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EX-32.2 - CERTIFICATION OF PRINCIPAL FINANCIAL OFFICER - GULFSLOPE ENERGY, INC.ex32-2.htm
EX-32.1 - CERTIFICATION OF PRINCIPAL EXECUTIVE OFFICER - GULFSLOPE ENERGY, INC.ex32-1.htm
EX-31.2 - CERTIFICATION OF PRINCIPAL FINANCIAL OFFICER - GULFSLOPE ENERGY, INC.ex31-2.htm
EX-31.1 - CERTIFICATION OF PRINCIPAL EXECUTIVE OFFICER - GULFSLOPE ENERGY, INC.ex31-1.htm
EX-23.2 - CONSENT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM - GULFSLOPE ENERGY, INC.ex23-2.htm
EX-23.1 - CONSENT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM - GULFSLOPE ENERGY, INC.ex23-1.htm

 

 

  

UNITED STATES 

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION 

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

 ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended: September 30, 2019

 

or

 

 TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from ___ to ___

 

Commission File No. 000-51638

 

GULFSLOPE ENERGY, INC. 

(Exact name of the issuer as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware 16-1689008
(State or Other Jurisdiction of (I.R.S. Employer I.D. No.)
incorporation or organization)  

 

1331 Lamar St., Suite 1665 

Houston, Texas 77010 

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(281) 918-4100 

(Issuer’s Telephone Number)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act: None

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act:

 

Title of each class Trading Symbol Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $0.001 GSPE OTCQB

 

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☐ No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act. Yes ☐ No☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company:

 

       
Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company
  Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐ No ☒

 

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common stock was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common stock, as of the last business day of the Registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter.

 

The market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates was $46,424,568 based on 635,952,993 shares held by non-affiliates. These computations are based upon the closing sales price of $0.073 for the common stock of the Company on the OTC Bulletin Board of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”) on March 31, 2019.

 

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the Registrant’s classes of common equity, as of the latest practicable date:

 

Class   Outstanding as of December 27, 2019
Common Stock, $0.001 par value per share   1,148,609,520

 

Documents incorporated by reference: None

 

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART 1      
  Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements   3
ITEM 1. Business   3
ITEM 1A. Risk Factors   9
ITEM 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments   9
ITEM 2. Properties   9
ITEM 3. Legal Proceedings   9
ITEM 4. Mine Safety Disclosures   9
       
PART II      
ITEM 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities   10
ITEM 6. Selected Financial Data   10
ITEM 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations   10
ITEM 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk   15
ITEM 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data   16
ITEM 9. Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure   37
ITEM 9A. Controls and Procedures   37
ITEM 9B. Other Information   38
       
PART III      
ITEM 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance   39
ITEM 11. Executive Compensation   40
ITEM 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters   41
ITEM 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence   42
ITEM 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services   42
       
PART IV      
ITEM 15. Exhibits and Financial Statements Schedules   44
ITEM 16. Form 10-K Summary   45
  Signatures   46

 

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PART I

 

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

In this Annual Report, references to “GulfSlope Energy,” “GulfSlope,” the “Company,” “we,” “us,” and “our” refer to GulfSlope Energy, Inc., the Registrant.

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (this “Annual Report” or this “Report”) contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act and Section 21E of the Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). All statements, other than statements of historical facts, included in this Annual report are forward looking statements, including, without limitation, statements regarding our strategy, future operations, financial position, estimated revenues and losses, projected costs, prospects, plans and objectives of management. These forward-looking statements may be, but are not always, identified by their use of terms and phrases such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “project,” “plan,” “will,” “shall,” “should,” “could” and “potential,” and similar terms and phrases, including when used in the negative. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in these forward-looking statements are reasonable, they do involve certain assumptions, risks and uncertainties. Actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements in this paragraph and elsewhere in this Annual Report. Other than as required under the securities laws, we do not assume a duty to update these forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, subsequent events or circumstances, changes in expectations or otherwise.

 

  ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

Business Development

 

General

 

GulfSlope Energy, Inc. is an independent crude oil and natural gas exploration and production company whose interests are concentrated in the United States Gulf of Mexico federal waters. We are a technically driven company and we use our licensed 2.2 million acres of advanced three-dimensional (3-D) seismic data to identify, evaluate, and acquire assets with attractive economic profiles. GulfSlope Energy commenced commercial operations in March 2013. GulfSlope Energy was originally organized as a Utah corporation in 2004 and became a Delaware corporation in 2012.

 

We have focused our operations in the Gulf of Mexico because we believe this area provides us with favorable geologic and economic conditions, including multiple reservoir formations, comprehensive geologic databases, extensive infrastructure, relatively favorable royalty regime, and an attractive acquisition market and because our management and technical teams have significant experience and technical expertise in this geologic province. Additionally, we licensed 2.2 million acres of advanced three-dimensional (3D) seismic data, a significant portion of which has been enhanced by new, state-of-the-art reprocessing and noise attenuation techniques including reverse time migration depth imaging. We have used our broad regional seismic database and our reprocessing efforts to generate and highgrade an inventory of high-quality prospects. The use of our extensive seismic database, coupled with our ability, knowledge, and expertise to effectively reprocess this seismic data, allows us to further optimize our drilling program and to effectively evaluate acquisition and joint venture opportunities. We consistently assess our prospect inventory in order to deploy capital as efficiently as possible.

 

Competitive Advantages

 

Experienced management. Our management has significant experience in finding and developing oil and natural gas. Our team has a track record of discovering and developing multi-billion dollar projects worldwide. Our management team has been successful in exploring, discovering, and developing oil and natural gas. We deployed a technical team with over 150 years of combined industry experience exploring for and developing oil and natural gas in the development and execution of our technical strategy. We believe the application of advanced geophysical techniques on a specific geographic area with unique geologic features such as conventional reservoirs whose trapping configurations have been obscured by overlying salt layers provides us with a competitive advantage.

 

Advanced seismic image processing. Commercial improvements in 3-D seismic data imaging and the development of advanced processing algorithms, including pre-stack depth, beam, and reverse time migration have allowed the industry to better distinguish hydrocarbon traps and identify previously unknown prospects. Specifically, advanced processing techniques improve the definition of the seismic data from a scale of time to a scale of depth, thus correctly locating the images in three dimensions. Our technical team has significant experience utilizing advanced seismic image processing techniques in our core area, and we have applied advanced noise reduction technology to generate clearer images.

 

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Industry leading position in our core area. We have licensed 2.2 million acres of 3D seismic data which covers over 440 OCS Federal lease blocks on the highly prolific Louisiana outer shelf, offshore Gulf of Mexico. We believe the proprietary and state-of-the-art reprocessing of our licensed 3-D seismic data, along with our proprietary and leading-edge geologic depositional and petroleum trapping models, gives us an advantage in identifying and high grading opportunities in our core area. We have continuously worked to identify additional leasing opportunities to further enhance our drilling portfolio.

 

Technical Strategy

 

We believe that a major obstacle to identifying potential hydrocarbon accumulations globally has been the inability of seismic technology to accurately image deeper geologic formations because of overlying massive, extensive, and complex salt bodies. Large and thick laterally extensive subsurface salt layers highly distort the seismic ray paths traveling through them, which often has led to misinterpretation of the underlying geology and the potential major accumulations of oil and gas. We believe the opportunity exists for a technology-driven company to extensively apply advanced seismic acquisition and processing technologies, with the goal of achieving attractive commercial discovery rates for exploratory wells, and their subsequent appraisal and development, potentially having a very positive impact on returns on invested capital. These tools and techniques have been proven to be effective in deep water exploration and production worldwide, and we are using them to drill targets below the salt bodies in an area of the shallower waters of the GOM where industry activity has largely been absent for over 20 years. In fact, GulfSlope management led the early industry teams in their successful efforts to discover and develop five new fields below the extensive salt bodies in our core area during the 1990’s, which have produced over 125 million barrels of oil equivalent.

 

Our technical approach to exploration and development is to deploy a team of highly experienced geo-scientists who have current and extensive understanding of the geology and geophysics of the petroleum system within our core area, thereby decreasing the traditional timing and execution risks of advancing up a learning curve. For data licensing, re-processing and interpretation, our technical staff has prioritized specific geographic areas within our 2.2 million acres of seismic coverage, with the goal to optimize initial capital outlays.

 

Modern 3-D seismic datasets with acquisition parameters that are optimal for improved imaging at multiple depths are readily available in many of these sub-basins across our core area, and can be licensed on commercially reasonable terms. Critical to the technical success is the application of the newest state-of-the-art seismic imaging technology available, in order to optimize delineation of prospective structures and to detect the presence of hydrocarbon-charged reservoirs below many complex salt bodies geologic features. An example of such a seismic technology is reverse time migration, which we believe to be the most accurate, fastest, and yet affordable, seismic imaging technology for critical depth imaging available today.

 

Lease and Acquisition Strategy

 

Our prospect identification and analytical strategy is based on a thorough understanding of the geologic trends within our core area. Exploration efforts have been focused in areas where lease acquisition opportunities are readily available. We entered into two master 3-D license agreements, together covering approximately 2.2 million acres and we have completed advanced processing on select areas within this licensed seismic area exceeding one million acres. We can expand this coverage and perform further advanced processing, both with currently licensed seismic data and seismic data to be acquired. We have sought to acquire and reprocess the highest resolution data available in the potential prospect’s direct vicinity. This includes advanced imaging information to further our understanding of a particular reservoir’s characteristics, including both trapping mechanics and fluid migration patterns. Reprocessing is accomplished through a series of model building steps that incorporate the geometry of the geology to optimize the final image. Our integration of existing geologic understanding and enhanced seismic processing and interpretation provides us with unique insights and perspectives on existing producing areas and especially underexplored formations below and adjacent to salt bodies that are highly prospective for hydrocarbon production.

 

We currently hold seven leases that comprise four prospects and we will evaluate additional potential sources for growth opportunities with companies that hold active leases in our core area. Our original leases have a five-year primary term, expiring in 2020, 2022 and 2023. BOEM’s regulatory framework provides multiple options for leaseholders to apply to receive extensions of lease terms under specified conditions. GulfSlope is exploring all options contained in BOEM’s regulatory framework. Additional prospective acreage can be obtained through lease sales, farm-in, or purchase. As is consistent with a prudent and successful exploration approach, we believe that additional seismic licensing, acquisition, processing, and/or interpretation may become highly advantageous, in order to more precisely define the most optimal drillable location(s), particularly for development of discoveries.

 

We continue to evaluate potential producing property acquisitions in the offshore GOM, taking advantage of our highly specialized subsurface and engineering capabilities, knowledge, and expertise to identify attractive opportunities. Any merger or acquisition is likely to be financed through a combination of debt and equity.

 

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Drilling and other Exploratory and Development Strategies

 

With our success in the leasing of our targeted prospects, our plan has been to partner with other entities which could include oil and gas companies and/or financial investors. Our goal is to diversify risk and minimize capital exposure to exploration drilling costs. We expect a portion of our exploration costs to be paid by our partners through these transactions, in return for our previous investment in prospect generation and delivery of an identified prospect on acreage we control. Such arrangements are a commonly accepted industry method of proportionately recouping pre-drill cost outlays for seismic, land, and associated interpretation expenses. We cannot assure you, however, that we will be able to enter into any such arrangements on satisfactory terms. In any drilling, we expect that our retained working interest will be adjusted based upon factors such as geologic risk and well cost. Early monetization of a discovered asset or a portion of a discovered asset is an option for the Company as a means to fund development or additional exploration projects as an alternative to potential equity or debt offerings. However, if a reasonable value were not received from the market at the discovery stage, then we may elect to retain (subject to lease terms) the discovery asset undeveloped, until a reasonable offer is received in line with our perceived market value, or we may elect to seek development partners on a promoted basis in order to substantially reduce capital development requirements. We will also evaluate and seek to acquire producing properties that have a strategic relationship to our core area.

 

Oil and Natural Gas Industry

 

The oil and natural gas industry is a complex, multi-disciplinary sector that varies greatly across geographies. As a heavily regulated industry, operating conditions are subject to political regimes and changing legislation. Governments can either induce or deter investment in exploration and production, depending on legal requirements, fiscal and royalty structures and regulation. Beyond political considerations, exploration and production for hydrocarbons is an extremely risky business with multiple failure modes. Exploration and production wells require substantial investment and are long-term projects, sometimes exceeding twenty to thirty years. Regardless of the effort spent on an exploration or production prospect, success is difficult to attain. Even though modern equipment, including seismic equipment and advanced software has helped geologists find producing structures and map reservoirs, they do not guarantee any outcome. Drilling is the only method to ultimately determine whether a prospect will be productive, and even then, many complications can arise during drilling (e.g., those relating to drilling depths, pressure, porosity, weather conditions, permeability of the formation and rock hardness, among others).

 

Typically, there is a significant chance that exploratory wells will result in non-producing dry holes, leaving investors with the cost of seismic data and a dry well, which can total millions of dollars. Even if oil or gas is produced from a particular well, there is always the possibility that treatment, at additional cost, may be required to make production commercially viable. Further, production profiles decline over time. In summary, oil and gas exploration and production is an industry with high risks and high entry barriers.

 

Oil and natural gas prices can have a significant impact on the commercial feasibility of a project. Certain projects may become feasible with higher prices or, conversely, may falter with lower prices. Volatility in the price of oil, natural gas and other commodities has increased and is likely to continue in the future. Beginning in late 2014, a significant decline in oil prices occurred, the decline continued into 2016, with oil prices subsequently stabilizing between $50/bbl and $60/bbl, although there has been additional volatility since 2017 with prices ranging from a low of near $45/bbl to a high of more than $70/bbl. This volatility complicates the assessment of the commercial viability of many oil and gas projects. Most governments have enforced strict regulations to uphold high standards of environmental awareness; thus, holding companies to a high degree of responsibility vis-а-vis protecting the environment. Aside from such environmental factors, oil and natural gas drilling is often conducted near populated areas. For a company to be successful in its drilling endeavors, working relationships with local communities are crucial to promote business strategies and to avoid the repercussions of disputes that might arise over local business operations. At this time, the Company does not have any production or proved oil or natural gas reserves.

 

Governmental Regulation

 

Our future oil and natural gas operations will be subject to various federal, state, and local governmental regulations. Matters subject to regulation include discharge permits for drilling operations, drilling and abandonment bonds, reports concerning operations, the spacing of wells, pooling of properties, occupational health and safety, and taxation. From time to time, regulatory agencies have imposed price controls and limitations on production by restricting the rate of flow of oil and natural gas wells below actual production capacity in order to conserve supplies of oil and natural gas. The production, handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of oil and gas, by-products thereof, and other substances and materials produced or used in connection with oil and gas operations are also subject to regulation under federal, state, and local laws and regulations relating primarily to the protection of human health and the environment. State and local laws and regulations may affect the prices at which royalty owners are paid for their leases by requiring more stringent disclosure and certification requirements, adjusting interest rates for late payments, raising legal and administrative costs and imposing more costly default contractual terms. The requirements imposed by such laws and regulations are frequently changed and subject to interpretation, and we are unable to predict the ultimate cost of compliance with these requirements or their effect on our operations. Although the regulatory burden on the oil and natural gas industry increases our cost of doing business and, consequently, affects our profitability, these burdens generally do not affect us any differently or to any greater or lesser extent than they affect others in our industry with similar business models.

