of the above factors.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Our major sources of liquidity for the periods covered by this annual report were borrowings through short-term bank and private loans and long-term notes payable.  Our operating activities provided approximately $12.8 million of cash in fiscal year 2011. As of June 30, 2011, our total indebtedness to non-related parties under existing short-term loans was approximately $95.5 million. We also had approximately $23.6 million under long-term notes payable to non-related parties.  We had no notes payable to related parties, however, approximately $82.4 million of our short-term notes payable were guaranteed by Shanghai Huaye and its affiliates.  As of June 30, 2011, the Company also had an unused line of credit with banks of approximately $31 million (RMB 200 million) which entitled us to draw bank loans for general corporate purposes.

 
28

 

 
Short-term bank and private loans and notes payable are likely to continue to be our key sources of financing for the foreseeable future, although in the future we may raise additional capital by issuing shares of our capital stock in an equity financing. We expect to renew our short term loans when they become due.

Our liquidity and working capital may be affected by a material decrease in cash flow due to factors such as the continued use of cash in operating activities resulting from a decrease in sales due to the current global economic crisis, increased competition, decreases in the availability, or increases in the cost of raw materials, unexpected equipment failures, or regulatory changes.

As stated above, a portion of our operations is funded through short-term bank loans and we expect to renew our short term loans when they become due. We are exposed to a variety of risks associated with short-term borrowings including adverse fluctuations in fixed interest rates for short-term borrowings and unfavorable increases in variable interest rates, potential inability to service our short term indebtedness through cash flow from operations and the overall reduction of credit in the current economic environment.

Our liquidity and working capital may also be affected by the substantial amount of our outstanding short-term loans, which represent our primary source of financing in China. Depending on the level of cash used in our operating activities and the level of our indebtedness, (i) it may become more difficult for us to satisfy our existing or future liabilities or obligations, which could in turn result in an event of default on such obligations, (ii) we may have to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flows from borrowings to our operating activities and to debt service payments, thereby reducing the availability of cash for working capital and capital expenditures, acquisitions, general corporate purposes or other purposes, (iii) our ability to obtain additional financing in the future for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions, general corporate purposes or other purposes may become impaired, (iv) our ability to withstand a downturn in our business, the industry in which we operate or the economy generally may be diminished, (v) we may experience limited flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the industry in which we operate and (vi) we may find ourselves at a competitive disadvantage compared to competitors that have proportionately less debt. If we are unable to meet our debt service obligations, we could be forced to restructure or refinance our indebtedness, seek additional equity capital or sell assets. We may be unable to obtain financing or sell assets on satisfactory terms, or at all, which could cause us to default on our debt service obligations and be subject to foreclosure on such loans. Additionally, we could incur additional indebtedness in the future and, if new debt is added to our current debt levels, the risks above could intensify.

As some of our loans become due, we may elect to refinance, rather than repay, the indebtedness. However, there is no assurance that additional financing will become available on terms acceptable to us. We believe that we will have the ability to refinance our indebtedness when and if we elect to do so. While we currently are not in a position to know the terms of such refinancing, we expect to refinance our indebtedness at prevailing market rates and on prevailing market terms.

As of June 30, 2011, we had cash and cash equivalents (excluding restricted cash) of $21.3 million and restricted cash of $72.3 million.  The following table provides detailed information about our net cash flow for all financial statement periods presented in this report.

Cash Flow
(all amounts in thousands of U.S. dollars)

(Unaudited)
 
Fiscal Years Ended June 30,
 
   
2011
   
2010
 
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
    12,811       (4,833 )
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities
    (33,890 )     15,357  
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
    28,441       (7,906 )
Effect of foreign currency translation on cash and cash equivalents
    626       65  
Net cash flows
    7,988       2,683  
 
29

 

Operating Activities

Net cash provided by operating activities was $12.8 million for fiscal year 2011, an increase of $17.6 million from $4.8 million net cash used in operating activities for the last fiscal year.  The increase in net cash provided by operating activities was primarily due to increased advances from customers, net income and accounts payable, partially offset by increased cash outflow from advances to suppliers for fiscal year 2011 as compared with last year.

Investing Activities

Our main uses of cash for investing activities are payments relating to the acquisition of property, plant and equipment and restricted cash pledged as deposits for bankers’ acceptance bills.

Net cash used in investing activities during fiscal year 2011 was $33.9 million as compared to $15.4 million net cash provided by investing activities for fiscal year 2010. The increase in net cash used in investing activities was primarily due to our purchase of new office space during fiscal year 2011 to prepare for our anticipated business needs and increase in restricted cash.

Financing Activities

Net cash provided by financing activities for fiscal year 2011 totaled $28.4 million, as compared to $7.9 million net cash used in financing activities for fiscal year 2010. The increase in net cash provided by financing activities was mainly due to an increase in proceeds from issuance of payable notes, partially offset by cash outflow from payments on notes payable.

As of June 30, 2011, the amount, maturity date and term of each of our loans were as follows.

(All amounts in millions of U.S. dollars)

Lender
 
Amount*
   
Starting
Date
   
Maturity
Date
 
Guarantor**
Construction Bank of China, Changshu Branch
  $ 3.09       2010-11-18       2011-11-17  
Shanghai Huaye
Construction Bank of China, Changshu Branch
    3.09       2010-11-22       2011-11-17  
Shanghai Huaye
Communications Bank of China, Changshu Branch
    3.09       2011-05-13       2011-11-15  
Shanghai Huaye
Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, Changshu Branch
    3.09       2011-05-20       2011-11-19  
Changshu Huaye
The Agricultural Bank of China, Changshu Branch
    3.09       2011-05-30       2011-10-26  
Shanghai Huaye,  Jiangsu Cold-Rolled
Construction Bank of China, Changshu Dayi Branch
    0.54       2011-06-02       2011-08-30  
Shanghai Huaye,  Jiangsu Cold-Rolled
Construction Bank of China, Changshu Dayi Branch
    2.16       2011-05-30       2011-08-17  
Jiangsu Cold-Rolled
Construction Bank of China, Changshu Dayi Branch
    2.13       2011-05-31       2011-08-18  
Jiangsu Cold-Rolled
Construction Bank of China, Changshu Dayi Branch
    0.30       2011-06-23       2011-10-13  
Jiangsu Cold-Rolled
The Agricultural Bank of China, Changshu Branch
    3.87       2010-07-09       2011-07-08  
Changshu Huaye, Shanghai Huaye
The Agricultural Bank of China, Changshu Branch
    7.27       2010-07-30       2011-07-28  
Changshu Huaye, Shanghai Huaye
The Agricultural Bank of China, Changshu Branch
    6.19       2010-08-25       2011-08-22  
Changshu Huaye, Shanghai Huaye
The Agricultural Bank of China, Changshu Branch
    6.19       2010-09-08       2011-09-06  
Changshu Huaye, Shanghai Huaye
The Agricultural Bank of China, Changshu Branch
    7.74       2010-10-15       2011-09-30  
None
The Agricultural Bank of China, Changshu Branch
    2.48       2010-10-26       2011-10-24  
None
The Agricultural Bank of China, Changshu Branch
    7.74       2010-11-12       2011-11-10  
Changshu Huaye, Shanghai Huaye
Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, Changshu Branch
    1.55       2010-12-27       2011-12-26  
Changshu Huaye
The Agricultural Bank of China, Changshu Dongbang Branch
    2.32       2011-01-21       2012-01-20  
Changshu Huaye, Shanghai Huaye
Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, Changshu Branch
    3.09       2011-03-02       2012-02-29  
Changshu Huaye, Shanghai Huaye
The Agricultural Bank of China, Changshu Dongbang Branch
    0.56       2011-04-22       2011-10-21  
None
Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, Changshu Branch
    3.09       2011-04-29       2011-10-28  
Changshu Huaye
The Agricultural Bank of China, Changshu Dongbang Branch
    5.26       2011-05-25       2011-11-24  
Jiangsu Cold-Rolled
The Agricultural Bank of China, Changshu Dongbang Branch
    10.06       2011-06-17       2011-12-15  
Changshu Huaye, Shanghai Huaye
Shenzhen Development Bank, Ningbo Branch
    1.55       2010-08-20       2011-08-20  
Changshu Huaye
The Agricultural Bank of China, LuoTuo Branch
    3.09       2011-05-11       2011-10-18  
Shanghai Huaye
Macao International Bank Co., LTD
    6.99       2011-02-23       2013-02-21  
Sutor BVI
Macao International Bank Co., LTD
    5.06       2011-03-11       2013-02-21  
Sutor BVI
Macao International Bank Co., LTD
    4.78       2011-03-23       2013-02-21  
Sutor BVI
Macao International Bank Co., LTD
    5.08       2011-04-01       2013-02-21  
Sutor BVI
Macao International Bank Co., LTD
    1.72       2011-04-11       2013-02-21  
Sutor BVI
Lin, GuiHua
    2.86       2008-11-20       2011-11-20  
None
Total
  $ 119.12                    

