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EX-32.1 - Sunworks, Inc.ex32-1.htm
EX-31.2 - Sunworks, Inc.ex31-2.htm
EX-31.1 - Sunworks, Inc.ex31-1.htm
EX-21.1 - Sunworks, Inc.ex21-1.htm
EX-4.3 - Sunworks, Inc.ex4-3.htm
EX-3.1 - Sunworks, Inc.ex3-1.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

 

[X] Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of The Securities Exchange Act of 1934
   
  For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019
   
OR
   
[  ] Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
   
  For the Transition Period from __________ to __________

 

Commission File No. 001-36868

 

 

 

SUNWORKS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

DELAWARE   01-0592299

(State or other jurisdiction

of incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

1030 Winding Creek Road, Suite 100

Roseville, CA

  95678
(Address of principal executive office)   (Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (916) 409-6900

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Common Stock, Par Value $0.001   SUNW   The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
(Title of class)   (Trading Symbol(s))   (Name of exchange on which registered)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: NONE

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and, (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed the interactive data exhibits required to be filed during the past 12 months (or shorter applicable period). Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer [  ] Accelerated filer [  ]
Non-accelerated filer [X] Smaller reporting company [X ]
  Emerging growth company [  ]

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [ ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes [  ] No [X]

 

The aggregate market value of the common stock held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2019 was $14.1 million.

 

The outstanding number of shares of common stock as of March 30, 2020 was 16,628,992.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

    Page
  PART I  
Item 1. Business 3
Item 1A. Risk Factors 8
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 20
Item 2. Properties 20
Item 3. Legal Proceedings 20
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 20
     
  PART II  
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 21
Item 6. Selected Financial Data 21
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 22
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk  
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 27
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 28
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 28
Item 9B. Other Information 28
     
  PART III  
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 29
Item 11. Executive Compensation 33
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 38
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, Director Independence 39
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services 40
     
  PART IV  
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules 41

 

2

 

 

PART I

 

Item 1. Business.

 

Forward-looking Statements

 

Statements in this annual report on Form 10-K that are not historical facts constitute forward-looking statements. Examples of forward-looking statements include statements relating to industry prospects, our future economic performance including anticipated revenues and expenditures, results of operations or financial position, and other financial items, our business plans and objectives, and may include certain assumptions that underlie forward-looking statements. Risks and uncertainties that may affect our future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements include, among other things, those listed under “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this annual report.

 

These risks and uncertainties include but are not limited to:

 

our limited operating history;
our ability to raise additional capital to meet our financial commitments and objectives;
our ability to compete in the solar power industry;
our ability to sell solar power systems;
our ability to arrange financing for our customers;
government incentive programs related to solar energy;
our ability to increase the size of our company and manage growth;
our ability to acquire and integrate other businesses;
disruptions to our business from protective tariffs on imported components, supply shortages and/or fluctuations in pricing;
disruptions to our supply chain due to the impact of COVID-19 (Coronavirus);
our ability or inability to attract and/or retain competent employees;
relationships with employees, consultants, customers, and suppliers; and
the concentration of our business in one industry in limited geographic areas.

 

In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential” or “continue” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology.

 

These statements are subject to business and economic risk and reflect management’s current expectations and involve subjects that are inherently uncertain and difficult to predict. Actual events or results may differ materially. Moreover, neither we nor any other person assumes responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of these statements. We are under no duty to update any of the forward-looking statements after the date of this annual report to conform these statements to actual results.

 

Business Introduction/Summary

 

References herein to “we,” “us,” “Sunworks,” and “the Company” are to Sunworks, Inc. and its wholly-owned subsidiaries Sunworks United, Inc. (“Sunworks United”), MD Energy, Inc. (“MD Energy”), and Plan B Enterprises, Inc. (“Plan B”).

 

We provide photovoltaic (“PV”) based power systems for the agricultural, commercial, industrial (“ACI”), public works, and residential markets in California, Nevada, Massachusetts, Oregon, New Jersey and Hawaii. We have direct sales and/or operations personnel in California, Massachusetts, and Oregon. Through our operating subsidiaries, we design, arrange financing, integrate, install, and manage systems ranging in size from 2kW (kilowatt) for residential projects to multi MW (megawatt) systems for larger ACI and public works projects. ACI installations have included installations at office buildings, manufacturing plants, warehouses, service stations, churches, and agricultural facilities such as farms, wineries, and dairies. Public works installations have included school districts, local municipalities, federal facilities and higher education institutions. We provide a full range of installation services to our solar energy customers including design, system engineering, procurement, permitting, construction, grid connection, warranty, system monitoring and maintenance.

 

We currently operate in one segment based upon our organizational structure and the way in which our operations are managed and evaluated. Approximately 69% of our 2019 revenue was from sales to the ACI and public works markets, and approximately 31% of our revenue was from sales to the residential market. Approximately 72% of our 2018 revenue was from sales to the ACI and public works markets, and approximately 28% of our revenue was from sales to the residential market.

 

At our Annual Meeting of Stockholders on August 7, 2019, the stockholders of the Company approved a reverse stock split of our issued and outstanding common stock at a ratio not less than 1-for-3 and not greater than 1-for-10. On August 29, 2019, our board of directors approved the reverse stock split at a ratio of 1-for-7 which went into effect at the open of trading on August 30, 2019. At the effective time of the reverse stock split, every seven shares of our issued and outstanding common stock were converted into one share of our issued and outstanding common stock. The authorized shares of 200,000,000 and the par value of $0.001 remain the same. All shares and related financial information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K is retroactively stated to reflect this 1-for-7 reverse stock split.

 

3

 

 

Strategy

 

Our strategy for near-term growth is focused on organic growth through continued expansion in California augmented by growth in other U.S. geographies. In the longer-term, we believe that the competitors in the solar industry will consolidate and that we will be able to enhance our growth and scale through accretive acquisitions. With scalable administrative and operational infrastructure in place, we believe our current approach for organic growth will lead to increased profitability and positive cash generation. We anticipate taking advantage of the long-term growth in the solar market as well as gaining market share relative to competitors. Additionally, we continue to evaluate various synergistic acquisitions.

 

In our residential business, we continue our methods of acquiring customers, which includes collaborating with third party residential sales companies. We believe that the scarce resource in the residential solar industry is quality, economic installations in which customers can trust. We provide outstanding operations and customer support, as well as a competitive product warranty, which drives demand for our branded installations. We believe this allows our sales partners to sell with confidence knowing that they are backed by installation and operations on which they can rely. Our relationships with strong residential sales organizations are enhanced by our referral business through our “Power Pay” program.

 

Company Operations

 

Employees

 

As of December 31, 2019, we employed approximately 178 full-time employees. However, in response to the economic downturn, and the uncertain impact of COVID-19 on our business, we adjusted our headcount. As of March 30, 2020, we employ approximately 98 full-time employees, 27 part-time employees and 37 employees on temporary layoff. A large percentage of the reductions in work force are intended to be temporary, but the duration of such temporary reductions, and the portion of which temporary reductions, if any, become permanent, is unknown and will depend on the severity of the impact of COVID-19 on our business. We also utilize outside subcontractors to assist with installing solar systems for our commercial and residential customers. Our direct installation labor is a combination of employees and contract labor.

 

Sales and Marketing

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had approximately 17 employees primarily focused on sales, sales support and marketing in California, Massachusetts, and Oregon. However, in response to the economic downturn, and the uncertain impact of COVID-19 on our business, as of March 30, 2020, we employed 11 employees primarily focused on sales, sales support and marketing in those states.

 

We continue to work more with third-party sales originators to generate most of our residential customer installations and mitigate the fixed costs and financial risk of maintaining our own direct residential sales force.

 

We have an advantage in the ACI solar market given our extensive contact list, resulting from our experience in the ACI construction market, which provides access to customers. Through our network of vendors, participation in variety of industry trade associations and independent sales consultants, we now have a growing list of repeat clients, as well as an active and loyal referral network.

 

Financing

 

To promote sales, we assist customers in obtaining financing. Our objective is to arrange the most flexible terms that meet the needs and wants of the customer. Although we do not provide financing ourselves, we have relationships to arrange financing with numerous private and public sources.

 

We believe it is best for customers to own their own systems, but some customers prefer not to own their systems. We also have the ability to arrange financing with third parties through Power Purchase Agreements (“PPAs”) and leases for our customers.

 

Suppliers

 

We purchase solar panels, inverters and materials directly from multiple manufacturers and through distributors. We intend to further coordinate purchases and optimize supply relationships to realize the advantages of greater scale.

 

If one or more of our suppliers fail to meet our anticipated demand, ceases or reduces production due to its financial condition, acquisition by a competitor or otherwise, it may be difficult to quickly identify alternate suppliers or to qualify alternative products on commercially reasonable terms, and our ability to satisfy this demand may be adversely affected. We do not, however, rely on any single supplier and, we believe, we can obtain needed solar panels and materials from a variety of different suppliers. Accordingly, we believe that the loss of any single supplier would not materially affect our business.

 

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We also utilize strategic partnerships with subcontractors for electrical installations, for racking and solar panel installations, as well as numerous subcontractors for grading, landscaping, and construction for our large ACI and public works projects.

 

Installation

 

We are a licensed contractor in the markets we serve, and we are responsible for every customer installation. We manage the entire process from permitting through inspection to interconnection to the power grid, thereby making the system installation process simple and seamless for our customers. Controlling every aspect of the installation process allows us to minimize costs, ensure quality and deliver high levels of customer satisfaction.

 

Even with controlling every aspect of the installation process, the ability to perform on a contract is subject to limitations. There remain jurisdictional approval processes outside our immediate control including, but not limited to, approval processes required by cities, counties, states or the Federal government or one of their agencies. Other aspects outside of our direct control include approvals from various utility companies and weather conditions.

 

After-Sales Support

 

It is our intent to provide continuing operation and maintenance services for our installed residential and commercial PV systems. We provide extended factory equipment technical support and act as a service liaison using our proprietary knowledge, technology, and solar electric energy engineering staff. We do this through a Limited Workmanship Warranty and Operations and Maintenance Program, which among other things provides a service and technical support line to our customers. We generally respond to our job site related issues within 24 hours and we strive to offer assistance as long as required to maintain customer satisfaction. Our price to customers includes this warranty, which includes the pass through of various manufacturers’ warranties.

 

Facilities

 

We maintain sales and installation offices in Roseville, Rocklin, Durham, Campbell (San Jose), Tulare, and Riverside, California, and in White City, Oregon. We lease all our offices and facilities.

 

Customers

 

The majority of our revenue comes from installations in California with a smaller amount in Nevada, Massachusetts, Oregon, Hawaii and New Jersey. Approximately 69% of our revenue in 2019 was in the ACI and public works markets, down from 72% in 2018. Approximately 31% of revenue was generated by residential installations, up from 28% in 2018. We expect that these percentages will vary from year to year.

 

We install systems for the ACI market and for public works projects. We define small commercial and public works projects as the installation of systems under 100kW, whereas large projects involve the installation of systems greater than 100kW. Solar projects have received limited financing from traditional lending sources, but we are encouraged by municipal PACE programs in California which have drawn funding sources such as Ygrene Energy Fund into the financing of energy projects. Public works projects are frequently financed through various PPA arrangements, often in conjunction with SPURR (School Project for Utility Rate Reduction) programs, a Joint Powers Authority in California. Cycle times vary from twenty weeks to more than a year, which is a common cycle for commercial and public works projects. Larger projects typically have a longer cycle time than smaller projects. Agricultural system sizes vary significantly within this sector and can range from 10kW to multiple megawatts. Agricultural loans to farmers and tax-oriented leases are the primary funding sources within the industry. Similar to commercial installations, cycle times for agricultural projects may commonly range from twenty weeks to more than a year depending upon the authority having jurisdiction, the existing utility infrastructure and the various approvals required.

 

Our residential operations address the needs of property owners installing systems typically smaller than 20kW. The typical residential system installed is about 6kW with an average cycle time of 45 days or less. There is an increased demand for systems with batteries, and we fill those customer needs as well. We facilitate purchase or lease financing and offer multiple product options to fit the specific needs of each customer.

 

Competitors

 

In the solar installation market, we compete with companies that offer products similar to ours. Some of these companies have greater financial resources, operational experience, and technical capabilities than we do. When bidding for solar installation projects, however, our current experience suggests that there is no clear dominant or preferred competitor in the markets in which we compete. We do not believe that any competitor has more than 10% of the market across all the areas in which we operate. We compete with other solar installers on pricing, service, warranty, and the ability to arrange financing. On a global scale, we also compete, on a cost basis, with traditional utilities that supply electricity to our potential customers and with companies that are not regulated like traditional utilities but that have access to the traditional utility electricity transmission and distribution infrastructure pursuant to state and local pro-competitive and consumer choice policies. Our advantage over traditional utilities is that we offer customers the opportunity to create their own electricity and reduce dependency from the traditional electrical grid.

 

5

 

 

Seasonality

 

Our revenue is impacted by seasonal weather patterns. In addition, some customers push to complete projects by the end of a calendar year to realize the benefits of available subsidy programs prior to year-end. The first quarter in California often has rain, which also reduces our ability to install and recognize revenues in that quarter relative to the remainder of the year.

 

Technology and Intellectual Property

 

Generally, the solar installation business is not dependent on intellectual property.

 

Government Regulation and Incentives

 

Government Regulation

 

We are not regulated as a public utility in the United States under applicable national, state or other local regulatory regimes where we conduct business.

 

To operate our systems, we obtain interconnection permission from the applicable local primary electric utility. Depending on the size of the solar energy system and local law requirements, interconnection permission is provided by the local utility and us and/or our customer. In almost all cases, interconnection permissions are issued on the basis of a standard process that has been pre-approved by the local public utility commission or other regulatory body with jurisdiction over net energy metering procedures. As such, no additional regulatory approvals are required once interconnection permission is given.

 

Our operations are subject to stringent and complex federal, state and local laws, including regulations governing the occupational health and safety of our employees and wage regulations. For example, we are subject to the requirements of the federal and California Occupational Safety and Health Act, as amended (“OSHA”), the U.S. Department of Transportation (“DOT”), and comparable state laws that protect and regulate employee health and safety.

 

Government Incentives

 

Federal, state and local government bodies provide incentives to owners, end users, distributors, system integrators and manufacturers of solar energy systems to promote solar energy in the form of rebates, tax credits and other financial incentives such as system performance payments, payments for renewable energy credits associated with renewable energy generation and exclusion of solar energy systems from property tax assessments. These incentives enable us to lower the price we charge customers to own or lease our solar energy systems, helping to catalyze customer acceptance of solar energy as an alternative to utility-provided power.

 

The Federal government offered a 30% Investment Tax Credit (‘ITC’) in 2019. The ITC is currently 26% under Section 48(a) of the Internal Revenue Code, for the installation of certain solar power facilities until December 31, 2020, after which it will fall to 22% in 2021 and 10% in 2022 and 10% for commercial credit thereafter.

 

The economics of purchasing a solar energy system are also improved by eligibility for accelerated depreciation, also known as the modified accelerated cost recovery system (“MACRS”) depreciation, which allows for the depreciation of equipment according to an accelerated schedule set forth by the Internal Revenue Service. The acceleration of depreciation creates a valuable tax benefit that reduces the overall cost of the solar energy system and increases the return on investment.

 

Approximately 50% of states in the U.S. offer a personal and/or corporate investment or production tax credit for solar energy that is additive to the ITC. Further, these states, and many local jurisdictions, have established property tax incentives for renewable energy systems that include exemptions, exclusions, abatements, and credits. Many state governments, traditional utilities, municipal utilities and co-operative utilities offer a rebate or other cash incentive for the installation and operation of a solar energy system or energy efficiency measures. Capital costs or “up-front” rebates provide funds to solar customers based on the cost, size or expected production of a customer’s solar energy system. Performance-based incentives provide cash payments to a system owner based on the energy generated by their solar energy system during a pre-determined period, and they are paid over that time period. Depending on the cost of the system and other site-specific variables, tax incentives can typically cover 30-40% of the cost of a commercial or residential solar system.

 

Many states also have adopted procurement requirements for renewable energy production that requires regulated utilities to procure a specified percentage of total electricity delivered to customers in the State from eligible renewable energy sources, such as solar energy systems, by a specified date.

 

6

 

 

Corporate History

 

We were originally incorporated in Delaware on January 30, 2002 as MachineTalker, Inc. In July 2010, we changed our company name to Solar3D, Inc. On January 31, 2014, we acquired 100% of the stock of Solar United Network, Inc., a California corporation. On March 2, 2015, we acquired MD Energy. On December 1, 2015, we acquired Plan B through a merger of Plan B Enterprises, Inc. into our wholly owned subsidiary, Elite Solar Acquisition Sub., Inc. On March 1, 2016 we changed our name to Sunworks, Inc. with simultaneous NASDAQ stock symbol change from SLTD to SUNW.