 

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Environmental laws provide for, among other things, restrictions and prohibitions on spills, releases, or emissions of various substances produced in association with oil and natural gas operations. The laws also require that wells and facility sites be operated, maintained, abandoned, and reclaimed to the satisfaction of the applicable regulatory authorities. Compliance with such laws can require significant expenditures and a breach may result in the imposition of fines and penalties, the payment of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations. Environmental legislation is evolving in a manner expected to result in stricter standards and enforcement, larger fines and liability, and potentially increased capital expenditures and operating costs. The discharge of oil or natural gas or other pollutants into the air, soil, or water may give rise to liabilities to governments and third parties and may require us to incur costs to remedy such discharge. No assurance can be given that environmental laws will not result in a curtailment of any future production or a material increase in the costs of production, development, or exploration activities or otherwise adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, or prospects. We could incur significant liability for damages, clean-up costs, and penalties in the event of discharges into the environment, environmental damage caused by us, or previous owners of our property, or non-compliance with environmental laws or regulations. In addition to actions brought by governmental agencies, we could face actions brought by private parties or citizens groups. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our financial results. Numerous departments and agencies, both federal and state, are authorized by statute to issue, and have issued, rules and regulations binding upon the oil and natural gas industry and its individual members. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (“BOEM”) and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (“BSEE”) regulations, pursuant to the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (“OCSLA”), apply to our operations on Federal leases in the Gulf of Mexico. The Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”), and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) hold statutory authority to monitor certain segments of the physical and futures energy commodities markets. These agencies have imposed broad regulations prohibiting fraud and manipulation of such markets. With regard to our future physical sales of crude oil or other energy commodities, and any related hedging activities that we undertake, we are required to observe the market-related regulations enforced by these agencies, which hold substantial enforcement authority.

 

These departments and agencies have authority to grant and suspend operations, and have authority to levy substantial penalties for non-compliance. Failure to comply with such regulations, as interpreted and enforced, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

On April 22, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon, a semi-submersible deep water drilling rig operating in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, sank after a blowout and fire resulting in a significant flow of hydrocarbons from the BP Macondo well. Subsequent to the Deepwater Horizon incident, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (“BOEM”) issued a series of Notice to Lessees (“NTLs”) imposing new regulatory requirements and permitting procedures for new wells to be drilled in federal waters of the outer continental shelf (“OCS”). These new regulatory requirements include the following:

 

  the Environmental NTL, which imposes new and more stringent requirements for documenting the environmental impacts potentially associated with the drilling of a new offshore well and significantly increases oil spill response requirements;

 

  the Compliance and Review NTL, which imposes requirements for operators to secure independent reviews of well design, construction and flow intervention processes and also requires certifications of compliance from senior corporate officers;

 

  the Drilling Safety Rule, which prescribes tighter cementing and casing practices, imposes standards for the use of drilling fluids to maintain well bore integrity and stiffens oversight requirements relating to blowout preventers and their components, including shear and pipe rams; and

 

  the Workplace Safety Rule, which requires operators to employ a comprehensive safety and environmental management system (“SEMS”) to reduce human and organizational errors as root causes of work-related accidents and offshore spills and to have their SEMS periodically audited by an independent third party auditor approved by the Bureau of Safety & Environmental Enforcement (“BSEE”).

 

Since the adoption of these new regulatory requirements, the BOEM has been taking much longer to review and approve permits for new wells than was common prior to the Deepwater Horizon incident. The new rules also increase the cost of preparing each permit application and will increase the cost of each new well, particularly for wells drilled in deeper waters on the OCS.

 

Hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico can have a significant impact on oil and gas operations on the OCS. The effects from past hurricanes have included structural damage to fixed production facilities, semi-submersibles and jack-up drilling rigs. The BOEM and the BSEE continue to be concerned about the loss of these facilities and rigs as well as the potential for catastrophic damage to key infrastructure and the resultant pollution from future storms. In an effort to reduce the potential for future damage, the BOEM and the BSEE have periodically issued guidance aimed at improving platform survivability by taking into account environmental and oceanic conditions in the design of platforms and related structures.

 

The BOEM, BSEE and Office of National Resources Revenue are expected to continue to issue new safety and environmental guidelines or regulations for drilling in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, and other regulatory agencies could potentially issue new safety and environmental guidelines or regulations in other geographic regions, and may take other steps that could increase the costs of exploration and production, reduce the area of operations and result in permitting delays. We are monitoring legislation and regulatory developments; however, it is difficult to predict the ultimate impact of any new guidelines, regulations or legislation.

 

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Environmental Regulation

 

The operation of our future oil and natural gas properties will be subject to numerous federal, state and local laws and regulations governing the discharge of materials into the environment or otherwise relating to environmental protection. Applicable U.S. federal environmental laws include, but are not limited to, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (“CERCLA”), the Clean Water Act (“CWA”) and the Clean Air Act (“CAA”). These laws and regulations govern environmental cleanup standards, require permits for air, water, underground injection, waste disposal and set environmental compliance criteria. In addition, state and local laws and regulations set forth specific standards for drilling wells, the maintenance of bonding requirements in order to drill or operate wells, the spacing and location of wells, the method of drilling and casing wells, the surface use and restoration of properties upon which wells are drilled, the plugging and abandoning of wells, and the prevention and cleanup of pollutants and other matters. Typically, operators maintain insurance against costs of clean-up operations, but are not fully insured against all such risks. Additionally, Congress and federal and state agencies frequently revise the environmental laws and regulations, and any changes that result in delay or more stringent and costly permitting, waste handling, disposal and clean-up requirements for the oil and gas industry could have a significant impact on our operating costs. There can be no assurance that future developments, such as increasingly stringent environmental laws or enforcement thereof, will not cause us to incur material environmental liabilities or costs.

 

Failure to comply with these laws and regulations may result in the assessment of administrative, civil and criminal fines and penalties and the imposition of injunctive relief. Accidental releases or spills may occur in the course of the operations of our properties, and we cannot assure you that we will not incur significant costs and liabilities as a result of such releases or spills, including any third-party claims for damage to property, natural resources or persons.

 

Among the environmental laws and regulations that could have a material impact on the oil and natural gas exploration and production industry and our business are the following:

 

Waste Discharges. The CWA and analogous state laws impose restrictions and strict controls with respect to the discharge of pollutants, including spills and leaks of oil and other substances, into waters of the United States. The discharge of pollutants into regulated waters is prohibited, except in accordance with the terms of a permit issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) or an analogous state agency. The CWA and regulations implemented thereunder also prohibit the discharge of dredge and fill material into regulated waters, including jurisdictional wetlands, unless authorized by an appropriately issued permit. Spill prevention, control and countermeasure requirements of federal laws mandate preparation of detailed plans that address spill response, including appropriate containment berms and similar structures to help prevent the contamination of navigable waters by a petroleum hydrocarbon tank spill, rupture or leak. In addition, the CWA and analogous state laws require individual permits or coverage under general permits for discharges of storm water runoff from certain types of facilities. Federal and state regulatory agencies can impose administrative, civil and criminal penalties as well as other enforcement mechanisms for noncompliance with discharge permits or other requirements of the CWA and analogous state laws and regulations.

 

Air Emissions and Climate Change. Air emissions from our operations are subject to the Federal Clean Air Act (“CAA”) and comparable state and local requirements. We may be required to incur certain capital expenditures in the future for air pollution control equipment in connection with obtaining and maintaining operating permits and approvals for air emissions. In addition, the EPA has developed, and continues to develop, stringent regulations governing emissions of toxic air pollutants at specified sources.

 

Moreover, the U.S. Congress and the EPA in addition to some state and regional efforts have in recent years considered legislation or regulations to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. These efforts have included consideration of cap-and-trade programs, carbon taxes, and greenhouse gas monitoring and reporting programs. In the absence of federal greenhouse gas limitations, the EPA has determined that greenhouse gas emissions present a danger to public health and the environment, and it has adopted regulations that, among other things, restrict emissions of greenhouse gases under existing provisions of the CAA and may require the installation of control technologies to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. These regulations would apply to any new or significantly modified facilities that we construct in the future that would otherwise emit large volumes of greenhouse gases together with other criteria pollutants. Also, certain of our operations are subject to EPA rules requiring the monitoring and annual reporting of greenhouse gas emissions from specified offshore production sources.

 

Oil Pollution Act. The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (“OPA”) and regulations thereunder impose a variety of requirements on “responsible parties” related to the prevention of oil spills and liability for damages resulting from such spills in United States waters. A “responsible party” includes the owner or operator of an onshore facility, pipeline or vessel, or the lessee or permittee of the area in which an offshore facility is located. OPA assigns liability to each responsible party for oil cleanup costs and a variety of public and private damages. While liability limits apply in some circumstances, a party cannot take advantage of liability limits if the spill was caused by gross negligence or willful misconduct or resulted from violation of a federal safety, construction or operating regulation. If the party fails to report a spill or to cooperate fully in the cleanup, liability limits likewise do not apply. Few defenses exist to the liability imposed by OPA. OPA imposes ongoing requirements on a responsible party, including the preparation of oil spill response plans and proof of financial responsibility to cover environmental cleanup and restoration costs that could be incurred in connection with an oil spill.

 

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National Environmental Policy Act. Oil and natural gas exploration and production activities on federal lands are subject to the National Environmental Policy Act (“NEPA”). NEPA requires federal agencies, including the Department of Interior, to evaluate major agency actions having the potential to significantly impact the environment. The process involves the preparation of either an environmental assessment or environmental impact statement depending on whether the specific circumstances surrounding the proposed federal action will have a significant impact on the human environment. The NEPA process involves public input through comments, which can alter the nature of a proposed project either by limiting the scope of the project or requiring resource-specific mitigation. NEPA decisions can be appealed through the court system, by process participants. This process may result in delaying the permitting and development of projects, increase the costs of permitting and developing some facilities and could result in certain instances in the cancellation of existing leases.

 

Worker Safety. The Occupational Safety and Health Act (“OSH Act”) and comparable state statutes regulate the protection of the health and safety of workers. The OSH Act’s hazard communication standard requires maintenance of information about hazardous materials used or produced in operations and provision of such information to employees. Other OSH Act standards regulate specific worker safety aspects of our operations. Failure to comply with OSH Act requirements can lead to the imposition of penalties.

 

Safe Drinking Water Act. The Safe Drinking Water Act and comparable state statutes may restrict the disposal, treatment or release of water produced or used during oil and gas development. Subsurface emplacement of fluids (including disposal wells or enhanced oil recovery) is governed by federal or state regulatory authorities that in some cases, includes the state oil and gas regulatory authority or the state’s environmental authority. These regulations may increase the costs of compliance.

 

Offshore Drilling. In 2011, the U.S. Department of Interior issued new rules designed to improve drilling and workplace safety in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, and various congressional committees began pursuing legislation to regulate drilling activities and increase liability. The BOEM, BSEE and Office of National Resources Revenue are expected to continue to issue new safety and environmental guidelines or regulations for drilling in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, and other regulatory agencies could potentially issue new safety and environmental guidelines or regulations in other geographic regions, and may take other steps that could increase the costs of exploration and production, reduce the area of operations and result in permitting delays. We are monitoring legislation and regulatory developments; however, it is difficult to predict the ultimate impact of any new guidelines, regulations or legislation. A prolonged suspension of drilling activity or permitting delays in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and new regulations and increased liability for companies operating in this sector, whether or not caused by a new incident in the region, could adversely affect the business and planned operations of oil and gas companies.

 

Hazardous Substances and Wastes. CERCLA, also known as the “Superfund law,” imposes liability, without regard to fault or the legality of the original conduct, on certain classes of persons that are considered to be responsible for the release of a “hazardous substance” into the environment. These persons include the owner or operator of the disposal site or sites where the release occurred and companies that transported or disposed or arranged for the transport or disposal of the hazardous substances found at the site. Persons who are or were responsible for releases of hazardous substances under CERCLA may be subject to joint and several liability for the costs of cleaning up the hazardous substances that have been released into the environment and for damages to natural resources, and it is not uncommon for neighboring landowners and other third parties to file corresponding common law claims for personal injury and property damage allegedly caused by the hazardous substances released into the environment.

 

Protected and Endangered Species. Executive Order 13158, issued in May 2000, directs federal agencies to safeguard existing Marine Protected Areas (“MPAs”) in the United States and establish new MPAs. The order requires federal agencies to avoid harm to MPAs to the extent permitted by law and to the maximum extent practicable. It also directs the EPA to propose new regulations under the Clean Water Act to ensure appropriate levels of protection for the marine environment. This order has the potential to adversely affect our operations by restricting areas in which we may carry out future development and exploration projects and/or causing us to incur increased operating expenses.

 

Competition

 

We operate in a highly competitive environment for generating, evaluating and drilling prospects and for acquiring properties. Many of our competitors are major or large independent oil and natural gas companies that possess and employ financial resources well in excess of the Company’s resources. We believe that we may have to compete with other companies when acquiring leases or oil and gas properties. These additional resources can be particularly important in reviewing prospects and purchasing properties. Competitors may be able to evaluate and purchase a greater number of properties and prospects than our financial or personnel resources permit. Competitors may also be able to pay more for prospects than we are able or willing to pay. Further, our competitors may be able to expend greater resources on the existing and changing technologies that we believe will impact attaining success in the industry. If we are unable to compete successfully in these areas in the future, our future growth may be diminished or restricted. Furthermore, these companies may also be better able to withstand the financial pressures of unsuccessful drill attempts, delays, sustained periods of volatility in financial or commodity markets and generally adverse global and industry-wide economic conditions, and may be better able to absorb the burdens resulting from changes in relevant laws and regulations, which would adversely affect our operations.

 

8 

 

 

Employees

 

We currently have seven employees. We utilize consultants, as needed, to perform strategic, technical, operational and administrative functions, and as advisors.

 

Historical Background

 

GulfSlope Energy, Inc., a Delaware corporation, is an independent crude oil and natural gas exploration and production company whose interests are concentrated in the United States Gulf of Mexico (“GOM”) federal waters offshore Louisiana in less than 450 feet of water depth. The Company currently has under lease fourteen federal Outer Continental Shelf blocks (referred to as “prospect,” “portfolio” or “leases” in this Report) and has licensed 2.2 million acres of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic data in its area of concentration.

 

General

 

Our address is 1331 Lamar St., Suite 1665, Houston, Texas 77010, and our telephone number is (281) 918-4100. Our web site is www.gulfslope.com. You may access and read our SEC filings through the SEC’s web site (http:www.sec.gov). This site contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding registrants, including us, that file electronically with the SEC.

 

 ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

Not required for smaller reporting companies.

 

 ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None.

 

 ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

For a discussion of our oil and gas properties, see Item 1. Business.

 

We lease approximately 5,000 square feet of office space at our corporate headquarters at 1331 Lamar St., Suite 1665, Houston, Texas 77010. We own office equipment, office furniture, and computer equipment.

 

 ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

From time to time, the Company may become involved in litigation relating to claims arising out of its operations in the normal course of business. No legal proceedings, government actions, administrative actions, investigations or claims are currently pending against us or involve the Company.

 

 ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable.

 

9 

 

 

PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock, $0.001 par value per share, is quoted on the OTCBB and the OTCQB under the symbol “GSPE.” Shares of our common stock have historically been thinly traded. As a result, our stock price as quoted by the OTCBB or OTCQB may not reflect an actual or perceived value.

 

Holders

 

The number of record holders of the Company’s common stock, as of December 27, 2019, is approximately 188.

 

Dividends

 

The Company has not declared any dividends with respect to its common stock and does not intend to declare any dividends in the foreseeable future. The future dividend policy of the Company cannot be ascertained with any certainty. There are no material restrictions limiting the Company’s ability to pay cash dividends on its common stock.

 

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

 

The following table sets forth information with respect to the equity compensation plans available to directors, officers, certain employees and certain consultants of the Company at September 30, 2019.

 

   (a)   (b)   (c) 
Plan category 

Number of securities to 

be issued upon exercise 

of outstanding stock options
(1) 

  

Weighted-average 

exercise price of 

outstanding stock options 

  

Number of securities 

remaining available for 

future issuance under 

equity compensation plans (2) 

 
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders   104,500,000   $0.0605    61,470,000 
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders            
Total   104,500,000         61,470,000 

 

(1) This column reflects the maximum number of shares of our common stock subject to stock option awards granted as Inducement Shares or under the 2014 and 2018 Omnibus Incentive Plans vested and unvested.
(2) This column reflects the total number of shares of our common stock remaining available for issuance under the 2014 and 2018 Omnibus Incentive Plans.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

In December 2019, the Company issued approximately 38.4 million shares of restricted common stock in settlement of a liability.

 

 ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

Not required for smaller reporting companies.