 
30

 

* Calculated on the basis that $1 = RMB 6.46

** We do not pay any consideration to Shanghai Huaye or its affiliated companies, which are controlled by our CEO and her spouse, for the guarantees of our loans.

The loan agreements with banks generally contain debt covenants that require us to maintain certain inventory levels, among other things. We were in material compliance with these debt covenants as of June 30, 2011.

In the coming 12 months, we have approximately $96.1 million in bank loans that will mature. We plan to replace these loans with new bank loans in approximately the same aggregate amounts.

We believe that our currently available working capital, credit facilities referred to above and the expected additional credit facility should be adequate to sustain our operations at the current level for at least the next twelve months. However, depending on our future needs and changes and trends in the capital markets affecting our shares and the Company, we may determine to seek additional equity or debt financing in the private or public markets.

Critical Accounting Policies

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires our management to make assumptions, estimates and judgments that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements, including the notes thereto, and related disclosures of commitments and contingencies, if any. We consider our critical accounting policies to be those that require the more significant judgments and estimates in the preparation of financial statements, including the following:

Share Based Compensation – Stock awards granted to employees and non-employees are accounted for under ASC 718-10, “Share-Based Payment”, and ASC 505-50 “Accounting for Equity Instruments That Are Issued to Other Than Employees for Acquiring, or in Conjunction with Selling Goods or Services”, respectively.

In accordance with ASC 718-10, all grants of share options to employees are recognized in the financial statements based on their grant-date fair values. The Company has elected to recognize compensation expense using the straight-line method for all share options granted.

 
31

 

ASC 718-10 requires forfeitures to be estimated at the time of grant and revised, if necessary, in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from initial estimates. Share-based compensation expense was recorded net of estimated forfeitures such that expense was recorded only for those share-based awards that are expected to vest.

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income – Accumulated other comprehensive income presented in the accompanying consolidated financial statements consists of foreign currency translation adjustments.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In March 2010, the (FASB) issued (ASU) 2010-11, “Derivative and Hedging (Topic 815)”. All entities that enter into contracts containing an embedded credit derivative feature related to the transfer of credit risk that is not only in the form of subordination of one financial instrument to another will be affected by the amendments in ASU 2010-11 because the amendments clarify that the embedded credit derivative scope exception in paragraph 815-15-15-8 through 15-9 does not apply to such contracts. ASU 2010-11 is effective at the beginning of the reporting entity’s first fiscal quarter beginning after June 15, 2010. The provisions of ASU 2010-11 did not have a material effect on the financial position, results of operations or cash flows of the Company.

In April 2010, the FASB issued ASU 2010-13, “Compensation—Stock Compensation (Topic 718)”. ASU 2010-13 provides amendments to ASC 718 to clarify that an employee share-based payment award with an exercise price denominated in the currency of a market in which a substantial portion of the entity’s equity securities trades should not be considered to contain a condition that is not a market, performance, or service condition. Therefore, an entity would not classify such an award as a liability if it otherwise qualifies as equity. The amendments in ASU 2010-13 are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning on or after December 15, 2010. The provision of ASU 2010-13 did not have a material effect on the financial position, results of operations or cash flows of the Company.

In May 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-04, “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820)”: Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRS. The new guidance results in a consistent definition of fair value and common requirements for measurement of and disclosure about fair value between US GAAP and IFRS. The new guidance changes some fair value measurement principles and disclosure requirements. The disclosure requirements have been enhanced. The most significant change will require entities, for their recurring Level 3 fair value measurements, to disclose quantitative information about unobservable inputs used, a description of the valuation processes used by the entity, and a qualitative discussion about the sensitivity of the measurements. New disclosures are required about the use of a nonfinancial asset measured or disclosed at fair value if its use differs from its highest and best use. In addition, entities must report the level in the fair value hierarchy of assets and liabilities not recorded at fair value but where fair value is disclosed. The amendments in this update are to be applied prospectively. For public entities, the amendments are effective during interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011. The Company is currently assessing the impact, if any, that the adoption of this update will have on its consolidated financial statements and disclosures.

In June 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-05, “Comprehensive Income (Topic 220)”: Presentation of Comprehensive Income. Under the amendments to Topic 220, Comprehensive Income, in this update, an entity has the option to present the total of comprehensive income, the components of net income, and the components of other comprehensive income either in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. In both choices, an entity is required to present each component of net income along with total net income, each component of other comprehensive income along with a total for other comprehensive income, and a total amount for comprehensive income. This update eliminates the option to present the components of other comprehensive income as part of the statement of changes in stockholders' equity. The amendments in this update do not change the items that must be reported in other comprehensive income or when an item of other comprehensive income must be reclassified to net income. The amendments in this update should be applied retrospectively. For public entities, the amendments are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011. Early adoption is permitted, because compliance with the amendments is already permitted. The amendments do not require any transition disclosures. The adoption of this standard is not expected to have a material effect on the financial position, results of operations or cash flows of the company.

 
32

 

Seasonality

Our operating results and operating cash flows historically have not been subject to significant seasonal variations. This pattern may change, however, as a result of new market opportunities or new product introductions.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We do not have any off-balance arrangements.

ITEM 7A.
QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK.

Not Applicable.

ITEM 8.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA.

The full text of our audited consolidated financial statements as of June 30, 2011 and 2010 begins on page F-1 of this report.

ITEM 9.
CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE.

None.

ITEM 9A.
CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

Our management, with the participation of our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, Ms. Lifang Chen and Mr. Yongfei Jiang, respectively, evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures. The term “disclosure controls and procedures,” as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act, means controls and other procedures of a company that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports, such as this report, that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to the company’s management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Based on that evaluation, Ms. Chen and Mr. Jiang concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of June 30, 2011.

Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting for the Company. Internal control over financial reporting refers to the process designed by, or under the supervision of, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, and effected by our Board of Directors, management and other personnel, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of our financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with U.S. GAAP, and includes those policies and procedures that:
 
 
·
pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of our assets;
 
 
·
provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, and that our receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with the authorization of our management and directors; and
 
 
·
provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Management conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2011 based on the framework set forth in the report entitled Internal Control - Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on the evaluation, management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2011 was effective.

 
33

 

Because we are a smaller reporting company, this annual report does not include an attestation report of our registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by our registered public accounting firm.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting during the fourth quarter of our fiscal year ended June 30, 2011 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

ITEM 9B.
OTHER INFORMATION.

We have no information to disclose that was required to be disclosed in a report on Form 8-K during fourth quarter of fiscal year 2011, but was not reported.

PART III
 
ITEM 10.
DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE.

Directors and Executive Officers

The following sets forth the name and position of each of our current executive officers and directors.
 
NAME
 
AGE
 
POSITION
Lifang Chen
 
40
 
Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and President
Yongfei Jiang
 
34
 
Director, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer and Secretary
Naijiang Zhou
 
48
 
Vice President of Finance
Gerard Pascale
 
41
 
Director
Guoyou Shao
 
62
 
Director
Xinchuang Li
 
48
 
Director

Lifang Chen.  Ms. Chen became our Chairman on February 1, 2007 and our Chief Executive Officer and President in May 2008. She has been the Chairman of our subsidiary Sutor BVI since August 2007. Since June 2001, Ms. Chen has served as the Vice President of Shanghai Huaye. From September 1993 to May 2001, Ms. Chen served as the director of the civil administrative bureau of Xiaoshan District, Hangzhou City. She has extensive experience in enterprise management and fine finished steel industry. Ms. Chen received a M.A. degree in philosophy from Zhenjiang University.

Yongfei Jiang.  Mr. Jiang became a member of our board of directors in June 2009 and has been our Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer and Secretary since February 1, 2007. He also has been the Chief Financial Officer of Changshu Huaye since 2005. From 2002 to 2005, Mr. Jiang served as the finance manager of Guangzhou Huaye Trading Co., Ltd., a subsidiary of Shanghai Huaye, where he was responsible for the financial and capital management. From 1999 to 2002, Mr. Jiang was the finance manager at Zhejiang Guotai Seal Material Co. Ltd., an equipment manufacturer.

Naijiang Zhou. Mr. Zhou became our Vice President of Finance on February 1, 2010. Previously, Mr. Zhou served as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer at Rich Fields Investment, Ltd., a private equity investment firm.  From April 2007 to July 2008, Mr. Zhou worked as international research analyst at Roth Capital Partners, a full service U.S. banking firm.  Before joining Roth Capital, Mr. Zhou worked for seven years as principal financial planner and principal financial analyst at American Electric Power, where he was responsible for strategic planning, financial planning and analysis, and corporate development. Prior to that, he worked for the Wing Group as financial analyst and U.S. Global Investors as senior research analyst and co-managed mutual fund investments. Mr. Zhou received both a Ph.D. and an MBA degree from the University of Texas at Austin, and a B.S. in Petroleum Engineering from China Petroleum University. He is a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) charter holder.

 
34

 

Gerard Pascale.   Mr. Pascale has been a member of our board of directors since January 15, 2010. Mr. Pascale has extensive experience in financial accounting, financial analysis and planning, marketing research, corporate governance and securities. For the past two and a half years he has served as President and CEO of SC Financial Group, LLC, where he specializes in advising both US and international clients on valuation, financial modeling and the responsibilities of publicly traded US companies.  Previously, he was the Director of Finance at Heritage Management Consultants, Inc. where Mr. Pascale specialized in providing finance and SEC support throughout the entire process of listing on a US exchange.  From 2003 to 2005, Mr. Pascale was a Director with the Corporate Executive Board, a consulting firm delivering data and tools, practice research and insight to clients. He has also held financial analyst positions with Intel Corporation and Emerson Electric.  Mr. Pascale has a Bachelor of Science in Accounting from Virginia Tech and an MBA in finance from the University of Chicago.

Guoyou Shao.  Mr. Shao has been a member of our board of directors since February 2008. Since April 2003, Mr. Shao has served as Board Chairman of Fortis Haitong Investment Management Co., Ltd., one of the first sino-foreign joint ventures specializing in fund management to gain approval in China. Prior to this, Mr. Shao served as Manager of the Investor Relations Department of Haitong Securities Co. Ltd. since July 1998. Mr. Shao has extensive securities investment and asset management experience and holds a Master’s degree in Business Administration from Hong Kong Science Management Institute.

Xinchuang Li.   Mr. Li has been a member of our board of directors since February 2008. Since 2009, Mr. Li has served as the Director of China Metallurgical Industry Planning & Research Institute (CMIPRI) in Beijing. From 2008 to 2009, Mr. Li served as the Executive Director of CMIPRI. From 2002 to 2008, Mr. Li served as the Vice Director and Chief Engineer of CMIPRI. From 1998 to 2002, Mr. Li served as the Vice-Chief Engineer of CMIPRI. Mr. Li has significant experience in the operations of companies engaged in steel production with a particular focus and specialization in the operations, planning and strategic focus of companies operating in the Chinese steel industry. Mr. Li holds a Master’s degree in Business Administration from Fordham University and Beijing University.

There are no agreements or understandings for any of our executive officers or director to resign at the request of another person and no officer or director is acting on behalf of nor will any of them act at the direction of any other person.

Directors are elected until their successors are duly elected and qualified.

Director Qualifications

Directors are responsible for overseeing the Company’s business consistent with their fiduciary duty to shareholders. This significant responsibility requires highly-skilled individuals with various qualities, attributes and professional experience. The Board believes that there are general requirements for service on the Company’s Board of Directors that are applicable to all directors and that there are other skills and experience that should be represented on the Board as a whole but not necessarily by each director. The Board and the Governance and Nominating Committee of the Board consider the qualifications of directors and director candidates individually and in the broader context of the Board’s overall composition and the Company’s current and future needs.

Qualifications for All Directors

In its assessment of each potential candidate, including those recommended by shareholders, the Governance and Nominating Committee considers the nominee’s judgment, integrity, experience, independence, understanding of the Company’s business or other related industries and such other factors the Governance and Nominating Committee determines are pertinent in light of the current needs of the Board. The Governance and Nominating Committee also takes into account the ability of a director to devote the time and effort necessary to fulfill his or her responsibilities to the Company.

The Board and the Governance and Nominating Committee require that each director be a recognized person of high integrity with a proven record of success in his or her field. Each director must demonstrate innovative thinking, familiarity with and respect for corporate governance requirements and practices, an appreciation of multiple cultures and a commitment to sustainability and to dealing responsibly with social issues. In addition to the qualifications required of all directors, the Board assesses intangible qualities including the individual’s ability to ask difficult questions and, simultaneously, to work collegially.

 
35

 

The Board does not have a specific diversity policy, but considers diversity of race, ethnicity, gender, age, cultural background and professional experiences in evaluating candidates for Board membership. Diversity is important because a variety of points of view contribute to a more effective decision-making process.