 

Our principal executive offices are located at 1030 Winding Creek Road, Suite 100, Roseville, CA 95678 and our telephone number is (916) 409-6900. Our web site address is www.sunworksusa.com. Information contained in or accessible through our website does not constitute part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Available Information

 

We file annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements and other information with the Securities and Exchange Commission, referred to herein as the SEC. Our SEC filings, including our Annual Report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and any amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act are available to the public free of charge over the Internet at our website at http://www.sunworksusa.com or at the SEC’s web site at http://www.sec.gov. Our SEC filings will be available on our website as soon as reasonably practical after we have electronically filed or furnished them to the SEC. Information contained on our website is not incorporated by reference into this 10-K. You can view our Code of Conduct and Ethics and the charters for each of our committees of our Board of Directors free of charge on the investor relations section of our website under corporate governance.

 

Recent Developments

 

Pursuant to an At Market Issuance Sales Agreement (the “ATM Agreement”) with B. Riley FBR, Inc. (the “Agent”) we may offer and sell from time to time up to an aggregate of $15,000,000 of shares of our common stock, par value $0.001 per share (the “Placement Shares”), through the Agent. In 2019, we sold 2,920,968 Placement Shares under the ATM Agreement with gross proceeds of $7,023. Since January 1, 2020 until March 30, 2020, we have sold an additional 9,817,343 Placement Shares resulting in additional gross proceeds of $7,976. No further Placement Shares will be sold under the ATM Agreement.

 

On January 29, 2020, we entered into a Loan Amendment with CrowdOut Capital, Inc. and paid $1.5 million of the $3.0 million outstanding on the Senior Notes held by CrowdOut Capital, Inc.

 

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared a pandemic related to the rapidly spreading coronavirus (“COVID-19”) outbreak, which has led to a global health emergency. The extent of the public-health impact of the outbreak is currently unknown and rapidly evolving and the related health crisis could adversely affect the global economy, resulting in an economic downturn that could impact demand for our products and services.

 

In addition, we rely on third-party suppliers and manufacturers in China. This outbreak has resulted in the extended shutdown of certain businesses in Asia, which may in turn result in disruptions or delays to our supply chain. These disruptions may include temporary closure of third-party supplier and manufacturer facilities, interruptions in product supply or restrictions on the export or shipment of our products. Any disruption of our suppliers and their contract manufacturers will likely adversely impact our revenues and operating results.

 

The future impact of the outbreak is highly uncertain and cannot be predicted. In response to the economic downturn, and the uncertain impact of COVID-19 on our business, we have implemented proactive steps to try and protect our business, including but not limited to: on March 23, 2020, terminating or temporarily laying off 59 employees, representing a 33% reduction from the beginning of the year headcount; reducing an additional 23 employees to part time; and temporarily eliminating salaries for members of our board of directors and our Chief Executive Officer and reducing other management individual’s salaries by at least 50%.

 

On March 13, 2020, we received a letter from The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC (“NASDAQ”) indicating that we have failed to comply with the minimum bid price requirement of Nasdaq Listing Rule 5550(a)(2). Nasdaq Listing Rule 5550(a)(2) requires that companies listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market maintain a minimum closing bid price of at least $1.00 per share. Under Nasdaq Listing Rule 5810(c)(3)(A), we have a 180 calendar day grace period to regain compliance by meeting the continued listing standard. To regain compliance, the closing bid price of the Company’s common stock must meet or exceed $1.00 per share for a minimum of ten consecutive business days during this grace period. We are monitoring the bid price of our common stock and will consider options available to us to achieve compliance.

 

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Item 1A. Risk Factors.

 

Our business and operations are subject to a number of significant risks and uncertainties as described below. However, the risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks and uncertainties that we are unaware of, or that we may currently deem immaterial, may become important factors that could harm our business, financial condition or results of operations. If any of the following risks actually occur, our business, financial condition or results of operations could suffer materially.

 

Risks Related to Our Financial Position and Capital Requirements

 

We have a limited operating history, which could make it difficult to accurately evaluate our business and prospects.

 

Although we were formed in January 2002, we did not begin selling solar systems until we acquired Solar United Network, Inc. in January 2014. We acquired MD Energy in March 2015 and Plan B Enterprises in December 2015. Management believes that our success depends in large part on our ability to continue to successfully sell solar systems in California and other states against determined competition, and to consummate synergistic acquisitions. We cannot assure that we will operate profitably or that we will have adequate working capital to meet our obligations as they become due.

 

We have incurred significant losses since inception.

 

We had an accumulated deficit of $72,473,000 and $63,510,000 as of December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. We incurred annual operating losses from our inception. We anticipate becoming profitable as we reduce our costs and increase our installation revenues. However, there can be no assurances that these actions will result in sustained profitability. We are subject to all the risks incidental to the sales, development and costs of construction of new solar energy revenues, and we may encounter unforeseen expenses, difficulties, complications, delays and other unknown factors that may adversely affect our business.

 

We may require substantial additional funding which may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all. If we fail to raise the necessary additional capital, we may be unable to achieve growth of our operations.

 

Our operations have consumed substantial amounts of cash since inception.

 

We cannot be certain that additional funding will be available on acceptable terms, or at all. If we are unable to raise additional capital in sufficient amounts or on terms acceptable to us, we may have to significantly delay, scale back or discontinue our organic growth or corporate acquisitions. Any of these events could significantly harm our business, financial condition, and strategy.

 

In order to carry out our business plan and implement our strategy, we anticipate that we will need to obtain additional financing from time to time and may choose to raise additional funds through strategic collaborations, public or private equity or debt financing, bank lines of credit, asset sales, government grants, or other arrangements. We cannot be sure that any additional funding, if needed, will be available on terms favorable to us or at all. Furthermore, any additional equity or equity-related financing may be dilutive to our shareholders, and debt or equity financing, if available, may subject us to restrictive covenants and significant interest costs.

 

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Our inability to raise capital when needed could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations, and could cause our stock price to decline or require that we cease operations.

 

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

 

Our business is subject to risks arising from epidemic diseases, such as the recent outbreak of the COVID-19 illness.

 

The recent outbreak of COVID-19, which has been declared by the World Health Organization to be a pandemic, has spread across the globe and is impacting worldwide economic activity. A pandemic, including COVID-19 or other public health epidemic, poses the risk that we or our employees, contractors, suppliers, and other partners may be prevented from conducting business activities for an indefinite period of time, including due to spread of the disease within these groups or due to shutdowns that may be requested or mandated by governmental authorities. While it is not possible at this time to estimate the impact that COVID-19 could have on our business, the continued spread of COVID-19 and the measures taken by the governments of countries affected (including federal, state and local directives to remain at home or forced business closures) could disrupt our supply chain and the manufacture or shipment of materials used in operations, disrupt our labor workforce, disrupt our ability to mobilize employees and sub-contractors to perform installations, cause the possible decline in market demand resulting from competing customer priorities for capital, and adversely impact our business, financial condition or results of operations. The COVID-19 outbreak and mitigation measures may also have an adverse impact on global economic conditions which could have an adverse effect on our business and financial condition. The extent to which the COVID-19 outbreak impacts our results will depend on future developments that are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted, including new information that may emerge concerning the severity of the virus and the actions to contain its impact.

 

A material reduction in the retail price of traditional utility generated electricity or electricity from other sources could harm our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

 

We believe that a significant number of our customers decide to buy solar energy because they want to pay less for electricity than what is offered by the traditional utilities. However, distributed residential solar energy has yet to achieve broad market adoption as evidenced by the fact that distributed solar has penetrated less than 5% of its total addressable market in the U.S. residential sector.

 

The customer’s decision to choose solar energy may also be affected by the cost of other renewable energy sources. Decreases in the retail prices of electricity from the traditional utilities or from other renewable energy sources would harm our ability to offer competitive pricing and could harm our business. The price of electricity from traditional utilities could decrease as a result of:

 

construction of a significant number of new power generation plants, including plants utilizing natural gas, nuclear, coal, renewable energy or other generation technologies;
relief of transmission constraints that enable local centers to generate energy less expensively;
reductions in the price of natural gas;
utility rate adjustment and customer class cost reallocation;
energy conservation technologies and public initiatives to reduce electricity consumption;
development of new or lower-cost energy storage technologies that have the ability to reduce a customer’s average cost of electricity by shifting load to off-peak times; or
development of new energy generation technologies that provide less expensive energy.

 

A reduction in utility electricity prices would make the purchase or the lease of our solar energy systems less economically attractive. If the retail price of energy available from traditional utilities were to decrease due to any of these reasons, or other reasons, we would be at a competitive disadvantage, we may be unable to attract new customers and our growth would be limited.

 

Existing electric utility industry regulations, and changes to regulations, may present technical, regulatory and economic barriers to the purchase and use of solar energy systems that may significantly reduce demand for our solar energy systems.

 

Federal, state and local government regulations and policies concerning the electric utility industry, and internal policies and regulations promulgated by electric utilities, heavily influence the market for electricity generation products and services. These regulations and policies often relate to electricity pricing and the interconnection of customer-owned electricity generation. In the United States, governments and utilities continuously modify these regulations and policies. These regulations and policies could deter customers from purchasing renewable energy, including solar energy systems. This could result in a significant reduction in the potential demand for our solar energy systems. For example, utilities commonly charge fees to larger, industrial customers for disconnecting from the electric grid or for having the capacity to use power from the electric grid for back-up purposes. These fees could increase our customers’ cost to use our systems and make them less desirable, thereby harming our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, depending on the region, electricity generated by solar energy systems competes most effectively with expensive peak-hour electricity from the electric grid, rather than the less expensive average price of electricity. Modifications to the utilities’ peak hour pricing policies or rate design, such as to a flat rate, would require us to lower the price of our solar energy systems to compete with the price of electricity from the electric grid.

 

In addition, any changes to government or internal utility regulations and policies that favor electric utilities could reduce our competitiveness and cause a significant reduction in demand for our products and services. For example, certain jurisdictions have proposed assessing fees on customers purchasing energy from solar energy systems or imposing a new charge that would disproportionately impact solar energy system customers who utilize net energy metering, either of which would increase the cost of energy to those customers and could reduce demand for our solar energy systems. It is possible charges could be imposed on not just future customers but our existing customers, causing a potentially significant consumer relations problem and harming our reputation and business. Due to the concentration of our business in California, any such changes in these markets would be particularly harmful to our business, results of operations, and future growth.

 

9

 

 

Our growth strategy depends on the widespread adoption of solar power technology.

 

The market for solar power products is emerging and rapidly evolving, and its future success is uncertain. If solar power technology proves unsuitable for widespread commercial deployment or if demand for solar power products fails to develop sufficiently, we would be unable to generate enough revenues to achieve and sustain profitability and positive cash flow. The factors influencing the widespread adoption of solar power technology include but are not limited to:

 

cost-effectiveness of solar power technologies as compared with conventional and non-solar alternative energy technologies;
performance and reliability of solar power products as compared with conventional and non-solar alternative energy products;
fluctuations in economic and market conditions which impact the viability of conventional and non-solar alternative energy sources, such as increases or decreases in the prices of oil and other fossil fuels;
availability and economics of battery storage and co-generation technology;
continued deregulation of the electric power industry and broader energy industry; and
availability of governmental subsidies and incentives.

 

Our business currently benefits from the availability of rebates, tax credits and other financial incentives. The expiration, elimination or reduction of these rebates, credits and incentives would adversely impact our business.

 

U.S. federal, state and local government bodies provide incentives to end users, distributors, system integrators and manufacturers of solar energy systems to promote solar electricity in the form of rebates, tax credits and other financial incentives such as system performance payments and payments for renewable energy credits associated with renewable energy generation. These governmental rebates, tax credits and other financial incentives enhance the return on investment for our customers and incent them to purchase solar systems. These incentives enable us to lower the price we charge customers for energy and for our solar energy systems. However, these incentives may expire on a particular date, end when the allocated funding is exhausted, or be reduced or terminated as solar energy adoption rates increase. These reductions or terminations often occur without warning.

 

Reductions in, or eliminations or expirations of, governmental incentives could adversely impact our results of operations and our ability to compete in our industry, causing us to increase the prices of our solar energy systems, and reducing the size of our addressable market. In addition, this would adversely impact our ability to attract investment partners and to form new financing funds and our ability to offer attractive financing to prospective customers.

 

Net energy metering and related policies to offer competitive pricing to our customers in our current markets, and changes to net energy metering policies may significantly reduce demand for electricity from our solar energy systems.

 

Each of the states where we currently serve customers has adopted a net energy metering policy. Net energy metering typically allows our customers to interconnect their on-site solar energy systems to the utility grid and offset their utility electricity purchases by receiving a bill credit at the utility’s retail rate for energy generated by their solar energy system that is exported to the grid in excess of the electric load used by the customers. At the end of the billing period, the customer simply pays for the net energy used or receives a credit at the retail rate if more energy is produced than consumed. Utilities operating in states without a net energy metering policy may receive solar electricity that is exported to the grid when there is no simultaneous energy demand by the customer without providing retail compensation to the customer for this generation.

 

Our ability to sell solar energy systems and the electricity they generate may be adversely impacted by the failure to expand existing limits on the amount of net energy metering in states that have implemented it, the failure to adopt a net energy metering policy where it currently is not in place, the imposition of new charges that only or disproportionately impact customers that utilize net energy metering, or reductions in the amount or value of credit that customers receive through net energy metering. Our ability to sell solar energy systems and the electricity they generate also may be adversely impacted by the unavailability of expedited or simplified interconnection for grid-tied solar energy systems or any limitation on the number of customer interconnections or amount of solar energy that utilities are required to allow in their service territory or some part of the grid. If such charges are imposed, the cost savings associated with switching to solar energy may be significantly reduced and our ability to attract future customers and compete with traditional utility providers could be impacted.

 

Limits on net energy metering, interconnection of solar energy systems and other operational policies in key markets could limit the number of solar energy systems installed in those markets. For example, California utilities limit net energy metering credit to 5% of the utilities’ aggregate customer peak demand. California has adopted legislation to establish a process and timeline for developing a new net energy metering program with no cap on participation. If the caps on net energy metering in California and other jurisdictions are reached or if the amount or value of credit that customers receive for net energy metering is significantly reduced, future customers will be unable to recognize the current cost savings associated with net energy metering. We rely substantially on net energy metering when we establish competitive pricing for our prospective customers and the absence of net energy metering for new customers would greatly limit demand for our solar energy systems.

 

10

 

 

Our business depends in part on the regulatory treatment of third-party owned solar energy systems.

 

Our leases and any power purchase agreements are third-party ownership arrangements. Sales of electricity by third parties face regulatory challenges in some states and jurisdictions. Other challenges pertain to whether third-party owned systems qualify for the same levels of rebates or other non-tax incentives available for customer-owned solar energy systems, whether third-party owned systems are eligible at all for these incentives, and whether third-party owned systems are eligible for net energy metering and the associated significant cost savings. Reductions in, or eliminations of, this treatment of these third-party arrangements could reduce demand for our systems, adversely impact our access to capital and could cause us to increase the price we charge our customers for energy.

 

Our ability to provide solar energy systems to customers on an economically viable basis depends on our ability to help customers arrange financing for such systems.

 

Our solar energy systems have been eligible for Federal ITCs or U.S. Treasury grants, as well as depreciation benefits. We have relied on, and will continue to rely on, financing structures that monetize a substantial portion of those benefits and provide financing for our solar energy systems. If, for any reason, our customers were unable to continue to monetize those benefits through these arrangements, we may be unable to provide and maintain solar energy systems for new customers on an economically viable basis.

 

The availability of this tax-advantaged financing depends upon many factors, including, but not limited to:

 

the state of financial and credit markets;
changes in the legal or tax risks associated with these financings; and
non-renewal of these incentives or decreases in the associated benefits.

 

U.S. Treasury grants are no longer available for new solar energy systems. Changes in existing law and interpretations by the Internal Revenue Service and the courts could reduce the willingness of funding sources to provide funds to customers of these solar energy systems. We cannot assure you that this type of financing will be available to our customers. If, for any reason, we are unable to find financing for solar energy systems, we may no longer be able to provide solar energy systems to new customers on an economically viable basis. This would have a negative impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Rising interest rates could adversely impact our business.

 

Increases in interest rates could have an adverse impact on our business by increasing our cost of capital, which would increase our interest expense and make acquisitions more expensive to undertake.

 

Further, rising interest rates may negatively impact our ability to arrange financing for our customers on favorable terms to facilitate our customers’ purchases of our solar energy systems. The majority of our cash flows to date have been from the sales of solar energy systems. Rising interest rates may have the effect of depressing the sales of solar energy systems because many consumers finance their purchases.

 

As a result, an increase in interest rates may negatively affect our costs and reduce our revenues, which would have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Our inability to arrange financing could hurt our future business.

 

We also compete, on a cost basis, with traditional utilities that supply electricity to our potential customers and with companies that are not regulated like traditional utilities but that have access to the traditional utility electricity transmission and distribution infrastructure pursuant to state and local pro-competitive and consumer choice policies. Our advantage over traditional utilities is that we offer customers the opportunity to create their own electricity and detach from the traditional electrical grid. To offer customers this opportunity, we often have to arrange financing for our customers as solar projects have received limited financing from traditional lending sources. Our objective is to arrange the most flexible terms that meet the needs and wants of the customer. Although we do not provide financing ourselves, we have relationships to arrange financing with numerous private and public sources, including PACE (Property Assessed Clean Energy) Programs, which are programs that involve both municipal governments and private financing companies that allows property owners to receive upfront funding for renewable energy projects, and agricultural financing offered by a network of lending institutions. Our inability to arrange financing through these or other sources could adversely affect our business and results of operations.

