Attached files

file filename
EX-32 - EXHIBIT 32 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex32.htm
EX-31 - EXHIBIT 31 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex31.htm
EX-10.23 - EXHIBIT 10.23 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-23.htm
EX-10.22 - EXHIBIT 10.22 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-22.htm
EX-10.21 - EXHIBIT 10.21 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-21.htm
EX-10.20 - EXHIBIT 10.20 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-20.htm
EX-10.19 - EXHIBIT 10.19 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-19.htm
EX-10.18 - EXHIBIT 10.18 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-18.htm
EX-10.17 - EXHIBIT 10.17 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-17.htm
EX-10.16 - EXHIBIT 10.16 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-16.htm
EX-10.15 - EXHIBIT 10.15 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-15.htm
EX-10.14 - EXHIBIT 10.14 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-14.htm
EX-10.13 - EXHIBIT 10.13 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-13.htm
EX-10.12 - EXHIBIT 10.12 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-12.htm
EX-10.11 - EXHIBIT 10.11 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-11.htm
EX-10.10 - EXHIBIT 10.10 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-10.htm
EX-10.9 - EXHIBIT 10.9 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-9.htm
EX-10.8 - EXHIBIT 10.8 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-8.htm
EX-10.7 - EXHIBIT 10.7 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-7.htm
EX-10.6 - EXHIBIT 10.6 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-6.htm
EX-10.5 - EXHIBIT 10.5 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-5.htm
EX-10.4 - EXHIBIT 10.4 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-4.htm
EX-10.3 - EXHIBIT 10.3 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-3.htm
EX-10.2 - EXHIBIT 10.2 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-2.htm
EX-10.1 - EXHIBIT 10.1 - COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORP /MD/tv492961_ex10-1.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

x     QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)

OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the Quarterly Period Ended March 31, 2018

 

OR

 

¨     TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)

OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from ______ to ______

 

Commission File Number 001-36094

 

The Community Financial Corporation

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

  Maryland   52-1652138  
  (State of other jurisdiction of   (I.R.S. Employer  
  incorporation or organization)   Identification No.)  

 

  3035 Leonardtown Road, Waldorf, Maryland 20601  
  (Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)  

 

(301) 645-5601

(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)

Not applicable

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes x                   No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

Yes x                   No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large Accelerated Filer  ¨ Accelerated Filer x
Non-accelerated Filer  ¨ Smaller Reporting Company  ¨
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)  
   
Emerging growth company  ¨  

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

Yes ¨                   No x

 

As of May 2, 2018, the registrant had 5,574,232 shares of common stock outstanding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE COMMUNITY FINANCIAL CORPORATION

FORM 10-Q

INDEX

 

  Page
PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION  
   
Item 1 – Financial Statements (Unaudited)  
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets – March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 1
   
Consolidated Statements of Income - Three Months Ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 2
   
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income - Three Months Ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 3
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows - Three Months Ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 4
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements 6
   
Item 2 – Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 44
   
Item 3 – Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk 72
   
Item 4 – Controls and Procedures 73
   
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION  
   
Item 1 –    Legal Proceedings 74
   
Item 1A – Risk Factors 74
   
Item 2 –    Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 74
   
Item 3 –    Defaults Upon Senior Securities 74
   
Item 4 –    Mine Safety Disclosures 74
   
Item 5 –    Other Information 74
   
Item 6 –    Exhibits 75
   
SIGNATURES 77

 

 

 

 

PART 1 - FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ITEM 1 – FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

   (Unaudited)     
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)  March 31, 2018   December 31, 2017 
Assets          
Cash and due from banks  $29,739   $13,315 
Federal funds sold   730    - 
Interest-bearing deposits with banks   3,986    2,102 
Securities available for sale (AFS), at fair value   71,024    68,285 
Securities held to maturity (HTM), at amortized cost   98,198    99,246 
Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) stock - at cost   5,587    7,276 
Loans receivable   1,280,773    1,151,130 
Less: allowance for loan losses   (10,471)   (10,515)
Net loans   1,270,302    1,140,615 
Goodwill   10,277    - 
Premises and equipment, net   22,496    21,391 
Premises and equipment held for sale   2,341    - 
Other real estate owned (OREO)   9,352    9,341 
Accrued interest receivable   4,749    4,511 
Investment in bank owned life insurance   35,619    29,398 
Core deposit intangible   3,385    - 
Other assets   9,211    10,481 
Total Assets  $1,576,996   $1,405,961 
Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity          
Deposits          
Non-interest-bearing deposits  $229,612   $159,844 
Interest-bearing deposits   1,056,324    946,393 
Total deposits   1,285,936    1,106,237 
Short-term borrowings   51,500    87,500 
Long-term debt   45,483    55,498 
Guaranteed preferred beneficial interest in junior subordinated debentures (TRUPs)   12,000    12,000 
Subordinated notes - 6.25%   23,000    23,000 
Accrued expenses and other liabilities   13,420    11,769 
Total Liabilities   1,431,339    1,296,004 
           
Stockholders' Equity          
Common stock - par value $.01; authorized - 15,000,000 shares; issued 5,573,841 and 4,649,658 shares, respectively   56    46 
Additional paid in capital   83,947    48,209 
Retained earnings   64,307    63,648 
Accumulated other comprehensive loss   (1,898)   (1,191)
Unearned ESOP shares   (755)   (755)
Total Stockholders' Equity   145,657    109,957 
Total Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity  $1,576,996   $1,405,961 

 

See notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 1 

 

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME (Unaudited)

 

   Three Months Ended March 31, 
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts )  2018   2017 
Interest and Dividend Income          
Loans, including fees  $14,726   $11,970 
Interest and dividends on investment securities   1,095    946 
Interest on deposits with banks   72    6 
Total Interest and Dividend Income   15,893    12,922 
Interest Expense          
Deposits   1,956    1,268 
Short-term borrowings   283    147 
Long-term debt   764    833 
Total Interest Expense   3,003    2,248 
Net Interest Income   12,890    10,674 
Provision for loan losses   500    380 
Net Interest Income After Provision For Loan Losses   12,390    10,294 
Noninterest Income          
Loan appraisal, credit, and miscellaneous charges   53    47 
Net gains (losses) on sale of OREO   -    27 
Income from bank owned life insurance   226    191 
Service charges   752    610 
Total Noninterest Income   1,031    875 
Noninterest Expense          
Salary and employee benefits   5,047    4,313 
Occupancy expense   766    653 
Advertising   159    108 
Data processing expense   683    577 
Professional fees   352    320 
Merger and acquisition costs   2,868    17 
Depreciation of premises and equipment   199    199 
Telephone communications   99    51 
Office supplies   40    32 
FDIC Insurance   198    166 
OREO valuation allowance and expenses   114    195 
Core deposit intangible amortization   205    - 
Other   937    748 
Total Noninterest Expense   11,667    7,379 
Income before income taxes   1,754    3,790 
Income tax expense   533    1,448 
Net Income  $1,221   $2,342 
Earnings Per Common Share          
Basic  $0.22   $0.51 
Diluted  $0.22   $0.51 
Cash dividends paid per common share  $0.10   $0.10 

 

See notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 2 

 

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (Unaudited)

 

   Three Months Ended March 31, 
(dollars in thousands)  2018   2017 
         
Net Income  $1,221   $2,342 
Net unrealized holding gains (losses) arising during period, net of tax (benefit) expense of $(269) and $83, respectively.   (707)   127 
Comprehensive Income  $514   $2,469 

 

See notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 3 

 

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (Unaudited)

 

   Three Months Ended March 31, 
(dollars in thousands)  2018   2017 
         
Cash Flows from Operating Activities          
Net income  $1,221   $2,342 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities          
Provision for loan losses   500    380 
Depreciation and amortization   414    394 
Net (gains) loss on the sale of OREO   -    (27)
Net amortization of premium/discount on investment securities   91    94 
Net accretion of merger accounting adjustments   (323)   - 
Amortization of core deposit intangible   205    - 
Increase in OREO valuation allowance   90    196 
Increase in cash surrender value of bank owned life insurance   (221)   (192)
Increase in deferred income tax benefit   (50)   (382)
Decrease (increase) in accrued interest receivable   187    (44)
Stock based compensation   105    113 
Compensation expense due to excess of fair market value over cost of leveraged ESOP shares released   9    - 
(Increase) decrease in net deferred loan costs   (32)   337 
Increase (decrease) in accrued expenses and other liabilities   99    (1,773)
Decrease in other assets   2,566    2,322 
Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities   4,861    3,760 
           
Cash Flows from Investing Activities          
Purchase of AFS investment securities   (5,532)   (5,559)
Proceeds from redemption or principal payments of AFS investment securities   1,907    1,731 
Purchase of HTM investment securities   (982)   (998)
Proceeds from maturities or principal payments of HTM investment securities   5,053    5,212 
Proceeds from sale of investment securities acquired in business combination   34,919    - 
Net increase (decrease) of FHLB and FRB stock   1,893    (469)
Loans originated or acquired   (67,772)   (84,972)
Principal collected on loans   78,582    59,407 
Purchase of premises and equipment   (86)   (436)
Proceeds from sale of OREO   -    846 
Net cash acquired in business combination   32,287    - 
           
Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Investing Activities   80,269    (25,238)

 

 4 

 

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (Unaudited)

(continued)

 

   Three Months Ended March 31, 
(dollars in thousands)  2018   2017 
         
Cash Flows from Financing Activities          
Net (decrease) increase in deposits  $(19,530)  $12,965 
Payments of long-term debt   (10,016)   (10,015)
Net (decrease) increase in short term borrowings   (36,000)   18,500 
Dividends paid   (543)   (450)
Repurchase of common stock   (3)   - 
Net Cash (Used in) Provided by Financing Activities   (66,092)   21,000 
Increase (Decrease) in Cash and Cash Equivalents  $19,038   $(478)
Cash and Cash Equivalents - January 1   15,417    11,264 
Cash and Cash Equivalents - March 31  $34,455   $10,786 
           
Supplemental Disclosures of Cash Flow Information          
Cash paid during the period for          
Interest  $3,403   $2,602 
Income taxes  $-   $- 
           
Supplemental Schedule of Non-Cash Operating Activities          
Issuance of common stock for payment of compensation  $247   $203 
Transfer from loans to OREO  $101   $- 
Financed amount of sale of OREO  $-   $200 
           
Business Combination Non-Cash Disclosures          
Assets acquired in business combination (net of cash received)  $193,836   $- 
Liabilities assumed in business combination  $200,780   $- 

 

See notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 5 

 

  

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

 

NOTE 1 – BASIS OF PRESENTATION AND NATURE OF BUSINESS

 

Basis of Presentation

The consolidated financial statements of The Community Financial Corporation (the “Company”) and its wholly owned subsidiary, Community Bank of the Chesapeake (the “Bank”), and the Bank’s wholly owned subsidiary, Community Mortgage Corporation of Tri-County, included herein are unaudited.

 

The consolidated financial statements reflect all adjustments consisting only of normal recurring accruals that, in the opinion of management, are necessary to present fairly the Company’s financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows for the periods presented. Certain information and note disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America have been condensed or omitted pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission. The Company believes that the disclosures are adequate to make the information presented not misleading. The balances as of December 31, 2017 have been derived from audited financial statements. There have been no significant changes to the Company’s accounting policies as disclosed in the 2017 Annual Report except as noted in the adoption of new accounting standards section included in Note 1. The results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2018 are not necessarily indicative of the results of operations to be expected for the remainder of the year or any other period.