Qualifications, Attributes, Skills and Experience to be Represented on the Board as a Whole

The Board has identified particular qualifications, attributes, skills and experience that are important to be represented on the Board as a whole, in light of the Company’s current needs and business priorities. The Company’s services are performed in areas of future growth located outside of the United States. Accordingly, the Board believes that international experience or specific knowledge of key geographic growth areas and diversity of professional experiences should be represented on the Board. In addition, the Company’s business is multifaceted and involves complex financial transactions. Therefore, the Board believes that the Board should include some directors with a high level of financial literacy and some directors who possess relevant business experience members of senior management teams. Our business involves complex technologies in a highly specialized industry, and therefore, the Board believes that extensive knowledge of the Company’s business and industry should be represented on the Board.

Summary of Qualifications of Directors

Set forth below is a narrative disclosure that summarizes some of the specific qualifications, attributes, skills and experiences of our directors. For more detailed information, please refer to the biographical information for each director set forth above.

Lifang Chen. Ms. Chen has extensive senior management experience in the industry in which we operate, having served as our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman since February 2008 and as the Vice President of Shanghai Huaye since 2001. In addition, Ms. Chen has worked extensively with various governmental agencies in connection with our industry.

Yongfei Jiang. Mr. Jiang has extensive experience in our industry, as well as over ten years of experience in working on corporate accounting, finance and capital management matters.

Gerard Pascale. Mr. Pascale brings to the Board a high level of financial literacy and sophistication, and extensive financial and capital markets experience, including M&A, debt and equity financings, restructuring and business expansion. In addition, Mr. Pascale has extensive experience dealing with corporate governance matters and filings with the SEC.

Guoyou Shao. Mr. Shao has extensive securities investment, asset management and investor relations experience.

Xinchuang Li.  Mr. Li has significant experience in the operations of companies engaged in steel production with a particular focus and specialization in the operations, planning and strategic focus of companies operating in the Chinese steel industry.

Family Relationships

There are no family relationships among our directors or officers.

Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings

To the best of our knowledge, none of our directors or executive officers has, during the past ten years:

 
·
been convicted in a criminal proceeding or been subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offences);
 
 
·
had any bankruptcy petition filed by or against the business or property of the person, or of any partnership, corporation or business association of which he was a general partner or executive officer, either at the time of the bankruptcy filing or within two years prior to that time;
 
 
·
been subject to any order, judgment, or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction or federal or state authority, permanently or temporarily enjoining, barring, suspending or otherwise limiting, his involvement in any type of business, securities, futures, commodities, investment, banking, savings and loan, or insurance activities, or to be associated with persons engaged in any such activity;

 
36

 
 
 
·
been found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action or by the Securities and Exchange Commission or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and the judgment has not been reversed, suspended, or vacated;
 
 
·
been the subject of, or a party to, any federal or state judicial or administrative order, judgment, decree, or finding, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated (not including any settlement of a civil proceeding among private litigants), relating to an alleged violation of any federal or state securities or commodities law or regulation, any law or regulation respecting financial institutions or insurance companies including, but not limited to, a temporary or permanent injunction, order of disgorgement or restitution, civil money penalty or temporary or permanent cease-and-desist order, or removal or prohibition order, or any law or regulation prohibiting mail or wire fraud or fraud in connection with any business entity; or
 
 
·
been the subject of, or a party to, any sanction or order, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any self-regulatory organization (as defined in Section 3(a)(26) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(26))), any registered entity (as defined in Section 1(a)(29) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1(a)(29))), or any equivalent exchange, association, entity or organization that has disciplinary authority over its members or persons associated with a member.

Except as set forth in our discussion below in Item 13, “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence – Transactions with Related Persons,” none of our directors, director nominees or executive officers has been involved in any transactions with us or any of our directors, executive officers, affiliates or associates which are required to be disclosed pursuant to the rules and regulations of the SEC.

Board Composition and Committees

Our board of directors is comprised of Lifang Chen, Yongfei Jiang, Gerard Pascale, Guoyou Shao and Xinchuang Li.

Messrs. Gerard Pascale, Guoyou Shao, and Xinchuang Li each serves on our board of directors as an “independent director” as defined by as defined by Rule 5605(a)(2) of the NASDAQ Marketplace Rules. Our board of directors has determined that Gerard Pascale possesses the accounting or related financial management experience that qualifies him as financially sophisticated within the meaning of Rule 5605(c)(2)(A) of the NASDAQ Marketplace Rules and that he is an “audit committee financial expert” as defined by the rules and regulations of the SEC.

Our board of directors currently has three standing committees which perform various duties on behalf of and report to the board of directors: (i) audit committee, (ii) compensation committee and (iii) governance and nominating committee. Each of the three standing committees is comprised entirely of independent directors. From time to time, the board of directors may establish other committees.

Audit Committee

Our board of directors established an audit committee in February 2008. Our audit committee consists of three members: Gerard Pascale, Guoyou Shao, and Xinchuang Li. Our audit committee oversees our accounting and financial reporting processes and the audits of the financial statements of our company. Mr. Pascale serves as our audit committee chairman.

Our audit committee is responsible for, among other things:

 
·
selecting our independent auditors and pre-approving all auditing and non-auditing services permitted to be performed by our independent auditors;
 
 
·
reviewing with our independent auditors any audit problems or difficulties and management’s response;
 
 
·
reviewing and approving all proposed related-party transactions, as defined in Item 404 of Regulation S-K under the Securities Act;
 
 
·
discussing the annual audited financial statements with management and our independent auditors;

 
37

 
 
 
·
reviewing major issues as to the adequacy of our internal controls and any special audit steps adopted in light of significant internal control deficiencies;
 
 
·
annually reviewing and reassessing the adequacy of our audit committee charter;
 
 
·
meeting separately and periodically with management and our internal and independent auditors;
 
 
·
reporting regularly to the full board of directors; and
 
 
·
such other matters that are specifically delegated to our audit committee by our board of directors from time to time.

Compensation Committee

Our board of directors established a compensation committee in February 2008. Our compensation committee consists of three members: Gerard Pascale, Guoyou Shao, and Xinchuang Li. Mr. Shao serves as the chairman of our compensation committee. Our compensation committee assists the board of directors in reviewing and approving the compensation structure of our directors and executive officers, including all forms of compensation to be provided to our directors and executive officers. Our Chief Executive Officer may not be present at any meeting of our compensation committee during which her compensation is deliberated.

Our compensation committee is responsible for, among other things:

 
·
approving and overseeing the compensation package for our executive officers;
 
 
·
reviewing and approving corporate goals and objectives relevant to the compensation of our Chief Executive Officer;
 
 
·
evaluating the performance of our Chief Executive Officer in light of those goals and objectives, and setting the compensation level of our Chief Executive Officer based on this evaluation; and
 
 
·
reviewing periodically and making recommendations to the board of directors regarding any long-term incentive compensation or equity plans, programs or similar arrangements, annual bonuses, employee pension and welfare benefit plans.

Governance and Nominating Committee

Our board of directors established a governance and nominating committee in February 2008. Our governance and nominating committee consists of three members: Gerard Pascale, Guoyou Shao, and Xinchuang Li. Mr. Li serves as the chairman to our governance and nominating committee. The governance and nominating committee assists the board of directors in identifying individuals qualified to become our directors and in determining the composition of the board of directors and its committees.