 

11

 

 

If we cannot compete successfully against other solar and energy companies, we may not be successful in developing our operations and our business may suffer.

 

The solar and energy industries are characterized by intense competition and technological advances, both in the United States and internationally. We compete with solar companies with business models that are similar to ours. In addition, we compete with solar companies in the downstream value chain of solar energy. For example, we face competition from purely finance driven organizations that acquire customers and then subcontract out the installation of solar energy systems, from installation businesses that seek financing from external parties, from large construction companies and utilities, and increasingly from sophisticated electrical and roofing companies. Some of these competitors specialize in the residential solar energy market, and some may provide energy at lower costs than we do. Further, some of our competitors are integrating vertically in order to ensure supply and to control costs. Many of our competitors also have significant brand name recognition and have extensive knowledge of our target markets.

 

If we are unable to complete in the market, it will have a negative impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Adverse economic conditions may have negative consequences on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Unpredictable and unstable changes in economic conditions, including recession, inflation, increased government intervention, or other changes, may adversely affect our general business strategy. We rely upon our ability to generate additional sources of liquidity and we may need to raise additional funds through public or private debt or equity financings in order to fund existing operations or to take advantage of opportunities, including acquisitions of complementary businesses or technologies. Any adverse event would have a negative impact on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Our business is concentrated in certain markets, putting us at risk of region-specific disruptions.

 

As of December 31, 2019, a vast majority of our total installations were in California and Nevada. We maintain offices in California and Oregon. We expect our near-term future growth to occur in California, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey and New York, and to further expand our customer base and operational infrastructure. Accordingly, our business and results of operations are particularly susceptible to adverse economic, regulatory, political, weather and other conditions in such markets and in other markets that may become similarly concentrated.

 

Substantially all of our business is conducted primarily using direct-selling, channel partners and authorized dealers.

 

While we are in the process of evaluating different distribution channels, currently substantially all of our business is conducted using direct selling, channel partners and authorized dealers. We compete against companies that sell solar energy systems to customers through a number of distribution channels, including homebuilders, home improvement stores, large construction, electrical and roofing companies and other third parties and companies that access customers through relationships with third parties in addition to other direct-selling companies. Our limited distribution channel may place us at a disadvantage with consumers who prefer to purchase products through these other distribution channels. Additionally, we are vulnerable to changes in laws related to direct marketing as regulations have limited unsolicited residential sales calls and may impose additional restrictions. If additional laws affecting direct marketing are passed in the markets in which we operate, it could take time to train our sales force to comply with such laws, and we may be exposed to fines or other penalties for violations of such laws. If we fail to compete effectively through our selling efforts or are not successful in executing our strategy to sell our solar energy systems through other channels, our financial condition, results of operations, and growth prospects will be adversely affected.

 

If we are unable to retain and recruit qualified technicians and advisors, or if our key executives, key employees or consultants discontinue their employment or consulting relationship with us, it may delay our development efforts or otherwise harm our business.

 

We may not be able to attract or retain qualified management or technical personnel in the future due to the intense competition for qualified personnel among solar, energy, and other businesses. Our industry has experienced a high rate of turnover of management personnel in recent years. If we are not able to attract, retain, and motivate necessary personnel to accomplish our business objectives, we may experience constraints that will significantly impede the successful development of any product candidates, our ability to raise additional capital, and our ability to implement our overall business strategy.

 

We are highly dependent on members of our management and technical staff. Our success also depends on our ability to continue to attract, retain and motivate highly skilled junior, mid-level, and senior managers as well as junior, mid-level, and senior technical personnel. The loss of any of our executive officers, key employees, or consultants and our inability to find suitable replacements could potentially harm our business, financial condition, and prospects. We may be unable to attract and retain personnel on acceptable terms given the competition among solar and energy companies. Certain of our current officers, directors, and/or consultants hereafter appointed may from time to time serve as officers, directors, scientific advisors, and/or consultants of other solar and energy companies. We do not maintain “key man” insurance policies on any of our officers or employees. Other than certain members of our senior management team, all of our employees are employed “at will” and, therefore, each employee may leave our employment and join a competitor at any time.

 

12

 

 

We plan to grant stock options, restricted stock grants, or other forms of equity awards in the future as a method of attracting and retaining employees, motivating performance, and aligning the interests of employees with those of our shareholders. If we are unable to implement and maintain equity compensation arrangements that provide sufficient incentives, we may be unable to retain our existing employees and attract additional qualified candidates. If we are unable to retain our existing employees and attract additional qualified candidates, our business and results of operations could be adversely affected. Currently the exercise prices of all outstanding stock options are greater than the current stock price.

 

In addition, we have reduced our workforce significantly from 178 full-time employees as of December 31, 2019 to 162 employees as of March 30, 2020, of which 98 are full-time, 37 are on temporary layoff and another 27 are now part-time and implemented other cost saving activities. These actions could lead to disruptions in our business, reduced employee morale and productivity, increased attrition, and problems with retaining existing and recruiting future employees.

 

We may not successfully implement our business model.

 

Our business model is predicated on our ability to provide solar systems at a profit, and through organic growth, geographic expansion, and strategic acquisitions. We intend to continue to operate as we have previously with sourcing and marketing methods that we have used successfully in the past. However, we cannot assure that our methods will continue to attract new customers in the very competitive solar systems marketplace.

 

In the event our customers resist paying the prices projected in our business plan to purchase solar installations, our business, financial condition, and results of operations will be materially and adversely affected.

 

We may not be able to effectively manage our growth.

 

Our future growth, if any, may cause a significant strain on our management and our operational, financial, and other resources. Our ability to manage our growth effectively will require us to implement and improve our operational, financial, and management systems and to expand, train, manage, and motivate our employees. These demands may require the hiring of additional management personnel and the development of additional expertise by management. Any increase in resources used without a corresponding increase in our operational, financial, and management systems could have a negative impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

We may not realize the anticipated benefits of future acquisitions, and integration of these future acquisitions which may disrupt our business and management.

 

In the future, we may acquire additional companies, project pipelines, products or technologies or enter into joint ventures or other strategic initiatives. We may not realize the anticipated benefits of these future acquisitions, and any acquisition has numerous risks. These risks include the following:

 

difficulty in assimilating the operations and personnel of the acquired company;
difficulty in effectively integrating the acquired technologies or products with our current technologies;
difficulty in maintaining controls, procedures and policies during the transition and integration;
disruption of our ongoing business and distraction of our management and employees from other opportunities and challenges due to integration issues;
difficulty integrating the acquired company’s accounting, management information, and other administrative systems;
inability to retain key technical and managerial personnel of the acquired business;
inability to retain key customers, vendors, and other business partners of the acquired business;
inability to achieve the financial and strategic goals for the acquired and combined businesses;
incurring acquisition-related costs or amortization costs for acquired intangible assets that could impact our operating results;
potential failure of the due diligence processes to identify significant issues with product quality, intellectual property infringement, and other legal and financial liabilities, among other things;
potential inability to assert that internal controls over financial reporting are effective;
potential inability to retain the right individuals to serve on our Board of Directors and as our senior management, post transaction; and
potential inability to obtain, or obtain in a timely manner, approvals from governmental authorities, which could delay or prevent such acquisitions.

 

Mergers and acquisitions of companies are inherently risky and, if we do not complete the integration of acquired businesses successfully and in a timely manner, we may not realize the anticipated benefits of the acquisitions to the extent anticipated, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

 

13

 

 

A portion of our total assets consists of goodwill, which is subject to a periodic impairment analysis, and a significant impairment determination in any future period could have an adverse effect on our statement of operations even without a significant loss of revenue or increase in cash expenses attributable to such period.

 

At December 31, 2019 we had goodwill totaling approximately $9.5 million associated with prior acquisitions. We will be required to continue to evaluate this goodwill for impairment based on the fair value of the operating business units to which this goodwill relates, at least once a year. This estimated fair value could change if we are unable to achieve operating results at the levels that have been forecasted, the market valuation of those business units decreases based on transactions involving similar companies, or there is a permanent, negative change in the market demand for the services offered by the business units. These changes could result in further impairment of the existing goodwill balance that could require a material non-cash charge to our results of operations.

 

In the year ending December 31, 2018 we had a goodwill impairment charge of $1.9 million.

 

We may be subject to claims arising from the operations of our various businesses for periods prior to the dates we acquired them.

 

We may be subject to claims or liabilities arising from the ownership or operation of acquired businesses for the periods prior to our acquisition of them, including environmental, employee-related, and other liabilities and claims not covered by insurance. These claims or liabilities could be significant. Our ability to seek indemnification from the former owners of our acquired businesses for these claims or liabilities may be limited by various factors, including the specific time, monetary or other limitations contained in the respective acquisition agreements and the financial ability of the former owners to satisfy our indemnification claims. In addition, insurance companies may be unwilling to cover claims that have arisen from acquired businesses or locations, or claims may exceed the coverage limits that our acquired businesses had in effect prior to the date of acquisition. If we are unable to successfully obtain insurance coverage of third-party claims or enforce our indemnification rights against the former owners, or if the former owners are unable to satisfy their obligations for any reason, including because of their current financial position, we could be held liable for the costs or obligations associated with such claims or liabilities, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

With respect to providing electricity on a price-competitive basis, solar systems face competition from traditional regulated electric utilities, from less-regulated third party energy service providers and from new renewable energy companies.

 

The solar energy and renewable energy industries are both highly competitive and continually evolving as participants strive to distinguish themselves within their markets and compete with large traditional utilities. We believe that one of our primary competitors (excluding other engineering, procure and construction businesses) are the traditional utilities that supply electricity to our potential customers. Traditional utilities generally have substantially greater financial, technical, operational and other resources than we do. As a result, these competitors may be able to devote more resources to the research, development, promotion, and sale of their products or respond more quickly to evolving industry standards and changes in market conditions than we can. Traditional utilities could also offer other value-added products or services that could help them to compete with us even if the cost of electricity they offer is higher than ours. In addition, a majority of utilities’ sources of electricity is non-solar, which may allow utilities to sell electricity more cheaply than electricity generated by our solar energy systems.

 

We also compete with companies that are not regulated like traditional utilities but that have access to the traditional utility electricity transmission and distribution infrastructure pursuant to state and local pro-competitive and consumer choice policies. These energy service companies are able to offer customers electricity supply-only solutions that are competitive with our solar energy system options on both price and usage of renewable energy technology while avoiding the long-term agreements and physical installations that our current fund-financed business model requires. This may limit our ability to attract new customers; particularly those who wish to avoid long-term contracts or have an aesthetic or other objection to putting solar panels on their roofs.

 

As the solar industry grows and evolves, we will also face new competitors who are not currently in the market. Low technological barriers to entry characterize our industry and well-capitalized companies could choose to enter the market and compete with us. Our failure to adapt to changing market conditions and to compete successfully with existing or new competitors will limit our growth and will have a negative impact on our business and prospects.

 

Developments in alternative technologies or improvements in distributed solar energy generation may materially adversely affect demand for our offerings.

 

Significant developments in alternative technologies, such as advances in other forms of distributed solar power generation, storage solutions such as batteries, the widespread use or adoption of fuel cells for residential or commercial properties or improvements in other forms of centralized power production may materially and adversely affect our business and prospects in ways we do not currently anticipate. Any failure by us to adopt new or enhanced technologies or processes, or to react to changes in existing technologies, could materially delay deployment of our solar energy systems, which could result in product obsolescence, the loss of competitiveness of our systems, decreased revenue and a loss of market share to competitors.

 

14

 

 

Due to the limited number of suppliers in our industry, the acquisition of any of these suppliers by a competitor or any shortage, delay, quality issues, price change, imposition of tariffs or duties or other limitation in our ability to obtain components or technologies we use could result in sales and installation delays, cancellations, and loss of market share.

 

While we purchase our products from several different suppliers, if one or more of the suppliers that we rely upon to meet anticipated demand ceases or reduces production due to its financial condition, acquisition by a competitor, or otherwise, is unable to increase production as industry demand increases or is otherwise unable to allocate sufficient production to us, it may be difficult to quickly identify alternate suppliers or to qualify alternative products on commercially reasonable terms, and our ability to satisfy this demand may be adversely affected. At times, suppliers may have issues with the quality of their products, which may not be realized until the product has been installed at a customer site. This may result in additional cost incurred. There are a limited number of suppliers of solar energy system components and technologies. While we believe there are other sources of supply for these products available, transitioning to a new supplier may result in additional costs and delays in acquiring our solar products and deploying our systems. These issues could harm our business or financial performance.

 

In addition, the acquisition of a component supplier or technology provider by one of our competitors could limit our access to such components or technologies and require significant redesigns of our solar energy systems or installation procedures and have a negative impact on our business.

 

There have also been periods of industry-wide shortages of key components, including solar panels, in times of industry disruption. The manufacturing infrastructure for some of these components has a long lead-time, requires significant capital investment and relies on the continued availability of key commodity materials, potentially resulting in an inability to meet demand for these components. The solar industry is frequently experiencing significant disruption and, as a result, shortages of key components, including solar panels, may be more likely to occur, which in turn may result in price increases for such components. Even if industry-wide shortages do not occur, suppliers may decide to allocate key components with high demand or insufficient production capacity to more profitable customers, customers with long-term supply agreements or customers other than us and our supply of such components may be reduced as a result.

 

Typically, we purchase the components for our solar energy systems on an as-needed basis and do not operate under long-term supply agreements. The vast majority of our purchases are denominated in U.S. dollars. Since our revenue is also generated in U.S. dollars we are mostly insulated from currency fluctuations. However, since our suppliers often incur a significant amount of their costs by purchasing raw materials and generating operating expenses in foreign currencies, if the value of the U.S. dollar depreciates significantly or for a prolonged period of time against these other currencies this may cause our suppliers to raise the prices they charge us, which could harm our financial results. Since we purchase most of the solar photovoltaic panels we use from China, we are particularly exposed to exchange rate risk from increases in the value of the Chinese Renminbi.

 

The supply of components from China is also uncertain due to COVID-19 (Coronavirus) that has resulted in travel restrictions and shutdowns of businesses in China and the broader Asian region. Any supply shortages, delays, price changes or other limitation in our ability to obtain components or technologies we use could limit our growth, cause cancellations or adversely affect our profitability, and result in loss of market share and damage to our brand.

 

Although our business has benefited from the declining cost of solar panels, our financial results may be harmed now that the cost of solar panels has stabilized and could increase in the future, due to increases in the cost of solar panels and tariffs on imported solar panels imposed by the U.S. government.

 

The declining cost of solar panels and the raw materials necessary to manufacture them has been a key driver in the pricing of our solar energy systems and customer adoption of this form of renewable energy. With the stabilization or increase of solar panel and raw materials prices, our growth could slow, and our financial results could suffer. Further, the cost of solar panels and raw materials could increase in the future due to tariff penalties or other factors.

 

On January 23, 2018, The U.S. government imposed a protective tariff on solar panel components. The U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) released the following terms of the tariff:

 

   Year 1   Year 2   Year 3   Year 4 
Safeguard Tariff on Panels and Cells   30%   25%   20%   15%
Cells Exempted from Tariff   2.5 gigawatts    2.5 gigawatts    2.5 gigawatts    2.5 gigawatts 

 

As indicated in the terms, the tariff will not apply to the first 2.5 gigawatts of solar cells imported in each of the four years. Panels imported from China and Taiwan previously were subject to tariffs from a 2012 solar trade case. The current tariff applies to all countries.

 

As a result of the protective tariffs, and if additional tariffs are imposed or other disruptions to the supply chain occur, our ability to purchase these products on competitive terms or to access specialized technologies from those countries could be limited. Any of those events could harm our financial results by requiring us to account for the cost of trade penalties or to purchase solar panels or other system components from alternative, higher-priced sources.

 

15

 

 

We act as the licensed general contractor for our customers and are subject to risks associated with construction, cost overruns, delays, regulatory compliance and other contingencies, any of which could have a negative impact on our business and results of operations.

 

We are a licensed contractor. We are normally the general contractor, electrician, construction manager, and installer for our solar energy systems. We may be liable to customers for any damage we cause to their home, belongings or property during the installation of our systems. For example, we penetrate our customers’ roofs during the installation process and may incur liability for the failure to adequately weatherproof such penetrations following the completion of installation of solar energy systems. In addition, because the solar energy systems we deploy are high-voltage energy systems, we may incur liability for the failure to comply with electrical standards and manufacturer recommendations. Because our profit on a particular installation is based in part on assumptions as to the cost of such project, cost overruns, delays, or other execution issues may cause us to not achieve our expected results or cover our costs for that project.

 

In addition, the installation of solar energy systems is subject to oversight and regulation in accordance with national, state, and local laws and ordinances relating to building, fire and electrical codes, safety, environmental protection, utility interconnection and metering, and related matters. We also rely on certain of our employees to maintain professional licenses in many of the jurisdictions in which we operate, and our failure to employ properly licensed personnel could adversely affect our licensing status in those jurisdictions. It is difficult and costly to track the requirements of every authority having jurisdiction over our operations and our solar energy systems. Any new government regulations or utility policies pertaining to our systems, or changes to existing government regulations or utility policies pertaining to our systems, may result in significant additional expenses to us and our customers and, as a result, could cause a significant reduction in demand for our systems.