 

 ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATION

 

The following discussion highlights the principal factors that have affected our financial condition and results of operations as well as our liquidity and capital resources for the periods described. This discussion contains forward-looking statements. Please see “Forward-Looking Statements” above for a discussion of the uncertainties, risks and assumptions associated with these forward-looking statements. The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations is based on our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared on the accrual basis of accounting, whereby revenues are recognized when earned, and expenses are recognized when incurred. You should read this management’s discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations in conjunction with our historical financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report. Our future results could differ materially from our historical results due to a variety of factors, many of which are out of our control.

 

10 

 

 

Overview

 

GulfSlope Energy, Inc. is an independent oil and natural gas exploration and production company whose interests are concentrated in the United States, Gulf of Mexico federal waters offshore Louisiana in 450 feet or less of water depth. The Company has under lease seven federal Outer Continental Shelf blocks (referred to as “leases” in this report) and licensed 2.2 million acres of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic data in its area of concentration. Approximately half this data has been reprocessed utilizing Reverse Time Migration (RTM) to more accurately define the imaging below salt. Since March 2013, we have been singularly focused on identifying high-potential oil and natural gas prospects located on the shelf in the U.S. GOM. We have evaluated this 3-D seismic data using advanced interpretation technologies. As a result of these analyses, we have identified and acquired leases on multiple prospects that we believe may contain economically recoverable hydrocarbon deposits, and we plan to continue to conduct more refined analyses of our prospects as well as target additional lease and property acquisitions. We have given preference to areas with water depths of 450 feet or less where production infrastructure already exists, which will allow for any discoveries to be developed rapidly and cost effectively with the goal to reduce economic risk while increasing returns. Recent actions of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (“BOEM”) have reduced the royalty rate for leases acquired in future lease sales in water depths of less than 200 meters (approximately 656 feet) from 18.75% to 12.5%, which further enhances the economics for the drilling of any leases acquired after August 2017 in these water depths. This reduced royalty applies to three of the Company’s leases.

 

The Company has invested significant technical person hours in the reprocessing and interpretation of seismic data. We believe the proprietary reprocessing and interpretation and the contiguous nature of our licensed 3-D seismic data gives us an advantage over other exploration and production (“E&P”) companies operating in our core area.

 

We have historically operated our business with working capital deficits and these deficits have been funded by equity investments and loans from management. As of September 30, 2019, we had $1.1 million of cash on hand, $0.6 million of this amount is for the payment of joint payables from drilling operations. The Company estimates that it will need to raise a minimum of $10.0 million to meet its obligations and planned expenditures through December 2020. The Company plans to finance its operations through the issuance of equity and/or debt financings. There are no assurances that financing will be available with acceptable terms, if at all.

 

Current Operations

 

The Company is currently conducting pre-drill operations on two prospects and we anticipate spudding one well in early 2020. The Company continues to be active in the evaluation of potential mergers and acquisitions that it deems to be attractive opportunities. Any such merger or acquisition is likely to be financed through a combination of debt and equity.

 

On January 8, 2018, the Company signed comprehensive documents related to partnering with Delek GOM Investments, LLC (“Delek”) and Texas South Energy, Inc. (“Texas South”) to participate in the drilling of nine currently leased prospects. The initial phase (Phase I) consists of a commitment to drill the Canoe Prospect (VR378) and the Tau Prospect (SS336 and SS351). The Company commenced drilling operations at the Canoe prospect in August 2018. The well completed drilling in August 2018 and based on Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) and Isotube analysis of hydrocarbon samples, oil sands were encountered in the northwest center of the block. The well was drilled to a total of 5,765 feet measured depth (5,700 feet true vertical depth) and encountered no problems while drilling. A full integration of the well information and seismic data is being performed for further evaluation of the shallow potential of the wellbore and the block, and to define commerciality of these oil pays. Multiple open hole plugs were set across several intervals and the well is equipped with a mud-line suspension system for possible future re-entry. A deeper subsalt prospect exists on the Canoe lease block, for which the block was originally leased.

 

The Tau Prospect is located approximately six miles northeast of the Mahogany Field, discovered in 1993. The Mahogany Field is recognized as the first commercial discovery below allochthonous salt in the Gulf of Mexico. The Tau Prospect is defined by mapping of 3D seismic reprocessed by RTM methods. Drilling operations on the Tau subsalt prospect commenced in September 2018. The wellbore was designed to test multiple Miocene horizons trapped against a well-defined salt flank, including equivalent reservoir sands discovered and developed at the nearby Mahogany Field. The surface location for Tau was located in 305 feet of water. Drilling was completed in May 2019. In January 2019, the Tau well experienced an underground control of well event and as a result, an insurance claim was filed with its insurance underwriters for a net amount of approximately $10.8 million for 100% working interest. The insurance claim was subsequently approved and all insurance proceeds have been received. On May 13, 2019, GulfSlope announced the Tau well was drilled to a measured depth of 15,254 feet, as compared to the originally permitted 29,857 feet measured depth. Producible hydrocarbon zones were not established to the current depth, but hydrocarbon shows were encountered. Complex geomechanical conditions required two by-pass wellbores, one sidetrack wellbore, and eight casing strings to reach the current depth. Equipment limitations prevented further drilling and the drilling rig had contractual obligations related to another operator. The Company elected to abandon this well in a manner that would allow for re-entry at a later time. The Company is currently evaluating various options related to future operations in this wellbore and testing of the deeper Tau prospect.

 

11 

 

 

The Company has incurred accumulated losses for the period from inception to September 30, 2019, of approximately $55.6 million, and has a net capital deficiency. Further losses are anticipated in developing its business. As a result, there exists substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. As of September 30, 2019, the Company had approximately $1.1 million of cash on hand, $0.6 million of this amount is for the payment of joint payables from drilling operations. Our current capital on hand is insufficient to enable us to execute our business strategy beyond December 2019. The Company estimates that it will need to raise a minimum of $10.0 million to meet its obligations and planned expenditures through December 2020. These expenditures include the Company’s drilling costs, lease rentals to the BOEM, general and administrative expenses, and costs associated with seismic acquisition and processing. The Company plans to finance the Company through best-efforts equity and/or debt financings and farm-out agreements. The Company also plans to extend the agreements associated with loans from related parties, the accrued interest payable on these loans, as well as the Company’s accrued liabilities. There can be no assurance that additional financing will be available, or if available, will be on terms acceptable to the Company. If adequate working capital is not available, the Company may be required to curtail or cease operations or the Company would need to sell assets or consider alternative plans up to and including restructuring.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

The Company uses the full cost method of accounting for its oil and natural gas exploration and development activities as defined by the SEC. Under the full cost method of accounting, all costs associated with successful and unsuccessful exploration and development activities are capitalized on a country-by-country basis into a single cost center (“full cost pool”). Such costs include property acquisition costs, geological and geophysical (“G&G”) costs, carrying charges on non-producing properties, costs of drilling both productive and non-productive wells and overhead charges directly related to acquisition, exploration and development activities. Proceeds from property sales will generally be credited to the full cost pool, with no gain or loss recognized, unless such a sale would significantly alter the relationship between capitalized costs and the proved reserves attributable to these costs. A significant alteration would typically involve a sale of 25% or more of the proved reserves related to a single full cost pool. Proved properties are amortized on a country-by-country basis using the units of production method (“UOP”), whereby capitalized costs are amortized over total proved reserves. The amortization base in the UOP calculation includes the sum of proved property, net of accumulated depreciation, depletion and amortization (“DD&A”), estimated future development costs (future costs to access and develop proved reserves), and asset retirement costs, less related salvage value.

 

The costs of unproved properties and related capitalized costs (such as G&G costs) are withheld from the amortization calculation until such time as they are either developed or abandoned. Unproved properties and properties under development are reviewed for impairment at least quarterly and are determined through an evaluation considering, among other factors, seismic data, requirements to relinquish acreage, drilling results, remaining time in the commitment period, remaining capital plan, and political, economic, and market conditions. In countries where proved reserves exist, exploratory drilling costs associated with dry holes are transferred to proved properties immediately upon determination that a well is dry and amortized accordingly. In countries where a reserve base has not yet been established, impairments are charged to earnings.

 

Companies that use the full cost method of accounting for oil and natural gas exploration and development activities are required to perform a ceiling test calculation each quarter. The full cost ceiling test is an impairment test prescribed by SEC Regulation S-X Rule 4-10. The ceiling test is performed quarterly, on a country-by-country basis, utilizing the average of prices in effect on the first day of the month for the preceding twelve-month period. The cost center ceiling is defined as the sum of (a) estimated future net revenues, discounted at 10% per annum, from proved reserves, (b) the cost of properties not being amortized, if any, and (c) the lower of cost or market value of unproved properties included in the cost being amortized. If such capitalized costs exceed the ceiling, the Company will record a write-down to the extent of such excess as a non-cash charge to earnings. Any such write-down will reduce earnings in the period of occurrence and results in a lower depreciation, depletion and amortization rate in future periods. A write-down may not be reversed in future periods even though higher oil and natural gas prices may subsequently increase the ceiling.

 

As of September 30, 2019, the Company’s oil and gas properties consisted of two wells in process, capitalized exploration and acquisition costs for unproved properties and no proved reserves. The Company incurred approximately $6 million of impairment of oil and natural gas properties for the year ended September 30, 2019 resulting from the expiration of oil and natural gas leases.

 

Factors Affecting Comparability of Future Results

 

Success in Acquiring Oil and Gas Leases or Prospects. As a result of our 3-D seismic imaging and reprocessing, we currently hold seven lease blocks in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, which we believe may potentially contain economically recoverable reserves.

 

We have No Proved Reserves. We have identified prospects based on available seismic and geological information that indicate the potential presence of oil or gas, and we own the drilling and production rights for these prospects. Some of our current prospects may require additional seismic data reprocessing and interpretation. Even when properly used and interpreted, seismic data and visualization techniques are only tools used to assist geoscientists in identifying structures and hydrocarbon indicators and do not enable the interpreter to have certainty as to whether hydrocarbons are, in fact, present in those structures. We do not know if any prospect will contain oil or gas in sufficient quantities or quality to recover drilling and completion costs or to be economically viable.

 

12 

 

 

Success in the Discovery and Development of Reserves. Because we have no operating history in the production of oil and gas, our future results of operations and financial condition will be directly affected by our ability to discover and develop reserves through our drilling activities.

 

Oil and Gas Revenue. We have not yet commenced oil and gas production. If and when we do commence production, we expect to generate revenue from such production. No oil and gas revenue is reflected in our historical financial statements.

 

General and Administrative Expenses. We expect that our general and administrative expenses will increase in future periods when we commence drilling operations.

 

Demand and Price. The demand for oil and gas is susceptible to volatility related to, among other factors, the level of global economic activity and may also fluctuate depending on the performance of specific industries. We expect that a decrease in economic activity, in the United States and elsewhere, would adversely affect demand for any oil and gas we may produce. Since we have not generated revenues, these key factors will only affect us if and when we produce and sell hydrocarbons.

 

Results of Operations for the Year Ended September 30, 2019 compared to September 30, 2018

 

We had no sales during the year ended September 30, 2019 and September 30, 2018. Impairment of oil and gas properties and capitalized exploration costs for the year ended September 30, 2019 was $6.0 million and zero for the year ended September 30, 2018. The increase of approximately $6.0 million of impairment costs was primarily due to the expiration of seven leases blocks, resulting in the write off of all the related costs. General and administrative expenses were approximately $1.5 million for the year ended September 30, 2019 compared to approximately $1.2 million for the year ended September 30, 2018. This increase in general and administrative expenses of approximately $0.3 million was primarily due to an increase in consulting, accounting and legal fees. Interest expense was approximately $1.8 million for the year ended September 30, 2019 net of approximately $1.1 million of interest expense capitalized to unevaluated oil and natural gas properties, as compared to $0.8 million for the year ended September 30, 2018. The increase is primarily due to the day one charge of approximately $1.7 million of interest as the derivative fair value of the warrants relating to convertible notes exceeded the proceeds received as well as debt discount amortization. Loss on extinguishment of debt was approximately $5.1 million for the year ended September 30. 2019 compare to approximately $0.1 million for the year ended September 30, 2018. This increase was primarily due to a loan and subsequent warrant exercise resulting in loan extinguishment and loss on debt extinguishment. Gain on derivative financial instrument was $0.6 million for the year ended September 30, 2019 compared to a loss of approximately $0.5 million for the year ended September 30, 2018.

 

We had a net loss of approximately $13.7 million for the year ended September 30, 2019, compared to a net loss of $2.6 million for the year ended September 30, 2018. The increase in net loss of approximately $11.1 million was primarily attributable to the aforementioned $6.0 million increase in impairment of oil and natural gas properties and the approximately $5.1 million loss on extinguishment of debt.

 

The basic loss per share for the year ended September 30, 2019 was $0.01, compared to a net loss per share of $0.00 for the year ended September 30, 2018.

 

For the year ended September 30, 2019, cash used in operating activities totaled $6.4 million compared to $4.9 million provided in operating activities in fiscal 2018. The decrease in cash provided by operating activities is primarily due to the increase of accounts receivable and decrease in deposits from the joint interest owners offset by an increase in accounts payable.

 

For the year ended September 30, 2019, cash used by investing activities was $10.6 million compared to $0.7 million provided in investing activities in fiscal 2018. Spending for exploration wells in process was $9.5 million higher than in fiscal 2018. Proceeds from the sale of working interests was $2.9 million lower than in fiscal 2018.

 

For the year ended September 30, 2019, cash provided by financing activities was $12.5 million compared to $.05 million for the year ended September 30, 2018. The increase is due to an increase of net proceeds from convertible promissory notes and warrants of $12.7 million offset by payments on note payable of $0.14 million compared to convertible promissory note proceeds of $0.2 million offset by $0.16 million of payments on notes payable for fiscal 2018.

 

As of September 30, 2019, the Company’s cash balance was $1.1 million compared to a cash balance of $5.6 million as of September 30, 2018. The Company’s fiscal 2019 cash decrease of approximately $4.5 million was primarily due to its net cash used in operating activities of $6.4 million, cash used in investing activities of $10.6 million and cash provided by financing activities of approximately $12.5 million.

 

13 

 

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

The Company has incurred accumulated losses for the period from inception to September 30, 2019, of approximately $55.6 million, and has a negative working capital of $21.3 million. For the year ended September 30, 2019, the Company has generated losses of $13.7 million and negative cash flows from operations of $7 million. As of September 30, 2019, we had $1.1 million of cash on hand, $0.6 million of this amount is for joint payables from drilling operations. The Company estimates that it will need to raise a minimum of $10 million to meet its obligations and planned expenditures through December 2020. The $10 million is comprised primarily of capital project expenditures as well as general and administrative expenses. It does not include any amounts due under outstanding debt obligations, which amounted to $15.0 million of current principal and interest as of September 30, 2019. The Company plans to finance its operations through the issuance of equity and debt financings. Our policy has been to periodically raise funds through the sale of equity on a limited basis, to avoid undue dilution while at the early stages of execution of our business plan. Short term needs have been historically funded through loans from executive management. There are no assurances that financing will be available with acceptable terms, if at all. If the Company is not successful in obtaining financing, operations would need to be curtailed or ceased. The accompanying financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

For the year ended September 30, 2019, the Company used approximately $7.0 million of net cash in operating activities, compared with approximately $4.9 million of net cash received in operating activities for the year ended September 30, 2018, due to approximately $4.1 million decrease in deposits and a $5.8 million increase in receivables and a $4.1 million increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities. For the year ended September 30, 2019, we used approximately $10.6 million of cash in investing activities compared with approximately $0.7 million of cash received in investing activities for the year ended September 30, 2018, primarily due to a $11.4 million investment in oil and gas properties for the year ended September 30, 2019 and approximately $2.9 million received for sale of working interest and offset by approximately $1.9 million investment in oil and gas properties for the year ended September 30, 2018. For the year ended September 30, 2019, we received approximately $13.1 million of net cash from financing activities, compared with approximately $0.1 million received in financing activities for year ended September 30, 2018. This increase is due to loan proceeds received during the year ended September 30, 2019.