Our governance and nominating committee is responsible for, among other things:

 
·
identifying and recommending to the board of directors nominees for election or re-election to the board of directors, or for appointment to fill any vacancy;
 
 
·
reviewing annually with the board of directors the current composition of the board of directors in light of the characteristics of independence, age, skills, experience and availability of service to us; and
 
 
·
identifying and recommending to the board of directors the directors to serve as members of the committees.

Section 16(A) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

Under U.S. securities laws, directors, certain executive officers and persons holding more than 10% of our common stock must report their initial ownership of the common stock, and any changes in that ownership, to the SEC. The SEC has designated specific due dates for these reports. In fiscal year 2011, all such reports were timely filed. In making these statements, we have relied upon examination of the copies of all Section 16(a) forms provided to us and the written representations of our executive officers, directors and beneficial owner of more than 10% of a registered class of our equity securities.

 
38

 

Code of Ethics

On January 31, 2007, our board of directors adopted a new code of ethics that applies to all of our directors, officers and employees, including our principal executive officer, principal financial officer and principal accounting officer. The new code replaces our prior code of ethics that applied only to our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller and any person who performed similar functions, and addresses, among other things, honesty and ethical conduct, conflicts of interest, compliance with laws, regulations and policies, including disclosure requirements under the federal securities laws, confidentiality, trading on inside information, and reporting of violations of the code.  A copy of the Code of Ethics has been filed as Exhibit 14 to our current report on Form 8-K, filed on February 2, 2007.

ITEM 11.
EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION.

Summary Compensation Table – Fiscal Years Ended June 30, 2011 and 2010

The following table sets forth information concerning all cash and non-cash compensation awarded to, earned by or paid to the named persons for services rendered in all capacities during the noted periods. No other executive officer received total annual salary and bonus compensation in excess of $100,000.

Name and Principal Position
 
Year
 
Salary
($)
   
Bonus
($)
   
Stock
Awards
($)(1)
   
All Other
Compensation
($)
   
Total
($)
 
Lifang Chen, CEO (2)
 
2011
    100,000       -       25,390       -       125,390  
   
2010
    100,000       -       4,553       -       104,553  
Naijiang Zhou, VP Finance (3)
 
2011
    90,527       -       67,776       -       158,303  
   
2010
    38,700       -       27,263       -       65,963  

(1) This amount represents the compensation expense that the Company recognized for financial statement reporting purposes in the applicable fiscal year for the portion of the fair value of equity awards granted to the named executive officer in such fiscal year, in accordance with ASC 718-10, “Share-Based Payment,” and ASC 505-50, “Accounting for Equity Instruments That Are Issued to Other Than Employees for Acquiring, or in Conjunction with Selling Goods or Services,” respectively.  Such amount thus does not reflect the amount of compensation actually received by the named executive officer during the applicable fiscal year.  For a description of the assumptions used in calculating the fair value of these equity awards, see Note 10 to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report.

(2) Pursuant to the Company’s 2009 Equity Incentive Plan, we granted options to purchase 40,000 shares of our common stock to Ms. Chen with an exercise price of $2.71 per share on April 27, 2010. One-third of the option will each vest on the first, second and third anniversaries of the date of grant.

(3) Mr. Zhou became our Vice President of Finance on February 1, 2010. As a result, his compensation for fiscal year 2010 covers the period from February 1, 2010 to June 30, 2010 only. Pursuant to the Company’s 2009 Equity Incentive Plan, we granted options to purchase 20,000 shares of our common stock to Mr. Zhou with an exercise price of $2.71 per share on April 27, 2010. One-third of the option will each vest on the first, second and third anniversaries of the date of grant. In addition, Mr. Zhou received 20,000 restricted shares of common stock as part of his compensation for services from February 1, 2010 to January 31, 2011. According to the amendment to the employment agreement entered into on February 23, 2011, Mr. Zhou received 30,000 additional restricted shares of common stock as part of his annual compensation to be vested over a twelve month period.

Employment Agreements

Currently, we do not have an employment agreement with our CEO, Ms. Lifang Chen.

 
39

 

On December 18, 2009, we entered into an employment agreement with Mr. Naijiang Zhou, our Vice President of Finance, under which Mr. Zhou will receive a monthly salary of RMB50,000 (approximately $7,740) and 20,000 shares of the Company’s common stock per year. The employment contract has a one year term, starting from February 1, 2010, which will be automatically renewed unless terminated or modified by the parties. On February 23, 2011, we entered into an amendment to Mr. Zhou’s employment agreement, which provides for an increase in the number of shares issued to Mr. Zhou annually under the employment agreement from 20,000 to 30,000 shares of common stock.

Our subsidiary, Sutor BVI, has an employment agreement with Yongfei Jiang, our Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Jiang is an employee-at-will and is receiving an annual salary at the range of $30,000 to $60,000 under the agreement.

We have not provided retirement benefits (other than a state pension scheme in which all of our employees in China participate) or severance or change of control benefits to our named executive officer.

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year End

The following table sets forth the equity awards outstanding at June 30, 2011 for each of our named executive officers.
 
   
OPTION AWARDS
 
STOCK AWARDS
 
                               
Equity
   
Equity
 
           
Equity
                 
Incentive Plan
   
Incentive
 
           
Incentive
                 
Awards:
   
Plan Awards:
 
           
Plan Awards:
                 
Number of
   
Market or
 
           
Number of
         
Number of
 
   
 
Unearned
   
Payout Value
 
   
Number of
 
Number of
 
Securities
         
Shares or
 
Market Value
 
Shares, Units
   
of Unearned
 
   
Securities
 
Securities
 
Underlying
         
Units of
 
of Shares or
 
or Other
   
Shares, Units or
 
   
Underlying
 
Underlying
 
Unexercised
 
Option
     
Stock That
 
Units of Stock
 
Rights That
   
Other Rights
 
   
Unexercised
 
Unexercised
 
Unearned
 
Exercise
 
Option
 
Have Not
 
That Have
 
Have Not
   
That Have Not
 
   
Options (#)
 
Options (#)
 
Options
 
Price
 
Expiration
 
Vested
 
Not Vested
 
Vested
   
Vested
 
Name  
Exercisable
 
Unexercisable
  (#)(1)  
($)
 
Date
  (#)  
($)
  (#)(2)     (#)(3)  
Lifang Chen
 
-
 
-
    26,667  
2.71
 
4/27/2015
    -  
-
    -       -  
Naijiang Zhou
 
-
 
-
    13,333  
2.71
 
4/27/2015
    -  
-
    12,500       15,750  

(1)
On April 27, 2010, we issued options to our executive officers under the Sutor Technology Group Limited 2009 Equity Incentive Plan. One-third of the option will each vest on the first, second and third anniversaries of the date of grant.

(2)
Pursuant to the amendment to the employment agreement dated February 23, 2011, we granted Mr. Zhou 30,000 shares to be vested over a twelve month period.

(3)
Values are based on the closing stock price of $1.26 per share on June 30, 2011.