 

These consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes included in the Company’s 2017 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Nature of Business

The Company provides a variety of financial services to individuals and businesses through its offices in Southern Maryland and Annapolis and Fredericksburg, Virginia. Its primary deposit products are demand, savings and time deposits, and its primary lending products are commercial and residential mortgage loans, commercial loans, construction and land development loans, home equity and second mortgages and commercial equipment loans.

 

The Company’s branches are located at its main office in Waldorf, Maryland, and branch offices in Waldorf, Bryans Road, Dunkirk, Leonardtown, La Plata, Charlotte Hall, Prince Frederick, Lusby, California, Maryland; and Fredericksburg, Virginia. The Company maintains five loan production offices (“LPOs”) in Annapolis, La Plata, Prince Frederick and Leonardtown, Maryland; and Fredericksburg, Virginia. The Leonardtown LPO is co-located with the branch.

 

The Company closed its Central Park Fredericksburg branch during the third quarter of 2017. This location continues to serve as a loan production office and the branch closure did not have a material effect on operations. The Company offered branch employees open positions.

 

On January 1, 2018, the Company completed the acquisition of County First Bank (“County First”) after regulatory approval and County First shareholder approvals were obtained. The Company’s asset increased to $1.6 billion as of March 31, 2018. See Note 2 – Business Combination and Goodwill for additional information. In January 2018, the Company disclosed its intentions to close four of the five acquired County First branches during the second quarter with the La Plata downtown branch remaining open. As of March 31, 2018, three branches are held for sale. The remaining County First branch will be retained (La Plata) or have an operating lease that will expire in the next six months.

 

Use of Estimates

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities as of the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amount of income and expenses during the reporting periods. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Material estimates that are particularly susceptible to significant change in the near term relate to the determination of the allowance for loan losses, real estate acquired in the settlement of loans, fair value of financial instruments, fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed in a business combination, evaluating other-than-temporary-impairment of investment securities and valuation of deferred tax assets.

 

Reclassifications

Certain amounts, previously reported, have been reclassified to state all periods on a comparable basis and had no effect on stockholders’ equity or net income.

 

 6 

 

 

Subsequent Events

Subsequent events are events or transactions that occur after the balance sheet date but before financial statements are issued. Recognized subsequent events are events or transactions that provide additional evidence about conditions that existed at the date of the balance sheet, including the estimates inherent in the process of preparing financial statements. Non-recognized subsequent events are events that provide evidence about conditions that did not exist at the date of the balance sheet but arose after that date. Management performed an evaluation to determine whether there have been any subsequent events since the balance sheet date and determined that no subsequent events occurred requiring accrual or disclosure.

 

New Accounting Policy

 

See Note 1 – Summary of Significant Accounting included in the Company’s 2017 Annual Report on Form 10-K for a list of all policies in effect as of December 31, 2017. The below summary is intended to provide updates or new policies required as a result of a new accounting standard or a change to the Company’s operations or assets that require a new or amended policy.

 

Purchase Credit Impaired “PCI” Loans

Loans purchased with evidence of credit deterioration since origination and for which it is probable that all contractually required payments will not be collected are considered credit impaired. Evidence of credit quality deterioration as of the purchase date may include statistics such as internal risk grade, past due and nonaccrual status, recent borrower credit scores and recent loan-to-value (“LTV”) percentages. Purchased credit-impaired (“PCI”) loans are initially measured at fair value, which includes estimated future credit losses expected to be incurred over the life of the loan. Accordingly, the associated allowance for credit losses related to these loans is not carried over at the acquisition date. We estimate the cash flows expected to be collected at acquisition using specific credit review of certain loans, quantitative credit risk, interest rate risk and prepayment risk models, and qualitative economic and environmental assessments, each of which incorporate our best estimate of current key relevant factors, such as property values, default rates, loss severity and prepayment speeds.

 

Under the accounting guidance for PCI loans, the excess of the present value of cash flows expected to be collected over the estimated fair value is referred to as the accretable yield and is recognized in interest income over the remaining life of the loan, or pool of loans, in situations where there is a reasonable expectation about the timing and amount of cash flows to be collected. The difference between the contractually required payments and the cash flows expected to be collected at acquisition, considering the impact of prepayments, is referred to as the nonaccretable difference and is available to absorb future charge-offs.

 

In addition, subsequent to acquisition, we periodically evaluate our estimate of cash flows expected to be collected. These evaluations require the continued usage of key assumptions and estimates, similar to the initial estimate of fair value. Estimates of cash flows for PCI loans require significant judgment given the impact of property value changes, changing loss severities, prepayment speeds and other relevant factors. Decreases in the expected cash flows will generally result in a charge to the provision for loan losses resulting in an increase to the allowance for loan losses. Significant increases in the expected cash flows will generally result in an increase in interest income over the remaining life of the loan, or pool of loans. Disposals of loans, which may include sales of loans to third parties, receipt of payments in full or part from the borrower or foreclosure of the collateral, result in removal of the loan from the PCI loan portfolio at its carrying amount.

 

At March 31, 2018, PCI loans represent loans acquired from County First, that were deemed credit impaired at the time of acquisition. PCI loans that had been classified as nonperforming loans by County First are no longer classified as nonperforming so long as, at acquisition and quarterly re-estimation periods, we believe we will fully collect the new carrying value of these loans. It is important to note that judgment regarding the timing and amount of cash flows to be collected is required to classify PCI loans as performing, even if the loan is contractually past due.

 

Revenue from Contracts with Customers

The Company records revenue from contracts with customers in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification Topic 606, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” (“Topic 606”). Under Topic 606, the Company must identify the contract with a customer, identify the performance obligations in the contract, determine the transaction price, allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract, and recognize revenue when (or as) the Company satisfies a performance obligation. Significant revenue has not been recognized in the current reporting period that results from performance obligations satisfied in previous periods.

 

 7 

 

 

The Company’s primary sources of revenue are derived from interest and dividends earned on loans, investment securities, and other financial instruments that are not within the scope of Topic 606. The Company has evaluated the nature of its contracts with customers and determined that further disaggregation of revenue from contracts with customers into more granular categories beyond what is presented in the Consolidated Statements of Income was not necessary. The Company generally fully satisfies its performance obligations on its contracts with customers as services are rendered and the transaction prices are typically fixed; charged either on a periodic basis or based on activity. Our accounting policies will not change materially since the principles of revenue recognition from the Accounting Standards Update are largely consistent with existing guidance and current practices applied by our business. The following is a discussion of revenues within the scope of the new guidance:

 

·Service fees on deposit accounts - The Company earns fees from its deposit clients for various transaction-based activities, account maintenance, and overdraft or non-sufficient funds (“NSF”). Transaction based fees, which include services such as stop payment charges, statement rendering, and ACH fees, are recognized at the time the transaction is executed as that is the point in time the Company fulfills the client' s request. Account maintenance fees, which relate primarily to monthly maintenance and account management, are earned over the course of a month, representing the period over which the Company satisfies the performance obligation. Overdraft and NSF fees are recognized at the point in time that the overdraft occurs or the NSF item is presented. Service charges on deposits are withdrawn from the client' s account balance.

 

·ATM and debit card income - The Company earns interchange fees from debit cardholder transactions conducted through the payment networks. Interchange fees from cardholder transactions represent a percentage of the underlying transaction value and are recognized daily, concurrently with the transaction processing services provided to the cardholder.

 

·Revenues from the sale of Other Real Estate Owned - ASC 606 required us to estimate income from the sale of OREO property that is under contract at year end. As a result, the Company could recognize revenue earlier under ASC 606 than under previous guidance. At December 31, 2017 there were no contracts for the sale of OREO property.

 

The Company’s’ revenue recognition pattern for revenue streams within the scope of ASU is not expected to change significantly from previous practice and was immaterial to our financial statements for the quarter ended March 31, 2017.

 

Accounting Standards

 

New Accounting Standards - Issued and Effective

 

Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2014-09 - The Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASU 2014-09 in May 2014, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” (“ASU 2014-09”), which requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. The ASU replaces most existing revenue recognition guidance in GAAP. The new standard was effective for the Company on January 1, 2018. Adoption of ASU 2014-09 did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and related disclosures as the Company’s primary sources of revenues are derived from interest and dividends earned on loans, investment securities, and other financial instruments that are not within the scope of ASU 2014-09. The Company’s revenue recognition pattern for revenue streams within the scope of ASU 2014-09, including but not limited to service charges on deposit accounts and gains/ losses on the sale of other real estate owned, did not change significantly from current practice. The standard permits the use of either the full retrospective or modified retrospective transition method. The Company elected to use the modified retrospective transition method which requires application of ASU 2014-09 to uncompleted contracts at the date of adoption however, periods prior to the date of adoption will not be retrospectively revised as the impact of the ASU on uncompleted contracts at the date of adoption was not material.

 

 8 

 

 

ASU 2016-01 - Financial Instruments - Overall (Subtopic 825-10): Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities. ASU 2016-1, among other things, (i) requires equity investments, with certain exceptions, to be measured at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in net income, (ii) simplifies the impairment assessment of equity investments without readily determinable fair values by requiring a qualitative assessment to identify impairment, (iii) eliminates the requirement for public business entities to disclose the methods and significant assumptions used to estimate the fair value that is required to be disclosed for financial instruments measured at amortized cost on the balance sheet, (iv) requires public business entities to use the exit price notion when measuring the fair value of financial instruments for disclosure purposes, (v) requires an entity to present separately in other comprehensive income the portion of the total change in the fair value of a liability resulting from a change in the instrument-specific credit risk when the entity has elected to measure the liability at fair value in accordance with the fair value option for financial instruments, (vi) requires separate presentation of financial assets and financial liabilities by measurement category and form of financial asset on the balance sheet or the accompanying notes to the financial statements and (viii) clarifies that an entity should evaluate the need for a valuation allowance on a deferred tax asset related to available-for-sale securities. The Company’s management engaged a third-party expert in the field of valuation and reporting to assist management in the development of a process to ensure adequate documentation of financial controls and analysis performed in its review of “exit pricing” of the fair values of loans, deposits and other financial instruments. ASU 2016-1 was effective on January 1, 2018 and did not have a significant impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements. See Notes 13 and 14 for further information regarding the valuations.

 

ASU 2018-02 Income Statement - Reporting Comprehensive Income(Topic 220). ASU 2018-02. On December 22, 2017, the Tax Cuts and Job Act (Tax Act) was signed into law. Under current U.S. GAAP, deferred tax assets and liabilities are to be adjusted for the effect of a change in tax laws or rates with the effect included in income from continuing operations in the reporting period that includes the enactment date. This accounting treatment resulted in the tax effect of items within accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) not reflecting the appropriate tax rate. This ASU allows stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Act to be reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) to retained earnings. The Company early adopted this guidance during the quarter ended December 31, 2017, resulting in a reclassification of $196,000 from accumulated other comprehensive loss to retained earnings to adjust the tax effect of items within accumulated other comprehensive loss to reflect the newly enacted federal corporate income tax rate.