 

Compliance with occupational safety and health requirements and best practices can be costly, and noncompliance with such requirements may result in potentially significant monetary penalties, operational delays, and adverse publicity.

 

The installation of solar energy systems requires our employees to work at heights with complicated and potentially dangerous electrical systems. The evaluation and modification of buildings as part of the installation process requires our employees to work in locations that may contain potentially dangerous levels of asbestos, lead, mold or other materials known or believed to be hazardous to human health. We also maintain a fleet of trucks and other vehicles to support our installers and operations. There is substantial risk of serious injury or death if proper safety procedures are not followed. Our operations are subject to regulation under the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Act, or OSHA, the U.S. Department of Transportation, or DOT, and equivalent state laws. Changes to OSHA or DOT requirements, or stricter interpretation or enforcement of existing laws or regulations, could result in increased costs. If we fail to comply with applicable OSHA regulations, even if no work-related serious injury or death occurs, we may be subject to civil or criminal enforcement and be required to pay substantial penalties, incur significant capital expenditures or suspend or limit operations. High injury rates could expose us to increased liability. In the past, we have had workplace accidents and received citations from OSHA regulators for alleged safety violations, resulting in fines. Any such accidents, citations, violations, injuries or failure to comply with industry best practices may subject us to adverse publicity, damage our reputation and competitive position and adversely affect our business.

 

Problems with product quality or performance may cause us to incur warranty expenses, damage our market reputation, and prevent us from maintaining or increasing our market share.

 

If our products fail to perform as expected while under warranty, or if we are unable to support the warranties or production guarantees, sales of our products may be adversely affected, or our costs may increase, and our business, results of operations, and financial condition could be materially and adversely affected.

 

We may also be subject to warranty or product liability claims against us that are not covered by insurance or are in excess of our available insurance limits or warranty reserves. In addition, quality issues can have various other ramifications, including delays in the recognition of revenue, loss of revenue, loss of future sales opportunities, increased costs associated with repairing or replacing products, and a negative impact on our goodwill and reputation. The possibility of future product failures could cause us to incur substantial expenses to repair or replace defective products. Furthermore, widespread product failures may damage our market reputation and reduce our market share causing sales to decline.

 

A failure to comply with laws and regulations relating to our interactions with current or prospective residential customers could result in negative publicity, claims, investigations, and litigation, and adversely affect our financial performance.

 

Approximately 31% of our business focuses on contracts and transactions with residential customers. We must comply with numerous federal, state, and local laws and regulations that govern matters relating to our interactions with residential consumers, including those pertaining to privacy and data security, consumer financial and credit transactions, home improvement contracts, warranties, and door-to-door solicitation. These laws and regulations are dynamic and subject to potentially differing interpretations, and various federal, state and local legislative and regulatory bodies may expand current laws or regulations, or enact new laws and regulations, regarding these matters. Changes in these laws or regulations or their interpretation could dramatically affect how we do business, acquire customers, and manage and use information we collect from and about current and prospective customers and the costs associated therewith. We strive to comply with all applicable laws and regulations relating to our interactions with residential customers. It is possible, however, that these requirements may be interpreted and applied in a manner that is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another and may conflict with other rules or our practices. Our non-compliance with any such law or regulations could also expose the company to claims, proceedings, litigation and investigations by private parties and regulatory authorities, as well as substantial fines and negative publicity, each of which may materially and adversely affect our business. We have incurred, and will continue to incur, significant expenses to comply with such laws and regulations, and increased regulation of matters relating to our interactions with residential consumers could require us to modify our operations and incur significant additional expenses, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

16

 

 

If we experience a significant disruption in our information technology systems, fail to implement new systems and software successfully, or if we experience cyber security incidents or have a deficiency in cybersecurity, our business could be adversely affected.

 

We depend on information systems throughout our company to process orders, manage inventory, process and bill shipments and collect cash from our customers, respond to customer inquiries, contribute to our overall internal control processes, maintain records of our property, plant and equipment, and record and pay amounts due vendors and other creditors. These systems may experience damage or disruption from a number of causes, including power outages, computer and telecommunication failures, computer viruses, malware, ransomware or other destructive software, internal design, manual or usage errors, cyberattacks, terrorism, workplace violence or wrongdoing, catastrophic events, natural disasters and severe weather conditions. We may also be impacted by breaches of our third-party processors.

 

If we were to experience a prolonged disruption in our information systems that involve interactions with customers and suppliers, it could result in the loss of sales and customers and/or increased costs, which could adversely affect our overall business operation. Although no such incidents have had a direct, material impact on us, we are unable to predict the direct or indirect impact of any future incidents to our business.

 

In addition, numerous and evolving cybersecurity threats, including advanced and persistent cyberattacks, phishing and social engineering schemes, particularly on internet applications, could compromise the confidentiality, availability, and integrity of data in our systems. The security measures and procedures we and our customers have in place to protect sensitive data and other information may not be successful or sufficient to counter all data breaches, cyberattacks, or system failures. Although we devote resources to our cybersecurity programs and have implemented security measures to protect our systems and data, and to prevent, detect and respond to data security incidents, there can be no assurance that our efforts will prevent these threats.

 

Because the techniques used to obtain unauthorized access, or to disable or degrade systems change frequently, have become increasingly more complex and sophisticated, and may be difficult to detect for periods of time, we may not anticipate these acts or respond adequately or timely. As these threats continue to evolve and increase, we may be required to devote significant additional resources in order to modify and enhance our security controls and to identify and remediate any security vulnerabilities.

 

Seasonality caused by customer demand and weather may cause fluctuations in our financial results.

 

We often find that some customers tend to book projects by the end of a calendar year to realize the benefits of available subsidy programs prior to year-end. This results in third and fourth quarter revenues being more robust usually at the expense of the first quarter. However, demand for our products may be affected by changes in the buying patterns of our customers.

 

In addition, the first quarter in California, Nevada and the Northeast often has rain and snow, which also reduces our ability to install in that quarter relative to the remainder of the year. In the future, this seasonality may cause fluctuations in our financial results. Poor performance because of unseasonable weather conditions whether due to climate change or otherwise, economic conditions or other factors, could have a negative impact on our business, financial condition and operating results for the entire fiscal year. Abnormally wet weather in the spring or summer months could negatively impact our financial results.

 

Shifts in customer demand or weather are difficult to predict and may not be immediately apparent, and the impact of these changes is difficult to quantify from period to period. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in implementing effective strategies to counter these shifts. In addition, other seasonality trends may develop and the existing seasonality that we experience may change.

 

If we fail to maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting and other business practices, and of board-level oversight, we may not be able to report our financial results accurately or prevent and detect fraud and other improprieties. Consequently, investors could lose confidence in our financial reporting, and this may decrease the trading price of our stock.

 

We must maintain effective internal controls to provide reliable financial reports and to prevent and detect fraud and other improprieties. We are responsible for reviewing and assessing our internal controls and implementing additional controls when improvement is needed. Failure to implement any required changes to our internal controls or other changes we identify as necessary to maintain an effective system of internal controls could harm our operating results and cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information. Any such loss of confidence would have a negative effect on the market price of our stock.

 

Sarbanes-Oxley Act requirements regarding internal control over financial reporting, and other internal controls over business practices, are costly to implement and maintain, and such costs are relatively more burdensome for smaller companies such as us than for larger companies. We have limited internal personnel to implement procedures and must scale our procedures to be compatible with our resources. We also rely on outside professionals including accountants and attorneys to support our control procedures. We are working to improve all of our controls but, if our controls are not effective, we may not be able to report our financial results accurately or prevent and detect fraud and other improprieties which could lead to a decrease in the market price of our stock.

 

Risks Relating to our Common Stock

 

If we fail to comply with the continued minimum closing bid requirements of the Nasdaq Capital Market LLC (“Nasdaq”) or other requirements for continued listing, our common stock may be delisted and the price of our common stock and our ability to access the capital markets could be negatively impacted.

 

January 28, 2020, was the last time that our shares traded at or above $1.00 per share. Compliance with Nasdaq Listing Rule 5550(a)(2), requires that the minimum bid price of our common stock stay at or above $1.00 per share, and cannot stay below that threshold for 30 consecutive business days. On March 13, 2020, we received a letter from NASDAQ indicating that we failed to comply with the minimum bid price requirement of Nasdaq Listing Rule 5550(a)(2). In accordance with Nasdaq Listing Rule 5810(c)(3)(A), we have a period of 180 calendar days from such notification, to regain compliance with the minimum bid price requirement. To regain compliance, the closing bid price of our common stock must meet or exceed $1.00 per share for at least 10 – 20 consecutive business days during the 180 calendar day period, as determined by the staff of NASDAQ, at its discretion. If we do not regain compliance within the allotted compliance period, including any extensions that may be granted by NASDAQ or fail to comply with or other requirements for continued listing, our common stock may be delisted and the price of our common stock and our ability to access the capital markets could be negatively impacted. A delisting of our common stock from The NASDAQ Capital Market could materially reduce the liquidity of our common stock and result in a corresponding material reduction in the price of our common stock. In addition, delisting could harm our ability to raise capital through alternative financing sources on terms acceptable to us, or at all, and may result in the potential loss of confidence by investors, employees and fewer business development opportunities.

 

17

 

 

Trading in our stock has been volatile in volume and price. Therefore, investors may not be able to sell as much stock as they want at prevailing prices. Moreover, low volumes can increase stock price volatility.

 

Because of the volatility of our common stock, it may be difficult for investors to sell or buy substantial quantities of shares in the public market at any given time at prevailing prices. When trading volume is low, significant price movement can be caused trading a relatively small number of shares.

 

The market price of our common stock may fluctuate significantly, and investors in our common stock may lose all or a part of their investment.

 

The market prices for securities of solar and energy companies have historically been highly volatile, and the market has from time to time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. The price at which our common stock has traded in the recent year has fluctuated greatly and has declined significantly. In addition, the market price of our common stock may continue to fluctuate significantly in response to numerous factors, some of which are beyond our control, such as:

 

adverse regulatory decisions;
changes in laws or regulations applicable to our products or services;
legal disputes or other developments relating to proprietary rights, including patents, litigation matters and our ability to obtain patent protection for our product candidates, and the results of any proceedings or lawsuits, including patent or shareholder litigation;
our dependence on third parties;
announcements of the introduction of new products by our competitors;
market conditions in the solar and energy sectors;
announcements concerning product development results or intellectual property rights of others;
future issuances of common stock or other securities;
the addition or departure of key personnel;
failure to meet or exceed any financial guidance or expectations that we may provide to the public;
actual or anticipated variations in quarterly operating results;
our failure to meet or exceed the estimates and projections of the investment community;
overall performance of the equity markets and other factors that may be unrelated to our operating performance or the operating performance of our competitors, including changes in market valuations of similar companies;
announcements of significant acquisitions, strategic partnerships, joint ventures or capital commitments by us or our competitors;
issuances of debt or equity securities;
sales of our common stock by us or our shareholders in the future;
trading volume of our common stock;
ineffectiveness of our internal controls;
publication of research reports about us or our industry or positive or negative recommendations or withdrawal of research coverage by securities analysts;
general political and economic conditions;
effects of natural or man-made catastrophic events, including widespread public health epidemics like the pandemic related to the rapidly spreading COVID-19; and,
other events or factors, many of which are beyond our control.

 

Further, the equity markets in general have recently experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations. Continued market fluctuations could result in extreme volatility in the price of our common stock, which could cause a decline in the value of our common stock. Price volatility of our common stock might worsen if the trading volume of our common stock is low. The realization of any of the above risks or any of a broad range of other risks, including those described in these “Risk Factors,” could have a dramatic and negative impact on the market price of our common stock.

 

A substantial number of shares of common stock may be sold in the market, which may depress the market price for our common stock.

 

A substantial majority of the outstanding shares of our common stock and exercisable options are freely tradable without restriction or further registration under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

 

Pursuant to ATM Agreement with the Agent, Sunworks may offer and sell from time to time up to an aggregate of $15,000,000 of the Placement Shares through the Agent. Sales of the Placement Shares pursuant to the ATM Agreement, may be made in sales deemed to be “at the market offerings” as defined in Rule 415 promulgated under the Securities Act. The Agent will act as sales agent and will use commercially reasonable efforts to sell on Sunworks’ behalf all of the Placement Shares requested to be sold by Sunworks, consistent with its normal trading and sales practices, on mutually agreed terms between the Agent and Sunworks. During 2019 we sold 2,920,968 shares under the ATM Agreement, with gross proceeds for the shares of $7,023. In 2020 we have sold 9,817,343 shares, with net proceeds of $7,737.

 

Sales of a substantial number of shares of our common stock in the public market, future sales of substantial amounts of shares of our common stock in the public market, or the perception that these sales could occur, could cause the market price of our common stock to decline. Increased sales of our common stock in the market for any reason could exert significant downward pressure on our stock price.

 

18

 

 

If securities analysts do not publish research or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

 

The trading market for our common stock depends in part on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. If one or more of the analysts who cover us downgrade our stock or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of our company or fail to publish reports on us regularly, demand for our stock could decrease, which might cause our stock price and trading volume to decline.

 

We do not expect any cash dividends to be paid on our common stock in the foreseeable future.

 

We have never declared or paid a cash dividend on our common stock, and we do not anticipate paying cash dividends in the foreseeable future. We expect to use future earnings, if any, as well as any capital that may be raised in the future, to fund business growth or retire debt. Consequently, a stockholder’s only opportunity to achieve a return on investment would be for the price of our common stock to appreciate. We cannot assure stockholders of a positive return on their investment when they sell their shares, nor can we assure that stockholders will not lose the entire amount of their investment.

 

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Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.

 

None.

 

Item 2. Properties.

 

Sunworks United leases 27,530 square feet of mixed use space consisting of office and warehouse facilities in Roseville, California, at a monthly lease rate of $22. The lease expires in December 2021.

 

Sunworks United leases 2,846 square feet of retail space in Rocklin, California, at a monthly lease rate of $10. The lease expires in January 2021. Sunworks is the sublessor through January 2021. Sublessee makes monthly payments at a rate of $9 per month.

 

Sunworks United leases 5,304 square feet of office space in Rocklin, California, at a monthly lease rate of $6. The lease expires in May 2021. Sunworks is the sublessor through May 2021. Sublessee makes monthly payments at a rate of $5 per month.

 

Sunworks United leases 2,021 square feet of mixed use space consisting of office and warehouse facilities in Reno, Nevada at monthly lease rate of $2. The lease expires in October 2020. Sunworks is the sublessor through October 2020. Sublessee makes monthly payments at a rate of $2 per month.

 

Sunworks United leases approximately 3,665 square feet of mixed use space consisting of office and warehouse facilities in Riverside, California, at a monthly lease rate of $3. The lease expires in June 2021.

 

Sunworks Inc. leases 15,600 square feet of mixed use space consisting of office and warehouse facilities from an entity controlled by the former sole shareholder of Plan B Enterprises, Inc. and current Sunworks executive in Durham, California, at a monthly lease rate of $9. The lease is month-to-month.

 

Sunworks United leases 5,000 square feet of mixed use space consisting of office and warehouse facilities in Tulare, California at monthly lease rate of $5. The lease expires in July 2021.

 

Sunworks United leases 3,560 square feet of mixed use space consisting of office and warehouse facilities in Campbell (San Jose), California at monthly lease rate of $5. The lease expires in January 2022.

 

Sunworks United leases 528 square feet of mixed use space consisting of office and warehouse facilities in White City, Oregon at monthly lease rate of $1. The lease is month-to-month.

 

All of these properties are adequate for our current needs and we expect that we can extend our leases on these properties, or replace them with similar space, at approximately the same cost.

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

 

We are not currently a party to any legal proceedings that, individually or in the aggregate, are deemed to be material to our financial condition or results of operations.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

 

On March 4, 2015 our common stock began to be traded on The NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “SLTD” that was changed on March 1, 2016 to “SUNW” simultaneously with our name change to Sunworks, Inc. Our common stock previously traded on the OTCQB under the symbol “SLTD.” The market for our common stock was often sporadic, volatile, and limited.

 

Holders of Common Stock.

 

On March 30, 2020, we had 89 registered holders of record of our common  stock.

 

Dividends and dividend policy.

 

We have never declared or paid any dividends on our common stock. We do not anticipate paying dividends on our common stock at the present time or in the foreseeable future. We currently intend to retain earnings, if any, for use in our business.

 

Securities authorized for issuance under equity compensation plans.

 

The following table reflects information for equity compensation plans and arrangements for any and all directors, officers, employees and/or consultants through December 31, 2019.

 

Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

  

Number of securities to be

issued upon exercise of

outstanding options,

warrants and rights (a)

  

Weighted-average exercise

price of outstanding

options, warrants and

rights

  

Number of securities

remaining available for

future issuance under

equity compensation plans

excluding securities

included in column (a)

 
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders   143,623   $8.99    289,949 
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders   -    -    - 
Total   

143,623

   $

8.99

    

289,949

 

 

In March 2016, our Board of Directors adopted the 2016 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2016 Plan”) and in June 2016, the shareholders adopted the same. The maximum number of shares of common stock that may be issued under the 2016 Plan is 542,858. The 2016 Plan is currently administered by the Company’s Compensation Committee. The 2016 Plan authorizes grants of stock options, stock appreciation rights and restricted stock awards to officers, employees, directors of the Company as well as consultants who are selected by the Compensation Committee to receive an award. No option shall be exercisable more than 10 years after the date of grant. No option granted under the 2016 Plan is transferable by the individual or entity to whom it was granted otherwise than by will or laws of descent and distribution, and, during the lifetime of such individual, is not exercisable by any other person, but only by the recipient.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities.