Compensation of Directors

The table below sets forth the compensation of our directors for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2011:

 
 
 
Name
 
Fees Earned
or Paid in Cash
($)
   
Stock
Awards
($)
   
Option
Awards
($)
   
Non-Equity
Incentive Plan
Compensation
($)
   
All Other
Compensation
($)
   
 
Total
($)
 
Gerard Pascale
    55,000             1,084                   56,084  
Guoyou Shao
    19,005       -       -       -       -       19,005  
Xinchuang Li
    19,005       -       -       -       -       19,005  

 
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In the first two fiscal quarters of 2011, we compensated independent directors under the then existing agreements, which entitled Mr. Pascale $55,000, Mr. Shao RMB 120,000 (approximately $18,576), and Mr. Li RMB 120,000 (approximately $18,576). In the third fiscal quarter of 2011, we renewed the agreements with each of our independent directors. Under the terms of the agreements, Mr. Pascale is entitled to $55,000 in cash and granted stock options to purchase 5,000 shares of common stock with an exercise price of $2.71 per share, Mr. Shao is entitled to RMB 132,000 (approximately $20,433) and Mr. Li is entitled to RMB 132,000 (approximately $20,433), effective in January 2011 through the expiration date of the agreements, as annual compensation for their service as independent directors, and as chairpersons of various board committees, as applicable. Mr. Pascale’s compensation is greater because he has greater responsibilities as the Audit Committee Chairman. Under the terms of the agreements, we will reimburses our directors for reasonable travel expenses related to attendance at board and committee meetings.

Additionally, we entered into Indemnification Agreements with each of Messrs. Pascale, Shao and Li.  Under the terms of these Indemnification Agreements, the Company agreed to indemnify the independent directors against expenses, judgments, fines, penalties or other amounts actually and reasonably incurred by the independent directors in connection with any proceeding (other than a proceeding by or in the right of the Company) if the independent director acted in good faith and in the best interests of the Company, and, with respect to any criminal action or proceeding, had no reasonable cause to believe the independent director’s conduct was unlawful.  The Company also agreed to pay any such expenses to an independent director in advance of the final disposition of any such proceeding if the director agrees to repay such amount to the extent it is ultimately determined they are not entitled to indemnification; provided, however, that the Company is not obligated to make any such advance payment if the board of directors determines, in its sole discretion, that it does not appear that such director has met the standards of conduct which make it permissible under applicable law to indemnify such director, and that the advancement of expenses would not be in the best interests of the Company and its stockholders.

ITEM 12.
SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management

The following table sets forth information regarding beneficial ownership of our common stock as of October 10, 2011 (i) by each person who is known by us to beneficially own more than 5% of our common stock; (ii) by each of our officers and directors; and (iii) by all of our officers and directors as a group.  Unless otherwise specified, the address of each of the persons set forth below is in care of Sutor Technology Group Limited, No. 8, Huaye Road, Dongbang Industrial Park Changshu, China, 215534.

Name & Address of 
Beneficial Owner
 
Office, If Any
 
Title of Class
 
Amount &
Nature of
Beneficial
Ownership(1)
   
Percent
of
Class(2)
 
Officers and Directors  
Lifang Chen
 
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
 
Common Stock
    30,351,383 (3) (4)     74.5 %
Yongfei Jiang
 
Chief Financial Officer
 
Common Stock
    8,667 (5)     *  
Naijiang Zhou
 
VP of Finance
 
Common Stock
    57,667 (6)     *  
Gerard Pascale
 
Director
 
Common Stock
    5,375 (7)     *  
Guoyou Shao
 
Director
 
Common Stock
    -       *  
Xinchuang Li
 
Director
 
Common Stock
    -       *  
All Officers and Directors as a group (6 persons named above)
            30,423,092       74.7 %
5% Security Holders  
Total Raise Investments Ltd.
     
Common Stock
    30,338,050       74.5 %
Lifang Chen
     
Common Stock
    30,351,383 (3)     74.5 %

* Less than 1%.

(1)
Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC and generally includes voting or investment power with respect to securities.

 
41

 

(2)
A total of 40,726,123 shares of our common stock are considered to be outstanding pursuant to SEC Rule 13d-3(d)(1) as of October 10, 2011. For each beneficial owner above, any options exercisable within 60 days have been included in the denominator.

(3)
Includes 30,338,050 shares of common stock owned by Total Raise Investments Ltd., a BVI company wholly owned by Ms. Chen. Ms. Chen disclaims beneficial ownership of such shares except to the extent of her pecuniary interest therein.

(4)
Pursuant to the Company’s 2009 Equity Incentive Plan, we granted Ms. Chen an option to purchase 40,000 shares of common stock with an exercise price of $2.71 per share on April 27, 2010. One-third of the option will each vest on the first, second and third anniversaries of the date of grant.

(5)
Pursuant to the Company’s 2009 Equity Incentive Plan, we granted Mr. Jiang an option to purchase 26,000 shares of common stock with an exercise price of $2.71 per share on April 27, 2010. One-third of the option will each vest on the first, second and third anniversaries of the date of grant.

(6)
On February 1, 2010, Mr. Zhou received 20,000 shares of our common stock in accordance with the terms of the employment agreement, to vest in equal installments over a twelve month period.  As of October 10, 2011, all of these shares have vested. In addition, on February 23, 2011, Mr. Zhou was granted 30,000 shares of our common stock in accordance with the terms of the employment agreement, to vest in equal installments over a twelve month period. Pursuant to the Company’s 2009 Equity Incentive Plan, we also granted Mr. Zhou an option to purchase 20,000 shares of common stock with an exercise price of $2.71 per share on April 27, 2010. One-third of the option will each vest on the first, second and third anniversaries of the date of grant.

(7)
Pursuant to the Company’s 2009 Equity Incentive Plan, we granted Mr. Pascale an option to purchase 5,000 shares of common stock with an exercise price of $2.71 per share which will vest monthly in equal installments over a 12-month period starting February 23, 2011.

Changes in Control

There are no arrangements known to us, including any pledge by any person of our securities, the operation of which may at a subsequent date result in a change in control of the Company.

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

The following table includes the information as of the end of fiscal year 2011 for each category of our equity compensation plan:

 
 
 
 
 
Plan category
 
Number of securities
tobe issued upon
exercise of
outstanding options,
restricted stock,
warrants and rights
(a)
   
Weighted-average
exercise price of
outstanding
options, restricted
stock, warrants and
rights
(b)
   
Number of securities
remaining available for
future issuance under
equity compensation plans
(excluding securities
reflected in column (a))
(c)
 
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders(1)
    100,000 (2)   $ 2.71       1,870,000  
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders
    -       -       -  
Total
    100,000     $ 2.71       1,870,000  

(1)
On April 15, 2009, our board of directors authorized the establishment of the Sutor Technology Group Limited 2009 Equity Incentive Plan, whereby we are authorized to issue shares of our Common Stock to certain employees, directors and consultants. The maximum aggregate number of shares of our common stock that may be issued under the Plan is 2,000,000 shares. The Plan was approved by our stockholders on June 16, 2009.

 
42

 

(2)
On April 27, 2010, we granted options to purchase a total of 100,000 shares of our common stock to certain officers, directors and employees with an exercise price of $2.71 per share. One third of the option will vest and become exercisable on the first, second and third anniversaries of the date of grant.  On February 23, 2011, we issued 30,000 shares of our common stock to Mr. Naijiang Zhou under the 2009 Equity Incentive Plan, to vest in equal installments over a twelve month period.