 

ASU 2016-15 - Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230) – “Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments”. ASU 2016-15 is intended to reduce diversity in practice in how eight particular transactions are classified in the statement of cash flows. ASU 2016-15 is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017. Entities will be required to apply the guidance retrospectively. If it is impracticable to apply the guidance retrospectively for an issue, the amendments related to that issue would be applied prospectively. As this guidance only affects the classification within the statement of cash flows, ASU 2016-15 did not have a material impact on the Company's Consolidated Financial Statements. There were no material reclassifications to the Company’s cash flow statement for the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

ASU 2016-16, “Income Taxes (Topic 740) - Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory.” ASU 2016-16 provides guidance stating that an entity should recognize the income tax consequences of an intra-entity transfer of an asset other than inventory when the transfer occurs. ASU 2016-16 was effective for us on January 1, 2018 and did not have a significant impact on our financial statements.

 

ASU 2016-18, “Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230) - Restricted Cash.” ASU 2016-18 requires that a statement of cash flows explain the change during the period in the total of cash, cash equivalents, and amounts generally described as restricted cash or restricted cash equivalents. Therefore, amounts generally described as restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents should be included with cash and cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning-of-period and end-of-period total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows. ASU 2016-18 was effective for us on January 1, 2018 and did not have a significant impact on our financial statements.

 

ASU 2017-01, “Business Combinations (Topic 805) - Clarifying the Definition of a Business.” ASU 2017-01 clarifies the definition and provides a more robust framework to use in determining when a set of assets and activities constitutes a business. ASU 2017-01 is intended to provide guidance when evaluating whether transactions should be accounted for as acquisitions (or disposals) of assets or businesses. ASU 2017-01 was effective for us on January 1, 2018 and did not have a significant impact on our financial statements as the transaction to acquire County First was already clearly within the scope of ASC 805, “Business Combinations.”

 

ASU 2017-05, “Other Income - Gains and Losses from the Derecognition of Nonfinancial Assets (Subtopic 610-20) - Clarifying the Scope of Asset Derecognition Guidance and Accounting for Partial Sales of Nonfinancial Assets.” ASU 2017-05 clarifies the scope of Subtopic 610-20 and adds guidance for partial sales of nonfinancial assets, including partial sales of real estate. Historically, U.S. GAAP contained several different accounting models to evaluate whether the transfer of certain assets qualified for sale treatment. ASU 2017-05 reduces the number of potential accounting models that might apply and clarifies which model does apply in various circumstances. ASU 2017-05 was effective for us on January 1, 2018 and did not have a significant impact on our financial statements.

 

 9 

 

 

ASU 2017-09, “Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718) - Scope of Modification Accounting.” ASU 2017-09 clarifies when changes to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award must be accounted for as modifications. Under ASU 2017-09, an entity will not apply modification accounting to a share-based payment award if all of the following are the same immediately before and after the change: (i) the award's fair value, (ii) the award's vesting conditions and (iii) the award's classification as an equity or liability instrument. ASU 2017-09 was effective for us on January 1, 2018 and did not have a significant impact on our financial statements.

 

New Accounting Standards - Issued, But Not Yet Effective

 

ASU 2016-02 - Leases (Topic 842). In February 2016, the FASB amended existing guidance that requires lessees recognize the following for all leases (with the exception of short term leases) at the commencement date (1) a lease liability, which is a lessee’s obligation to make lease payments arising from a lease, measured on a discounted basis; and (2) a right-of-use asset, which is an asset that represents the lessee’s right to use, or control the use of, a specified asset for the lease term. Leases will be classified as either finance or operating with classification affecting the pattern of expense recognition in the income statement. Under the new guidance, lessor accounting is largely unchanged. Certain targeted improvements were made to align, where necessary, lessor accounting with the lessee accounting model and Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers.

 

Lessees (for capital and operating leases) and lessors (for sales-type, direct financing, and operating leases) must apply a modified retrospective transition approach for leases existing at, or entered into after, the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements. The modified retrospective approach would not require any transition accounting for leases that expired before the earliest comparative period presented. Lessees and lessors may not apply a full retrospective transition approach.

 

The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this new accounting standard on the consolidated financial statements. Based on leases outstanding at December 31, 2017, the Company does not expect the updates to have a material impact on the income statement but does anticipate an increase in assets and liabilities. The Company will continue to evaluate the potential impact of ASU 2016-02 during 2018. This new standard will be effective for the Company beginning January 1, 2019.

 

ASU 2016-13 - Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326) - Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments. ASU No. 2016-13 significantly changes how entities will measure credit losses for most financial assets and certain other instruments that aren’t measured at fair value through net income. The standard will replace today’s “incurred loss” approach with an “expected loss” model. The new model, referred to as the current expected credit loss (“CECL”) model, will apply to: (1) financial assets subject to credit losses and measured at amortized cost, and (2) certain off-balance sheet credit exposures. This includes, but is not limited to, loans, leases, held-to-maturity securities, loan commitments, and financial guarantees. The CECL model does not apply to available-for-sale (“AFS”) debt securities. For AFS debt securities with unrealized losses, entities will measure credit losses in a manner similar to what they do today, except that the losses will be recognized as allowances rather than reductions in the amortized cost of the securities. As a result, entities will recognize improvements to estimated credit losses immediately in earnings rather than as interest income over time, as they do today. The ASU also simplifies the accounting model for purchased credit-impaired debt securities and loans. ASU 2016-13 also expands the disclosure requirements regarding an entity’s assumptions, models, and methods for estimating the allowance for loan and lease losses. In addition, entities will need to disclose the amortized cost balance for each class of financial asset by credit quality indicator, disaggregated by the year of origination. Entities will apply the standard’s provisions as a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings as of the beginning of the first reporting period in which the guidance is effective (i.e., modified retrospective approach).

 

The Company has formed a CECL committee that is assessing data and system needs in order to evaluate the impact of adopting the new standard. We expect to recognize a one-time cumulative effect adjustment to the allowance for loan losses as of the beginning of the first reporting period in which the new standard is effective. We expect the adoption will result in a material increase to the allowance for loan losses balance. At this time, the impact is being evaluated.

 

ASU No. 2016-13 is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019, early adoption is permitted for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018. This new standard will be effective for us beginning January 1, 2020.

 

 10 

 

 

ASU 2017-04, “Intangibles - Goodwill and Other (Topic 350) - Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment.” ASU 2017-04 eliminates Step 2 from the goodwill impairment test which required entities to compute the implied fair value of goodwill. Under ASU 2017-04, an entity should perform its annual, or interim, goodwill impairment test by comparing the fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying amount. An entity should recognize an impairment charge for the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the reporting unit’s fair value; however, the loss recognized should not exceed the total amount of goodwill allocated to that reporting unit. ASU 2017-04 will be effective for us on January 1, 2020, with earlier adoption permitted and is not expected to have a significant impact on our financial statements.

 

ASU 2017-08, “Receivables - Nonrefundable Fees and Other Costs (Subtopic 310-20) - Premium Amortization on Purchased Callable Debt Securities.” ASU 2017-08 shortens the amortization period for certain callable debt securities held at a premium to require such premiums to be amortized to the earliest call date unless applicable guidance related to certain pools of securities is applied to consider estimated prepayments. Under prior guidance, entities were generally required to amortize premiums on individual, non-pooled callable debt securities as a yield adjustment over the contractual life of the security. ASU 2017-08 does not change the accounting for callable debt securities held at a discount. ASU 2017-08 will be effective for us on January 1, 2019, with early adoption permitted. We are currently evaluating the potential impact of ASU 2017-08 on our financial statements.

 

ASU 2017-12, Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815) - Targeted Improvements to Accounting for Hedging Activities.” ASU 2017-12 amends the hedge accounting recognition and presentation requirements in ASC 815 to improve the transparency and understandability of information conveyed to financial statement users about an entity’s risk management activities to better align the entity’s financial reporting for hedging relationships with those risk management activities and to reduce the complexity of and simplify the application of hedge accounting. ASU 2017-12 will be effective for us on January 1, 2019 and is not expected to have a significant impact on our financial statements.

 

NOTE 2 – BUSINESS COMBINATION AND GOODWILL

 

Business Combinations

Generally, acquisitions are accounted for under the acquisition method of accounting in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 805, “Business Combinations”. Both the purchased assets and liabilities assumed are recorded at their respective acquisition date fair values. Determining the fair value of assets and liabilities, especially the loan portfolio, is a complicated process involving significant judgment regarding methods and assumptions used to calculate estimated fair values. Fair values are preliminary and subject to refinement for up to one year after the closing date of the acquisition as additional information regarding fair values becomes available.

 

County First Bank

On January 1, 2018, the Company completed its previously announced merger of County First Bank (“County First”) with and into the Bank, with the Bank as the surviving bank (the “Merger”) pursuant to the Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated as of July 31, 2017, by and among the Company, the Bank and County First. Pursuant to the Merger Agreement, at the effective time of the Merger (the “Effective Time”), each share of common stock, par value $1.00 per share, of County First issued and outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time was converted into the right to receive 0.9543 shares of Company common stock and $2.20 in cash (the “Merger Consideration”). The $2.20 in cash represents the sum of (a) $1.00 in cash consideration (the “Cash Consideration”) plus (b) $1.20 in Contingent Cash Consideration that was determined before the completion of the Merger in accordance with the terms of the Merger Agreement. The aggregate merger consideration consisted of 918,526 shares of the Company’s common stock and $2.1 million in cash. Based upon the $38.78 per share price of the Company’s common stock, the transaction value was $37.7 million.

 

County First had five branch offices in La Plata, Waldorf, New Market, Prince Frederick and California, Maryland. The Bank intends to keep the La Plata branch open and consolidate the remaining four branches with legacy Community Bank of the Chesapeake branch offices in May of 2018.

 

The assets acquired and liabilities assumed from County First were recorded at their fair value as of the closing date of the merger. Goodwill of $10.3 million was recorded at the time of the acquisition.