 

None.

 

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

 

As a smaller reporting company, we are not required to provide the information under this item, pursuant to Regulation S-K Item 301(c).

 

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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations together with our consolidated financial statements and related notes appearing elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K. This discussion and analysis contains forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. The actual results may differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of certain factors, including, but not limited to, those set forth under “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K.

 

Amounts in thousands, except share and per share data

 

Overview

 

Sunworks provides PV based power systems for the agricultural, commercial, industrial, public works, and residential markets in California, Nevada, Massachusetts, Oregon, New Jersey and Hawaii. We have direct sales and/or operations personnel in California, Massachusetts, and Oregon. Through our operating subsidiaries, we design, arrange financing, integrate, install, and manage systems ranging in size from 2kW (kilowatt) for residential loads to multi MW (megawatt) systems for larger ACI and public works projects. ACI installations have included installations at office buildings, manufacturing plants, warehouses, churches, and agricultural facilities such as farms, wineries, and dairies. Public works installations have included school districts, local municipalities, federal facilities and higher education institutions. The Company provides a full range of installation services to our solar energy customers including design, system engineering, procurement, permitting, construction, grid connection, warranty, system monitoring and maintenance.

 

We currently operate in one segment based upon our organizational structure and the way in which our operations are managed and evaluated. Approximately 69% of our 2019 revenue was from sales to the ACI and public works markets and approximately 31% of our revenue was from sales to the residential market. Approximately 72% of our 2018 revenue was from sales to the ACI and public works markets and approximately 28% of our revenue was from sales to the residential market.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to impairment of property, plant and equipment, intangible assets, deferred tax assets, costs to complete projects, and fair value computation using the Black Scholes option pricing model. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions, such as the trading value of our common stock and estimated future undiscounted cash flows, that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions; however, we believe that our estimates, including those for the above-described items, are reasonable.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Significant estimates include estimates used to review the Company’s goodwill, impairments and estimations of long-lived assets, revenue recognition on percentage of completion type contracts, allowances for uncollectible accounts, warranty reserves, inventory valuation, valuations of non-cash capital stock issuances and the valuation allowance on deferred tax assets. The Company bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable in the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Revenues and related costs on construction contracts are recognized as the performance obligations are satisfied over time in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. Under ASC 606, revenue and associated profit, will be recognized as the customer obtains control of the goods and services promised in the contract (i.e., performance obligations). The cost of uninstalled materials or equipment will generally be excluded from our recognition of profit, unless specifically produced or manufactured for a project, because such costs are not considered to be a measure of progress. All un-allocable indirect costs and corporate general and administrative costs are charged to the periods as incurred. However, in the event a loss on a contract is foreseen, the Company will recognize the loss as it is determined.

 

22

 

 

Revisions in cost and profit estimates, during the course of the contract, are reflected in the accounting period in which the facts, which require the revision, become known. Provisions for estimated losses on uncompleted contracts are made in the period in which such losses are determined. Changes in job performance, job conditions, and estimated profitability, including those arising from contract penalty provisions, and final contract settlements may result in revisions to costs and income and are recognized in the period in which the revisions are determined.

 

Contract assets represent revenues recognized in excess of amounts invoiced to customers on contracts in progress. Contract liabilities represent amounts invoiced to customers in excess of revenues recognized on contracts in progress.

 

Indefinite Lived Intangibles and Goodwill Assets

 

The Company accounts for business combinations under the acquisition method of accounting in accordance with ASC 805, “Business Combinations,” where the total purchase price is allocated to the tangible and identified intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their estimated fair values. The purchase price is allocated using the information currently available, and may be adjusted, up to one year from acquisition date, after obtaining more information regarding, among other things, asset valuations, liabilities assumed and revisions to preliminary estimates. The purchase price in excess of the fair value of the tangible and identified intangible assets acquired less liabilities assumed is recognized as goodwill.

 

The Company tests for indefinite lived intangibles and goodwill impairment in the fourth quarter of each year and whenever events or circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset exceeds its fair value and may not be recoverable. In accordance with its policies, the Company performed a quantitative assessment of indefinite lived intangibles and goodwill at December 31, 2019 and 2018. At December 31, 2019, the Company determined that the carrying amount of goodwill did not exceed its fair value and, as a result, no impairment was recorded. At December 31, 2018, the Company determined that the carrying amount of goodwill exceeded its fair value and, as a result, recorded an impairment of $1,900.

 

Business Combinations

 

We allocate the fair value of purchase consideration to the tangible assets acquired, liabilities assumed and intangible assets acquired based on their estimated fair values. The excess of the fair value of purchase consideration over the fair values of these identifiable assets and liabilities is recorded as goodwill. Such valuations require management to make significant estimates and assumptions, especially with respect to intangible assets. Significant estimates in valuing certain intangible assets include, but are not limited to, future expected cash flows from acquired customer lists, acquired technology, and trade names from a market participant perspective, useful lives and discount rates. Management’s estimates of fair value are based upon assumptions believed to be reasonable, but which are inherently uncertain and unpredictable and, as a result, actual results may differ from estimates. During the measurement period, which is one year from the acquisition date, we may record adjustments to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed, with the corresponding offset to goodwill. Upon the conclusion of the measurement period, any subsequent adjustments are recorded to earnings.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company periodically issues stock options to employees and directors. The Company accounts for stock option grants issued and vesting to employees based on the authoritative guidance provided by the Financial Accounting Standards Board whereas the value of the award is measured on the date of grant and recognized over the vesting period.

 

The Company accounts for stock grants issued to non-employees in accordance with the authoritative guidance of the Financial Accounting Standards Board whereas the value of the stock compensation is based upon the measurement date as determined at either a) the date at which a performance commitment is reached, or b) at the date at which the necessary performance to earn the equity instruments is complete. Non-employee stock-based compensation charges generally are amortized over the vesting period on a straight-line basis. In certain circumstances where there are no future performance requirements by the non-employee, option grants are immediately vested and the total stock-based compensation charge is recorded in the period of the measurement date.

 

Accounts Receivable

 

Accounts receivables are recorded on contracts for amounts currently due based upon progress billings, as well as retention, which are collectible upon completion of the contracts. Retention receivable is the amount withheld by a customer until a contract is completed. Retention receivables of $1,027 and $1,234 were included in the balance of trade accounts receivable as of December 31, 2019, and 2018, respectively.

 

The Company performs ongoing credit evaluation of its customers. Management monitors outstanding receivables based on factors surrounding the credit risk of specific customers, historical trends, age of receivables and other information, and records bad debts using the allowance method. Accounts receivable are presented net of an allowance for doubtful accounts of $350 at December 31, 2019, and $325 at December 31, 2018. During the year ended December 31, 2019, $111 was recorded as bad debt expense compared to $91 in 2018.

 

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Inventory

 

Inventory is valued at a weighted average cost method. Inventory primarily consists of panels, inverters, and mounting racks and other materials. The company also carries a reserve for inventory obsolescence that may arise from technological advancement or obsolescence. Inventory is presented net of an allowance of $50 at December 31, 2019, and $50 at December 31, 2018.

 

Warranty Liability

 

The Company establishes warranty liability reserves to provide for estimated future expenses as a result of installation and product defects, product recalls and litigation incidental to the Company’s business. Liability estimates are determined based on management’s judgment, considering such factors as historical experience, the likely current cost of corrective action, manufacturers’ and subcontractors’ participation in sharing the cost of corrective action, and consultations with third party experts such as engineers. Solar panel manufacturers currently provide substantial warranties between ten to twenty-five years with full reimbursement to replace and install replacement panels while inverter manufacturers currently provide warranties covering ten to fifteen-year replacement and installation. Warranty liabilities for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 were $441 and $321, respectively.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company uses the liability method of accounting for income taxes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to financial statements carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carry-forwards. The measurement of deferred tax assets and liabilities is based on provisions of applicable tax law. The measurement of deferred tax assets is reduced, if necessary, by a valuation allowance based on the amount of tax benefits that, based on available evidence, is not expected to be realized.

 

Impact of COVID-19

 

The recent outbreak of COVID-19 has spread globally, including to the United States, which has resulted in significant governmental measures being implemented to control the spread of the virus, including quarantines, travel restrictions and business shutdowns. Although we cannot presently predict the scope and severity of COVID-19, these developments and measures could adversely affect our business and our results of operation and financial condition, particularly if the COVID-19 outbreak adversely impacts our ability to source materials used in our operations or adversely affects our ability to complete ongoing installations in a timely manner, or at all. COVID-19 could also potentially cause a decline in demand of our products and services. Market volatility and conditions could limit our ability to raise additional capital to finance our business plans on attractive terms, or at all. We may suffer negative impacts to operations that may be vulnerable as a result of government or company measures taken to control the spread of COVID-19, including potential shutdowns of government agencies that issue permits related to our installations. Additionally, any one of our key executives or other personnel could become incapacitated by COVID-19.

 

In response to the economic downturn, and the uncertain impact of COVID-19 on our business, we have implemented proactive steps to try and protect our business, including but not limited to: as of March 30, 2020, terminating or temporarily laying off 59 employees, representing a 33% reduction from the beginning of the year headcount, reducing an additional 23 employees to part time, and temporarily eliminating salaries for members of our board of directors and our Chief Executive Officer and reducing other management individual’s salaries by at least 50%.

 

The extent to which COVID-19 impacts our business, operations or financial results will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, such as the duration of the outbreak, new information that may emerge concerning the severity of COVID-19 or the nature or effectiveness of actions to contain COVID-19 or treat its impact, among others. We cannot presently predict the scope and severity of any potential business shutdowns or disruptions. If we or any of the third parties with whom we engage, however, were to experience shutdowns or other business disruptions, our ability to conduct our business could be materially and negatively affected, which could have a negative impact on our business, results of operation and financial condition.

 

Results of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

REVENUE AND COST OF REVENUES

 

For the year ended December 31, 2019, revenue declined 15.7% to $59,830 compared to $70,965 for the year ended December 31, 2018. The largest driver of the decrease year over year is a drop in Public Works revenues of $5,858. The decline in revenue in 2019 was primarily driven by fewer new project wins converting to revenue in the current year as well as delays in recognizing installation revenue at our Fresno Unified School District project due to conflicts with the school schedules. ACI revenue declined $4,253 primarily driven by delays in permitting and in achieving utility and other agency approvals. Residential revenues declined $1,024 due to lower sales from our leading third-party sales generator primarily due to competitive forces in Northern California. Although we continue to add new third-party sales generators, their impact on revenue in 2019 was not significant enough to overcome the decline in our primary sales channel. We also experienced very low revenues for ACI, Public Works and Residential in the first quarter of 2019 due to extremely rainy weather in California. Cost of goods sold for year ended December 31, 2019 was $53,167 or 88.9% of revenues, compared to $58,701 or 82.7% of revenues for the year ended December 31, 2018. The increase in cost of goods sold as a percentage of revenues resulted from a combination of redundant overhead in the first quarter of 2019 when our field teams were unable to work due to weather delays; significant amounts of rework in engineering design and permit application processes; and inefficiencies in construction activities on a number of jobs, primarily in the fourth quarter of 2019.

 

Approximately 69% of our 2019 revenue was from installations for the ACI and public works markets and approximately 31% was from residential system installations. Larger ACI projects take longer to sell, design, engineer, permit and construct than residential projects. Some current projects may take more than a year to complete from the time that the sales agreement is signed, and revenue is fully recognized with the installation and receipt of final inspection documents.

 

Gross profit for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $6,663 or 11.1% of revenues compared to $12,264 or 17.3% of revenues for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Gross margin in 2019 was lower than the prior year due to the reduction in revenue for all three business groups, ACI, Public Works and Residential creating under absorption of fixed costs coupled with the increase in cost of goods sold as described above.

 

SELLING AND MARKETING EXPENSES

 

Selling and marketing (“S&M”) expenses for the year ended December 31, 2019 were $2,992 compared to $3,824 for the year ended December 31, 2018. The 21.8% decline in S&M expenses was primarily due to decreases in employee headcount and related costs, commissions, and media advertising expenses compared to the prior year. As a percentage of revenues S&M expenses decreased to 5.0% of revenues in 2019 compared to 5.4% in 2018. The decrease was primarily due to a reduction in headcount and lower commissions owed due to lower new sales.

 

24

 

 

GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

 

General and administrative (“G&A”) expenses for the year ended December 31, 2019 were $11,213 compared to $10,001 for the year ended December 31, 2018. As a percentage of revenue, G&A expenses increased to 18.7% of revenues during the 2019 compared to 14.1% in 2018. In total dollars, G&A expense increased primarily due to increased legal costs of approximately $312, a bonus expense of $0 in 2019 compared to a reversal of a bonus accrual of $497 in 2018, an increase in employment costs of $257 and an increase in state taxes and bond premiums of $109.

 

Operating expenses are expected to be slightly lower going forward as we benefit from cost reduction efforts implemented in the fourth quarter of 2019 and the first quarter of 2020.

 

GOODWILL IMPAIRMENT

 

Goodwill impairment recorded for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $0 and $1,900, respectively. The Company retained a valuation consultant who performed a quantitative assessment of indefinite lived intangibles and goodwill at December 31, 2019 and 2018. At December 31, 2019, the Company determined that the carrying amount of goodwill did not exceed its fair value and, as a result, no impairment was recorded. At December 31, 2018 the Company determined that the carrying amount of goodwill exceeded its fair value and as a result, recorded an impairment of $1,900.

 

STOCK BASED COMPENSATION EXPENSES

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we incurred approximately $434 in non-cash stock compensation costs associated with Restricted Stock Grant Agreements and stock options compared to $1,313 during the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, stock-based compensation of $250 and $250, respectively, is for the March 2017 grant of 71,429 restricted shares to our CEO at the per share value at the date of grant of $10.50. This grant is being expensed on a straight-line basis over 36 months, expiring in March 2020.

 

Stock-based compensation, excluding restricted stock grant agreements, related to employee and director options totaled $184 and $381 for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

DEPRECIATION AND AMORTIZATION

 

Depreciation and Amortization expenses for the year ended December 31, 2019 were $353 compared to $384 for the year ended December 31, 2018. Depreciation and Amortization expenses decreased primarily due certain equipment becoming fully depreciated.

 

OTHER INCOME/(EXPENSES)

 

Other income/(expenses) increased for the year ended December 31, 2019 to ($857) compared to ($582) for the year ended December 31, 2018. Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2019 increased to $863 from $544 for year ended December 31, 2018. Approximately $780 and $473 of the interest expense for the years ended December 2019 and 2018, respectively, was from the Loan Agreement entered into in April 2018.

 

25

 

 

NET LOSS

 

The Company had a consolidated net loss of $9,186 for the year ended December 31, 2019 compared to a net loss of $5,740 for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

We had $3,154 in cash at December 31, 2019, as compared to $3,628 at December 31, 2018. We believe that the aggregate of our existing cash and cash equivalents, in addition to funds generated in operations and cash proceeds from our “At the Market” (ATM) equity sales, will be sufficient to meet our operating cash requirements for at least the next 12 months. Estimates about the adequacy of funding for our activities are based upon certain assumptions. There can be no assurance that changes in our business will not result in accelerated or unexpected expenditures. To satisfy our capital requirements, including ongoing future operations, we may seek to raise additional financing through debt and equity financings.

 

As of December 31, 2019, our working capital surplus was $1,460 compared to a working capital surplus of $3,791 at December 31, 2018.

 

The Loan Agreement for the Promissory Notes Payable contains a subjective acceleration clause based on the lender determining that an event has occurred that, in the exercise of its reasonable discretion, would reasonably be expected to have a “material adverse effect” on our business or our ability to perform our obligations under the Loan Agreement. If this clause is applied, and an Event of Default is determined to have occurred, the outstanding indebtedness could become immediately due. We believe that the likelihood of a material adverse effect being determined to have occurred is remote.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we used $6,456 of cash in operating activities compared to $5,752 used in operating activities for the prior year ended December 31, 2018. The cash used in operating activities was primarily the result of the current year net loss combined with changes in working capital accounts

 

Net cash provided by investing activities was $11 in the year ended December 31, 2019 compared to $3 used in investing activities in the year ended December 31, 2018. The cash provided by investing activities was from proceeds from the sale of assets.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities during the year ended December 31, 2019 was $5,909. This is due to net proceeds of $6,694 received from the At the Market offering, partially offset by principal payments on acquisition and equipment debt totaling $785. Cash provided by financing activities during the year ended December 31, 2018 was $2,999. The cash was primarily used to provide financial flexibility and to pay principal payments on existing debt. Since January 1, 2020 until March 30, 2020, we have sold an additional 9,817,343 Placement Shares resulting in additional net proceeds of approximately $7,737.