 

We will need to raise additional funds to cover expenditures planned for early 2020, as well as any additional, unexpected expenditures that we may encounter. Future equity financings may be dilutive to our stockholders. Alternative forms of future financings may include preferences or rights superior to our common stock. Debt financings may involve a pledge of assets and will rank senior to our common stock. We have historically financed our operations through private equity and debt financings. We do not have any credit or equity facilities available with financial institutions, stockholders or third-party investors, and will continue to rely on best efforts financings. The failure to raise sufficient capital could cause us to cease operations, or the Company would need to sell assets or consider alternative plans up to and including restructuring

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We had no off-balance sheet arrangements as of September 30, 2019.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, “Leases,” and in March 2019, the FASB issued ASU No. 2019-01, “Leases: Codification Improvements”, which updated the accounting guidance related to leases to increase transparency and comparability among organizations by recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet and disclosing key information about leasing arrangements. They also clarify implementation issues. These updates are effective for public companies for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods therein. Accordingly, the standard is effective for the Company for its annual period beginning October 1, 2019, and interim periods therein. The standard is to be applied utilizing a modified retrospective approach, with early adoption permitted. We will adopt these standards on October 1, 2019 with a cumulative adjustment to retained earnings rather than retrospectively adjusting prior periods. This adoption approach will result in a balance sheet presentation that is not comparable to the prior period in the first year of adoption. The Company has yet to begin to assess the quantitative effect of the new standard on the Company’s financial statements and intends to begin the assessment in the upcoming period.

 

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07, Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718), Improvements to Nonemployee Share-based Payments (“ASU 2018-07”). This ASU expands the scope of Topic 718 to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees. The amendments in this ASU are effective for public companies for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within that fiscal year. Early adoption is permitted and the Company adopted this new standard effective January 1, 2019 with no material impact to stock compensation issued to non-employees during the year ended September 30, 2019.

 

The Company has evaluated all other recent accounting pronouncements and believes that none of them will have a significant effect on the Company’s financial statements.

 

14 

 

 

 ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not required for smaller reporting companies.

 

15 

 

 

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

GulfSlope Energy, Inc.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

  Page 
   

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

17 

   
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 18
   

Balance Sheets as of September 30, 2019 and 2018

19

   

Statements of Operations for the Years Ended September 30, 2019 and 2018

20

   

Statement of Stockholders’ Deficit for the Years Ended September 30, 2019 and 2018

21

   

Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended September 30, 2019 and 2018

22

 

16 

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 

Shareholders and Board of Directors

GulfSlope Energy, Inc.

Houston, Texas

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of GulfSlope Energy, Inc. (the “Company”) as of September 30, 2019, the related statements of operations, stockholders’ deficit, and cash flows for the year then ended, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company at September 30, 2019, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Going Concern Uncertainty

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As described in Note 2 to the financial statements, the Company has a net capital deficiency, and further losses are anticipated in developing the Company’s business, which raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans in regard to these matters are also described in Note 2. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audit we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audit included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audit also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/s/ Pannell Kerr Forster of Texas, P.C.

 

We served as the Company’s auditor since November 2019.

 

Houston, Texas

December 30, 2019

 

17 

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 

Shareholders and Board of Directors

GulfSlope Energy, Inc.

Houston, Texas

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of GulfSlope Energy, Inc. (the “Company”) as of September 30, 2018, the related statements of operations, stockholders’ deficit, and cash flows for the year then ended, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company at September 30, 2018, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Going Concern Uncertainty

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As described in Note 2 to the financial statements, the Company has a net capital deficiency, and further losses are anticipated in developing the Company’s business, which raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans in regard to these matters are also described in Note 2. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audit we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audit included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audit also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/s/ BDO USA, LLP

 

We served as the Company’s auditor from 2016 to 2019.

 

Salt Lake City, Utah

December 31, 2018

 

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GulfSlope Energy, Inc.

 

BALANCE SHEETS

 

   As of September 30, 
   2019   2018 
Assets        
Current Assets          
Cash  $1,138,919   $5,621,814 
Accounts Receivable, Net   8,493,308    6,286,796 
Prepaid Expenses and Other Current Assets   137,173    32,042 
Total Current Assets   9,769,400    11,940,652 
Property and Equipment, net of depreciation   13,014    14,786 
Oil and Natural Gas Properties, Full Cost Method of Accounting, Unproved Properties   17,338,978    8,112,784 
Other Non-Current Assets   3,662,231    24,785 
Total Non-Current Assets   21,014,223    8,152,355 
Total Assets  $30,783,623   $20,093,007 
           
Liabilities and Stockholders’ Deficit          
Current Liabilities          
Accounts Payable  $12,747,382   $7,591,236 
Deposits from Joint Interest Owners       4,078,786 
Related Party Payable   365,904    306,386 
Accrued Interest Payable   2,282,217    1,732,239 
Accrued Liabilities and Other Payables   1,949,360    268,862 
Loans from Related Parties   8,725,500    9,084,500 
Notes Payable   267,000     
Promissory Notes Payable   1,197,966    135,000 
Derivative Financial Instruments   3,534,456    271,710 
Funds Received from Capital Raise       965,800 
Other   42,746    44,723 
Total Current Liabilities   31,112,531    24,479,242 
Total Liabilities   31,112,531    24,479,242 
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 11)          
Stockholders’ Deficit          
Preferred Stock; par value ($0.001); Authorized 50,000,000 shares, none issued or outstanding        
Common Stock; par value ($0.001); Authorized 1,500,000,000 as of September 30, 2019 and 2018; issued and outstanding 1,092,266,844 and 832,013,272, as of September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively   1,092,266    832,013 
Additional Paid-in Capital   54,160,836    36,640,009 
Accumulated Deficit   (55,582,010)   (41,858,257)
Total Stockholders’ Deficit   (328,908)   (4,386,235)
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Deficit  $30,783,623   $20,093,007 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part to these financial statements.

 

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GulfSlope Energy, Inc.

 

STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

  

For the Years ended

September 30,

 
   2019   2018 
Revenues  $   $ 
Operating Expenses:          
Impairment of Oil and Natural Gas Properties   6,000,517     
General and Administrative Expenses   1,472,729    1,220,247 
Net Loss from Operations   (7,473,246)   (1,220,247)
Other Income (Expense):          
Interest Expense, net   (1,828,489)   (780,513)
Interest Income   76,469    27,312 
Loss on Debt Extinguishment   (5,099,340)   (136,827)
Gain (Loss) on Derivative Financial Instrument   600,853    (526,459)
Net Loss Before Income Taxes   (13,723,753)   (2,636,734)
Income Taxes        
Net Loss  $(13,723,753)  $(2,636,734)
Loss Per Share – Basic and Diluted  $(0.01)  $(0.00)
Weighted Average Shares Outstanding – Basic and Diluted   983,454,724    768,365,759 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part to these financial statements.

 

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GulfSlope Energy, Inc.

 

STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

For the Years Ended September 30, 2019 and 2018

 

       Additional       Net 
   Common   Paid-in   Accumulated   Stockholders’ 
   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Deficit 
Balance at September 30, 2017   692,196,625   $692,196   $27,212,577   $(39,221,523)  $(11,316,750)
Common stock issued for services   84,348,985    84,349    5,122,404        5,206,753 
Amortization of employee stock options           1,857,531        1,857,531 
Value of beneficial conversion feature in conjunction with convertible promissory notes           103,519        103,519 
Value of warrants issued in conjunction with convertible promissory notes           47,387        47,387 
Common stock issued for convertible promissory notes   2,000,000    2,000    47,093        49,093 
Common stock issued for conversion of convertible promissory notes plus accrued interest   41,850,996    41,851    924,474        966,325 
Common stock issued for warrants exercised   416,666    417    12,083        12,500 
Common stock issued to settle debt   11,200,000    11,200    1,095,800        1,107,000 
Value of warrants issued in conjunction with Bridge Note extensions           217,141        217,141 
Net loss               (2,636,734)   (2, 636,734) 
Balance at September 30, 2018   832,013,272    832,013    36,640,009    (41,858,257)    (4, 386,235) 
Amortization of employee stock options           1,629,333        1,629,333 
Value of warrants issued in conjunction with term loans, net of capital costs            5,090,470        5,090,470 
Common stock and warrants issued in capital raise   19,325,000    19,325    946,925        966,250 
Value of warrants issued in conjunction with Bridge Note extensions           152,078        152,078 
Common stock issued for warrants exercised in exchange for extinguishment of term loans, net of capital costs   238,095,238    238,095    9,685,746        9,923,841 
Common stock issued for exercise of Bridge Note warrants   2,833,334    2,833    82,167        85,000 
Common stock registration costs           (65,892)       (65,892)
Net loss               (13,723,753)   (13,723,753)
Balance at September 30, 2019   1,092,266,844   $1,092,266   $54,160,836   $(55,582,010)  $(328,908)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part to these financial statements.

 

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GulfSlope Energy, Inc.

 

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

   For the Years Ended 
   September 30, 
   2019   2018 
OPERATING ACTIVITIES          
Net Loss  $(13,723,753)  $(2,636,734)
Adjustments to Reconcile Net Loss to Cash Provided by (Used in) Operating Activities:          
Impairment of Oil and Natural Gas Properties   6,000,517     
Depreciation   5,619    4,724 
Debt Discount Amortization   625,919    254,501 
Capitalization of Interest Expense   (1,109,823)    
Loss Recorded to Interest Expense Related to Warrant Derivative Associated with the Issuance of Convertible Notes   1,758,073     
Loss on Asset Retirement   3,835     
Loss on Debt Extinguishment   5,099,340    526,459 
Stock Based Compensation   744,945    1,036,654 
Stock Issued for Services       503,076 
Change in fair value of Derivatives   (600,853)   136,827 
Changes in Operating Assets and Liabilities:          
(Increase) Decrease in Accounts Receivable   (5,843,958)   (6,286,796)
(Increase) Decrease in Prepaid Expenses and Other Current Assets   41,179    146,488 
Increase (Decrease) in Deposits from Joint Interest Owners   (4,078,786)   4,078,786 
Increase (Decrease) in Accounts Payable   4,065,384    5,914,705 
Increase (Decrease) in Related Party Payable   59,518    7,928 
Increase (Decrease) in Accrued Interest Payable   549,978    520,375 
Increase (Decrease) in Accrued Liabilities and Other Payables       633,865 
Increase (Decrease) in Other Assets/Liabilities, net   (1,978)   44,723 
Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Operating Activities   (6,404,844)   4,885,581 
           
INVESTING ACTIVITIES          
Leases Purchased / Lease Rentals Paid   (61,629)   (280,268)
Proceeds from Sale of Working Interest       2,884,651 
Insurance Proceeds Received   860,680     
Capitalized Exploration and Wells In Process Costs   (11,419,188)   (1,904,618)
Deposits and Equipment Purchases   (7,681)   (22,050)
Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Investing Activities   (10,627,818)   677,715 
           
FINANCING ACTIVITIES          
Payments on Note Payable   (146,310)   (160,408)
Proceeds from Convertible Promissory Notes and Warrants   13,252,000    212,500 
Deferred Loan and Equity Issuance Costs    (555,923)    
Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Financing Activities   12,549,767    52,092 
           
Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash   (4,482,895)   5,615,388 
Beginning Cash Balance   5,621,814    6,426 
           
Ending Cash Balance  $1,138,919   $5,621,814 
           
Supplemental Schedule of Cash Flow Activities:          
Cash Paid for Interest  $4,343   $5,636 
           
Non-Cash Investing and Financing Activities:          
Prepaid Asset Financed Through Notes Payable  $146,310   $156,718 
Funds Received from Capital Raise Transferred to Equity Upon Issuance of Common Stock   965,800     
Accrued Liabilities, Convertible Notes and Accrued Interest Settled Through Issuance of Common Stock       1,896,999 
Term Loans Extinguished Through Exercise of Warrants   10,000,000     
Derivative Liability Recorded at Issuance of Convertible Notes Recorded as Deferred Loan Costs   2,137,450     
Warrants Issued with Term Loans and Bridge Financing Note Extensions recorded as Deferred Loan Costs   5,349,374     
Debt Issuance Costs Retained by Lender Related to Convertible Debentures   333,000     
Warrants Issued in Bridge Financing Note Extension    152,078     
Accrued Professional Fees Recorded as Deferred Loan Costs    17,296     
Accrued Professional Fees Capitalized as Equity Issuance Costs    142,051     
Purchase of Capital Expenditures          
Included in Accounts Payable   2,611,913    1,223,792 
Through Stock Based Compensation to Employees   884,839    820,877 
Through Issuance of Common Stock       4,880,000 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part to these financial statements.

 

22 

 

 

GulfSlope Energy, Inc.

 

Notes to the Financial Statements

 

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

(a) Organization

 

GulfSlope Energy, Inc. (the “Company” or “GulfSlope”) is an independent oil and natural gas exploration company whose interests are concentrated in the United States Gulf of Mexico federal waters offshore Louisiana. The Company has leased 14 federal Outer Continental Shelf blocks (referred to as “prospect,” “portfolio” or “leases”) and licensed three-dimensional (3-D) seismic data in its area of concentration.

 

(b) Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) and the instructions to Form 10-K and Regulation S-X published by the US Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). The accompanying financial statements include the accounts of the Company.

 

(c) Going Concern

 

The Company’s financial statements have been presented on the basis that it is a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has incurred net losses through September 30, 2019 of $55.6 million, has a lack of cash on-hand, and a working capital deficit. These factors raise substantial doubt as to the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management intends to raise additional operating funds through equity and/or debt offerings. Management also plans to extend the agreements associated with loans from related parties, the accrued interest payable on these loans, as well as the Company’s accrued liabilities. However, there can be no assurance that additional financing will be available, or if available, will be on terms acceptable to the Company. If adequate working capital is not available, the Company may be required to curtail or cease operations or the Company would need to sell assets or consider alternative plans up to and including restructuring.

 

(d) Cash

 

The Company considers all short-term highly liquid investments with an original maturity at the date of purchase of three months or less to be cash equivalents. There were no cash equivalents at September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

(e) Accounts Receivable

 

The Company records an accounts receivable for operations expense reimbursements due from joint interest partners. The Company estimates allowances for doubtful accounts based on the aged receivable balances and historical losses. If the Company determines any account to be uncollectible based on significant delinquency or other factors, we assess the receivable and the underlying asset for recovery. As of September 30, 2019 and 2018, no allowance was recorded. Accounts receivable from oil and gas joint operations are $12.1 million at September 30, 2019, which includes $3.7 million classified as other non-current assets. See note 13 Subsequent Events.

 

(f) Full Cost Method

 

The Company uses the full cost method of accounting for its oil and gas exploration and development activities. Under the full cost method of accounting, all costs associated with successful and unsuccessful exploration and development activities are capitalized on a country-by-country basis into a single cost center (“full cost pool”). Such costs include property acquisition costs, geological and geophysical (“G&G”) costs, carrying charges on non-producing properties, costs of drilling both productive and non-productive wells. Overhead costs, which includes employee compensation and benefits including stock-based compensation, incurred that are directly related to acquisition, exploration and development activities are capitalized. Interest expense is capitalized related to unevaluated properties and wells in process during the period in which the Company is incurring costs and expending resources to get the properties ready for their intended purpose. For significant investments in unproved properties and major development projects that are not being currently depreciated, depleted, or amortized and on which exploration or development activities are in progress, interest costs are capitalized. Proceeds from property sales will generally be credited to the full cost pool, with no gain or loss recognized, unless such a sale would significantly alter the relationship between capitalized costs and the proved reserves attributable to these costs. A significant alteration would typically involve a sale of 25% or more of the proved reserves related to a single full cost pool.

 

23 

 

 

Proved properties are amortized on a country-by-country basis using the units of production method (“UOP”), whereby capitalized costs are amortized over total proved reserves. The amortization base in the UOP calculation includes the sum of proved property, net of accumulated depreciation, depletion and amortization (“DD&A”), estimated future development costs (future costs to access and develop proved reserves), and asset retirement costs, less related salvage value.

 

The costs of unproved properties and related capitalized costs (such as G&G costs) are withheld from the amortization calculation until such time as they are either developed or abandoned. Unproved properties and properties under development are reviewed for impairment at least quarterly and are determined through an evaluation considering, among other factors, seismic data, requirements to relinquish acreage, drilling results, remaining time in the commitment period, remaining capital plan, and political, economic, and market conditions. In countries where proved reserves exist, exploratory drilling costs associated with dry holes are transferred to proved properties immediately upon determination that a well is dry and amortized accordingly. In countries where a reserve base has not yet been established, impairments are charged to earnings.