ITEM 13.
CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE.

Transactions with Related Persons

The following includes a summary of transactions since the beginning of our 2010 fiscal year, or any currently proposed transaction, in which we were or are to be a participant and the amount involved exceeded or exceeds the lesser of $120,000 or one percent of the average of our total assets at year-end for the last two completed fiscal years, and in which any related person had or will have a direct or indirect material interest (other than compensation described under Item 11, “Executive Compensation”). We believe the terms obtained or consideration that we paid or received, as applicable, in connection with the transactions described below were comparable to terms available or the amounts that would be paid or received, as applicable, in arm’s-length transactions.

 
·
We sell our products to and buy raw materials from various companies which are beneficially owned or controlled by our CEO and President, Ms. Lifang Chen. The amounts charged for products to our Company by such related party are under the same pricing, terms and conditions as those charged to third parties. See Note 7, “Related Parties” to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report. The transactions relating to the sale of our products are set forth below:

       
Amount of Transaction
 
Related Party
 
Nature of Transaction
 
Fiscal 2011
   
Fiscal 2010
 
Changshu Diemate Steel Processing Co. Ltd.
 
Sale of products by Company
  $ 1,015     $ 410,755  
Hangzhou Xiaoshan Southern Industry Co., Ltd.
 
Sale of products by Company
            207,118  
Ningbo Huaye Steel Processing Co., Ltd.
 
Sale of products by Company
    216,965       456,392  
Shanghai Huaye Steel Processing Co., Ltd.
 
Sale of products by Company
    19,661,583       18,010,636  
Shanghai Huaye Steel Group Co., Ltd.
 
Sale of products by Company
    140,213,706       192,828,758  
Wuxi Haide Steel Processing Co., Ltd.
 
Sale of products by Company
            8,642,826  
Shanghai Pukesheng Steel Trade Co., Ltd
 
Sale of products by Company
            12,244,568  
Zhejiang Nanye Metal Cutting & Delivery Co., Ltd.
 
Sale of products by Company
    60,717       70,871  
Guangzhou Qiyuan Steel Processing Co., Ltd.
 
Sale of products by Company
            8,667,138  
Tianjin Huaye Steel processing Co., Ltd.
 
Sale of products by Company
    5,415,935       2,514,821  

 
For the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, purchases from related parties beneficially owned or controlled by Ms. Chen totaled $237,261,815 and $365,354,368, respectively.

 
·
On November 10, 2009, Changshu Huaye acquired 100% of the equity interests of Ningbo Zhehua from Shanghai Huaye for a cash payment of approximately $6.6 million.  We consider Shanghai Huaye to be an affiliate due to the fact that Ms. Lifang Chen, our major shareholder, chief executive officer and chairwoman, and her husband Feng Gao own 100% of Shanghai Huaye.  We treated the acquisition of Ningbo Zhehua as a related party transaction.  From an accounting perspective, the acquisition was accounted for as a transfer of equity interests between entities under common control and was recognized as a recapitalization of Ningbo Zhehua into the Company in a manner similar to the pooling-of-interests method of accounting, with the assets and liabilities of Ningbo Zhehua recognized at their historical carrying amounts.  As a result of the reorganization, the financial statements for the periods covered by this annual report have been adjusted to combine the assets, liabilities, stockholders’ equity, and results of operations and cash flows of Ningbo Zhehua with those of the Company for all periods presented. The $6.6 million payment to Shanghai Huaye has been recognized as a dividend distribution to its shareholders in November 2009.

 
43

 

 
·
At June 30, 2011 and 2010, the Company had letters of credit totaling $38,972,693 and $14,687,307, respectively, in the form of banker’s acceptance notes that are held by related parties in connection with purchases from related parties. The banker’s acceptance notes carry a 0% interest rate, can be presented to the respective banks in 90 to 180 days from the dates they were written, are secured by cash on deposit with the respective banks and are guaranteed by related parties.

 
·
On December 20, 2007, Ms. Chen loaned the Company $7,099,998. The loan was for an initial period of 24 months through December 20, 2009, and carried an interest rate of 5%.  On March 11, 2009, Ms. Chen loaned the Company $99,998. The loan was for a period of 36 months, carried an interest rate of 3.60%. On April 29, 2009, Ms. Chen loaned the Company $149,998. The loan was for a period of 36 months, carried an interest rate of 5.00%. On July 25, 2009, Ms. Chen loaned the Company $199,930. The loan was for a period of 12 months, and carried an interest rate of 2%. The maturity of the loans described above with total principal of $7,549,924 was extended to December 31, 2013 through an agreement between the Company and Ms. Chen dated at December 1, 2009.

 
·
On various dates from February 25, 2007 to June 30, 2009, Ms. Chen loaned the Company a total of $5.3 million. The Company during that same period repaid Ms. Chen $2.5 million. The Company further paid off $1 million during the period ended March 31, 2010. The balance of the loan as of June 30, 2011 was $1,850,955 with no interest bearing and due on demand. On May 10, 2011, the Company paid off $600,000 for the loan dated December 20, 2007 described above. As at June 30, 2011, the accrued interest for the loans described above was $1,250,812. Since the Company has a right of offset for amounts due from related parties, the aggregate amount of these notes and accrued interest of $10,051,691 has been recorded as a reduction of advances to related parties in the accompanying balance sheet as of June 30, 2011.

 
·
Some of our notes payables are guaranteed by Shanghai Huaye and its affiliates, as disclosed under Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – Liquidity and Capital Resources.” We did not pay any stated or unstated consideration to Shanghai Huaye or its affiliates for their guarantees of our note payables.

 
·
On November 8, 2008, we entered into a lease agreement with Ms. Lifang Chen under which we rented 12F, Building B, World Trade Center, NO.45, North Haiyu Road, Changshu City from Ms. Chen as our office. The size of the premise is approximately 1,200 square meters. The lease has a three year term and the monthly rent is RMB 120,000 (approximately $17,500).  The Company has accrued expense for this lease of $594,105 and $352,495 that is included on the balance sheet under the caption “Other payables – related parties” at June 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively. The Company and Ms. Chen renewed the lease and extended the date of agreement from November 7, 2011 to November 7, 2014. On June 1, 2011, the Company signed an agreement with Ms. Chen to terminate the above lease agreement.

 
·
On August 6, 2004, our subsidiary Ningbo Zhehua entered into a lease agreement with Ningbo Huaye Steel Processing Co., Ltd., a subsidiary of Shanghai Huaye, pursuant to which Ningbo Zhehua leased a factory building located at the Ningbo Camel Machinery & Electronics Industrial Park. The lease agreement has a term of 10 years which will expire on August 31, 2013 and the annual rent is RMB 960,000 (approximately $0.14 million).

Except as set forth in our discussion above, none of our directors, director nominees or executive officers has been involved in any transactions with us or any of our directors, executive officers, affiliates or associates which are required to be disclosed pursuant to the rules and regulations of the SEC.

Promoters and Certain Control Persons

We did not have any promoters at any time during the past five fiscal years.

 
44

 

Parents of the Company

Total Raise Investments Ltd., an entity owned and controlled by Ms. Lifang Chen, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, currently owns approximately 74.5% of our common stock.