 

On January 29, 2020, we entered into a Loan Amendment with CrowdOut Capital, Inc. and paid $1.5 million of the $3.0 million outstanding on the Senior Notes held by CrowdOut Capital, Inc.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements that are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, revenues, results of operations, liquidity, or capital expenditures.

 

26

 

 

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

 

SUNWORKS, INC.

 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

 

CONTENTS

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm F-1
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-2
   
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-3
   
Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-4
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-5
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements F-6

 

27

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of

Sunworks, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Sunworks, Inc., (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the related consolidated statements of operations, shareholders’ equity, and cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/s/ LIGGETT & WEBB, P.A.  

 

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2014.

 

New York, NY

March 30, 2020

 

F-1

 

 

SUNWORKS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

   December 31, 2019   December 31, 2018 
Assets          
Current Assets          
Cash and cash equivalents  $3,154   $3,628 
Restricted cash   385    447 
Accounts receivable, net   7,606    8,201 
Inventory, net   2,970    3,233 
Contract assets   4,864    6,153 
Other current assets   275    150 
Total Current Assets   19,254    21,812 
Property and Equipment, net   511    852 
Operating lease right-of-use asset   1,505      
Other Assets          
Other deposits   69    68 
Goodwill   9,464    9,464 
Total Other Assets   9,533    9,532 
Total Assets  $30,803   $32,196 
           
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity          
Current Liabilities          
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities  $11,221   $11,858 
Contract liabilities   4,616    5,069 
Customer deposits   753    58 
Operating lease liability, current portion   864    - 
Loan payable, current portion   88    179 
Convertible promissory notes, current portion   -    100 
Acquisition promissory note, current portion   252    757 
Total Current Liabilities   17,794    18,021 
           
Long-Term Liabilities          
Operating lease liability   641    - 
Loan payable   -    88 
Promissory note payable, net   3,484    3,669 
Acquisition promissory note   -    101 
Warranty liability   441    321 
Total Long-Term Liabilities   4,566    4,179 
Total Liabilities   22,360    22,200 
           
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 14)          
           
Shareholders’ Equity          

Preferred stock Series B, $.001 par value; 5,000,000 authorized shares; 0 and 0 issued and outstanding, respectively

   -    - 

Common stock, $.001 par value; 200,000,000 authorized shares; 6,805,697 and 3,730,110 issued and outstanding, respectively

   7    4 
Additional paid in capital   81,132    73,502 
Accumulated deficit   (72,696)   (63,510)
Total Shareholders’ Equity   8,443    9,996 
Total Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity  $30,803   $32,196 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-2

 

 

SUNWORKS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

   2019   2018 
Revenue  $59,830   $70,965 
           
Cost of Goods Sold   53,167    58,701 
           
Gross Profit   6,663    12,264 
           
Operating Expenses          
Selling and marketing expenses   2,992    3,824 
General and administrative expenses   11,213    10,001 
Goodwill impairment   -    1,900 
Stock-based compensation   434    1,313 
Depreciation and amortization   353    384 
           
Total Operating Expenses   14,992    17,422 
           
Loss before Other Income/(Expenses)   (8,329)   (5,158)
           
Other Income/(Expenses)          
Other income (expense)   6    (38)
Interest expense   (863)   (544)
           
Total Other Income/(Expenses)   (857)   (582)
           
Loss Before Income Taxes   (9,186)   (5,740)
           
Income Tax Expense   -    - 
           
Net Loss  $(9,186)  $(5,740)
           
LOSS PER SHARE:          
Basic  $(2.07)  $(1.61)
Diluted  $(2.07)  $(1.61)
           
WEIGHTED-AVERAGE COMMON SHARES OUTSTANDING          
Basic   4,447,648    3,563,774 
Diluted   4,447,648    3,563,774 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-3

 

 

SUNWORKS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

   Series B           Additional         
   Preferred stock   Common stock   Paid-in   Accumulated     
   Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Total 
Balance at December 31, 2017   1,506,024   $2    3,307,276   $3   $72,020   $(56,365)  $15,660 
Adoption of ASC 606 (Note 3)   -    -    -    -    -    (1,405)   (1,405)
Issuance of common stock for conversion of promissory notes, plus accrued interest   -    -    49,873    -    118    -    118 
Issuance of common stock for exercise of options             27,473    -    50    -    50 
Issuance of common stock under terms of restricted stock grants             130,341    -    -    -    - 
Conversion of preferred stock to common stock   (1,506,024)   (2)   215,147    1    1    -    - 
Stock-based compensation   -    -    -    -    1,313    -    1,313 
Net loss for the twelve months ended December 31, 2018   -    -    -    -    -    (5,740)   (5,740)
Balance at December 31, 2018   -   $-    3,730,110   $4   $73,502   $(63,510)  $9,996 
Issuance of common stock under terms of restricted stock grants   -    -    23,809    -    250    -    250 
Issuance of common stock for conversion of promissory notes, plus accrued interest   -    -    68,082    -    161    -    161 
Issuance of common stock as fees paid for the extension of maturity date of debt   -    -    57,143    -    344    -    344 
Sales of common stock pursuant to S-3 registration statement   -    -    2,920,968    3    6,691    -    6,694 
Stock-based compensation   -    -    -    -    184    -    184 
Rounding shares due to reverse split   -    -    5,585    -    -    -    - 
Net loss for the twelve months ended December 31, 2019   -    -    -    -    -    (9,186)   (9,186)
Balance at December 31, 2019   -   $-    6,805,697   $7   $81,132   $(72,696)  $8,443 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-4

 

 

SUNWORKS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2019 AND 2018

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

   2019   2018 
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:          
Net loss  $(9,186)  $(5,740)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities          
Depreciation and amortization   353    384 
Amortization of right-of-use asset   648    - 
Stock-based compensation   434    1,313 
Goodwill impairment   -    1,900 
(Gain) on sale of equipment   (23)   - 
Amortization of debt issuance costs   

159

    36 
Bad debt expense   111    91 
Changes in Assets and Liabilities:          
(Increase) Decrease in:          
Accounts receivable   484    3,038 
Inventory   263    1,217 
Deposits and other current assets   (126)   1,931 
Contract assets   1,289    (2,947)
Increase (Decrease) in:          
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities   (576)   (1,163)
Contract liabilities   (453)   (3,040)
Customer deposits   695    (2,847)
Warranty and other liabilities   120    75 
Operating lease liability   (648)   - 
NET CASH USED IN OPERATING ACTIVITIES   (6,456)   (5,752)
           
NET CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:          
Purchase of property and equipment   

(23

)   (9)
Proceeds from sale of property and equipment   34    6 
NET CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) INVESTING ACTIVITIES   11    (3)
           
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:          
Loans and notes payable repayments   (785)   (683)
Proceeds from issuance of note payable, net   -    3,632 
Proceeds from sale of common stock, net   6,694    - 
Proceeds from exercise of stock options   -    50 
NET CASH PROVIDED BY FINANCING ACTIVITIES   5,909    2,999 
           
NET (DECREASE) IN CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS, AND RESTRICTED CASH   (536)   (2,756)
CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS, AND RESTRICTED CASH, BEGINNING OF YEAR   4,075    6,831 
CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS, AND RESTRICTED CASH, END OF YEAR  $3,539   $4,075 
           
CASH PAID FOR:          
Interest  $477   $374 
Taxes  $-   $- 
           
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURES OF NON-CASH TRANSACTIONS          
Issuance of common stock upon conversion of debt  $161   $118 
Issuance of common stock upon conversion of preferred stock  $-   $2 
Operating right-of-use asset and operating lease liability upon adoption of ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842)  $2,153   $- 
Issuance of common stock for fees paid for the extension of maturity date of debt  $344   $- 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-5

 

 

SUNWORKS, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

December 31, 2019 and 2018

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

1. ORGANIZATION AND LINE OF BUSINESS

 

Organization and Line of Business

 

Sunworks, Inc. (the “Company”) was originally incorporated in Delaware on January 30, 2002 as MachineTalker, Inc. In July 2010, the Company changed its name to Solar3D, Inc. On January 31, 2014, the Company acquired 100% of the stock of Solar United Network, Inc., a California corporation. On March 2, 2015, the Company acquired MD Energy. On December 1, 2015, the Company acquired Plan B through a merger of Plan B Enterprises, Inc. into its wholly owned subsidiary, Elite Solar Acquisition Sub., Inc. On March 1, 2016 the Company changed its name to Sunworks, Inc. with simultaneous NASDAQ stock symbol change from SLTD to SUNW.

 

The Company provides photovoltaic (“PV”) based power systems for the agricultural, commercial, industrial (“ACI”), public works, and residential markets in California, Nevada, Massachusetts, Oregon, New Jersey and Hawaii. The Company has direct sales and/or operations personnel in California, Massachusetts, and Oregon. Through the Company’s operating subsidiaries, it designs, arranges financing, integrates, installs, and manages systems ranging in size from 2kW (kilowatt) for residential loads to multi MW (megawatt) systems for larger ACI and public works projects. Commercial installations have included installations at office buildings, manufacturing plants, warehouses, churches, and agricultural facilities such as farms, wineries, and dairies. Public works installations have included school districts, local municipalities, federal facilities and higher education institutions. The Company provides a full range of installation services to its solar energy customers including design, system engineering, procurement, permitting, construction, grid connection, warranty, system monitoring and maintenance.

 

At the Company’s Annual Meeting of Stockholders on August 7, 2019, the stockholders of the Company approved a reverse stock split of its issued and outstanding common stock at a ratio not less than 1-for-3 and not greater than 1-for-10. On August 29, 2019, the Company’s Board of Directors approved the reverse stock split at a ratio of 1-for-7 which went into effect at the open of trading on August 30, 2019. At the effective time of the reverse stock split, every seven shares of issued and outstanding common stock was converted into one share of issued and outstanding common stock. The authorized shares of 200,000,000 and the par value of $0.001 remain the same. All shares and related financial information in this Form 10-K is retroactively stated to reflect this 1-for-7 reverse stock split.

 

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

This summary of significant accounting policies of Sunworks, Inc. is presented to assist in understanding the Company’s financial statements. The financial statements and notes are representations of the Company’s management, which is responsible for their integrity and objectivity. These accounting policies conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and have been consistently applied in the preparation of the financial statements.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Sunworks, Inc., and its wholly owned operating subsidiaries, Sunworks United, Inc. (“Sunworks United”), MD Energy, Inc. (“MD Energy”), and Plan B Enterprises, Inc. (“Plan B”). All material intercompany transactions have been eliminated upon consolidation of these entities.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Significant estimates include estimates used to review the Company’s goodwill, impairments and estimations of long-lived assets, revenue recognition on percentage of completion type contracts, allowances for uncollectible accounts, operating lease right-of-use assets and liabilities, warranty reserves, inventory valuation, valuations of non-cash capital stock issuances and the valuation allowance on deferred tax assets. The Company bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable in the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Revenues and related costs on construction contracts are recognized as the performance obligations are satisfied over time in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. Under ASC 606, revenue and associated profit, will be recognized as the customer obtains control of the goods and services promised in the contract (i.e., performance obligations). The cost of uninstalled materials or equipment will generally be excluded from the Company’s recognition of profit, unless specifically produced or manufactured for a project, because such costs are not considered to be a measure of progress. All un-allocable indirect costs and corporate general and administrative costs are charged to the periods as incurred. However, in the event a loss on a contract is foreseen, the Company will recognize the loss as it is determined.

 

F-6

 

 

Revisions in cost and profit estimates, during the course of the contract, are reflected in the accounting period in which the facts, which require the revision, become known. Provisions for estimated losses on uncompleted contracts are made in the period in which such losses are determined. Changes in job performance, job conditions, and estimated profitability, including those arising from contract penalty provisions, and final contract settlements may result in revisions to costs and income and are recognized in the period in which the revisions are determined.

 

Contract assets represent revenues recognized in excess of amounts invoiced to customers on contracts in progress. Contract liabilities represent amounts invoiced to customers in excess of revenues recognized on contracts in progress.

 

Accounts Receivable

 

Accounts receivables are recorded on contracts for amounts currently due based upon progress billings, as well as retention, which are collectible upon completion of the contracts. Retention receivable is the amount withheld by a customer until a contract is completed. Retention receivables of $1,027 and $1,234 were included in the balance of trade accounts receivable as of December 31, 2019, and 2018, respectively.

 

The Company performs ongoing credit evaluation of its customers. Management monitors outstanding receivables based on factors surrounding the credit risk of specific customers, historical trends, age of receivables and other information, and records bad debts using the allowance method. Accounts receivable are presented net of an allowance for doubtful accounts of $350 at December 31, 2019, and $325 at December 31, 2018. During calendar year 2019, $111 was recorded as bad debt expense compared to $91 in 2018.

 

Customer Deposits

 

Customer deposits are recorded for funds remitted by the Company’s customers in advance of progress billings being completed.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalent

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents.

 

Restricted Cash

 

The Company considers restricted cash to be cash balances that have legal and/or contractual restrictions imposed by a third party and are restricted as to withdrawal or use except for the specified purpose.

 

Concentration Risk

 

Cash includes amounts deposited in financial institutions in excess of insurable Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) limits. At times throughout the year, the Company may maintain cash balances in certain bank accounts in excess of FDIC limits. As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the cash balance in excess of the FDIC limits was $3,405 and $3,413, respectively. The Company has not experienced any losses in such accounts and believes it is not exposed to any significant credit risk in these accounts.

 

Inventory

 

Inventory is valued at a weighted average cost method. Inventory primarily consists of panels, inverters, and mounting racks and other materials. The company also carries a reserve for inventory obsolescence that may arise from technological advancement or obsolescence. Inventory is presented net of an allowance of $50 at December 31, 2019, and $50 at December 31, 2018.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost. Depreciation for property and equipment commences when it is put into service and are depreciated using the straight-line method over its estimated useful lives:

 

Machinery & equipment 3-7 Years
Furniture & fixtures 5-7 Years
Computer equipment 3-5 Years
Vehicles 5-7 Years
Leasehold improvements 3-5 Years

 

Depreciation expense as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $353 and $384, respectively.

 

F-7

 

 

Warranty Liability

 

The Company establishes warranty liability reserves to provide for estimated future expenses as a result of installation and product defects, product recalls and litigation incidental to the Company’s business. Liability estimates are determined based on management’s judgment, considering such factors as historical experience, the likely current cost of corrective action, manufacturers’ and subcontractors’ participation in sharing the cost of corrective action, and consultations with third party experts such as engineers. Solar panel manufacturers currently provide substantial warranties between ten to twenty-five years with full reimbursement to replace and install replacement panels while inverter manufacturers currently provide warranties covering ten to fifteen-years replacement and installation. The warranty liability for estimated future warranty costs at December 31, 2019 and 2018 is $441 and $321, respectively.

 

Advertising and Marketing

 

The Company expenses advertising and marketing costs as incurred. Advertising and marketing costs include printed material, billboards, sponsorships, direct mail, radio, telemarketing, tradeshow costs, magazine, and catalog advertisement. Advertising and marketing costs for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 were $123 and $237, respectively.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company periodically issues stock options to employees and directors. The Company accounts for stock option grants issued and vesting to employees based on the authoritative guidance provided by the Financial Accounting Standards Board whereas the value of the award is measured on the date of grant and recognized over the vesting period.

 

The Company accounts for stock grants issued to non-employees in accordance with the authoritative guidance of the Financial Accounting Standards Board whereas the value of the stock compensation is based upon the measurement date as determined at either a) the date at which a performance commitment is reached, or b) at the date at which the necessary performance to earn the equity instruments is complete. Non-employee stock-based compensation charges generally are amortized over the vesting period on a straight-line basis. In certain circumstances where there are no future performance requirements by the non-employee, option grants are immediately vested and the total stock-based compensation charge is recorded in the period of the measurement date.

 

Basic and Diluted Net Income (Loss) per Share Calculations

 

Income (Loss) per Share dictates the calculation of basic earnings per share and diluted earnings per share. Basic earnings per share are computed by dividing income available to common shareholders by the weighted-average number of common shares available. Diluted earnings per share is computed similar to basic earnings per share except that the denominator is increased to include the number of additional common shares that would have been outstanding if the potential common shares had been issued and if the additional common shares were dilutive. The shares for employee options, restricted stock, warrants and convertible notes were not used in the calculation of the net loss per share.

 

A net loss causes all outstanding common stock options, warrants, convertible preferred stock and convertible notes to be anti-dilutive. As a result, the basic and diluted losses per common share are the same for the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018.

 

As of December 31, 2019, the potentially dilutive securities were excluded from the computations of weighted average shares outstanding including 143,623 stock options, 5,952 restricted stock grants and 428,143 warrants.

 

As of December 31, 2018, the potentially dilutive securities were excluded from the computations of weighted average shares outstanding including 224,127 stock options, 31,746 restricted stock grants, 428,143 warrants, and shares underlying convertible notes.

 

Dilutive per share amounts are computed using the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding and potentially dilutive securities, using the treasury stock method if their effect would be dilutive.

 

Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company reviews its property and equipment and any identifiable intangibles for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. The test for impairment is required to be performed by management at least annually. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to the future undiscounted operating cash flow expected to be generated by the asset. If such assets are considered to be impaired, the impairment to be recognized is measured by the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset. Long-lived assets to be disposed of are reported at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less costs to sell.