 

 11 

 

 

The following table summarizes the consideration paid by the Company in the merger with County First and the amounts of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed recognized at the acquisition date:

 

(dollars in thousands)  As Recorded
by
County First
   Fair Value and Other
Merger Related
Adjustments
   As Recorded
by
the Company
 
             
Consideration Paid               
Cash            $2,122 
Common shares issued             35,620 
Fair Value of Total Consideration Transferred            $37,742 
                
Recognized amounts of identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed               
Cash and cash equivalents  $34,409   $-   $34,409 
Securities   38,861    (619)   38,242 
Loans, net of allowance   142,404    (1,655)   140,749 
Premises and equipment   2,980    776    3,756 
Core deposit intangibles   -    3,590    3,590 
Interest receivable   513    (12)   501 
Bank owned life insurance   6,275    -    6,275 
Deferred tax asset   639    (502)   137 
Other assets   586    -    586 
Total assets acquired  $226,667   $1,578   $228,245 
                
Deposits  $199,210   $18   $199,228 
Other liabilities   1,449    103    1,552 
Total liabilities assumed  $200,659   $121   $200,780 
Net identifiable assets acquired  $26,008   $1,457   $27,465 
                
Goodwill resulting from acquisition            $10,277 

 

The following table presents certain pro forma information as if County First had been acquired on January 1, 2017. These results combine the historical results of County First in the Company’s consolidated statement of income and, while certain adjustments were made for the estimated impact of certain fair value adjustments and other acquisition-related activity, they are not indicative of what would have occurred had the acquisition taken place on January 1, 2017. Merger and acquisition costs of $2.9 million (pre-tax) are included in the Company’s consolidated statements of income for the three months ended March 31, 2018. The Company has not segregated County First earnings after the acquisition date as the bank’s operations have been merged into Community Bank of the Chesapeake and it would be impractical to do so. There are no assumptions about what merger related costs would have been in the proforma information below, only actual expenses are included in net income. Furthermore, additional expenses related to systems conversions and other costs of integration are expected to be recorded during 2018. Additionally, the Company expects to achieve further operating cost savings and other business synergies as a result of the acquisition which are not reflected in the pro forma amounts below:

 

   Proforma Results for the
Three Months Ended March 31, 2017
     
(dollars in thousands, except per
share amounts)
  The Community
Financial Corporation
Actual
   County First
Actual
   Proforma
March 31, 2017
   Actual Results
Three Month Ended
March 31, 2018
 
                 
Total revenues (net interest income plus noninterest income)  $11,549   $2,068   $13,617   $13,921 
Net income   2,342    313    2,655    1,221 
Basic earnings per common share  $0.51   $0.34   $0.48   $0.22 

 

 12 

 

 

NOTE 3 – INCOME TAXES

 

The Company files a consolidated federal income tax return with its subsidiaries. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined using the liability (or balance sheet) method. Under this method, the net deferred tax asset or liability is determined based on the tax effects of the temporary differences between the book and tax bases of the various balance sheet assets and liabilities and gives current recognition to changes in tax rates and laws and when it is considered more likely than not that deferred tax assets will be realized. It is the Company’s policy to recognize accrued interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits as a component of tax expense.

 

   The Months Ended 
   March 31, 
   2018   2017 
         
Current income tax expense  $480   $1,798 
Deferred income tax expense (benefit)   53    (350)
income tax expense as reported  $533   $1,448 
           
Effective tax rate   30.4%   38.2%

 

Net deferred tax assets totaled $5.6 million at March 31, 2018 and $5.9 million at December 31, 2017. No valuation allowance for deferred tax assets was recorded at March 31, 2018 as management believes it is more likely than not that deferred tax assets will be realized against deferred tax liabilities and projected future taxable income.

 

The effective income tax rates differed from the U.S. statutory federal income tax rates of 21% and 35% during 2017 primarily due to the effect of merger related expenses, tax-exempt loans, life insurance policies and the income tax effects associated with stock-based compensation.

 

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was enacted on December 22, 2017, as more fully discussed in the 2017 Form 10-K. Among other things, the new law established a new, flat corporate federal statutory income tax rate of 21%. As a result of the new law, we recognized a provisional net tax expense of $2.7 million in the fourth quarter of 2017. We will continue to analyze certain aspects of the new law and refine our calculations based on this analysis and future tax positions taken, which could affect the measurement of these assets and liabilities or give rise to new deferred tax amounts. There has been no change to the provisional net tax expense we recorded during the fourth quarter of 2017 for the three months ended March 31, 2018.

 

NOTE 4 - ACCUMULATED OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

 

The following tables present the components of comprehensive income for the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017. The Company’s comprehensive gains and losses and reclassification adjustments were solely for securities for the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017. Reclassification adjustments are recorded in non-interest income.

  

   Three Months Ended March 31, 2018   Three Months Ended March 31, 2017 
(dollars in thousands)  Before Tax   Tax Effect   Net of Tax   Before Tax   Tax Effect   Net of Tax 
Net unrealized holding gains (losses) arising during period  $(976)  $(269)  $(707)  $210   $83   $127 
Reclassification adjustments   -    -    -    -    -    - 
Other comprehensive (loss) income  $(976)  $(269)  $(707)  $210   $83   $127 

 

 13 

 

 

The following table presents the changes in each component of accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of tax, for the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

   Three Months Ended         
March 31, 2018
   Three Months Ended        
March 31, 2017
 
(dollars in thousands)  Net Unrealized Gains And
Losses
   Net Unrealized Gains And
Losses
 
         
Beginning of period  $(1,191)  $(928)
Other comprehensive gains (losses), net of tax before reclassifications   (707)   127 
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss   -    - 
Net other comprehensive (loss) income   (707)   127 
End of period  $(1,898)  $(801)

 

The FASB issued ASU 2018-02 allowing companies to reclassify stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Cuts and Job Act from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) to retained earnings. The Company early adopted this guidance during the quarter ended December 31, 2017 and utilizing the portfolio method reclassified $196,000 from accumulated other comprehensive loss to retained earnings to eliminate the stranded tax effects.

 

NOTE 5 - EARNINGS PER SHARE (“EPS”)

 

Basic earnings per common share represent income available to common shareholders, divided by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per share reflect additional common shares that would have been outstanding if dilutive potential common shares had been issued. Potential common shares that may have been issued by the Company related to outstanding stock options and were determined using the treasury stock method. The Company has not granted any stock options since 2007 and all outstanding options expired on July 17, 2017.

 

As of March 31, 2018 and 2017, there were 0 options, respectively, which were excluded from the calculation as their effect would be anti-dilutive, because the exercise price of the options was greater than the average market price of the common shares. Basic and diluted earnings per share have been computed based on weighted-average common and common equivalent shares outstanding as follows:

 

   Three Months Ended 
   March 31, 
(dollars in thousands)  2018   2017 
Net Income  $1,221   $2,342 
           
Average number of common shares outstanding   5,547,715    4,628,357 
Dilutive effect of common stock equivalents   -    2,041 
Average number of shares used to calculate diluted EPS   5,547,715    4,630,398 
           
Earnings Per Common Share          
Basic  $0.22   $0.51 
Diluted   0.22    0.51 

 

 14 

 

  

NOTE 6 - STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION

 

The Company has stock-based incentive arrangements to attract and retain key personnel. In May 2015, the 2015 Equity Compensation Plan (the “Plan”) was approved by shareholders, which authorizes the issuance of restricted stock, stock appreciation rights, stock units and stock options to the Board of Directors and key employees. Compensation expense for service-based awards is recognized over the vesting period. Performance-based awards are recognized based on a vesting schedule and the probability of achieving goals specified at the time of the grant. The 2015 Plan replaced the 2005 Equity Compensation Plan.

 

Stock-based compensation expense totaled $105,000 and $113,000, respectively, for the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017. Stock-based compensation expense consisted of the vesting of grants of restricted stock.

 

The Company has not granted any stock options since 2007 and all outstanding options expired on July 17, 2017. The fair value of the Company’s outstanding employee stock options were estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The Company estimated expected market price volatility and expected term of the options based on historical data and other factors. The exercise price for options granted is set at the discretion of the committee administering the Plan, but is not less than the market value of the shares as of the date of grant. An option’s maximum term is 10 years and the options vest at the discretion of the committee. Aggregate intrinsic value represents the difference between the Company’s closing stock price on the last trading day of the period and the exercise price multiplied by the number of options outstanding.

 

The following table below summarize option activity and outstanding and exercisable options at and for the year ended December 31, 2017.

 

       Weighted       Weighted-Average 
       Average   Aggregate   Contractual Life 
       Exercise   Intrinsic   Remaining In 
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)  Shares   Price   Value   Years 
                 
Outstanding at January 1, 2017   15,081   $27.70   $-      
Exercised   (14,231)   27.70    134      
Expired   (350)   27.70    -      
Forfeited   (500)   27.70    -      
                     
Outstanding at December 31, 2017   -   $-   $-    - 
                     
Exercisable at December 31, 2017   -   $-   $-    - 

 

The Company granted restricted stock in accordance with the Plan. The vesting period for outstanding granted restricted stock is between three and five years. As of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, unrecognized stock compensation expense was $655,000 and $521,000, respectively. The following tables summarize the unvested restricted stock awards outstanding at March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively.

 

   Restricted Stock 
   Number of
Shares
   Weighted
Average Grant
Date Fair Value
 
         
Nonvested at January 1, 2018   32,809   $22.61 
Granted   6,662    37.23 
Vested   (15,413)   21.87 
Cancelled   (326)   26.11 
           
Nonvested at March 31, 2018   23,732   $27.05 

 

 15 

 

  

   Restricted Stock 
   Number of
Shares
   Weighted
Average Grant
Date Fair Value
 
         
Nonvested at January 1, 2017   47,881   $20.41 
Granted   6,752    30.20 
Vested   (21,738)   20.13 
Cancelled   (86)   20.75 
           
Nonvested at December 31, 2017   32,809   $22.61 

  

NOTE 7 - GUARANTEED PREFERRED BENEFICIAL INTEREST IN JUNIOR SUBORDINATED DEBENTURES (“TRUPs”)

 

On June 15, 2005, Tri-County Capital Trust II (“Capital Trust II”), a Delaware business trust formed, funded and wholly owned by the Company, issued $5.0 million of variable-rate capital securities in a private pooled transaction. The variable rate is based on the 90-day LIBOR rate plus 1.70%. The Trust used the proceeds from this issuance, along with the $155,000 for Capital Trust II’s common securities, to purchase $5.2 million of the Company’s junior subordinated debentures. The interest rate on the debentures and the trust preferred securities is variable and adjusts quarterly. These capital securities qualify as Tier I capital and are presented in the Consolidated Balance Sheets as “Guaranteed Preferred Beneficial Interests in Junior Subordinated Debentures.” Both the capital securities of Capital Trust II and the junior subordinated debentures are scheduled to mature on June 15, 2035, unless called by the Company.

 

On July 22, 2004, Tri-County Capital Trust I (“Capital Trust I”), a Delaware business trust formed, funded and wholly owned by the Company, issued $7.0 million of variable-rate capital securities in a private pooled transaction. The variable rate is based on the 90-day LIBOR rate plus 2.60%. The Trust used the proceeds from this issuance, along with the Company’s $217,000 capital contribution for Capital Trust I’s common securities, to purchase $7.2 million of the Company’s junior subordinated debentures. The interest rate on the debentures and the trust preferred securities is variable and adjusts quarterly. These debentures qualify as Tier I capital and are presented in the Consolidated Balance Sheets as “Guaranteed Preferred Beneficial Interests in Junior Subordinated Debentures.” Both the capital securities of Capital Trust I and the junior subordinated debentures are scheduled to mature on July 22, 2034, unless called by the Company.

 

NOTE 8 – SUBORDINATED NOTES

 

On February 6, 2015 the Company issued $23.0 million of unsecured 6.25% fixed to floating rate subordinated notes due February 15, 2025 (“subordinated notes”). On February 13, 2015, the Company used proceeds of the offering to redeem all $20 million of the Company’s outstanding preferred stock issued under the Small Business Lending Fund (“SBLF”) program. The subordinated notes qualify as Tier 2 regulatory capital and replaced SBLF Tier 1 capital. The subordinated notes are not listed on any securities exchange or included in any automated dealer quotation system and there is no market for the notes. The notes are unsecured obligations and are subordinated in right of payment to all existing and future senior debt, whether secured or unsecured. The notes are not guaranteed obligations of any of the Company’s subsidiaries.

 

Interest will accrue at a fixed per annum rate of 6.25% from and including the issue date to but excluding February 15, 2020. From and including February 15, 2020 to but excluding the maturity date interest will accrue at a floating rate equal to the three-month LIBOR plus 479 basis points. Interest is payable on the notes on February 15 and August 15 of each year, commencing August 15, 2015, through February 15, 2020, and thereafter February 15, May 15, August 15 and November 15 of each year through the maturity date or earlier redemption date.