Director Independence

Messrs. Gerard Pascale, Guoyou Shao, and Xinchuang Li each serves on our board of directors as an “independent director” as defined by Rule 5605(a) (2) of the NASDAQ Listing Rules.

ITEM 14.
PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES.

Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm’s Fees

The following is a summary of the fees billed to the Company by Hansen Barnett & Maxwell, P.C. for professional services rendered for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010:

(in thousands of U.S. dollars)

   
June 30, 2011
   
June 30, 2010
 
Audit fees(1)
  $ 484.8     $ 444.8  
Audit-related fees(2)
    6.8       45.8  
Tax fees
    -       -  
All other fees
    -       -  
Total
    491.6       490.6  

(1)
Consists of fees billed for the audit of our annual financial statements, review of financial statements included in our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and services that are normally provided by the accountant in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements.

(2)
Consists of assurance and related services that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit and reviews of our financial statements and are not included in “audit fees” in this table. The services provided by our accountants within this category consisted of advice relating to SEC matters and employee benefit matters.

Pre-Approval Policies and Procedures

Under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, all audit and non-audit services performed by our auditors must be approved in advance by our Board to assure that such services do not impair the auditors’ independence from us. In accordance with its policies and procedures, our Board pre-approved the audit service performed by Hansen Barnett & Maxwell, P.C. for our consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended June 30, 2011.

PART IV
 
ITEM 15.
EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES.

Financial Statements and Schedules

The financial statements are set forth under Item 8 of this annual report on Form 10-K. Financial statement schedules have been omitted since they are either not required, not applicable, or the information is otherwise included.

Exhibit List

The list of exhibits in the Exhibit Index to this Report is incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
45

 

SIGNATURES
 
In accordance with section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant caused this Report on Form 10-K to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereto duly authorized individual.
 
Date: October 13, 2011
SUTOR TECHNOLOGY GROUP LIMITED
 
 
By: 
/s/ Lifang Chen
 
Lifang Chen
 
Chief Executive Officer
   
By: 
/s/ Yongfei Jiang
 
Yongfei Jiang
 
Chief Financial Officer
 
In accordance with the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

Signature
 
Title
 
Date
         
/s/ Lifang Chen
 
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
 
October 13, 2011
Lifang Chen
 
(Principal Executive Officer)
   
         
/s/ Yongfei Jiang
 
Director, Chief Financial Officer
 
October 13, 2011
Yongfei Jiang
 
(Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)
   
         
/s/ Gerard Pascale
 
Director
 
October 13, 2011
Gerard Pascale
       
         
/s/ Guoyou Shao
 
Director
 
October 13, 2011
Guoyou Shao
       
         
/s/ Xinchuang Li
 
Director
 
October 13, 2011
Xinchuang Li
       
         
 
 
46

 
 
SUTOR TECHNOLOGY GROUP LIMITED AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

  
 
Page
     
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
 
F-2
     
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2011 and 2010
 
F-3
     
Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income for the Years Ended June 30, 2011 and 2010
 
F-4
     
Consolidated Statement of Stockholders’ Equity for the Years Ended June 30, 2010 and 2011
 
F-5
     
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended June 30, 2011 and 2010
 
F-6
     
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
 
F-7
 
 
F-1

 
 
 
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
 
To the Board of Directors and the Stockholders of
Sutor Technology Group Limited

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Sutor Technology Group Limited and subsidiaries as of June 30, 2011 and 2010, and the related consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for the years then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis of designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
 
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Sutor Technology Group Limited and subsidiaries as of June 30, 2011 and 2010 and the results of their operations and their cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 
/s/ HANSEN, BARNETT & MAXWELL, P.C.
Salt Lake City, Utah
 
October 13, 2011
 

 
 
F-2

 
 
SUTOR TECHNOLOGY GROUP LIMITED AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
  
   
June 30,
   
June 30,
 
   
2011
   
2010
 
             
ASSETS
           
Current Assets:
           
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 21,324,931     $ 13,336,736  
Restricted cash
    72,326,482       48,315,962  
Trade accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $856,554 and $498,620, respectively
    3,969,090       10,913,736  
Other receivables and prepayments, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $529,068 and $279,885, respectively
    2,004,044       929,507  
Advances to suppliers, related parties
    116,772,842       96,776,181  
Advances to suppliers, net of allowance of $493,761 and $542,490, respectively
    42,067,716       8,304,246  
Inventory, net of allowance for obsolescence of $88,346 and $102,028, respectively
    46,197,179       40,179,358  
Notes receivable
    168,029       73,437  
Deferred income taxes
    363,497       329,414  
Total Current Assets
    305,193,810       219,158,577  
                 
Advances for Purchase of Long Term Assets
    81,191       -  
Property, Plant and Equipment, net of accumulated depreciation of $35,081,522 and $25,914,352, respectively
    79,103,131       70,018,522  
Intangible Assets, net of accumulated amortization of $509,200 and $415,178, respectively
    3,083,569       2,995,488  
TOTAL ASSETS
  $ 387,461,701     $ 292,172,587  
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
               
Current Liabilities:
               
Accounts payable
  $ 55,674,454     $ 23,954,009  
Advances from customers
    11,737,085       6,769,481  
Other payables and accrued expenses
    4,840,135       4,688,324  
Other payables - related parties
    594,105       352,495  
Short-term notes payable
    95,494,490       82,128,484  
Short-term notes payable - related parties
    -       587,492  
Total Current Liabilities
    168,340,269       118,480,285  
                 
Long-Term Notes Payable
    23,626,900       2,859,995  
Total Liabilities
    191,967,169       121,340,280  
                 
Stockholders' Equity
               
Undesignated preferred stock - $0.001 par value; 1,000,000 shares authorized; no shares outstanding
    -       -  
Common stock - $0.001 par value; 500,000,000 shares authorized, 40,745,602 and 40,715,602 shares outstanding at June 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively
    40,745       40,715  
Additional paid-in capital
    42,584,974       42,465,581  
Statutory reserves
    15,662,039       12,629,151  
Retained earnings
    107,137,213       96,164,928  
Accumulated other comprehensive income
    30,069,561       19,531,932  
Total Stockholders' Equity
    195,494,532       170,832,307  
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY
  $ 387,461,701     $ 292,172,587  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements
 
 
F-3

 
 
SUTOR TECHNOLOGY GROUP LIMITED AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

   
For The Years Ended
 
   
June 30
 
   
2011
   
2010
 
             
Revenue:
           
Revenue
  $ 266,126,597     $ 234,633,835  
Revenue from related parties
    165,569,921       244,053,884  
      431,696,518       478,687,719  
                 
Cost of Revenue
               
Cost of revenue
    240,847,808       216,663,282  
Cost of revenue from related party sales
    150,397,400       229,216,965  
      391,245,208       445,880,247  
                 
Gross Profit
    40,451,310       32,807,472  
                 
Operating Expenses:
               
                 
Selling expenses
    7,503,738       8,066,336  
General and administrative expenses
    7,813,711       6,358,399  
Total Operating Expenses
    15,317,449       14,424,735  
Income from Operations
    25,133,861       18,382,737  
                 
Other Incomes/(Expenses):
               
Interest income
    901,511       1,106,114  
Other income
    159,496       448,465  
Int