 

F-8

 

 

Indefinite Lived Intangibles and Goodwill Assets

 

The Company accounts for business combinations under the acquisition method of accounting in accordance with ASC 805, “Business Combinations,” where the total purchase price is allocated to the tangible and identified intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their estimated fair values. The purchase price is allocated using the information currently available, and may be adjusted, up to one year from acquisition date, after obtaining more information regarding, among other things, asset valuations, liabilities assumed and revisions to preliminary estimates. The purchase price in excess of the fair value of the tangible and identified intangible assets acquired less liabilities assumed is recognized as goodwill.

 

The Company tests for indefinite lived intangibles and goodwill impairment in the fourth quarter of each year and whenever events or circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset exceeds its fair value and may not be recoverable. In accordance with its policies, the Company performed a quantitative assessment of indefinite lived intangibles and goodwill at December 31, 2019 and 2018. At December 31, 2019, the Company determined that the carrying amount of goodwill did not exceed its fair value and, as a result, no impairment was recorded. At December 31, 2018, the Company determined that the carrying amount of goodwill exceeded its fair value and, as a result, recorded an impairment of $1,900.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

Disclosures about fair value of financial instruments, requires disclosure of the fair value information, whether or not recognized in the balance sheet, where it is practicable to estimate that value. As of December 31, 2019, the amounts reported for cash, accrued interest and other expenses, and notes payable approximate the fair value because of their short maturities.

 

The Company accounts for financial instruments measured as fair value on a recurring basis under ASC Topic 820. ASC Topic 820 defines fair value, established a framework for measuring fair value in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States and expands disclosures about fair value measurements.

 

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. ASC Topic 820 established a three-tier fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (level 3 measurements). These tiers include:

 

  Level 1, defined as observable inputs such as quoted prices for identical instruments in active markets;
     
  Level 2, defined as inputs other than quoted prices in active markets that are either directly or indirectly observable such as quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets or quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active; and
     
  Level 3, defined as unobservable inputs in which little or no market data exists, therefore requiring an entity to develop its own assumptions, such as valuations derived from valuation techniques in which one or more significant inputs or significant value drivers are unobservable.

 

Business Combinations

 

The Company allocates the fair value of purchase consideration to the tangible assets acquired, liabilities assumed and intangible assets acquired based on their estimated fair values. The excess of the fair value of purchase consideration over the fair values of these identifiable assets and liabilities is recorded as goodwill. Such valuations require management to make significant estimates and assumptions, especially with respect to intangible assets. Significant estimates in valuing certain intangible assets include, but are not limited to, future expected cash flows from acquired customer lists, acquired technology, and trade names from a market participant perspective, useful lives and discount rates. Management’s estimates of fair value are based upon assumptions believed to be reasonable, but which are inherently uncertain and unpredictable and, as a result, actual results may differ from estimates. During the measurement period, which is one year from the acquisition date, the Company may record adjustments to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed, with the corresponding offset to goodwill. Upon the conclusion of the measurement period, any subsequent adjustments are recorded to earnings.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company uses the liability method of accounting for income taxes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to financial statements carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carry-forwards. The measurement of deferred tax assets and liabilities is based on provisions of applicable tax law. The measurement of deferred tax assets is reduced, if necessary, by a valuation allowance based on the amount of tax benefits that, based on available evidence, is not expected to be realized.

 

F-9

 

 

Reclassifications

 

Certain reclassifications have been made to prior year’s financial statement to conform to classifications used in the current year.

 

Segment Reporting

 

Operating segments are defined as components of an enterprise for which separate financial information is available and evaluated regularly by the chief operating decision maker, or decision-making group, in deciding the method to allocate resources and assess performance. The Company currently has one reportable segment for financial reporting purposes, which represents the Company’s core business.

 

Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (ASC 606), to clarify the principles of recognizing revenue and create common revenue recognition guidance between U.S. GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards. Under ASC 606, revenue is recognized when a customer obtains control of promised goods or services and is recognized at an amount that reflects the consideration expected to be received in exchange for such goods or services. In addition, ASC 606 requires disclosure of the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. The ASC was effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017. The Company has adopted ASC 606 beginning on January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective approach for contracts not substantially complete at that date by recognizing a cumulative adjustment to the opening balance of accumulated deficit. See Note 3 for additional disclosures in accordance with the new revenue recognition standard.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842): Accounting for Leases. This update requires that lessees recognize right-of-use assets and lease liabilities that are measured at the present value of the future lease payments at lease commencement date. The recognition, measurement, and presentation of expenses and cash flows arising from a lease by a lessee will largely remain unchanged and shall continue to depend on its classification as a finance or operating lease. The Company adopted the ASU and related amendments on January 1, 2019 and elected certain practical expedients permitted under the transition guidance. The Company elected the optional transition method that allows for a cumulative-effect adjustment in the period of adoption and did not restate prior periods. Under the new guidance, the majority of the Company’s leases continued to be classified as operating. During the first quarter of 2019, the Company completed its implementation of its processes and policies to support the new lease accounting and reporting requirements. Based on the Company’s lease portfolio as of January 1, 2019, the impact of adopting ASU 2016-02 increased both the Company’s total assets and total liabilities by $2,153. The adoption of this ASU did not have a significant impact on the Company’s Consolidated Statements of Operations or Cash Flows. See Note 4 for additional disclosures in accordance with the new leases standard.

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-04, Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment, which simplifies the subsequent measurement of goodwill by eliminating Step 2 from the goodwill impairment test. In computing the implied fair value of goodwill under Step 2, current U.S. GAAP requires the performance of procedures to determine the fair value at the impairment testing date of assets and liabilities (including unrecognized assets and liabilities) following the procedure that would be required in determining the fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed in a business combination. Instead, the amendments under this ASU require the goodwill impairment test to be performed by comparing the fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying amount. An impairment charge should be recognized for the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the reporting unit’s fair value; however, the loss recognized should not exceed the total amount of goodwill allocated to that reporting unit. The ASU becomes effective for the Company on January 1, 2020. There is no material impact expected to the Company’s financial statements due to the adoption of this new standard.

 

F-10

 

 

Management reviewed currently issued pronouncements during the year ended December 31, 2019, and believes that any other recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting standards, if currently adopted, would not have a material effect on the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

 

3. REVENUE FROM CONTRACTS WITH CUSTOMERS

 

Revenues and related costs on construction contracts are recognized as the performance obligations are satisfied over time in accordance with ASC 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. Under ASC 606, revenue and associated profit, will be recognized as the customer obtains control of the goods and services promised in the contract (i.e., performance obligations). The cost of uninstalled materials or equipment will generally be excluded from the Company’s recognition of profit, unless specifically produced or manufactured for a project, because such costs are not considered to be a measure of progress.

 

The following table represents a disaggregation of revenue by customer type from contracts with customers for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

  

Year Ended

December 31,

 
   2019   2018 
Agricultural, Commercial, and Industrial (ACI)  $28,940   $33,193 
Public Works   12,128    17,986 
Residential   18,762    19,786 
Total   59,830    70,965 

 

In adopting ASC 606, the Company had the following significant changes in accounting principles:

 

(i) Timing of revenue recognition for uninstalled materials - The Company previously recognized the majority of its revenue from the installation or construction of commercial & public works projects using the percentage-of-completion method of accounting, whereby revenue is recognized as the Company progresses on the contract. The percentage-of-completion for each project was determined on an actual cost-to-estimated final cost basis. Under ASC 606, revenue and associated profit, is recognized as the customer obtains control of the goods and services promised in the contract (i.e., performance obligations). The cost of uninstalled materials or equipment is generally excluded from the Company’s recognition of profit, unless specifically produced or manufactured for a project, because such costs are not considered to be a measure of progress.

 

(ii) Completed contracts - The Company previously recognized the majority of its revenue from the installation of residential projects using the completed contract method of accounting whereby revenue the Company recognized when the project is completed. Under, ASC 606, revenue is recognized as the customer obtains control of the goods and services promised in the contract (i.e., performance obligations).

 

Revenue recognition for other sales arrangements such as the sales of materials will remain materially consistent with prior treatment.

 

The adoption of the new revenue recognition standard resulted in a cumulative effect adjustment to retained earnings of approximately $1,405 as of January 1, 2018. The details of this adjustment are summarized below.

 

   Balance at   Adjustments   Balance at 
   December 31, 2017   Due to ASC 606   January 1, 2018 
Contract assets  $3,790   $(584)  $3,206 
Contract liabilities   7,288    821    8,109 
Accumulated deficit   (56,365)   (1,405)   (57,770)

 

F-11

 

 

The following tables summarize the impact of the adoption of ASC 606 on the Company’s condensed consolidated statement of operations for the year ended December 31, 2018 and the consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2018:

 

   For the Year Ended December 31, 2018 
       Without Adoption   Impact of Adoption 
   As Reported   of ASC 606   of ASC 606 
Revenue  $70,965   $68,845   $(2,120)
Cost of goods sold   58,701    57,471    (1,230)
Gross profit   12,264    11,374    (890)

 

   December 31, 2018 
       Without Adoption   Impact of Adoption 
   As Reported   of ASC 606   of ASC 606 
Contract assets  $6,153   $6,990   $837 
Contract liabilities   5,069    5,402    333 

 

Contract assets represent revenues recognized in excess of amounts invoiced to customers on contracts in progress. Contract liabilities represent amounts invoiced to customers in excess of revenues recognized on contracts in progress. At December 31, 2019 and 2018, the contract asset balances were $4,864 and $6,153, and the contract liability balances were $4,616 and $5,069, respectively.

 

4. LEASES

 

The Company has operating leases for offices, warehouses, vehicles, and office equipment. The Company’s leases have remaining lease terms of 1 year to 5 years, some of which include options to extend.

 

The Company’s lease expense for the year ended December 31, 2019 was entirely comprised of operating leases and amounted to $1,342. Operating lease payments, which reduced operating cash flows for the year ended December 31, 2019 amounted to $1,342. The difference between the ROU asset amortization of $648 and the associated lease expense of $1,342 consists of interest, new vehicles, new facilities and lease extensions, office and office equipment leases originated during the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

    December 31, 2019  
    (in thousands)  
Operating lease right-of-use assets   $ 1,505  
         
Operating lease liabilities—short term     864  
Operating lease liabilities—long term     641  
Total operating lease liabilities   $ 1,505  

 

As of December 31, 2019, the weighted average remaining lease term was 1.5 years and the discount rates for the Company’s leases was 10.0%.

 

Maturities for leases were as follows:

 

   Operating Leases 
    (in thousands) 
2020  $938 
2021   648 
2022   43 
2023   5 
Thereafter   - 
Total lease payments  $1,634 
Less: imputed interest   129 
Total  $1,505 

 

5. PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT, NET

 

Property and equipment is summarized as follows at December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

   2019   2018 
Leasehold improvements  $446   $446 
Vehicles & trailers   229    236 
Machinery & equipment   740    740 
Office equipment & furniture   379    380 
Computers and software   144    144 
    1,938    1,946 
Less accumulated depreciation   (1,427)   (1,094)
   $511   $852 

 

Depreciation expense for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $353 and $384, respectively.

 

6. ACCOUNTS PAYABLE AND ACCRUED LIABILITIES

 

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities at December 31, 2019 and 2018 are as follows:

 

   2019   2018 
Trade payables  $8,676   $9,488 
Accrued payroll, vacation and payroll taxes   628    506 
Accrued expenses, bonus and commissions   1,917    1,864 
Total  $11,221   $11,858 

 

7. LOANS PAYABLE

 

Plan B, a subsidiary of the Company, entered into a business loan agreement, prior to being acquired by the Company, with Tri Counties Bank dated March 14, 2014, in the original amount of $131 bearing interest at 4.95%. The loan agreement called for monthly payments of $2 and was scheduled to mature on March 14, 2019. Proceeds from the loan were used to purchase a pile driver and related equipment and is secured by the equipment. The loan was fully paid off during the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Plan B entered into a business loan agreement prior to being acquired by the Company, with Tri Counties Bank dated April 9, 2014, in the original amount of $250 bearing interest at 4.95%. The loan agreement calls for monthly payments of $5 and was scheduled to mature on April 9, 2019. Proceeds from the loan were used to purchase racking inventory and related equipment. The loan was secured by the inventory and equipment. The loan was fully paid off during the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

On January 5, 2016, the Company entered into a loan agreement for the acquisition of a pile driver in the principal amount of $182 bearing interest at 5.5%. The loan agreement calls for monthly payments of $4 and is scheduled to mature on January 15, 2020. The loan is secured by the equipment. The outstanding balance at December 31, 2019, is $4.

 

On September 8, 2016, the Company entered into a loan agreement for the acquisition of a pile driver in the principal amount of $174 bearing interest at 5.5%. The loan agreement calls for monthly payments of $4 and is scheduled to mature on September 15, 2020. The loan is secured by the equipment. The outstanding balance at December 31, 2019, is $36.

 

F-12

 

 

On November 14, 2016, the Company entered into a 0% interest loan agreement for the acquisition of an excavator in the principal amount of $59. The loan agreement calls for monthly payments of $1 and is scheduled to mature on November 13, 2020. The loan is secured by the equipment. The outstanding balance at December 31, 2019, is $13.

 

On December 23, 2016, the Company entered into a loan agreement for the acquisition of modular office systems and related furniture in the principal amount of $172 bearing interest at 4.99%. The loan agreement calls for 16 quarterly payments of $12 and is scheduled to mature in September 2020. The loan is secured by the equipment. The outstanding balance at December 31, 2019, is $35.

 

As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, loans payable are summarized as follows:

 

   2019   2018 
Business loan agreement dated March 14, 2014   -    7 
Business loan agreement dated April 9, 2014   -    19 
Equipment notes payable   88    241 
Subtotal   88    267 
Less: Current position   (88)   (179)
Long-term position  $-   $88 

 

8. ACQUISITION PROMISSORY NOTE

 

On February 28, 2015, the Company issued a 4% convertible promissory note in the aggregate principal amount of $2,650 as part of the consideration paid to acquire 100% of the total outstanding stock of MD Energy. The note is convertible into shares of common stock on or after each of the following dates: November 30, 2015, November 30, 2016 and November 30, 2017. The conversion price is $18.20 per share. A beneficial conversion feature of $3,262 was calculated but capped at the $2,650 value of the note. The beneficial conversion feature was calculated by multiplying the difference between the fair value of stock at the date of the note $40.60 less the conversion price of $18.20 multiplied by the maximum number of share subject to conversion, 145,604. In November 2015, the Company issued 48,535 shares of common stock upon conversion of the principal amount of $883. Commencing on March 31, 2015, and each quarter thereafter during the first two (2) years of the note, the Company made quarterly interest only payments to the shareholder for accrued interest on the Note during the quarter. Commencing with the quarter ending on June 30, 2017, the Company began to make quarterly payments of interest accrued on the convertible note during the prior quarter plus $151 with the final payment of all outstanding principal and accrued but unpaid interest on the convertible note due and payable on February 28, 2020 (the maturity date). The debt discount is fully amortized and has zero balance at December 31, 2019 and 2018. The Company recorded interest expense of $19 and $43 during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The outstanding balances at December 31, 2019 and 2018 were $252 and $858, respectively.

 

The Company evaluated the foregoing financing transactions in accordance with ASC Topic 470, Debt with Conversion and Other Options, and determined that the conversion feature of the convertible promissory note was afforded the exemption for conventional convertible instruments due to its fixed conversion rate. The convertible promissory notes had explicit limits on the number of shares issuable, so they did meet the conditions set forth in current accounting standards for equity classification. The convertible promissory notes were issued with non-detachable conversion options that were beneficial to the investors at inception because the conversion option has an effective strike price that is less than the market price of the underlying stock at the commitment date. The accounting for the beneficial conversion feature required that the beneficial conversion feature be recognized by allocating the intrinsic value of the conversion option to additional paid-in-capital, resulting in a discount on the convertible notes, which was amortized and recognized as interest expense.

 

9. CONVERTIBLE PROMISSORY NOTES

 

Convertible promissory note at December 31, 2019 and 2018 are as follows:

 

   2019   2018 
Convertible promissory notes  $-   $100 
Less: debt discount   -    - 
Convertible promissory notes, net  $-   $100 

 

F-13

 

 

On January 31, 2014, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement providing for the sale of a 10% convertible promissory note in the principal amount of up to $750 for consideration of $750. The proceeds were restricted and were used for the purchase of Solar United Network, Inc. The note was convertible into shares of common stock of the Company at a price equal to a variable conversion price equal to the lesser of $9.10 per share, or fifty percent (50%) of the lowest trading price after the effective date. As of September 30, 2014, the note was exchanged for a new convertible note with a fixed conversion price of $2.37. Per ASC 815, the derivative liability on the note was extinguished and the new note was re-valued per ASC 470 as a beneficial conversion feature, which was expensed in the statement of operations during 2014. The note originally matured on October 28, 2014, was extended three months to January 31, 2015, was extended to September 30, 2016, and in March 2016 was subsequently extended to June 30, 2019 with zero interest. During the year ended December 31, 2016, the noteholder made a partial conversion of principal and accrued interest in the amount of $196 and $45 respectively in exchange for 101,656 shares of common stock, with a remaining principal balance of $554. During the year ended December 31, 2017, the noteholder made a partial conversion of principal in the amount of $505 in exchange for 213,441 shares of common stock, with a remaining principal balance of $49. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the noteholder made a partial conversion of principal in the amount of $49 and accrued interest of $69 in exchange for 49,874 shares of common stock, with a remaining principal balance of $0.