 

 16 

 

 

The subordinated notes may be redeemed in whole or in part on February 15, 2020 or on any scheduled interest payment date thereafter and upon the occurrence of certain special events. The redemption price is equal to 100% of the principal amount of the subordinated notes to be redeemed plus accrued and unpaid interest to the date of redemption. Any partial redemption will be made pro rata among all holders of the subordinated notes. The subordinated notes are not subject to repayment at the option of the holders. The subordinated notes may be redeemed at any time, if (1) a change or prospective change in law occurs that could prevent the Company from deducting interest payable on the notes for U.S. federal income tax purposes, (2) a subsequent event occurs that precludes the notes from being recognized as Tier 2 Capital for regulatory capital purposes, or (3) the Company is required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended.

 

NOTE 9 - OTHER REAL ESTATE OWNED (“OREO”)

 

OREO assets are presented net of the valuation allowance. The Company considers OREO as classified assets for regulatory and financial reporting. OREO carrying amounts reflect management’s estimate of the realizable value of these properties incorporating current appraised values, local real estate market conditions and related costs. An analysis of the activity follows.

 

   Three Months Ended March 31,   Years Ended
December 31,
 
(dollars in thousands)  2018   2017   2017 
Balance at beginning of year  $9,341   $7,763   $7,763 
Additions of underlying property   101    -    3,634 
Disposals of underlying property   -    (820)   (1,456)
Valuation allowance   (90)   (196)   (600)
Balance at end of period  $9,352   $6,747   $9,341 

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, OREO additions were $101,000 and $0, respectively. During the three months ended March 31, 2018, there were no disposals of OREO. The Company disposed of three residential properties and three residential lots for proceeds of $846,000 and a gain of $27,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2017. The Bank provided $200,000 in financing for one residential property and the three residential lots which were transferred from OREO to loans during the first quarter of 2017. The transaction qualified for full accrual sales treatment under ASC Topic 360-20-40 “Property Plant and Equipment – Derecognition.

 

The Company had $122,000 of impaired loans secured by residential real estate for which formal foreclosure proceedings were in process as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively.

 

Additions to the valuation allowances of $90,000 and $196,000 were taken to adjust properties to current appraised values for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. OREO carrying amounts reflect management’s estimate of the realizable value of these properties incorporating current appraised values, local real estate market conditions and related costs. Expenses applicable to OREO assets included the following.

 

   Three Months Ended March 31, 
(dollars in thousands)  2018   2017 
Valuation allowance  $90   $196 
Operating expenses   24    (1)
   $114   $195 

 

 17 

 

 

NOTE 10 – SECURITIES

 

   March 31, 2018 
   Amortized   Gross
Unrealized
   Gross
Unrealized
   Estimated 
(dollars in thousands)  Cost   Gains   Losses   Fair Value 
Securities available for sale (AFS)                    
Asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies                    
Residential Mortgage Backed Securities ("MBS")  $7,088   $-   $291   $6,797 
Residential Collateralized Mortgage Obligations ("CMOs")   49,343    13    1,789    47,567 
U.S. Agency   12,542    -    507    12,035 
Other investments   4,670    -    45    4,625 
Total securities available for sale  $73,643   $13   $2,632   $71,024 
                     
Securities held to maturity (HTM)                    
Asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies                    
Residential MBS  $28,307   $109   $754   $27,662 
Residential CMOs   52,434    75    1,393    51,116 
U.S. Agency   8,492    -    307    8,185 
Asset-backed securities issued by Others:                    
Residential CMOs   612    -    49    563 
Callable GSE Agency Bonds   5,015    -    105    4,910 
Certificates of Deposit Fixed   2,342    -    -    2,342 
U.S. government obligations   996    -    -    996 
Total securities held to maturity  $98,198   $184   $2,608   $95,774 

 

   December 31, 2017 
   Amortized   Gross
Unrealized
   Gross
Unrealized
   Estimated 
(dollars in thousands)  Cost   Gains   Losses   Fair Value 
Securities available for sale (AFS)                    
Asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies                    
Residential MBS  $7,265   $-   $178   $7,087 
Residential CMOs   45,283    12    1,158    44,137 
U.S. Agency   12,863    -    346    12,517 
Corporate equity securities   37    -    -    37 
Bond mutual funds   4,480    27    -    4,507 
Total securities available for sale  $69,928   $39   $1,682   $68,285 
                     
Securities held to maturity (HTM)                    
Asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies                    
Residential MBS  $29,113   $135   $261   $28,987 
Residential CMOs   54,805    62    845    54,022 
U.S. Agency   8,660    -    235    8,425 
Asset-backed securities issued by Others:                    
Residential CMOs   651    -    52    599 
Callable GSE Agency Bonds   5,017    -    43    4,974 
U.S. government obligations   1,000    -    -    1,000 
Total securities held to maturity  $99,246   $197   $1,436   $98,007 

 

 18 

 

 

At March 31, 2018, securities with an amortized cost of $35.0 million were pledged to secure certain customer deposits. At March 31, 2018, securities with an amortized cost of $3.8 million were pledged as collateral for advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank (“FHLB”) of Atlanta.

 

At March 31, 2018, greater than 99% of the asset-backed securities and agency bond portfolio was rated AAA by Standard & Poor’s or the equivalent credit rating from another major rating agency. AFS asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies had an average life of 4.94 years and average duration of 4.34 years and are guaranteed by their issuer as to credit risk. HTM asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies had an average life of 5.06 years and average duration of 4.42 years and are guaranteed by their issuer as to credit risk.

 

At December 31, 2017, securities with an amortized cost of $31.5 million were pledged to secure certain customer deposits. At December 31, 2017, securities with an amortized cost of $4.0 million were pledged as collateral for advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank (“FHLB”) of Atlanta.

 

At December 31, 2017, greater than 99% of the asset-backed securities and agency bond portfolio was rated AAA by Standard & Poor’s or the equivalent credit rating from another major rating agency. AFS asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies had an average life of 4.74 years and average duration of 4.22 years and are guaranteed by their issuer as to credit risk. HTM asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies had an average life of 4.95 years and average duration of 4.39 years and are guaranteed by their issuer as to credit risk.

 

Management believes that AFS securities with unrealized losses will either recover in market value or be paid off as agreed. The Company intends to, and has the ability to, hold these securities to maturity. Because our intention is not to sell the investments and it is not more likely than not that the Company will be required to sell the investments, management considers the unrealized losses in the AFS portfolio to be temporary.

 

The Company intends to, and has the ability to, hold the HTM securities with unrealized losses until they mature, at which time the Company will receive full value for the securities. Because our intention is not to sell the investments and it is not more likely than not that the Company will be required to sell the investments before recovery of their amortized cost basis, which may be maturity, management considers the unrealized losses in the held-to-maturity portfolio to be temporary.

 

No charges related to other-than-temporary impairment were made during the three months ended March 31, 2018 and the year ended December 31, 2017.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, there were no securities sold from the Company’s legacy securities’ portfolios. The Company liquidated most of the acquired County First securities immediately after the legal merger and retained only the certificates of deposit fixed portfolio with an amortized cost of $2.3 million at March 31, 2018. During the year ended December 31, 2017 the Company recognized net gains on the sale of securities of $175,000. The Company sold three AFS securities with aggregate carrying values of $3.7 million and nine HTM securities with aggregate carrying values of $4.8 million, recognizing gains of $9,000 and $166,000, respectively.

 

The sale of HTM securities is permitted under ASC 320 “Investments - Debt Securities.” ASC 320 permits the sale of HTM securities for certain changes in circumstances. The Company will dispose of HTM securities using the safe harbor rule that allows for the sale of HTM securities that have principal payments paid down to less than 15% of original purchased par. ASC 320 10-25-15 indicates that a sale of a debt security after a substantial portion of the principal has been collected is equivalent to holding the security to maturity. In addition, the Company may dispose of HTM securities under ASC 320-10-25-6 due to a significant deterioration in the issues’ creditworthiness.

 

 19 

 

 

AFS Securities

Gross unrealized losses and estimated fair value by length of time that the individual AFS securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position at March 31, 2018 were as follows:

 

 

March 31, 2018  Less Than 12   More Than 12         
   Months   Months   Total 
(dollars in thousands)  Fair Value   Unrealized
Loss
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Loss
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Losses
 
Asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies  $28,029   $669   $37,629   $1,918   $65,658   $2,587 
Other investments   4,377    45    -    -    4,377    45 
   $32,406   $714   $37,629   $1,918   $70,035   $2,632 

 

At March 31, 2018, the AFS investment portfolio had an estimated fair value of $71.0 million on an amortized cost of $73.6 million. AFS asset-backed securities issued by GSEs are guaranteed by the issuer and AFS U.S. government agency securities and bonds are guaranteed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. AFS asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies with unrealized losses had an average life of 4.92 years and an average duration of 4.32 years. Management believes that the securities will either recover in market value or be paid off as agreed.

 

Gross unrealized losses and estimated fair value by length of time that the individual AFS securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position at December 31, 2017 were as follows:

 

December 31, 2017  Less Than 12   More Than 12         
   Months   Months   Total 
(dollars in thousands)  Fair Value   Unrealized
Loss
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Loss
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Losses
 
Asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies  $24,571   $328   $38,428   $1,354   $62,999   $1,682 

 

At December 31, 2017, the AFS investment portfolio had an estimated fair value of $68.3 million on an amortized cost of $69.9 million. AFS asset-backed securities issued by GSEs are guaranteed by the issuer and AFS U.S. government agency securities and bonds are guaranteed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. AFS asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies with unrealized losses had an average life of 4.71 years and an average duration of 4.20 years. Management believes that the securities will either recover in market value or be paid off as agreed.

 

HTM Securities

Gross unrealized losses and estimated fair value by length of time that the individual HTM securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position at March 31, 2018 were as follows:

 

March 31, 2018  Less Than 12   More Than 12         
   Months   Months   Total 
(dollars in thousands)  Fair Value   Unrealized
Loss
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Loss
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Losses
 
Asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies   33,722    754    42,803    1,700    76,525    2,454 
Callable GSE Agency Bonds   4,910    105    -    -    4,910    105 
Asset-backed securities issued by Others   -    -    563    49    563    49 
   $38,632   $859   $43,366   $1,749   $81,998   $2,608 

 

At March 31, 2018, the HTM investment portfolio had an estimated fair value of $95.8 million on an amortized cost of $98.2 million. Of these securities, $81.4 million were asset-backed securities or bonds issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies and $563,000 were asset-backed securities issued by others.

 

 20 

 

 

HTM asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and GSE agency bonds are guaranteed by the issuer and HTM U.S. government agency securities and bonds are guaranteed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. The securities with unrealized losses had an average life of 4.88 years and an average duration of 4.29 years. Management believes that the securities will either recover in market value or be paid off as agreed. The Company intends to, and has the ability to, hold these securities to maturity.

 

HTM asset-backed securities issued by others are collateralized mortgage obligation securities. The securities have credit support tranches that absorb losses prior to the tranches that the Company owns. The Company reviews credit support positions on its securities regularly. HTM asset-backed securities issued by others with unrealized losses had an average life of 3.13 years and an average duration of 2.57 years.