 

Companies that use the full cost method of accounting for oil and natural gas exploration and development activities are required to perform a ceiling test calculation each quarter. The full cost ceiling test is an impairment test prescribed by SEC Regulation S-X Rule 4-10. The ceiling test is performed quarterly, on a country-by-country basis, utilizing the average of prices in effect on the first day of the month for the preceding twelve month period. The cost center ceiling is defined as the sum of (a) estimated future net revenues, discounted at 10% per annum, from proved reserves, (b) the cost of properties not being amortized, if any, and (c) the lower of cost or market value of unproved properties included in the cost being amortized. If such capitalized costs exceed the ceiling, the Company will record a write-down to the extent of such excess as a non-cash charge to earnings. Any such write-down will reduce earnings in the period of occurrence and results in a lower depreciation, depletion and amortization rate in future periods. A write-down may not be reversed in future periods even though higher oil and natural gas prices may subsequently increase the ceiling.

 

The Company capitalizes exploratory well costs into oil and gas properties until a determination is made that the well has either found proved reserves or is impaired. If proved reserves are found, the capitalized exploratory well costs are reclassified to proved properties. The well costs are charged to expense if the exploratory well is determined to be impaired. The Company has drilled two well bores and is currently evaluating such wells for proved reserves.  Accordingly such costs are included as suspended well costs at September 30, 2019 and it is expected that a final analysis will be completed in the next twelve months at which time the costs will be transferred to the full cost pool.

 

As of September 30, 2019, the Company’s oil and gas properties consisted of unproved properties, wells in process and no proved reserves.

 

(g) Asset Retirement Obligations

 

The Company’s asset retirement obligations will represent the present value of the estimated future costs associated with plugging and abandoning oil and natural gas wells, removing production equipment and facilities and restoring the seabed in accordance with the terms of oil and gas leases and applicable state and federal laws. Determining asset retirement obligations requires estimates of the costs of plugging and abandoning oil and natural gas wells, removing production equipment and facilities and restoring the sea bed as well as estimates of the economic lives of the oil and gas wells and future inflation rates. The resulting estimate of future cash outflows will be discounted using a credit-adjusted risk-free interest rate that corresponds with the timing of the cash outflows. Cost estimates will consider historical experience, third party estimates, the requirements of oil and natural gas leases and applicable local, state and federal laws, but do not consider estimated salvage values. Asset retirement obligations will be recognized when the wells drilled reach total depth or when the production equipment and facilities are installed or acquired with an associated increase in proved oil and gas property costs. Asset retirement obligations will be accreted each period through depreciation, depletion and amortization to their expected settlement values with any difference between the actual cost of settling the asset retirement obligations and recorded amount being recognized as an adjustment to proved oil and gas property costs. Cash paid to settle asset retirement obligations will be included in net cash provided by operating activities from continuing operations in the statements of cash flows. On a quarterly basis, when indicators suggest there have been material changes in the estimates underlying the obligation, the Company reassesses its asset retirement obligations to determine whether any revisions to the obligations are necessary. At least annually, the Company will assess all of its asset retirement obligations to determine whether any revisions to the obligations are necessary. Future revisions could occur due to changes in estimated costs or well economic lives, or if federal or state regulators enact new requirements regarding plugging and abandoning oil and natural gas wells. The Company has drilled two well bores and is currently evaluating these wells. The two wellbores drilled in 2018 and 2019, were both plugged and therefore the costs related to the asset retirement obligation were incurred. Such costs were recognized as capitalized oil and gas costs. The asset retirement obligation was completely extinguished in that if the well proves not to be commercially viable, there is no further cost needed to remediate the site.

 

24 

 

 

(h) Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are carried at cost and include expenditures for new equipment and those expenditures that substantially increase the productive lives of existing equipment and leasehold improvements. Maintenance and repair costs are expensed as incurred. Property and equipment are depreciated on a straight-line basis over the assets’ estimated useful lives. Fully depreciated property and equipment still in use are not eliminated from the accounts.

 

The Company assesses the carrying value of its property and equipment for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Recoverability is measured by comparing estimated undiscounted cash flows, expected to be generated from such assets, to their net book value. If net book value exceeds estimated cash flows, the asset is written down to its fair value, determined by the estimated discounted cash flows from such asset. When an asset is retired or sold, its cost and related accumulated depreciation and amortization are removed from the accounts. The difference between the net book value of the asset and proceeds on disposition is recorded as a gain or loss in our statements of operations in the period in which they occur. 

 

(i) Income Taxes

 

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the temporary differences between the financial reporting basis and tax basis of the Company’s assets and liabilities at enacted tax rates expected to be in effect when such amounts are realized or settled. A valuation allowance is provided if, based on the weight of available evidence, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. The Company’s policy is to recognize potential interest and penalties as a component of income tax expense when incurred.

 

(j) Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company records expenses associated with the fair value of stock-based compensation. For fully vested and restricted stock grants, the Company calculates the stock based compensation expense based upon estimated fair value on the date of grant. For stock warrants and options, the Company uses the Black-Scholes option valuation model to calculate stock based compensation at the date of grant. Option pricing models require the input of highly subjective assumptions, including the expected price volatility. Changes in these assumptions can materially affect the fair value estimate.

 

(k) Stock Issuance

 

The Company records stock-based compensation awards issued to non-employees and other external entities for goods and services at either the fair market value of the goods received or services rendered or the instruments issued in exchange for such services, whichever is more readily determinable.

 

(l) Earnings per Share

 

Basic earnings per share (“EPS”) is computed by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted EPS is computed by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of common shares and potential common shares outstanding (if dilutive) during each period. Potential common shares include stock options, warrants, convertible notes and restricted stock. The number of potential common shares outstanding relating to stock options, warrants, and restricted stock is computed using the treasury stock or if-converted method. As the Company has incurred losses for the years ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, the potentially dilutive shares are anti-dilutive and thus not added into the EPS calculations. As of September 30, 2019 and 2018, there were 354,818,379 and 213,089,281 potentially dilutive shares, respectively.  

 

(m) Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

25 

 

  

(n) Impact of New Accounting Standards

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, “Leases,” and in March 2019, the FASB issued ASU No. 2019-01, “Leases: Codification Improvements”, which updated the accounting guidance related to leases to increase transparency and comparability among organizations by recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet and disclosing key information about leasing arrangements. They also clarify implementation issues. These updates are effective for public companies for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods therein. Accordingly, the standard is effective for the Company for its annual period beginning October 1, 2019, and interim periods therein. The standard is to be applied utilizing a modified retrospective approach, with early adoption permitted. The Company is assessing the quantitative effect of adopting the new standard on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07, Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718), Improvements to Nonemployee Share-based Payments (“ASU 2018-07”). This ASU expands the scope of Topic 718 to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees. The amendments in this ASU are effective for public companies for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within that fiscal year.  Early adoption is permitted and the Company adopted this new standard effective January 1, 2019 with no material impact to stock compensation issued to non-employees during the year ended September 30, 2019. 

 

The Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, or JOBS Act, provides that an emerging growth company can take advantage of the extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards. An emerging growth company can therefore delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. However, the Company has elected not to take advantage of such extended transition period, and as a result, will comply with new or revised accounting standards on the relevant dates on which adoption of such standards is required for non-emerging growth companies.

 

The Company has evaluated all other recent accounting pronouncements and believes that none of them will have a significant effect on the Company’s financial statements.

 

NOTE 2 – LIQUIDITY/GOING CONCERN

 

The Company has incurred accumulated losses as of September 30, 2019 of $55.6 million, and has a net capital deficiency. Further losses are anticipated in developing our business, and there exists substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. As of September 30, 2019, the Company had $1.1 million of cash on hand, $0.6 million of this amount is for the payment of joint payables from drilling operations. The Company estimates that it will need to raise a minimum of $10 million to meet its obligations and planned expenditures through December 2020. The Company plans to finance operations and planned expenditures through equity and/or debt financings and/or farm-out agreements. The Company also plans to extend the agreements associated with all loans, the accrued interest payable on these loans, as well as the Company’s accrued liabilities. There are no assurances that financing will be available with acceptable terms, if at all. If the Company is not successful in obtaining financing, operations would need to be curtailed or ceased or the Company would need to sell assets or consider alternative plans up to and including restructuring. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

NOTE 3 – OIL AND NATURAL GAS PROPERTIES

 

The Company currently has under lease seven federal Outer Continental Shelf blocks and has licensed 2.2 million acres of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic data in its area of concentration.

 

In January 2018, the Company entered into a strategic partnership with Delek GOM Investments, LLC. (“Delek”), and Texas South Energy, Inc. (“Texas South”) (collectively, the “Parties”) and executed a participation agreement (the “Agreement”) for a multi-phase exploration program. Under the terms of the Agreement, the Parties have committed to drill the Company’s “Canoe” and “Tau” prospects (the “Initial Phase”) with Delek having the option to participate in two additional two-well drilling phases and a final, three-well drilling phase (collectively, the “Phases”). In each Phase, Delek will earn a 75% working interest upon paying 90% of the exploratory costs associated with drilling each exploratory well. The Company will retain a 20% working interest while paying 8% of the costs associated with drilling each exploratory well. The Company will be required to fund 20% of well costs in excess of 115% of budget. The Company will be the operator during exploratory drilling of the prospect, however, subsequent to a commercial discovery, Delek will have the right to become the operator. Delek will have the right to terminate this agreement at the conclusion of any drilling phase. At present, Delek’s commitment and rights extend only to the Initial Phase. Delek will also have the option to purchase up to 5% of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share (the “Common Stock”), upon fulfilling its obligation for each Phase (maximum of 20% in the aggregate) at a price per share equal to a 10% discount to the 30-day weighted average closing price for the Common Stock preceding the acquisition. This option will expire January 8, 2020.

  

The Company, as the operator of two wells drilled in the Gulf of Mexico, has incurred tangible and intangible drilling costs for the wells in process and has billed its working interest partners for their respective shares of the drilling costs to date. GulfSlope drilled the first well, Canoe, to a total depth of 5,765 feet (5,670 feet TVD). Multiple open hole plugs were set across several intervals and the well is equipped with a mud-line suspension system for possible future re-entry. Calibration of seismic amplitudes, petrophysical analysis, reservoir engineering and scoping of development is currently underway to determine the commerciality of these sands and that work is expected to be completed during the first calendar quarter of 2020.

 

26 

 

 

The second well, Tau, was drilled to a measured depth of 15,254 feet, as compared to the originally permitted 29,857 foot measured depth. Producible hydrocarbon zones were not established to that depth, but hydrocarbon shows were encountered. Complex geomechanical conditions required two by-pass wellbores, one sidetrack wellbore, and eight casing strings to reach that depth. Equipment limitations prevented further drilling. In addition, the drilling rig had contractual obligations related to another operator. The Company elected to abandon this well in a manner that would allow for re-entry at a later time. The drilling, pressure, and reservoir information has confirmed geophysical and geological models, and reinforces the Company’s confidence that there is resource potential. The Company is currently evaluating various options related to future operations in this wellbore and testing of the deeper Tau prospect.

 

In January 2019, the Tau well experienced an underground control of well event and as a result, the Company filed an insurance claim with its insurance underwriters. The total amount of the claim was approximately $10.8 million for 100% working interest after the insurance deductible amount, and at September 30, 2019 approximately $10.8 million had been received. GulfSlope received approximately $2.5 million of this amount and credited wells in process for approximately $0.9 million, and accrued payable for approximately $1.6 million, pending evaluation of distributions to the working interest owners.

 

As of September 30, 2019, the Company’s oil and natural gas properties consisted of unproved properties, wells in process and no proved reserves. During the years ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, the company capitalized approximately $1.1 million and $Nil of interest expense to oil and natural gas properties, respectively, and approximately $1,229,742 and $1,242,807, of general and administrative expenses, respectively. The Company incurred approximately $6 million of impairment of oil and natural gas properties for the year ended September 30, 2019 primarily resulting from the expiration of oil and natural gas leases.

 

NOTE 4 – PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

Property and equipment consist of the following at September 30, 2019 and 2018:

 

   2019   2018 
Office equipment and computers  $133,089   $133,089 
Furniture and fixtures   16,280    16,280 
Leasehold improvements   7,680    5,756 
Total   157,049    155,125 
Less: accumulated depreciation   (144,035)   (140,339)
           
Net property and equipment  $13,014   $14,786 

 

Depreciation is computed on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the assets, which were as follows:

 

  Life
Office equipment and computers 3 years
Furniture and fixtures 5 years
Leasehold improvements Shorter of 5 years or related lease term

 

Depreciation expense was $5,619 and $4,724 for the years ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

NOTE 5 – INCOME TAXES 

 

The provision for income taxes consists of the following for the years ended September 30, 2019 and 2018:

    2019    2018 
FEDERAL          
Current  $   $ 
Deferred        
STATE          
Current        
Deferred        
TOTAL PROVISION  $   $ 

 

The difference between the actual income tax provision versus tax computed at the statutory rate is as follows for the years ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively:

 

    2019     2018  
Expected provision (based on statutory rate of 21%)   $ (2,881,988)     $ (553,714)  
Effect of:                
Increase in valuation allowance     2,879,685       2,696,631  
Non-deductible expense     500,638       53,493  
Rate change           (2,305,270)  
Other, net     (498,335)       108,860  
Total actual provision   $     $  

 

27 

 

 

The Company does not have any material uncertain tax positions. The Company’s policy is to recognize interest and penalties accrued related to unrecognized tax benefits as a component of income tax expense (benefit). For the years ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, the Company did not recognize any interest or penalties, nor did we have any interest or penalties accrued as of September 30, 2019 and 2018 relating to unrecognized benefits. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities at September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively, consist of the following:

 

   2019   2018 
DEFERRED TAX ASSETS (LIABILITIES)          
Net operating losses  $10,295,547   $7,131,636 
Exploration costs   (1,110,135)   (1,503,472)
Oil and natural gas leases   2,336,776    2,192,654 
IDC   (1,036,737)    
Partnership ordinary loss   (178,359)    
Stock based compensation   567,406    411,287 
Accrued interest and expenses not paid   386,685    271,190 
Derivative financial instrument   69,120    (57,059)
Differences in book/tax depreciation   9,191    13,573 
Net deferred tax asset  $11,339,494   $8,459,809 
Valuation allowance   (11,339,494)   (8,459,809)
NET DEFERRED TAXES  $   $ 

 

The Company’s valuation allowance increased $2,879,685 during the year ended September 30, 2019 and increased $2,696,633 during the year ended September 30, 2018.

 

At September 30, 2019, the Company had approximately $49 million of NOLs, approximately 66% of which will expire from 2032 to 2038. Approximately $33.4 million of the Company’s NOLs are allowable as a deduction against 100 percent of future taxable income since they were generated prior to the effective date of limitations imposed by the TCJA.

 

The tax years ended September 30, 2016 through 2019 are open for examination for federal income tax purposes and by other major taxing jurisdictions to which we are subject.

 

NOTE 6 – RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

During April 2013 through September 2017, the Company entered into promissory notes whereby it borrowed a total of $8,675,500 from John Seitz, the chief executive officer (“CEO”). The notes are due on demand, bear interest at the rate of 5% per annum, and $5,300,000 of the notes are convertible into shares of common stock at a conversion price equal to $0.12 per share of common stock (the then offering price of shares of common stock to unaffiliated investors). As of September 30, 2019 and 2018, the total amount owed to John Seitz is $8,675,500. This amount is included in loans from related parties within the balance sheet. There was a total of $2,080,885 and $1,641,086 of unpaid interest associated with these loans included in accrued interest payable within the balance sheets as of September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

From August 2015 through February 2016 the Company entered into promissory notes whereby it borrowed a total of $267,000 from Dr. Ronald Bain, its former president and chief operating officer, and his affiliate ConRon Consulting, Inc. These notes are not convertible, due on demand and bear interest at the rate of 5% per annum. As of September 30, 2018, the total amount owed to Dr. Bain and his affiliate was $267,000. In June of 2016, Dr. Ronald Bain also entered into a $92,000 convertible promissory note with associated warrants under the same terms received by other investors (see Note 7).