 

On February 11, 2014, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement providing for the sale of a 10% convertible promissory note in the principal amount of $100. The note was convertible into shares of common stock of the Company at a price equal to a variable conversion price equal to the lesser of $9.10 per share, or fifty percent (50%) of the lowest trading price after the effective date. As of September 30, 2014, the note was exchanged for a new convertible note with a fixed conversion price of $2.37. Per ASC 815, the derivative liability on the note was extinguished and the new note was re-valued per ASC 470 as a beneficial conversion feature. The note matured on various dates from the effective date of each advance with respect to each advance. At the sole discretion of the lender, the lender was able to modify the maturity date to be twelve (12) months from the effective date of each advance. The note matured on various dates in 2014, and was extended to September 30, 2016, and in March 2016 was subsequently extended to June 30, 2019 with zero interest. The Company recorded no interest expense during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018. On April 10, 2019, all remaining principal and accrued interest due under the convertible promissory notes dated January 31, 2014 and February 11, 2014 were converted into 68,082 post-split shares of common stock. The balances converted included $100 of principal and $61 of accrued interest with a remaining principal balance of $0.

 

10. PROMISSORY NOTES PAYABLE

 

On April 27, 2018, the Company entered into a Loan Agreement (the “Loan Agreement”) with CrowdOut Capital, Inc. pursuant to which the Company issued an aggregate of $3,750 in promissory notes (the “Notes”), of which $3,000 are Senior Notes and $750 are Subordinated Notes. The Subordinated Notes were funded by the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Charles Cargile and the Company’s Vice President of Commercial Operations, Kirk Short.

 

The Notes bear interest at the rate of the one-month LIBOR plus 950 basis points and was originally scheduled to mature on June 30, 2020, prior to the maturity date being extended to January 31, 2021.

 

On June 3, 2019, the Company entered into an amendment to its Loan Agreement (the “Amendment”), pursuant to which the maturity date of the $3,000 Senior Note and $750 Subordinated Note was extended from June 30, 2020 to January 31, 2021. In connection with entering into the Amendment, the Company agreed to issue to CrowdOut, as the holder of the Senior Note, 57,143 shares of common stock as an amendment fee (the “Amendment Fee”) pursuant to the Company’s shelf registration statement on Form S-3.

 

Based upon the closing price of the Company’s common stock on June 17, 2019, the day of issuance, the 57,143 shares were valued at $344. The $344 Amendment Fee plus $7 for CrowdOut Amendment related legal fees have been added to the debt issuance costs and are being amortized over the remaining life of the loan. The Notes may be prepaid in whole without the consent of the lender or in part with the consent of the lender. In the event the Notes are prepaid in full prior to the maturity date, the Company shall pay CrowdOut, as the holder of the Senior Notes an exit fee of $375 if prepaid prior to March 31, 2020 or $435 if prepaid after March 31, 2020 but prior to the maturity date. The Company is accruing the exit fee of $435 over the extended remaining life of the Loan Agreement and recognizing the exit fee as interest expense. For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, exit fee recorded as interest expense was $160 and $134, respectively.

 

In connection with the issuance of the Senior Notes, the Company entered into a security agreement (the “Security Agreement”) pursuant to which the Company granted to the holder of the Senior Notes a security interest in certain of the Company’s assets to secure the prompt payment, performance and discharge in full of all of the Company’s obligations under the Senior Notes. The Company also entered into a subordination agreement with the holders of the Subordinated Notes and the Senior Notes pursuant to which the Subordinated Notes are subordinated to the Senior Notes.

 

The Loan Agreement contains certain customary Events of Default including, but not limited to, default in payment of any sum payable thereunder, breaches of representations or warranties thereunder, the occurrence of an event of default under the transaction documents, change in control of the Company, filing of bankruptcy and the entering or filing of certain monetary judgments against the Company. Upon the occurrence of an Event of Default the outstanding principal amount of the Notes, plus accrued but unpaid interest and other amounts owing in respect thereof, shall become, at the giving of notice by Lender, immediately due and payable. Interest on overdue payments upon the occurrence of an Event of Default shall accrue interest at a rate equal to the lesser of 18% per annum or the maximum rate permitted under applicable law. Additionally, the Loan Agreement includes a subjective acceleration clause if a “material adverse effect” occurs in the Company’s business that could result in an Event of Default. The Company believes that the likelihood of material adverse effect being determined to have occurred is remote. In January 2020, $1,500 of the $3,000 Senior Note was paid.

 

In conjunction with the Loan Agreement and Amendment, the Company recorded $468 of capitalized debt issuance costs. The debt issuance costs are being amortized over the life of the Loan Agreement and recognized as interest expense. The Note payable balance is reported net of the unamortized portion of the debt issuance costs. The Company recorded amortization of the debt issuance cost of $159 and $36 as interest expense during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

F-14

 

 

Promissory notes payable at December 31, 2019 and 2018 are as follows:

 

   2019   2018 
Promissory notes payable  $3,750   $3,750 
Less, debt issuance costs   (266)   (81)
Promissory notes payable, net  $3,484   $3,669 

 

11. CAPITAL STOCK

 

Common Stock

 

At the Company’s Annual Meeting of Stockholders on August 7, 2019, the stockholders of the Company approved a reverse stock split of our issued and outstanding common stock at a ratio not less than 1-for-3 and not greater than 1-for-10. On August 29, 2019, the board of directors of the Company approved the reverse stock split at a ratio of 1-for-7 which went into effect at the open of trading on August 30, 2019. At the effective time of the reverse stock split, every seven shares of issued and outstanding common stock was converted into one share of issued and outstanding common stock. The authorized shares of 200,000,000 and the par value of $0.001 remain the same. All shares and related financial information in this Form 10-K is retroactively stated to reflect this 1-for-7 reverse stock split.

 

Twelve months ended December 31, 2019

 

On April 10, 2019, the remaining principal of $100 and accrued interest of $61 due under the convertible promissory notes dated January 31, 2014 and February 11, 2014 were converted into 68,082 shares of common stock.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, 23,809 shares of common stock were issued to Charles Cargile from Mr. Cargile’s Restricted Stock Grant Agreement (“RSGA”) executed in 2017.

 

In connection with the June 3, 2019 Amendment to the Loan Agreement, the Company agreed to issue 57,143 shares of common stock to CrowdOut, as the holder of the $3,000,000 Senior Note. The shares were issued pursuant to the Company’s shelf registration on Form S-3 on June 17, 2019 at a market value of $344 based upon a closing price of $6.01 per common share. (See Note 10)

 

Pursuant to an At Market Issuance Sales Agreement (the “ATM Agreement”) with B. Riley FBR, Inc. (the “Agent”), the Company may offer and sell from time to time up to an aggregate of $15,000,000 of shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share (the “Placement Shares”), through the Agent.

 

The Placement Shares have been registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, pursuant to the Registration Statement on Form S-3 (File No. 333-231653), which was originally filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) on May 21, 2019 and declared effective by the SEC on May 31, 2019, the base prospectus contained within the Registration Statement, and a prospectus supplement that was filed with the SEC on June 6, 2019.

 

Placement Shares sold between June 6, 2019 and December 31, 2019 total 2,920,968 shares. Total gross proceeds for the shares were $7,023, or an average of $2.40 per share, as of December 31, 2019. Net proceeds, less issuance costs, were $6,694, or an average of $2.29 per share, as of December 31, 2019.

 

Sales of the Placement Shares, if any, pursuant to the ATM Agreement, may be made in sales deemed to be “at the market offerings” as defined in Rule 415 promulgated under the Securities Act. The Agent will act as sales agent and will use commercially reasonable efforts to sell on the Company’s behalf all of the Placement Shares requested to be sold by the Company, consistent with its normal trading and sales practices, on mutually agreed terms between the Agent and the Company.

 

The Company has no obligation to sell any of the Placement Shares under the ATM Agreement, and may at any time suspend offers under the ATM Agreement or terminate the ATM Agreement. The Company intends to use the net proceeds from this offering for general corporate purposes, including, without limitation, sales and marketing activities, product development, making acquisitions of assets, businesses, companies or securities, capital expenditures, repayment of indebtedness, and for working capital needs.

 

Due to the 1-7 reverse stock split that went into effect on August 30, 2019, a rounding of common stock shares was required due to partial share amounts that are rounded up to the next whole share. This resulted in an increase in shares of common stock of 5,585.

 

Twelve months ended December 31, 2018

 

On May 2, 2018, 215,147 shares of the Company’s outstanding Series B Preferred Stock were converted into the same number of shares of the Company’s common stock.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, 90,659 and 39,682 shares of common stock were issued to James Nelson and Charles Cargile, respectively, from RSGAs executed in 2013 and 2017, respectively.

 

On May 3, 2018, James Nelson exercised 27,473 options at an exercise price of $1.82 per share and was issued the equivalent number of shares of common stock.

 

On September 14, 2018, the Company issued 49,873 shares of common stock at a conversion price of $2.37 per share for partial conversion of principal and accrued interest for a convertible promissory note in the aggregate amount of $118.

 

Preferred Stock

 

On November 25, 2015, the Company designated 1,700,000 shares, of its authorized preferred stock, as Series B Preferred Stock, $0.001 par value per share. Pursuant to the Certificate of Designation filed with the Secretary of State of the State of Delaware, and subject to the rights of any other series of preferred stock that may be established by the Company’s Board of Directors, holders of Series B Preferred Stock (the “Holders”) will have liquidation preference over the holders of the Company’s common stock in any distribution upon winding up, dissolution, or liquidation. Holders will also be entitled to receive dividends, if, when and as declared by the Company’s Board of Directors, which dividends shall be payable in preference and priority to any payment of any dividend to holders of common stock. Holders will be entitled to convert each share of Series B Preferred Stock into one (1) share of common stock and will also be entitled to vote together with the holders of common stock on all matters submitted to shareholders at a rate of one (1) vote for each share of Series B Preferred Stock. In addition, so long as at least 100,000 shares of Series B Preferred Stock are outstanding, the Company may not, without the consent of the Holders of at least a majority of the shares of Series B Preferred Stock then outstanding: (i) amend, alter or repeal any provision of the Certificate of Incorporation or bylaws of the Company or the Certificate of Designation so as to adversely affect any of the rights, preferences, privileges, limitations or restrictions provided for the benefit of the Holders or (ii) issue or sell, or obligate itself to issue or sell, any additional shares of Series B Preferred Stock, or any securities that are convertible into or exchangeable for shares of Series B Preferred Stock. 1,506,024 shares of Series B Preferred Stock, at a fair value of $4,500 were issued in December 2015 in connection with the acquisition of Plan B. On May 2, 2018, the Holder converted 1,506,024 shares of Series B Preferred Stock into 215,147 post-split shares of the Company’s common stock. As of December 31, 2019 there were no outstanding shares of Preferred Stock.

 

F-15

 

 

12. STOCK OPTIONS, RESTRICTED STOCK AND WARRANTS

 

Options

 

As of December 31, 2019, the Company has 143,623 non-qualified stock options outstanding to purchase 143,623 shares of common stock, per the terms set forth in the option agreements. The stock options vest at various times and are exercisable for a period of five years from the date of grant at exercise prices ranging from $2.10 to $21.70 per share, the market value of the Company’s common stock on the date of each grant. The Company determined the fair market value of these options by using the Black Scholes option valuation model.

 

A summary of the Company’s stock option activity and related information follows:

 

   2019   2018 
       Weighted       Weighted 
   Number   Average   Number   Average 
   of   Exercise   of   Exercise 
   Options   Price   Options   Price 
Outstanding, beginning January 1   224,127   $12.11    267,880   $12.60 
Granted   55,707    2.73    45,215    7.14 
Exercised   -    -    (27,473)   1.82 
Forfeited   (136,211)   11.49    (61,495)   17.92 
Expired   -    -    -    - 
Outstanding, end of December 31   143,623    8.99    224,127    12.11 
Exercisable at the end of December 31   85,181    12.18    165,993    12.81 
Weighted average fair value of options granted during period        1.31         3.85 

 

The following summarizes the options to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock which were outstanding at December 31, 2019:

 

            Weighted 
            Average 
            Remaining 
Exercisable   Stock Options   Stock Options   Contractual 
Prices   Outstanding   Exercisable   Life (years) 
$18.76    18,570    18,570    1.28 
$20.16    7,142    7,142    1.67 
$21.70    7,142    7,142    1.84 
$10.50    20,282    17,920    2.38 
$10.71    1,428    1,111    2.67 
$6.93    7,142    4,161    3.25 
$8.68    7,142    3,887    3.37 
$6.51    7,142    4,004    3.32 
$7.63    14,997    8,949    3.41 
$2.31    3,071    1,082    3.95 
$2.10    12,284    4,072    4.01 
$3.07    30,138    6,548    4.63 
 2.52    7,143    593    4.76 
      143,623    85,181      

 

Aggregate intrinsic value of options outstanding and exercisable at December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $0. Aggregate intrinsic value represents the difference between the Company’s closing stock price on the last trading day of the fiscal period, which was $1.25 and $1.83 as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively, and the exercise price multiplied by the number of options outstanding.

 

The Company recorded stock-based compensation for issued options of $184 and $381 for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

F-16

 

 

Restricted Stock Grant to CEO

 

With an effective date of March 29, 2017, subject to the Sunworks, Inc. 2016 Equity Incentive Plan, (the “2016 Plan”) the Company entered into an RSGA with its Chief Executive Officer, Charles Cargile. All shares issuable under the RSGA are valued as of the grant date at $10.50 per share. The RSGA provides for the issuance of up to 71,429 shares of the Company’s common stock. The restricted shares shall vest as follows: 23,810 of the restricted shares shall vest on the one (1) year anniversary of the effective date, and the balance, or 47,619 restricted shares, shall vest in twenty-four (24) equal monthly installments commencing on the one (1) year anniversary of the effective date.

 

In the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 stock-based compensation expense of $250 and $250, respectively was recognized for the March 29, 2017 RSGA.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2013, the Company entered into an RSGA with its then Chief Executive Officer, James B. Nelson, intended to provide and incentivize Mr. Nelson to improve the economic performance of the Company and to increase its value and stock price. All shares issuable under the RSGA were performance-based shares, valued as of the grant date at $3.29 per share. The RSGA provided for the issuance of up to 109,890 shares of the Company’s common stock to Mr. Nelson provided certain milestones are met in certain stages. As of September 30, 2014, two of the milestones were met, when the Company’s market capitalization exceeded $10 million and the consolidated gross revenue, calculated in accordance with GAAP, equaled or exceeded $10 million for the trailing twelve-month period. The Company issued 54,945 shares of common stock to Mr. Nelson at fair value of $180 during the year ended December 31, 2014. In conjunction with Mr. Nelson’s retirement in April 2018, the remaining 54,945 shares of the Company’s common stock vested and were issued to Mr. Nelson and $179 was expensed during 2018.

 

In the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, stock-based compensation expense of $0 and $179, respectively, was recognized for the 2013 RSGA.

 

In recognition of the efforts of James B. Nelson, the Company’s Chairman, in leading the Company through the uplisting and financing transaction consummated by the Company in 2015, on August 31, 2016, the Company granted Mr. Nelson a restricted stock grant of 35,714 shares of the Company’s common stock pursuant to the terms of the 2016 Plan. All shares issuable under the RSGA are valued as of the grant date at $20.30 per share. The restricted stock grant to Mr. Nelson was to vest upon the earlier of (i) January 1, 2021, (ii) a Change of Control as defined in the 2016 Plan (iii) upon Mr. Nelson’s retirement or (iv) upon Mr. Nelson’s death. “Change of Control” as defined in the 2016 Plan means (i) a sale of all or substantially all of the Company’s assets or (ii) a merger with another entity or an acquisition of the Company that results in the existing shareholders of the Company owning less than fifty percent (50%) of the outstanding shares of capital stock of the surviving entity following such transaction. Mr. Nelson’s retirement in April 2018 resulted in the RGSA being vested in full.

 

In the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, stock-based compensation expense of $0 and $502, respectively, was recognized for the 2016 RSGA.

 

The total combined option and restricted stock compensation expense recognized, in the statement of operations, during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $434 and $1,313, respectively.

 

Warrants

 

As of December 31, 2019, the Company had 428,143 common stock purchase warrants outstanding. As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the weighted average exercise price was $1.20 and $29.05, respectively. The reduction in the exercise price is a result of the sale of Placement Shares pursuant to the ATM Agreement at prices less than the original $29.05 exercise price of the warrants. In accordance with the terms of the Warrant Agreement, the original $29.05 exercise price is reduced to a price equal to the aggregate consideration received divided by the number of additional shares of common stock issued. The warrants had an issuance date of March 9, 2015 and expired unexercised on March 9, 2020.

 

A summary of the Company’s warrant activity and related information follows:

 

   December 31, 2019   December 31, 2018 
       Weighted       Weighted 
   Number   Average   Number   Average 
   of   Exercise   of   Exercise