 

Gross unrealized losses and estimated fair value by length of time that the individual HTM securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position at December 31, 2017 were as follows:

 

December 31, 2017  Less Than 12   More Than 12         
   Months   Months   Total 
(dollars in thousands)  Fair Value   Unrealized
Loss
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Loss
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Losses
 
Asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies  $36,607   $254   $45,119   $1,130   $81,726   $1,384 
Asset-backed securities issued by Others   -    -    599    52    599    52 
   $36,607   $254   $45,718   $1,182   $82,325   $1,436 

 

At December 31, 2017, the HTM investment portfolio had an estimated fair value of $98.0 million on an amortized cost of $99.2 million. Of these securities, $81.7 million were asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies and $599,000 were asset-backed securities issued by others.

 

HTM asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and GSE agency bonds are guaranteed by the issuer and HTM U.S. government agency securities and bonds are guaranteed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. The securities with unrealized losses had an average life of 5.02 years and an average duration of 4.43 years. Management believes that the securities will either recover in market value or be paid off as agreed. The Company intends to, and has the ability to, hold these securities to maturity.

 

HTM asset-backed securities issued by others are collateralized mortgage obligation securities. The securities have credit support tranches that absorb losses prior to the tranches that the Company owns. The Company reviews credit support positions on its securities regularly. HTM asset-backed securities issued by others with unrealized losses had an average life of 3.20 years and an average duration of 2.66 years.

 

 21 

 

 

Credit Quality of Asset-Backed Securities and Agency Bonds

 

The tables below present the Standard & Poor’s (“S&P”) or equivalent credit rating from other major rating agencies for AFS and HTM asset-backed securities issued by GSEs and U.S. Agencies and others or bonds issued by GSEs or U.S. government agencies at March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 by carrying value. The Company considers noninvestment grade securities rated BB+ or lower as classified assets for regulatory and financial reporting. GSE asset-backed securities and GSE agency bonds with S&P AA+ ratings were treated as AAA based on regulatory guidance.

 

March 31, 2018  December 31, 2017
Credit Rating  Amount   Credit Rating  Amount 
(dollars in thousands)
AAA  $163,985   AAA  $162,337 
BB   612   BB   651 
B+   -   B+   - 
Total  $164,597   Total  $162,988 

 

 22 

 

  

NOTE 11 – LOANS

 

Loans consist of the following:

 

   March 31, 2018   December 31, 2017 
(dollars in thousands)  PCI   All other
loans**
   Total   % of
Gross
Loans
   Total   % of
Gross
Loans
 
                         
Commercial real estate  $1,537   $816,038   $817,576    63.88%  $727,314    63.25%
Residential first mortgages   -    166,390    166,390    13.00%   170,374    14.81%
Residential rentals   1,756    127,271    129,026    10.08%   110,228    9.58%
Construction and land development   110    28,116    28,226    2.21%   27,871    2.42%
Home equity and second mortgages   468    39,013    39,481    3.09%   21,351    1.86%
Commercial loans   -    52,198    52,198    4.08%   56,417    4.91%
Consumer loans   -    853    853    0.07%   573    0.05%
Commercial equipment   -    45,905    45,905    3.59%   35,916    3.12%
Gross loans   3,871    1,275,784    1,279,655    100.00%   1,150,044    100.00%
Net deferred costs (fees)   -    1,118    1,118    0.09%   1,086    0.09%
Total loans, net of deferred costs  $3,871   $1,276,902   $1,280,773        $1,151,130      
Less: allowance for loan losses   -    (10,471)   (10,471)   -0.82%   (10,515)   -0.91%
Net loans  $3,871   $1,266,431   $1,270,302        $1,140,615      

 

**All other loans include acquired Non-PCI pools at fair value.

 

At March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the Bank’s allowance for loan losses totaled $10.5 million and $10.5 million, or 0.82% and 0.91%, respectively, of loan balances. Allowance for loan loss levels decreased in first quarter of 2018, primarily due to the addition of County First loans, after consummation of the legal merger on January 1, 2018, for which no allowance was provided for in accordance with purchase accounting standards. Management’s determination of the adequacy of the allowance is based on a periodic evaluation of the portfolio with consideration given to the overall loss experience, current economic conditions, size, growth and composition of the loan portfolio, financial condition of the borrowers and other relevant factors that, in management’s judgment, warrant recognition in providing an adequate allowance.

 

Net deferred loan fees and premiums of $1.1 million at March 31, 2018 included net deferred fees paid by customers of $2.8 million offset by net deferred premiums paid for the purchase of residential first mortgages and deferred costs of $3.9 million. Net deferred loan fees and premiums of $1.1 million at December 31, 2017 included net deferred fees paid by customers of $2.8 million offset by net deferred premiums paid for the purchase of residential first mortgages and deferred costs of $3.9 million.

 

Risk Characteristics of Portfolio Segments

Concentrations of Credit - Loans are primarily made within the Company’s operating footprint of Southern Maryland, Annapolis Maryland and the greater Fredericksburg area of Virginia. Real estate loans can be affected by the condition of the local real estate market. Commercial and industrial loans can be affected by the local economic conditions. The commercial loan portfolio has concentrations in business loans secured by real estate and real estate development loans. At March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the Company had no loans outstanding with foreign entities.

 

The Company manages its credit products and exposure to credit losses (credit risk) by the following specific portfolio segments (classes), which are levels at which the Company develops and documents its allowance for loan loss methodology. These segments are:

 

Commercial Real Estate (“CRE”)

Commercial and other real estate projects include office buildings, retail locations, churches, other special purpose buildings and commercial construction. Commercial construction balances were 7.1% and 6.2% of the CRE portfolio at March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively. The Bank offers both fixed-rate and adjustable-rate loans under these product lines. The primary security on a commercial real estate loan is the real property and the leases that produce income for the real property. Loans secured by commercial real estate are generally limited to 80% of the lower of the appraised value or sales price at origination and have an initial contractual loan payment period ranging from three to 20 years.

 

 23 

 

 

Loans secured by commercial real estate are larger and involve greater risks than one-to four-family residential mortgage loans. Because payments on loans secured by such properties are often dependent on the successful operation or management of the properties, repayment of such loans may be subject to a greater extent to adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy.

 

Residential First Mortgages

Residential first mortgage loans are generally long-term loans, amortized on a monthly basis, with principal and interest due each month. The contractual loan payment period for residential loans typically ranges from ten to 30 years. The Bank’s experience indicates that real estate loans remain outstanding for significantly shorter time periods than their contractual terms. Borrowers may refinance or prepay loans at their option, without penalty. The Bank’s residential portfolio has both fixed-rate and adjustable-rate residential first mortgages. During the three months ended March 31, 2018 and the year ended December 31, 2017, the Bank purchased residential first mortgages of $963,000 and $25.5 million, respectively.

  

The annual and lifetime limitations on interest rate adjustments may limit the increases in interest rates on these loans. There are also credit risks resulting from potential increased costs to the borrower as a result of repricing of adjustable-rate mortgage loans. During periods of rising interest rates, the risk of default on adjustable-rate mortgage loans may increase due to the upward adjustment of interest cost to the borrower. The Bank’s adjustable rate residential first mortgage portfolio was $56.2 million or 4.4% of total gross loans of $1.28 billion at March 31, 2018 compared to $56.9 million or 5.0% of total gross loans of $1.15 billion at December 31, 2017.

 

Residential Rentals

Residential rental mortgage loans are amortizing, with principal and interest due each month. The loans are secured by income-producing 1-4 family units and apartments. As of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, $104.0 million and $85.0 million, respectively, were 1-4 family units and $25.0 million and $25.2 million, respectively, were apartment buildings. Loans secured by residential rental properties are generally limited to 80% of the lower of the appraised value or sales price at origination and have an initial contractual loan payment period ranging from three to 20 years. The primary security on a residential rental loan is the property and the leases that produce income. During periods of rising interest rates, the risk of default on adjustable-rate mortgage loans may increase due to the upward adjustment of interest cost to the borrower. The Bank’s adjustable rate residential rental portfolio was $100.1 million or 7.8% of total gross loans of $1.28 billion at March 31, 2018 compared to $93.4 million or 8.1% of total gross loans of $1.15 billion at December 31, 2017.

 

Loans secured by residential rental properties involve greater risks than 1-4 family residential mortgage loans. Although, there are similar risk characteristics shared with commercial real estate loans, the balances for the loans secured by residential rental properties are generally smaller. Because payments on loans secured by residential rental properties are often dependent on the successful operation or management of the properties, repayment of these loans may be subject to a greater extent to adverse conditions in the rental real estate market or the economy than similar owner-occupied properties.

 

Construction and Land Development

The Bank offers loans for the construction of one-to-four family dwellings. Generally, these loans are secured by the real estate under construction as well as by guarantees of the principals involved. In addition, the Bank offers loans to acquire and develop land, as well as loans on undeveloped, subdivided lots for home building.

 

A decline in demand for new housing might adversely affect the ability of borrowers to repay these loans. Construction and land development loans are inherently riskier than providing financing on owner-occupied real estate. The Bank’s risk of loss is affected by the accuracy of the initial estimate of the market value of the completed project as well as the accuracy of the cost estimates made to complete the project. In addition, the volatility of the real estate market has made it increasingly difficult to ensure that the valuation of land associated with these loans is accurate. During the construction phase, a number of factors could result in delays and cost overruns. If the estimate of construction costs proves to be inaccurate, the Bank may be required to advance funds beyond the amount originally committed to permit completion of the development. If the estimate of value proves to be inaccurate, a project’s value might be insufficient to assure full repayment. As a result of these factors, construction lending often involves the disbursement of substantial funds with repayment dependent, in part, on the success of the project rather than the ability of the borrower or guarantor to repay principal and interest. If the Bank forecloses on a project, there can be no assurance that the Bank will be able to recover all of the unpaid balance of, and accrued interest on, the loan as well as related foreclosure and holding costs.

 

 24 

 

 

Home Equity and Second Mortgage Loans

The Bank maintains a portfolio of home equity and second mortgage loans. These products contain a higher risk of default than residential first mortgages as in the event of foreclosure, the first mortgage would need to be paid off prior to collection of the second mortgage. This risk is heightened as the market value of residential property has not fully returned to pre-financial crisis levels and interest rates began to increase in 2017.

 

Commercial Loans

The Bank offers commercial loans to its business customers. The Bank offers a variety of commercial loan products including term loans and lines of credit. Such loans are generally made for terms of five years or less. The Bank offers both fixed-rate and adjustable-rate loans under these product lines. When making commercial business loans, the Bank considers the financial condition of the borrower, the borrower’s payment history of both corporate and personal debt, the projected cash flows of the business, the viability of the industry in which the borrower operates, the value of the collateral, and the borrower’s ability to service the debt from income. These loans are primarily secured by equipment, real property, accounts receivable or other security as determined by the Bank.

 

Commercial loans are made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayment from the cash flows of the borrower’s business. As a result, the availability of funds for the repayment of commercial loans may depend substantially on the success of the business itself.

 

Consumer Loans

Consumer loans consist of loans secured by automobiles, boats, recreational vehicles and trucks. The Bank also makes home improvement loans and offers both secured and unsecured personal lines of credit. Consumer loans entail greater risk from other loan types due to being secured by rapidly depreciating assets or the reliance on the borrower’s continuing financial stability.