On November 15, 2016, a family member of the CEO entered into a $50,000 convertible promissory note with associated warrants (“Bridge Financing”) under the same terms received by other investors (see Note 7). 

Domenica Seitz CPA, related to John Seitz, has provided accounting consulting services to the Company. During the years ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, the services provided were valued at $59,250 and $23,660, respectively. The Company has accrued these amounts, and they have been reflected in related party payable in the September 30, 2019 and 2018 financial statements.

 

See Note 7 for a description of the Delek term loan.

 

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NOTE 7 – TERM LOAN AND CONVERTIBLE DEBENTURES

 

Between June and November 2016, the Company issued eleven convertible promissory notes (“Bridge Financing Notes”) with associated warrants in a private placement to accredited investors for total gross proceeds of $837,000. Three of the notes were to related parties for proceeds totaling $222,000, including the extinguishment of $70,000 worth of related party payables. The convertible notes had a maturity of one year (prior to extension), an annual interest rate of 8% and can be converted at the option of the holder at a conversion price of $0.025 per share. In addition, the convertible notes will automatically convert if a qualified equity financing of at least $3 million occurs before maturity and such mandatory conversion price will equal the effective price per share paid in the qualified equity financing. In addition to the convertible notes, the investors received approximately 27.9 million warrants, with an exercise price of $0.03 per share and a term of the earlier of three years or upon a change of control. Upon maturity of the eleven promissory notes during 2017, the Company issued approximately 7 million extension warrants with an exercise price of $0.03 per share (equal to 25% of the original warrant amount) to the holders of the notes to extend the terms to January 15, 2018. Upon revised maturity of the eleven promissory notes on January 15, 2018, the Company issued approximately 2.8 million extension warrants with an exercise price of $0.10 per share (equal to 10% of the original warrant amount) to the holders of the notes to extend the term to April 16, 2018. In June 2018, the maturity date of all of the notes was extended to January 15, 2019. Six of the Bridge Financing Notes with a principal balance of $560,000 plus accrued interest of approximately $87,000 were converted to common stock during the year ended September 30, 2018. The remaining note balance at September 30, 2019 is $277,000. Accrued interest for the year ended September 30, 2019, was approximately $5,500 and cumulative accrued interest was approximately $72,000. During June 2019, the Company completed the extension of the remaining notes to April 30, 2020. In consideration for the extension of the remaining notes, the Company extended the term of the warrants until April 30, 2020. As a result, approximately $152,000 was recorded as a debt discount and to additional paid-in capital for the modification.

 

On March 1, 2019, the Company entered into a Term Loan Agreement by and among the Company, as borrower, and Delek, as lender. In the Term Loan Agreement, Delek agreed to provide the Company with multiple draw term loans in an aggregate stated principal amount of up to $11.0 million (the “Term Loan Facility” and the loans thereunder, the “Loans”). The maturity date of the Term Loan Facility is six months following the closing date of the Term Loan Agreement which is March 1, 2019. Until such maturity date, the Loans under the Term Loan Agreement shall bear interest at a rate per annum equal to 5.0%, payable in arrears on the maturity date. If an event of default occurs, all Loans under the Term Loan Agreement shall bear interest at a rate equal to 7.0%, payable on demand. In connection with the Term Loan Agreement, the Company entered into: (i) a Subordination Agreement (the “Subordination Agreement”) by and among the Company, as borrower, John N. Seitz, as subordinated lender (the “Subordinated Lender”), and Delek, as senior lender; (ii) a Security Agreement (the “Security Agreement”) among the Company, as debtor, and Delek, as lender; and (iii) warrants to purchase 238,095,238 shares of Common Stock, at an exercise price of $0.042 per share issued to Delek GOM (the “Warrants”). The Company may elect, at its option, to prepay borrowings outstanding under the Term Loan Agreement in multiples of $100,000 and not less than $500,000 without premium or penalty. The Company may be required to prepay the Loans with any net cash proceeds resulting from an asset sale, receipt of insurance proceeds from certain casualty events, proceeds from equity issuances or incurrence of indebtedness other than the Loans (subject to a $500,000 carve-out to be applied toward the Company’s general corporate purposes) or receipt of any cash proceeds from any payments, refunds, rebates or other similar payments and amounts under the Company’s operative documents. Amounts outstanding under the Term Loan Agreement are secured by a security interest in substantially all of the properties and assets of the Company.

 

As of March 6, 2019, the Company had borrowed a total of $10.0 million under the Term Loan Facility and issued to Delek GOM warrants to purchase 238,095,238 shares of Common Stock; and Delek GOM fully exercised the warrants through a Loan Reduction Exercise, thereby extinguishing the Company’s outstanding obligations to Delek GOM as of that date. The Company allocated the proceeds between debt and warrants on a relative fair value basis, recording a debt discount of approximately $5.1 million. The exercise of the warrants through the extinguishment of the loan was accounted for as a standard warrant exercise and an extinguishment of debt including a recognition of a loss in the amount of the debt discount of approximately $5.1 million.

 

On April 19, 2019, the Company borrowed $1.0 million under the Term Loan Facility and issued to Delek warrants to purchase 23,809,524 shares of stock with an exercise price of $0.042 per share. The Company allocated the proceeds between debt and warrants on a relative fair value basis, recording a debt discount of approximately $0.5 million. The term loan facility expired as of September 4, 2019, and as of September 30, 2019, the warrants have not been exercised and the term loan is outstanding. See Note 13 Subsequent Events.

 

On June 21, 2019 the Company entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement (“SPA”) under the terms of which the Company will issue and sell to buyers up to an aggregate of $3,000,000 of convertible debentures (“Convertible Debentures”) and associated warrants. On June 21, 2019, approximately $2,100,000 of Convertible Debentures were purchased upon the signing of the SPA (the “First Closing”), and $400,000 and $500,000, respectively, shall be purchased by the holder upon: (1) the filing of a Registration Statement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) registering the resale of the conversion shares by the buyers which occurred on August 5, 2019; and (2) the date a registration statement covering the underlying common shares has first been declared effective by the SEC which occurred on November 4, 2019.

 

On August 7, 2019, the Company purchased approximately $400,000 of convertible debentures under the June 21, 2019 Securities Purchase Agreement.

 

The Convertible Debentures accrue interest at 8.0% per annum, mature on June 21, 2020, and August 7, 2020, respectively and are convertible at the option of the holder any time after issuance into common stock at a conversion rate of the lesser of: (1) $0.05 per share; or (2) 80% of the lowest volume weighted adjusted price (as reported by Bloomberg, LP) for the ten consecutive trading days immediately preceding conversion. In addition, the holder received warrants to purchase an aggregate of 50 million shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.04 per share. Such warrants expire on the fifth anniversary of issuance. The direct offering costs related to the two note issuances were approximately $333,000 and has been recorded as a debt discount.

 

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The Company evaluated the conversion feature and concluded that it should be bifurcated and accounted for as a derivative liability due to the variable conversion feature which does not contain an explicit limit on the number of shares that are required to be issued. In addition, the Company concluded the warrants required treatment as derivative liabilities as the Company could not assert in has sufficient authorized but unissued shares to settle the warrants upon exercise when taking into account other stock based commitments including the Convertible Debentures. Accordingly, the embedded conversion feature and warrants were recorded at fair value at issuance and are subsequently remeasured to fair value each reporting period. The fair value of the derivative liabilities at issuance exceeded the remaining net proceeds received resulting in an approximately $1.8 million day one charge to interest expense in the September 30, 2019 Statement of Operations.

 

The fair value of the embedded conversion feature was determined utilizing a Geometric Brownian Motion Stock Path Based Monte Carlo Simulation that utilized the following key assumptions:

 

   June 21, 2019 Convertible Debenture   August 7, 2019 Convertible Debenture 
   June 21, 2019   June 30, 2019   September 30, 2019  August 7, 2019   September 30, 2019
Stock Price  $0.041   $0.041   $0.034   $0.037   $0.034 
Fixed Exercise Price  $0.050   $0.050   $0.05   $0.05   $0.05 
Volatility   148%   150%   135%   144%   135%
Term (Years)   1.00    0.98    0.73    1.00    0.73 
Risk Free Rate   1.95%   1.92%   1.75%   1.75%   1.75%

 

In addition to the fixed exercise price noted above, the model incorporates the variable conversion price which is simulated as 80% of the lowest trading price within the ten consecutive days preceding presumed conversion.

 

The Company’s Term Loan and Convertible Debentures consisted of the following as of September 30, 2019.

 

Promissory Notes Payable at September 30, 2019  Notes   Discount   Notes, Net of Discount 
Term Loan  $1,000,000   $   $1,000,000 
Convertible Debentures and Bridge Financing Notes   $2,727,000   $(2,529,034)  $197,966 
Total  $3,727,000   $(2,529,034)  $1,197,966 

 

At September 30, 2018, Promissory Notes Payable totaled $135,000 and was comprised of three Bridge Financing Notes.

 

See Note 9 for a summary of the warrants outstanding relating to the Bridge Financing Notes and Note 13 Subsequent Events related to the term loan payoff.

 

NOTE 8 – Fair Value Measurement

 

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received upon the sale of an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Fair value measurements are classified and disclosed in one of the following categories:

 

Level 1: Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets that are accessible at the measurement date for identical, unrestricted assets or liabilities. GulfSlope considers active markets as those in which transactions for the assets or liabilities occur in sufficient frequency and volume to provide pricing information on an ongoing basis.
Level 2: Quoted prices in markets that are not active, or inputs which are observable, either directly or indirectly, for substantially the full term of the asset or liability. This category includes those derivative instruments that GulfSlope values using observable market data. Substantially all of these inputs are observable in the marketplace throughout the term of the derivative instrument, can be derived from observable data, or are supported by observable levels at which transactions are executed in the marketplace. Instruments in this category include non-exchange traded derivative financial instruments as well as long-term incentive plan liabilities calculated using the Black-Scholes model to estimate the fair value as of the measurement date.
Level 3: Measured based on prices or valuation models that require inputs that are both significant to the fair value measurement and less observable from objective sources (i.e. supported by little or no market activity).

 

Financial assets and liabilities are classified based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. The Company’s assessment of the significance of a particular input to the fair value measurement requires judgment, and may affect the valuation of the fair value of assets and liabilities and their placement within the fair value hierarchy levels.

 

30 

 

 

Fair Value on a Recurring Basis

 

The following table sets forth by level within the fair value hierarchy GulfSlope Energy, Inc.’s liabilities that were accounted for at fair value on a recurring basis as of September 30, 2019 and 2018:

 

   Fair Value Measurements Using 
   Quoted Prices in
Active Markets for
Identical Assets
   Significant Other
Observable
Inputs
   Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
   Total Carrying 
Description  (Level 1)   (Level 2)   (Level 3)   Value as of 
   (In thousands) 
Derivative Financial Instrument  $   $(271,710)  $   $(271,710)
Total as of September 30, 2018       (271,710)       (271,710)
Issuance of Derivative Financial Instruments       (3,863,599)       (3,863,599)
Change in fair value for year ended September 30, 2019       600,853        600,853 
Total as of Total as of September 30, 2019  $   $(3,534,456)  $   $(3,534,456)

 

During the years ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, the Company did not have any assets or liabilities measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis.

 

NOTE 9 - COMMON STOCK/PAID IN CAPITAL

 

As discussed in Note 7, between June and November 2016, the Company issued 27.9 million warrants in conjunction with Convertible Debentures. The warrants have an exercise price of $0.03 and a term of the earlier of three years or upon a change of control. During June through August 2017, the maturity date of all of the Bridge Financing Notes was extended to January 15, 2018, in exchange for the issuance of 25% additional warrants, or approximately 7 million extension warrants. The warrants have an exercise price of $0.03 and the same expiration date (three years from original transaction) as the original warrants. On January 15, 2018, the maturity date of the Bridge Financing Notes was extended to April 16, 2018, in exchange for the issuance of 10% additional warrants, or approximately 2.8 million extension warrants (see Note 7). The warrants have an exercise price of $0.10 per share and the same expiration date (three years from original transaction) as the original warrants. Through September 30, 2019, approximately 3.3 million warrants have been exercised, approximately 22.0 million have expired and approximately 12.5 million remain outstanding. During June 2019, the Company completed the extension of the remaining notes to April 30, 2020. In consideration for the extension of the remaining notes, the Company extended the term of the warrants until April 30, 2020.

 

The fair value of the warrants were determined using the Black Scholes valuation model with the following key assumptions:

 

    June 2016     November 2016     June 2017       January 2018  
Remaining Warrants   7.6 million     1.7 million     2.3 million       0.9 Million  
Stock Price:   $ 0.054 (1)   $ 0.029 (1)   $ 0.025 (1)   $ 0.11 (1)
Exercise Price   $ 0.03     $ 0.03     $ 0.03     $ 0.10  
Term     3 years       3 years       2 years       1.5 years  
Risk Free Rate     .87 %     1.28 %     1.35 %     1.89%  
Volatility     135 %     131 %     135 %     163%  

 

  (1) Fair market value on the date of agreement.

 

A summary of warrants, issued in conjunction with the Bridge Financing Notes and outstanding at September 30, 2019:

 

          Warrants Outstanding     Warrants Exercisable  
Date Issued   Exercise Price     Number
Outstanding
    Weighted
Average
Remaining
Contractual
Life (Yrs)
    Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
    Number
Exercisable
    Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
 
June 2016   $ 0.03       7,566,667       .58     $ 0.03       7,566,667     $ 0.03  
November 2016   $ 0.03       1,666,667       .58     $ 0.03       1,666,667     $ 0.03  
June 2017   $ 0.03       1,891,667       .58     $ 0.03       1,891,667     $ 0.03  
November 2017   $ 0.03       416,667       .58     $ 0.03       416,667     $ 0.03  
January 2018   $ 0.10       923,333        .58     $ 0.10       923,333     $ 0.10  

 

In December 2016 and March 2017, the Company issued 550,000 and 1,100,000 warrants to purchase stock at $0.10 per share to an investor as part of a financing transaction. The warrants have a term of five years.

 

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In October and December 2017, the Company issued 1,100,000 and 1,100,000 warrants to purchase stock at $0.10 per share to an investor as part of a financing transaction. The warrants have a term of five years.

 

A summary of the warrants, issued in conjunction with Bridge Financing Notes, Private Placements and Services Rendered and outstanding at September 30, 2019:

 

      Warrants Outstanding     Warrants Exercisable  
Exercise Price     Number
Outstanding
    Remaining
Contractual Life
(Yrs)
    Weighted
Average
Exercise Price
    Number
Exercisable
    Weighted
Average
Exercise Price
 
$ 0.10       550,000       2.25     $ 0.10       550,000     $ 0.10  
$ 0.10       1,100,000       2.46     $ 0.10       1,100,000     $ 0.10  
$ 0.10       1,100,000       3.04     $ 0.10       1,100,000     $ 0.10  
$ 0.10       1,100,000       3.21     $ 0.10       1,100,000     $ 0.10  
$ 0.09       9,662,500       1.90     $ 0.09       9,662,500     $ 0.09  
$ 0.15       2,027,780       1.99     $ 0.15       2,027,780     $ 0.15  
$ 0.042       23,809,523       0.55     $ 0.042       23,809,523     $ 0.042  
$ 0.04       50,000,000       4.73     $ 0.04       50,000,000     $ 0.04  

 

During December 2018, the Company issued approximately 19.3 million shares of common stock and approximately 9.7 million warrants to accredited investors in a private placement. The funds were received in the prior fiscal year and included as a liability because the transaction did not close until the current fiscal year and it was moved to equity during the quarter ended December 31, 2018. Based upon the allocation of proceeds between the common stock and the warrants, approximately $259,000 was allocated to the warrants.

 

The fair value of the warrants was determined using the Black Scholes valuation model with the following key assumptions:

 

Number of Warrants Issued     9,662,500  
Stock Price   $ 0.044  
Exercise Price   $ 0.09  
Term     3 years  
Risk Free Rate     2.46 %
Volatility     149 %

 

In September 2018, the Company issued approximately 4 million shares of common stock valued at approximately $231,000 on the date of grant and approximately 2 million warrants valued at $80,000 utilizing the Black Scholes model with an exercise price of $0.15 per share in settlement of a liability for services rendered.