 

Commercial Equipment Loans

These loans consist primarily of fixed-rate, short-term loans collateralized by a commercial customer’s equipment or secured by real property, accounts receivable, or other security as determined by the Bank. When making commercial equipment loans, the Bank considers the same factors it considers when underwriting a commercial business loan. Commercial loans are of higher risk and typically are made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayment from the cash flows of the borrower’s business. As a result, the availability of funds for the repayment of commercial loans may depend substantially on the success of the business itself. In the case of business failure, collateral would need to be liquidated to provide repayment for the loan. In many cases, the highly specialized nature of collateral equipment would make full recovery from the sale of collateral problematic.

 

Non-accrual and Aging Analysis of Current and Past Due Loans

Non-accrual loans as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 were as follows:

 

   March 31, 2018 
(dollars in thousands)  90 or Greater
Days
Delinquent
   Number
of Loans
   Non-accrual
Only Loans
   Number
of Loans
   Total
Non-accrual
Loans
   Total
Number
of Loans
 
                         
Commercial real estate  $4,271    6   $822    3   $5,093    9 
Residential first mortgages   436    3    496    1    932    4 
Residential rentals   84    1    719    3    803    4 
Construction and land development   -    -    -    -    -    - 
Home equity and second mortgages   125    2    121    1    246    3 
Commercial loans   1,063    3    -    -    1,063    3 
Consumer loans   1    1    -    -    1    1 
Commercial equipment   301    2    -    -    301    2 
   $6,281    18   $2,158    8   $8,439    26 

 

 25 

 

 

   December 31, 2017 
(dollars in thousands)  90 or Greater
Days
Delinquent
   Number
of Loans
   Non-accrual
Only Loans
   Number
of Loans
   Total
Non-accrual
Loans
   Total
Number
of Loans
 
                         
Commercial real estate  $1,148    4   $839    3   $1,987    7 
Residential first mortgages   478    3    507    1    985    4 
Residential rentals   84    1    741    3    825    4 
Construction and land development   -    -    -    -    -    - 
Home equity and second mortgages   134    3    123    1    257    4 
Commercial loans   172    2    -    -    172    2 
Consumer loans   -    -    -    -    -    - 
Commercial equipment   467    3    -    -    467    3 
   $2,483    16   $2,210    8   $4,693    24 

 

Non-accrual loans (90 days or greater delinquent and non-accrual only loans) increased $3.7 million from $4.7 million or 0.41% of total loans at December 31, 2017 to $8.4 million or 0.66% of total loans at March 31, 2018. Non-accrual loans can be current, but classified as non-accrual due to customer operating results or payment history. All interest accrued but not collected from loans that are placed on non-accrual or charged-off is reversed against interest income. In accordance with the Company’s policy, interest income is recognized on a cash basis or cost-recovery method, until qualifying for return to accrual status.

 

At March 31, 2018, non-accrual loans of $8.4 million included 26 loans, of which $6.3 million, or 75% represented 9 loans and four customer relationships. At December 31, 2017, non-accrual loans of $4.7 million included 24 loans, of which $3.3 million, or 71% represented 10 loans and five customer relationships. During the year ended December 31, 2017 non-accrual loans decreased $3.0 million due to the foreclosure of a stalled residential development project. The Bank is working with a construction manager to stabilize and market the project. Before the foreclosure, the loans in this relationship were troubled debt restructures (“TDRs”). Additionally, during the third quarter of 2017, non-accrual loans decreased $607,000 due to the foreclosure of a commercial office building.

 

Non-accrual loans included one TDR totaling $730,000 and $769,000 at March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively. This loan is classified solely as non-accrual for the calculation of financial ratios. Loan delinquency (90 days or greater delinquent and 31-89 days delinquent) decreased $198,000 from $11.7 million, or 1.02% of loans, at December 31, 2017 to $11.5 million, or 0.90% of loans, at March 31, 2018.

 

Non-accrual loans on which the recognition of interest has been discontinued, which did not have a specific allowance for impairment, amounted to $7.1 million and $3.8 million at March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively. Interest due but not recognized on these balances at March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 was $161,000 and $85,000, respectively. Non-accrual loans with a specific allowance for impairment on which the recognition of interest has been discontinued amounted to $1.3 million and $876,000 at March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively. Interest due but not recognized on these balances at March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 was $88,000 and $100,000, respectively.

 

 26 

 

 

The Company considers a loan to be past due or delinquent when the terms of the contractual obligation are not met by the borrower. PCI loans are included as a single category in the table below as management believes, regardless of their age, there is a lower likelihood of aggregate loss related to these loan pools. Additionally, PCI loans are discounted to allow for the accretion of income on a level yield basis over the life of the loan based on expected cash flows. Regardless of payment status, the associated discount on these loan pools results in income recognition.

 

Past due and PCI loans as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 were as follows:

 

   March 31, 2018 
(dollars in thousands)  31-60
Days
   61-89
Days
   90 or Greater
Days
   Total
Past Due
   PCI Loans   Current   Total
Loan
Receivables
 
Commercial real estate  $3,084   $-   $4,271   $7,355   $1,537   $808,684   $817,576 
Residential first mortgages   447    -    436    883    -    165,507    166,390 
Residential rentals   244    -    84    328    1,756    126,942    129,026 
Construction and land dev.   -    -    -    -    110    28,116    28,226 
Home equity and second mtg.   19    -    125    144    468    38,869    39,481 
Commercial loans   123    -    1,063    1,186    -    51,012    52,198 
Consumer loans   -    -    1    1    -    852    853 
Commercial equipment   325    989    301    1,615    -    44,290    45,905 
Total  $4,242   $989   $6,281   $11,512   $3,871   $1,264,272   $1,279,655 

 

   December 31, 2017 
(dollars in thousands)  31-60
Days
   61-89
Days
   90 or Greater
Days
   Total
Past Due
   PCI Loans   Current   Total
Loan
Receivables
 
Commercial real estate  $-   $6,711   $1,148   $7,859   $-   $719,455   $727,314 
Residential first mortgages   -    68    478    546    -    169,828    170,374 
Residential rentals   -    207    84    291    -    109,937    110,228 
Construction and land dev.   -    -    -    -    -    27,871    27,871 
Home equity and second mtg.   19    18    134    171    -    21,180    21,351 
Commercial loans   892    299    172    1,363    -    55,054    56,417 
Consumer loans   -    1    -    1    -    572    573 
Commercial equipment   1,012    -    467    1,479    -    34,437    35,916 
Total  $1,923   $7,304   $2,483   $11,710   $-   $1,138,334   $1,150,044 

 

 27 

 

 

Impaired Loans and Troubled Debt Restructures (“TDRs”)

Impaired loans, including TDRs, at March 31, 2018 and 2017 and at December 31, 2017 were as follows:

 

   March 31, 2018 
(dollars in thousands)  Unpaid
Contractual
Principal Balance
   Recorded
Investment With No
Allowance
   Recorded
Investment With
Allowance
   Total
Recorded
Investment
   Related
Allowance
   Quarter
Average Recorded
Investment
   Quarter
Interest Income
Recognized
 
                             
Commercial real estate  $27,398   $25,156   $1,750   $26,906   $290   $26,964   $279 
Residential first mortgages   2,435    1,916    454    2,370    2    2,403    23 
Residential rentals   1,424    1,401    -    1,401    -    1,428    16 
Construction and land dev.   729    -    729    729    210    729    10 
Home equity and second mtg.   309    306    -    306    -    309    2 
Commercial loans   3,008    1,889    1,061    2,950    419    2,950    20 
Commercial equipment   1,333    1,023    301    1,324    239    1,341    12 
Total  $36,637   $31,691   $4,296   $35,987   $1,161   $36,125   $362 

 

   December 31, 2017 
(dollars in thousands)  Unpaid
Contractual
Principal Balance
   Recorded
Investment With No
Allowance
   Recorded
Investment With
Allowance
   Total
Recorded
Investment
   Related
Allowance
   YTD Average
Recorded Investment
   YTD Interest
Income
Recognized
 
                             
Commercial real estate  $33,180   $30,921   $2,008   $32,929   $370   $33,575   $1,379 
Residential first mortgages   2,455    1,978    459    2,437    2    2,479    91 
Residential rentals   2,389    1,981    395    2,376    18    2,432    111 
Construction and land dev.   729    -    729    729    163    729    26 
Home equity and second mtg.   317    317    -    317    -    318    12 
Commercial loans   3,010    2,783    168    2,951    168    3,048    137 
Commercial equipment   1,538    1,048    467    1,515    303    1,578    73 
Total  $43,618   $39,028   $4,226   $43,254   $1,024   $44,159   $1,829 

 

 28 

 

  

   March 31, 2017 
(dollars in thousands)  Unpaid
Contractual
Principal Balance
   Recorded
Investment With No
Allowance
   Recorded
Investment With
Allowance
   Total
Recorded
Investment
   Related
Allowance
   Quarter
Average Recorded
Investment
   Quarter
Interest Income
Recognized
 
                             
Commercial real estate  $20,300   $15,543   $4,564   $20,107   $795   $20,213   $225 
Residential first mortgages   2,534    2,035    472    2,507    17    2,523    28 
Residential rentals   3,320    2,750    570    3,320    71    3,379    30 
Construction and land dev.   4,304    2,926    851    3,777    188    3,777    3 
Home equity and second mtg.   232    232    -    232    -    233    1 
Commercial loans   3,088    2,832    169    3,001    169    3,029    28 
Commercial equipment   648    112    500    612    425    633    8 
Total  $34,426   $26,430   $7,126   $33,556   $1,665   $33,787   $323 

 

 29 

 

 

TDRs, included in the impaired loan schedules above, as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 were as follows:

 

   March 31, 2018   December 31, 2017 
(dollars in thousands)  Dollars   Number
of Loans
   Dollars   Number
of Loans
 
                 
Commercial real estate  $9,175    9   $9,273    9 
Residential first mortgages   522    2    527    2 
Residential rentals   219    1    221    1 
Construction and land development   729    2    729    2 
Commercial loans   4    1    4    1 
Commercial equipment   34    1    36    1 
Total TDRs  $10,683    16   $10,790    16 
Less: TDRs included in non-accrual loans   (730)   (1)   (769)   (1)
Total accrual TDR loans  $9,953    15   $10,021    15 

 

TDRs decreased $107,000 due to principal paydowns for the three months ended March 31, 2018. There were no TDRs added or disposed of during the three months ended March 31, 2018. The Company had specific reserves of $448,000 on six TDRs totaling $2.8 million at March 31, 2018. The Company had specific reserves of $413,000 on seven TDRs totaling $3.0 million at December 31, 2017. During the year ended December 31, 2017, TDR disposals, which included payoffs and refinancing decreased by seven loans totaling $3.9 million, of which $3.0 million related to the foreclosure of the stalled residential development project mentioned previously. TDR loan principal curtailment was $385,000 for the year ended December 31, 2017. There were no TDRs added during the year ended December 31, 2017.

 

 30 

 

 

Allowance for Loan Losses

The following tables detail activity in the allowance for loan losses at and for the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. An allocation of the allowance to one category of loans does not prevent the Company from using that allowance to absorb losses in a different category.