 

NOTE 10 – STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION

 

On January 1, 2017, 33.5 million stock options were granted to employees, officers and directors of the Company. The stock options vested 50% on January 1, 2017 and 50% on January 1, 2018. The stock options are exercisable for seven years from the original grant date of January 1, 2017, until January 1, 2024.

 

On May 1, 2018, 500,000 stock options, with an exercise price of $0.065 per share were granted to an employee. The stock options vested on the issue date. The stock options are exercisable for approximately 7.5 years from the date of grant of May 1, 2018 to December 31, 2025.

 

On June 1, 2018, 67.5 million stock options, with an exercise price of $0.075 per share were granted to employees, directors and contractors. 18.5 million of the stock options vested on June 1, 2018, 24 million vested on June 1, 2019 and 25 million will vest on June 1, 2020 provided the holder continues to serve as an employee or a director on the vesting date. The stock options are exercisable for approximately 7.5 years from the grant date of June 1, 2018, to December 31, 2025. Forty-nine million of these stock options were awarded from the Company’s 2018 Omnibus Incentive Plan and 18.5 million stock options were inducement awards.

 

On January 2, 2019 the Company issued 1 million stock options to a former employee and contractor. Fifty percent of the stock options vested on the issue date and the remainder vested in July 2019. The stock options were valued at approximately $35,000 to be recognized over the service period of seven months. The stock options are exercisable until December 31, 2025.

 

Stock-based compensation cost is measured at the grant date, based on the estimated fair value of the award, and is recognized over the vesting period. The Company recognized $1,629,333 and $1,857,531 in stock-based compensation expense for the years ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively. A portion of these costs allocable to the Company’s exploration activities, $884,839 and $820,877 were capitalized to unproved properties and the remainder was recorded as general and administrative expenses, for the years ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

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The Company uses the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to estimate the fair value of options granted. The weighted-average fair values of stock options granted for the years ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 were based on the following assumptions at the date of grant as follows:

 

Date of Grant  May 1, 2018   June 1, 2018   January 2, 2019 
Number of Stock Options Granted   500,000    67,500,000    1,000,000 
Stock Price  $0.065   $0.075   $0.045 
Exercise Price  $0.065   $0.075   $0.045 
Expected Life of Options   4.25 years    4.25 years    3.75 years 
Risk Free Rate   2.74%   2.675%   2.51%
Volatility   145.21%   145.21%   126.37%

 

The following table summarizes the Company’s stock option activity during the year ended September 30, 2019:

   Number
of Options
   Weighted
Average
Exercise Price
   Weighted Average
Remaining
Contractual Term
(In years)
 
Outstanding at September 30, 2018   103,500,000   $0.0605      
Granted   1,000,000    0.0450      
Exercised             
Cancelled             
Outstanding at September 30, 2019   104,500,000   $0.0604    5.13 
Vested and expected to vest   104,500,000   $0.0604    5.13 
Exercisable at September 30, 2019   79,500,000   $0.0552    5.13 

 

The Company used its historical stock trading price volatility for the last four years. The Company has no historical data regarding the expected life of the options and therefore used the simplified method of calculating the expected life. The risk free rate was calculated using the U.S. Treasury constant maturity rates similar to the expected life of the options, as published by the Federal Reserve. The Company has no plans to declare any future dividends.

 

As of September 30, 2019, there was $1.1 million of unrecognized stock-based compensation cost related to the stock option grants expected to be amortized over a weighted average period of nine months.

 

NOTE 11 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

From time to time, the Company may become involved in litigation relating to claims arising out of its operations in the normal course of business. No legal proceedings, government actions, administrative actions, investigations or claims are currently pending against us or involve the Company.

 

In July 2018, the Company entered into a 39 month lease for approximately 5,000 square feet of office space in 4 Houston Center in downtown Houston. Annual base rent is approximately $94 thousand for the first 18 months, increasing to approximately $97 thousand and $99 thousand, respectively during the remaining term of the lease.

 

The Company reached an agreement with a vendor in August 2018 for the settlement of approximately $1 million in debt. The vendor was paid $150,000 in cash, future cash payments of $7,500 and 10 million shares of GulfSlope common stock. The agreement contains a provision that upon the sale of the common stock if the original debt is not fully satisfied, full payment will be made, under a mutually agreed payment plan. If the stock is sold for a gain any surplus in excess of $1.3 million shall be a credit against future purchases from the vendor. The agreement was determined to meet the definition of a derivative in accordance with ASC 815. At September 30, 2019 there is a fair value liability of approximately $554,000.

 

NOTE 12 – CORRECTION OF IMMATERIAL ERROR IN PREVIOUSLY ISSUED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Prior to the filing of the Company’s September 30, 2019 Form 10-K, the management of the Company determined that capitalized interest should be computed for the Company’s oil and gas properties that were being actively developed. As a result, the Company is revising certain of its condensed financial statements as of and for the quarters ended December 31, 2018, March 31, 2019, and June 30, 2019 to correct this error. After considering Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 99, Assessing Materiality, management does not deem this revision to be material to its financial statements due to its consideration of the amount and direction of the error and its impact on the quality of key oil and natural gas industry financial metrics.

 

33 

 

 

As a result of the correction, the originally reported net loss for the three months ended December 31, 2018, March 31, 2019, and June 30, 2019 was decreased by approximately $78,000, $106,000, and $371,000, respectively, and the originally reported net loss for the six months ended March 31, 2019, and nine months ended June 30, 2019 was decreased by approximately $183,000 and $554,000, respectively. Originally reported basic and diluted loss per share for these periods was not changed.

 

The following tables reflect the amounts within the balance sheet, statement of operations and statement of cash flows as originally reported to amounts as now reflected as of and for the quarters ended December 31, 2018, March 31, 2019, and June 30, 2019.

 

   December 31, 2018 
   As Originally
reported
   Adjustment   Corrected 
Balance Sheet               
Oil and Natural Gas Properties  $11,203,790   $77,542   $11,281,332 
Total Assets  $28,172,736   $77,542   $28,250,278 
Accumulated Deficit  $(42,282,117)  $77,542   $(42,204,575)
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Deficit  $28,172,736   $77,542   $28,250,278 
                
   March 31, 2019 
    As Originally
reported
    Adjustment    Corrected 
Balance Sheet               
Oil and Natural Gas Properties  $16,892,281   $183,299   $17,075,580 
Total Assets  $32,438,825   $183,299   $32,622,124 
Accumulated Deficit  $(47,695,556)  $183,299   $(47,512,257)
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Deficit  $32,438,825   $183,299   $32,622,124 
                
   June 30, 2019 
    As Originally
reported
    Adjustment    Corrected 
Balance Sheet               
Oil and Natural Gas Properties  $17,318,916   $554,086   $17,873,002 
Total Assets  $37,551,079   $554,086   $38,105,165 
Accumulated Deficit  $(54,574,356)  $554,086   $(54,020,270)
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Deficit  $37,551,079   $554,086   $38,105,165 

 

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   Three Months Ended December 31, 2018 
   As Originally reported   Adjustment   Corrected 
             
Statement of Operations               
Interest Expense, net
  $(98,157)  $77,542   $(20,615)
Net Loss  $(423,861)  $77,542   $(346,319)
                
Statement of Cash Flows               
Net Loss  $(423,861)  $77,542   $(346,319)
Capitalized Interest Expense  $   $(77,542)  $(77,542)
                         
   Three Months Ended March 31, 2019   Six Months Ended March 31, 2019 
   As Originally reported   Adjustment   Corrected   As Originally reported   Adjustment   Corrected 
                         
Statements of Operations                              
Interest Expense, net  $(106,152)  $105,757   $(395)  $(204,309)  $183,299   $(21,010)
Net Loss  $(5,413,439)  $105,757   $(5,307,682)  $(5,837,299)  $183,299   $(5,654,000)
                               
Statement of Cash Flows                              
Net Loss                 $(5,837,299)  $183,299   $(5,654,000)
Capitalized Interest Expense                 $   $(183,299)  $(183,299)
                         
   Three Months Ended June 30, 2019   Nine Months Ended June 30, 2019 
   As Originally reported   Adjustment   Corrected   As Originally reported   Adjustment   Corrected 
                         
Statements of Operations                              
Interest Expense, net  $(2,080,620)  $370,787   $(1,709,833)  $(2,284,928)  $554,086   $(1,730,842)
Net Loss  $(6,878,800)  $370,787   $(6,508,013)  $(12,716,099)  $554,086   $(12,162,013)
                               
Statement of Cash Flows                              
Net Loss                 $(12,716,099)  $554,086   $(12,162,013)
Capitalized Interest Expense                 $   $(554,086)  $(554,086)

 

NOTE 13 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

In November 2019, the Company purchased an insurance policy for approximately $241,000 and financed approximately $221,000 of the premium by executing a note payable.

 

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In October 2019, the Company signed a Post-Drilling Agreement with Delek GOM Investments, LLC. The Agreement provides, among other things, that the Company (i) issue to Delek 38,423,221 shares of common stock of the Company (the “Insurance Proceeds Shares”) as compensation with respect to certain insurance proceeds received in connection with drilling of the Tau well prospect, (ii) that as payoff for the Company’s outstanding obligations of $1,220,548 (“Term Loan Payoff”) to Delek under the Term Loan Agreement entered into between the Company and Delek on March 1, 2019, the Company issue a convertible debenture (the “Convertible Debenture”) to Delek in a principal amount equal to the Term Loan Payoff, as a consequence of which the Term Loan Agreement has been terminated, (iii) that the Security Agreement entered into between the Company and Delek on March 1, 2019, be amended to release all liens and security interests Delek may hold in properties of the Company other than those attributable to the Tau well, and (iv) that the Registration Rights Agreement entered into between the Company and Delek on March 25, 2019, be amended to extend Delek’s rights thereunder to the shares underlying the Convertible Debenture, discussed below. The Convertible Debenture is convertible at the option of Delek at any time in whole or in part for up to 24,410,960 shares of Common Stock at a conversion price of $0.05 per share.  Interest on the Convertible Debenture is accruable at 12% per annum and the maturity of the Convertible Debenture is October 22, 2020 (which interest rate will increase to 15% per annum upon any Event of Default as defined in the Convertible Debenture).  The Company has a right to prepay the Convertible Debenture prior to maturity for an amount equal to the outstanding principal balance plus accrued and unpaid interest.  Absent any restrictions under the federal securities laws, Delek’s ability to sell shares of common stock of the Company issued upon conversion of the Convertible Debenture will be limited, in any one-month period, to 10% (ten percent) of the total volume of such converted shares.

 

Underwriters (the "Underwriters") associated with the Company's Energy Package insurance policy (the "Policy") have acknowledged confirmation of coverage, subject to the Policy terms and conditions, related to a subsurface well occurrence that happened during the drilling of the Company's Tau well earlier this year. This occurrence transpired on May 5, 2019 during drilling operations at a measured depth of 15,254 feet. The Company subsequently controlled the occurrence and ceased drilling operations. Plugs were placed in the well to meet regulatory requirements prior to rig release. Pursuant to the Policy terms and conditions, the Underwriters will reimburse GulfSlope for qualified actual costs and expenses incurred to (i) regain control of the well, and (ii) restore or re-drill the well to 15,254 feet. GulfSlope is working with the Underwriters to finalize details associated with the claim.

 

In November 2019, an agreement was reached with Texas South whereby Texas South re-conveyed to GulfSlope all of Texas South’s interest in Tau and Canoe in exchange for the release of claims and foregoing collections for Texas South’s failure to pay JIBs for the Tau and Canoe wells.

 

Convertible debentures in the amount of $300,000 plus accrued interest of $86,636 have been converted into 17,919,455 shares of common stock at a weighted average price of $0.0214.

 

36 

 

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

As previously reported in our Current Report on Form 8-K filed on November 6, 2019, on November 1, 2019, the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors of GulfSlope Energy, Inc. dismissed BDO USA, LLP as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm and approved the engagement of Pannell Kerr Forster of Texas, P.C. (“PKF”) as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm for the Company’s fiscal year ending September 30, 2019.

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures, as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the reports filed or submitted under the Exchange Act, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified by the Commission’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed or submitted under the Exchange Act are properly recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods required by the Commission’s rules and forms.

 

We carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of these disclosure controls and procedures, as such term is defined in Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e), as of September 30, 2019. Based on this evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of September 30, 2019, the end of the period covered by this Annual Report on Form 10-K, due to the material weaknesses described below.

 

Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act). Our internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. All control systems contain inherent limitations, no matter how well designed. As a result, our management acknowledges that its internal controls over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving their control objectives.

 

Our management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of September 30, 2019. In making this assessment, management used the criteria established by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission in Internal Control – Integrated Framework (2013). Based on this evaluation, our management concluded that, as of September 30, 2019, our internal control over financial reporting was not effective due to the material weaknesses described below.

 

A material weakness is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the Company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. The design and operating effectiveness of our controls were inadequate to ensure that all complex accounting matters are properly accounted for and reviewed in a timely manner. In connection with the previous restatement of our March 31, 2019 financial statements, we identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. These material weaknesses are due to a lack of effective controls over certain account analysis and accounting judgments related to certain estimates throughout the year which resulted in a material error in the financial statements. 

 

Our Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer are in the preliminary stage of a review of our controls relating to such accounting matter. Although our analysis is not complete, we believe that adding additional resources with expertise in accounting for complex accounting matters, including timely review, may be warranted. Notwithstanding the identified material weaknesses, the Company believes the financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K fairly represent in all material respects our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows at and for the periods presented in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Management has developed a contract review process, increased the use of external consultants and is investigating expansion of the accounting department in its ongoing remediation efforts of the material weaknesses reported by management in our Annual Report on Form 10-K and Form 10-Q/A for the quarter ended March 31, 2019. Other than the ongoing remediation efforts, there have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act) that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

37 

 

 

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

 

Not Applicable.

 

38 

 

 

PART III

 

ITEM 10.  DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Identification of Directors and Executive Officers

 

Our executive officers and directors and their respective ages, positions and biographical information are set forth below.

 

Name   Age   Title
John N. Seitz   67   Chairman, Chief Executive Officer
John H. Malanga   52   Chief Financial Officer
Charles G. Hughes   62   Vice President, Land
Richard S. Langdon   69   Director
Paul L. Morris   77   Director

 

John N. Seitz. Mr. Seitz has served as the Company’s chief executive officer and chairman of the board and director since May 31, 2013, and served as a consultant to the Company from March 2013 through May 2013. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Seitz held positions of increasing responsibility at Anadarko Petroleum Corporation (NYSE: APC), serving most recently as a director and as president and chief executive officer until 2003. Mr. Seitz also serves on the board of directors of ION Geophysical Corporation (NYSE: IO), a leading technology focused seismic solutions company. Mr. Seitz is a Certified Professional Geological Scientist from the American Institute of Professional Geologists and a licensed professional geoscientist with the State of Texas. Mr. Seitz also serves as a trustee for the American Geological Institute Foundation. In 2000, the Houston Geological Society honored Mr. Seitz as a “Legend in Wildcatting,” and he is a member of the All American Wildcatters. Mr. Seitz holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Geology from the University of Pittsburgh, a Master of Science degree in Geology from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and has completed the Advanced Management Program at the Wharton School.

 

John H. Malanga. Mr. Malanga has served as chief financial officer since July 2014 and is responsible for leading the financial function of the organization, overseeing strategic planning and analysis, accounting and reporting, treasury, tax, audit and risk management. From 2005 to 2014, Mr. Malanga worked as a senior investment banker with the energy firms of Weisser, Johnson & Co. and Sanders Morris Harris Inc. Mr. Malanga began his investment banking career with Jefferies & Co. Over his career, he has participated in capital markets, mergers and acquisitions, and financial advisory transactions with particular emphasis on providing strategic and financial advice to emerging growth companies. Mr. Malanga holds a Bachelor of Science in Economics from Texas A&M University and a Master in Business Administration with a concentration in finance from Rice University.

 

Charles G. Hughes. Mr. Hughes has served as vice president land since April 2014. Mr. Hughes’ executive responsibilities include all land and industry partner related matters. He formerly served as general manager – land and business development for Marubeni Oil & Gas (USA), Inc. from 2007 to 2014. From 1980 to 2007, Mr. Hughes served in roles of increasing responsibility both onshore and offshore in the Gulf of Mexico at Anadarko Petroleum Corporation. Mr. Hughes is a member and former Chairman of the OCS Advisory Board, a member of the Association of Professional Landmen, the Houston Association of Professional Landmen and the Professional Landmen’s Association of New Orleans. Mr. Hughes received his Bachelor of Business Administration in Petroleum Land Management from the University of Texas.

 

Richard S. Langdon. Richard S. Langdon has served as a director of the Company since March 2014. Mr. Langdon is currently the executive vice president and chief financial officer of Altamont Energy, Inc., a newly formed privately held exploration and production company. Mr. Langdon served as the president, chief executive officer and outside director of Badlands Energy, Inc. and its predecessor entity, Gasco Energy, Inc. since May 2013 and Debtor-in Possession since August 2017. Prior to assuming the President and CEO role, Mr. Langdon had served as a Gasco Energy Inc. outside board member since 2003. Mr. Langdon serves as a member of the board of managers of Sanchez Midstream Partners, LP, and is a member of its Audit, Nominating and Corporate Governance and Conflicts Committees. Mr. Langdon was the president and chief executive officer of KMD Operating Company, LLC (“KMD Operating”), and its predecessor entity, Matris Exploration Company LP (“Matris Exploration”), both privately held exploration and production companies, from July 2004 through December 2015. Mr. Langdon was executive vice president and chief operating officer of KMD Operating, from August 2009, until the merger of Matris Exploration into KMD Operating in November 2011. From 1997 until 2002, Mr. Langdon served as executive vice president and chief financial officer of EEX Corporation, a publicly traded exploration and production company that merged with Newfield Exploration Company in 2002. Prior to that, he held various positions with the Pennzoil Companies from 1991 to 1996, including executive vice president - International Marketing - Pennzoil Products Company; senior vice president - Business Development - Pennzoil Company and senior vice president - Commercial & Control - Pennzoil Exploration & Production Company. Mr. Langdon graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1972 and a Masters of Business Administration in 1974.

 

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Paul L. Morris. Mr. Morris has served as a director of the Company since March 2014. Mr. Morris founded Elk River Resources, LLC in August 2013 to explore and develop oil and gas potential in the oil-producing regions of the southwest United States. Mr. Morris has served as chairman and chief executive officer of Elk River Resources since inception. Prior to Elk River Resources, Mr. Morris served as president and chief executive officer from 1988 to September 2013 of Wagner & Brown, Ltd., an independent oil and gas company headquartered in Midland, Texas. With Wagner & Brown, Mr. Morris oversaw all company operations, including exploration and production activities, in eight states as well as in France, England and Australia. Mr. Morris also oversaw affiliates involved in natural gas gathering and marketing, crude oil purchasing and reselling, pipeline development, construction and operation, and compressed natural gas (CNG) design, fabrication and operations. Mr. Morris served as president of Banner Energy from 1981 until 1988. Mr. Morris graduated from the University of Cincinnati with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1964. Mr. Morris has also completed the Executive Management Program in the College of Business Administration of Penn State University

 

Board Committees and Meetings

 

The Board currently consists of three directors. Vacancies on the Board may be filled by a vote of a majority of the remaining directors, although less than a quorum is present. A director elected by the Board to fill a vacancy shall serve for the remainder of the term of that director until the director’s successor is elected and qualified. This includes vacancies created by an increase in the number of directors. The Board has three standing committees: the Audit and Compliance Committee, the Compensation Committee, and the Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee.

 

The Company has no formal policy with regard to Board members’ attendance at annual meetings of security holders. The Company held an annual shareholder meeting in May of 2018. During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2019, the Board held four meetings.

 

Compliance with Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act

 

Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act requires our directors and executive officers, and persons who beneficially own more than 10% of our common stock, to file with the SEC initial reports of ownership and reports of changes in ownership of our common stock. Directors, executive officers and more than 10% stockholders are required by SEC regulations to provide us with copies of all Section 16(a) forms they file. To our knowledge, based solely on a review of the copies of the reports furnished to us, all Section 16(a) filing requirements applicable to our directors, officers and more than 10% beneficial owners were complied with during the year ended September 30, 2019.

 

Code of Ethics

 

We have adopted a written code of ethics and whistleblower policy (the “Code of Ethics”) that applies to our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller, and persons performing similar functions. We believe that the Code of Ethics is reasonably designed to deter wrongdoing and promote honest and ethical conduct; provide full, fair, accurate, timely and understandable disclosure in public reports; comply with applicable laws; ensure prompt internal reporting of code violations; and provide accountability for adherence to the code. A copy of our Code of Ethics was previously filed as an exhibit to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended 2012, and can be found at www.sec.gov. Our Code of Ethics can also be found on our website at www.gulfslope.com. A copy of the Code of Ethics will be provided to any person, without charge, upon request to the Secretary at 1331 Lamar St., Suite 1665, Houston, Texas 77010.

 

Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings

 

There are currently no material pending legal proceedings to which the Company is a party or of which any of its property is the subject, in which any of the above referenced directors or officers is a party adverse to the Company or has a material interest adverse to the Company. Furthermore, during the past ten years, none of the Company’s officers or directors described above were involved in any legal proceedings that are material to an evaluation of the ability or integrity of such directors and officers.

 

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

Compensation to Officers of the Company

 

The following tables contain compensation data for our named executive officers for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2019 and 2018:

 

Summary Compensation Table                          
Name and
Principal Position
   Year    Salary    Bonus    Stock
Awards
    Stock
Option Awards
    All Other
Compensation
    Total 
John N. Seitz(1)   2019   $   $   $   $   $   $ 
CEO   2018                        
                                    
John H. Malanga   2019    60,000            393,000        453,000 
CFO   2018    36,000            560,250        596,250 

 

(1)  Mr. Seitz is not currently receiving or accruing any compensation as of the date of this Annual Report.

 

40 

 

 

Employment and Consulting Arrangements

 Not applicable.

 

Compensation Policies and Practices as they Relate to the Company’s Risk Management

 Not applicable.

 

Director Compensation

 

During 2019, the directors of the Company were not compensated for their services as directors. In January of 2017 the Company’s nonemployee directors were each awarded 2,500,000 stock options for the Company’s stock at an exercise price of $0.0278 per share, 50% vested in January 2017 and 50% vested in January of 2018. The stock options will expire in January 2024. In June of 2018 the Company’s nonemployee directors were each awarded 4,500,000 stock options for the Company’s stock at an exercise price of $0.075 per share, 1.5 million vested in June 2018, and 1.5 million vested in June 2019 and 1.5 million will vest in June 2020. The stock options will expire in December 2025.

 

Grants of Plan-Based Awards

 

The Company shareholders approved the 2018 Omnibus Incentive Plan in May of 2018. Restricted stock and stock option awards made after this date, to executives, employees, and directors were made pursuant to the plan.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year End

 

In October 2013, two million stock options were awarded with an exercise price of $0.12 and an expiration of October 2023. Fifty percent vested upon grant and fifty percent vested one year later. In January 2017, 22 million stock options were awarded to GulfSlope Energy executives, 5 million to directors, and 28.5 million to employees. The exercise price of the stock options is $0.0278 and they expire in January 2024. Fifty percent of these options vested upon grant in January 2017 and fifty percent vested in January 2018. In May 2018, 0.5 million stock options were awarded, the exercise price is $0.065 the options vested upon grant and expire in December 2025. In June 2018, 67.5 million stock options were awarded to GulfSlope Energy executives, employees, consultants and directors. The exercise price of the stock options is $0.075 and they expire in December 2025. Eighteen and one half million of these options vested upon grant in June 2018, 24 million vested in June 2019, and 25 million will vest in June 2020, provided the recipient remains employed at the Company. On January 2, 2019 the Company issued 1 million stock options to a former employee and consultant. Of these options, 18.5 million vested on the grant date and the remainder vested in July 2019. The stock options were valued at approximately $35,000 to be recognized over the service period of seven months. The stock options are exercisable until December 31, 2025.

 

ITEM 12.  SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

The following table sets forth the number and percentage of outstanding shares of common stock owned by: (a) each of our directors; (b) each person who is known by us to be the beneficial owner of more than 5% of our outstanding shares of common stock; (c) the named executive officers as defined in Item 402 of Regulation S-K; and (d) all current directors and executive officers, as a group. As of December 27, 2019, there were 1,137,679,008 shares of common stock deemed issued and outstanding.

 

Unless otherwise stated, beneficial ownership has been determined in accordance with Rule 13d-3 under the Exchange Act. Under this rule, certain shares may be deemed to be beneficially owned by more than one person (if, for example, persons share the power to vote or the power to dispose of the shares). In addition, shares are deemed to be beneficially owned by a person if the person has the right to acquire shares (for example, upon exercise of an option or warrant) within 60 days of the date as of which the information is provided. In computing the percentage ownership of any person or group of persons, the number of shares beneficially owned by such person or group of persons is deemed to include the number of shares beneficially owned by such person or the members of such group by reason of such acquisition rights, and the total number of shares outstanding is also deemed to include such shares (but not shares subject to similar acquisition rights held by any other person or group) for purposes of that calculation. As a result, the percentage of outstanding shares of any person as shown in the following table does not necessarily reflect the person’s actual voting power at any particular date. To our knowledge, except as indicated in the footnotes to this table and pursuant to applicable community property laws, the persons named in the table have sole voting and investment power with respect to all shares of common stock shown as beneficially owned by them. The address for each of the beneficial owners is the Company’s address.

 

41 

 

 

Name of Beneficial Owner  Number of Shares of Common Stock Beneficially Owned   Percentage of Class Beneficially Owned 
Named Executive Officers and Directors:          
           
John N. Seitz (1)   255,232,528    22.4%
John H. Malanga (3)   35,666,667    3.1%
Richard S. Langdon (4)   7,916,667    0.7%
Paul L. Morris (2)   9,228,038    0.8%
All directors & executive officers as a group (4 persons)   308,043,900    27.1%
           
Shareholders of Greater Than 5%:          
Delek GOM Investments, LLC   276,518,459    24.3%

 

(1) Includes 44,166,667 shares of common stock underlying the convertible demand note in the principal amount of $5.3 million and 11,480,308 shares underlying the convertible accrued interest in the amount of $1,377,637.
(2) Includes 61,371 shares of common stock held by the Morris Family Limited Partnership LP, a partnership of which an entity controlled by Mr. Morris is the general partner and 2,500,000 stock options awarded in January 2017, one-half vested in January of 2017 and one-half vested in January 2018. Includes 4,500,000 stock options awarded in June 2018, one-third vested in June of 2018, one-third vested in June 2019 and one-third will vest in June 2020.
(3) Includes 15,000,000 stock options awarded in January 2017, one-half vested in January of 2017 and one-half vested in January 2018. Includes 18,000,000 stock options awarded in June 2018, one-third vested in June of 2018, one-third vested in June 2019 and one-third will vest in June 2020.
(4) Includes 2,500,000 stock options awarded in January 2017, one-half vested in January of 2017 and one-half vested in January 2018. Includes 4,500,000 stock options awarded in June 2018, one-third vested in June of 2018, one-third vested in June 2019 and one-third will vest in June 2020.

 

ITEM 13.  CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

For a discussion of related party transactions, see Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data, Note 6 Related Party Transactions.

  

Director Independence

 

For purposes of determining director independence, we have applied the NYSE MKT standards for independence. The OTCBB, on which shares of our common stock are quoted, does not have any director independence requirements. The NYSE MKT definition of independent director means a person other than an executive officer or employee of the Company or any other individual having a relationship which, in the opinion of the our Board of Directors, would interfere with the exercise of independent judgment in carrying out the responsibilities of a director.

 

The members of the Audit and Compliance Committee, the Compensation Committee, and the Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee are Messrs. Morris and Langdon, each, of whom, is independent.

 

 

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ITEM 14.  PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

 

Audit Fees and Services

 

For the fiscal year ended September 30, 2019 professional services were performed by PKF of Texas. The aggregate fees billed by PKF of Texas for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2019 were as follows:

 

   September 30, 2019 
Audit Fees (1)  $87,000 
Audit-Related Fees (2)    
Tax Fees (3)   13,725 
All Other Fees    
     
(1)   Audit services include fees for professional services rendered only for the audit of the Company’s annual financial statements for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2019.

 

(2)   Audit-related services primarily include fees for assurance and related services by our principal accountants that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of our financial statements.

 

(3)   Tax services include fees for consultation and assistance with tax preparation and compliance during the year ended September 30, 2019.

 

Audit Committee Pre-Approval Policies and Procedures

 

The Audit and Compliance Committee has adopted policies and procedures that will require the Company to obtain the Committee’s pre-approval of all audit and permissible non-audit services to be provided by the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm. The Committee pre-approved 100% of the non-audit services provided to the Company by PKF of Texas, .

 

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PART IV

 

ITEM 15.  EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

(a) (1) Financial Statements (included under Item 8):

 

  Page(s) 
   
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 17
   
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 18
   
Balance Sheets as of September 30, 2019 and 2018 19
   
Statements of Operations for the Years Ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 20
   
Statements of Stockholders’ Deficit for the Years Ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 21
   
Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 22
   
Notes to the Financial Statements 23 - 36

 

(3) Exhibits. The following exhibits are filed as part of this Annual Report:

 

Exhibit No. Description

 

3.1 Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of GulfSlope Energy, Inc., incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 of the Company’s Form 8-K filed May 30, 2014
3.2 Bylaws of GulfSlope Energy, Inc., incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 of the Company’s Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2014
4.1 Common Stock Specimen, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 of the Company’s Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2012
10.1 (3) Form of Restricted Stock Agreement, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2014
10.2 (3) Form of Indemnification Agreement, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of Form 8-K filed October 31, 2013
10.3 Form of Convertible Promissory Note between the Company and John N. Seitz, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 of Form 8-K filed October 31, 2013
10.4 (1) Form of Promissory Note between the Company and John N. Seitz; Dr. Ronald Bain and an affiliate
10.5 (3) GulfSlope Energy, Inc. 2014 Omnibus Incentive Plan dated effective May 24, 2014, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of Form 8-K filed May 30, 2014
10.6 (3) Option Agreement between the Company and Brady Rodgers dated October 21, 2013, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.12 of the Company’s Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2013
14.1 Code of Ethics, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 14.1 of the Company’s Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2012
23.1 (1) Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
23.2 (1) Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
31.1 (1) Certification of Principal Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
31.2 (1) Certification of Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
32.1 (1) Certification of Principal Executive Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
32.2 (1) Certification of Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
101.INS XBRL Instance Document   Documents
101.SCH XBRL Schema Document
101.CAL XBRL Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF XBRL Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB XBRL Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE XBRL Presentation Linkbase Document

 

(1) Filed herewith.
(2) Pursuant to Rule 406T of Regulation S-T, the Interactive Data Files on Exhibit 101 hereto are deemed not filed or part of a registration statement or prospectus for purposes of Sections 11 or 12 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, are deemed not filed for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and otherwise are not subject to liability under those sections.

(3) Management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement required to be filed as an exhibit hereto pursuant to Item 15(b).

 

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ITEM 16.  FORM 10-K SUMMARY

 

None.

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

Date: December 30, 2019

GulfSlope Energy, Inc.

(Registrant)

 

  By: /s/ John N. Seitz  
    John N. Seitz  
    Chief Executive Officer and Chairman  

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Signature Title Date
     
/s/ John N. Seitz Chief Executive Officer and Chairman December 30, 2019
John N. Seitz (Principal Executive Officer)  
     
/s/ John H. Malanga Chief Financial Officer
(Principal Financial Officer)
(Principal Accounting Officer)
December 30, 2019
John H. Malanga    
/s/ Richard S. Langdon

Director

 

December 30, 2019
Richard S. Langdon    
     
/s/ Paul L. Morris Director December 30, 2019
Paul L. Morris    

   

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