 

   March 31, 2018 
(dollars in thousands)  Beginning
Balance
   Charge-offs   Recoveries   Provisions   Ending
Balance
 
Three Months Ended                         
Commercial real estate  $6,451   $(236)  $2   $447   $6,664 
Residential first mortgages   1,144    (37)   -    (170)   937 
Residential rentals   512    -    -    (53)   459 
Construction and land development   462    -    -    20    482 
Home equity and second mortgages   162    (7)   9    (46)   118 
Commercial loans   1,013    -    -    32    1,045 
Consumer loans   7    (1)   -    1    7 
Commercial equipment   764    (299)   25    269    759 
   $10,515   $(580)  $36   $500   $10,471 
                          
Purchase Credit Impaired**  $-   $-   $-   $-   $- 

 

** There is no allowance for loan loss on the PCI porfolios as of March 31, 2018. A more detailed rollforward schedule will be presented if an allowance is required.

 

   March 31, 2017 
(dollars in thousands)  Beginning
Balance
   Charge-offs   Recoveries   Provisions   Ending
Balance
 
Three Months Ended                         
Commercial real estate  $5,212   $-   $5   $(38)  $5,179 
Residential first mortgages   1,406    -    -    22    1,428 
Residential rentals   362    -    -    (8)   354 
Construction and land development   941    -    -    (50)   891 
Home equity and second mortgages   138    -    -    (62)   76 
Commercial loans   794    -    1    (6)   789 
Consumer loans   3    (2)   -    4    5 
Commercial equipment   1,004    (146)   11    518    1,387 
   $9,860   $(148)  $17   $380   $10,109 

 

 31 

 

 

The following tables detail loan receivable and allowance balances disaggregated on the basis of the Company’s impairment methodology at March 31, 2018 and 2017 and December 31, 2017.

 

   March 31, 2018   December 31, 2017   March 31, 2017 
(dollars in thousands)  Ending balance:
individually
evaluated for
impairment
   Ending balance:
collectively
evaluated for
impairment
   Purchase
Credit
Impaired
   Total   Ending balance:
individually
evaluated for
impairment
   Ending balance:
collectively
evaluated for
impairment
   Total   Ending balance:
individually
evaluated for
impairment
   Ending balance:
collectively
evaluated for
impairment
   Total 
Loan Receivables:                                                  
Commercial real estate  $26,906   $789,133   $1,537   $817,576   $32,929   $694,385   $727,314   $20,107   $657,098   $677,205 
Residential first mortgages   2,370    164,020    -    166,390    2,437    167,937    170,374    2,507    176,396    178,903 
Residential rentals   1,401    125,869    1,756    129,026    2,376    107,852    110,228    3,320    97,571    100,891 
Construction and land development   729    27,387    110    28,226    729    27,142    27,871    3,777    33,984    37,761 
Home equity and second mortgages   306    38,707    468    39,481    317    21,034    21,351    232    21,160    21,392 
Commercial loans   2,950    49,248    -    52,198    2,951    53,466    56,417    3,001    52,090    55,091 
Consumer loans   1    852    -    853    -    573    573    -    439    439 
Commercial equipment   1,324    44,581    -    45,905    1,515    34,401    35,916    612    41,448    42,060 
   $35,987   $1,239,797   $3,871   $1,279,655   $43,254   $1,106,790   $1,150,044   $33,556   $1,080,186   $1,113,742 
                                                   
Allowance for loan losses:                                                  
Commercial real estate  $290   $6,374   $-   $6,664   $370   $6,081   $6,451   $795   $4,384   $5,179 
Residential first mortgages   2    935    -    937    2    1,142    1,144    17    1,411    1,428 
Residential rentals   -    459    -    459    18    494    512    71    283    354 
Construction and land development   210    272    -    482    163    299    462    188    703    891 
Home equity and second mortgages   -    118    -    118    -    162    162    -    76    76 
Commercial loans   419    626    -    1,045    168    845    1,013    169    620    789 
Consumer loans   1    6    -    7    -    7    7    -    5    5 
Commercial equipment   239    520    -    759    303    461    764    425    962    1,387 
   $1,161   $9,310   $-   $10,471   $1,024   $9,491   $10,515   $1,665   $8,444   $10,109 

 

During the fourth quarter of 2016, the Company expanded its factor scoring categories from three levels to five levels to capture additional movements in qualitative factors used to calculate the general allowance of each portfolio segment. No additional qualitative factors were added to the Company’s methodology as part of this change. There were no material changes to the existing allowance for loan losses by portfolio segment or in the aggregate as a result of the change.

 

 32 

 

 

Credit Quality Indicators

Credit quality indicators as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 were as follows:

 

Credit Risk Profile by Internally Assigned Grade            
                         
   Commercial Real Estate   Construction and Land Dev.   Residential Rentals 
(dollars in thousands)  3/31/2018   12/31/2017   3/31/2018   12/31/2017   3/31/2018   12/31/2017 
                         
Unrated  $72,225   $75,581   $1,313   $1,775   $29,882   $28,428 
Pass   717,314    619,604    26,074    25,367    96,874    80,279 
Special mention   588    -    110    -    1,247    - 
Substandard   27,449    32,129    729    729    1,023    1,521 
Doubtful   -    -    -    -    -    - 
Loss   -    -    -    -    -    - 
Total  $817,576   $727,314   $28,226   $27,871   $129,026   $110,228 

 

   Commercial Loans   Commercial Equipment   Total Commercial Portfolios 
(dollars in thousands)  3/31/2018   12/31/2017   3/31/2018   12/31/2017   3/31/2018   12/31/2017 
                         
Unrated  $15,032   $14,356   $11,589   $10,856   $130,041   $130,996 
Pass   34,228    39,118    33,224    23,581    907,714    787,949 
Special mention   -    -    -    -    1,945    - 
Substandard   2,938    2,943    1,092    1,479    33,231    38,801 
Doubtful   -    -    -    -    -    - 
Loss   -    -    -    -    -    - 
Total  $52,198   $56,417   $45,905   $35,916   $1,072,931   $957,746 

 

   Non-Commercial Portfolios **   Total All Portfolios         
(dollars in thousands)  3/31/2018   12/31/2017   3/31/2018   12/31/2017         
                         
Unrated  $149,642   $152,616   $279,683   $283,612           
Pass   55,453    38,081    963,167    826,030           
Special mention   88    96    2,033    96           
Substandard   1,541    1,505    34,772    40,306           
Doubtful   -    -    -    -           
Loss   -    -    -    -           
Total  $206,724   $192,298   $1,279,655   $1,150,044           

 

** Non commercial portfolios are generally evaluated based on payment activity, but may be risk graded if part if a larger commercial relationship or are credit impaired (e.g., nonaccrual loans, TDRs).

 

Credit Risk Profile Based on Payment Activity            
                         
   Residential First Mortgages   Home Equity and Second Mtg.   Consumer Loans 
(dollars in thousands)  3/31/2018   12/31/2017   3/31/2018   12/31/2017   3/31/2018   12/31/2017 
                         
Performing  $165,955   $169,896   $39,356   $21,217   $852   $573 
Nonperforming   435    478    125    134    1    - 
Total  $166,390   $170,374   $39,481   $21,351   $853   $573 

 

 33 

 

 

A risk grading scale is used to assign grades to commercial relationships, which include commercial real estate, residential rentals, construction and land development, commercial loans and commercial equipment loans. Loans are graded at inception, annually thereafter when financial statements are received and at other times when there is an indication that a credit may have weakened or improved. Only commercial loan relationships with an aggregate exposure to the Bank of $1,000,000 or greater are subject to being risk rated.

 

Home equity and second mortgages and consumer loans are evaluated for creditworthiness in underwriting and are monitored based on borrower payment history. Residential first mortgages are evaluated for creditworthiness during credit due diligence before being purchased. Residential first mortgages, home equity and second mortgages and consumer loans are classified as unrated unless they are part of a larger commercial relationship that requires grading or are troubled debt restructures or nonperforming loans with an Other Assets Especially Mentioned (“OAEM”) or higher risk rating due to a delinquent payment history.

 

Management regularly reviews credit quality indicators as part of its individual loan reviews and on a monthly and quarterly basis. The overall quality of the Bank’s loan portfolio is assessed using the Bank’s risk grading scale, the level and trends of net charge-offs, nonperforming loans and delinquencies, the performance of troubled debt restructured loans and the general economic conditions in the Company’s geographical market. This review process is assisted by frequent internal reporting of loan production, loan quality, concentrations of credit, loan delinquencies and nonperforming and potential problem loans. Credit quality indicators and allowance factors are adjusted based on management’s judgment during the monthly and quarterly review process. Loans subject to risk ratings are graded on a scale of one to ten. The Company considers loans classified substandard, doubtful and loss as classified assets for regulatory and financial reporting.

 

Ratings 1 thru 6 - Pass

Ratings 1 thru 6 have asset risks ranging from excellent low risk to adequate. The specific rating assigned considers customer history of earnings, cash flows, liquidity, leverage, capitalization, consistency of debt service coverage, the nature and extent of customer relationship and other relevant specific business factors such as the stability of the industry or market area, changes to management, litigation or unexpected events that could have an impact on risks.

 

Rating 7 - OAEM (Other Assets Especially Mentioned) – Special Mention

These credits, while protected by the financial strength of the borrowers, guarantors or collateral, have reduced quality due to economic conditions, less than adequate earnings performance or other factors which require the lending officer to direct more than normal attention to the credit. Financing alternatives may be limited and/or command higher risk interest rates. OAEM loans are the first adversely classified assets on our watch list. These relationships will be reviewed at least quarterly.

 

Rating 8 - Substandard

Substandard assets are assets that are inadequately protected by the sound worth or paying capacity of the borrower or of the collateral pledged. These assets have a well-defined weakness or weaknesses that jeopardize the liquidation of the debt. They are characterized by the possibility that the Bank will sustain some loss if the deficiencies are not corrected. Loss potential, while existing in the aggregate amount of substandard assets, does not have to exist in individual assets classified substandard. The loans may have a delinquent history or combination of weak collateral, weak guarantor strength or operating losses. When a loan is assigned to this category the Bank may estimate a specific reserve in the loan loss allowance analysis. These assets listed may include assets with histories of repossessions or some that are non-performing bankruptcies. These relationships will be reviewed at least quarterly.

 

Rating 9 - Doubtful

Doubtful assets have many of the same characteristics of Substandard with the exception that the Bank has determined that loss is not only possible but is probable and the risk is close to certain that loss will occur. When a loan is assigned to this category the Bank will identify the probable loss and the loan will receive a specific reserve in the loan loss allowance analysis. These relationships will be reviewed at least quarterly.

 

Rating 10 – Loss

Once an asset is identified as a definite loss to the Bank, it will receive the classification of “loss”. There may be some future potential recovery; however, it is more practical to write off the loan at the time of classification. Losses will be taken in the period in which they are determined to be uncollectable.

 

 34 

 

 

Purchased Credit-Impaired Loans and Acquired Loans

PCI loans had an unpaid principal balance of $4.5 million and a carrying value of $3.9 million at March 31, 2018. PCI loans represented .25% of total assets at March 31, 2018. Determining the fair value of the PCI loans at the time of acquisition required the Company to estimate cash flows expected to result from those loans and to discount those cash flows at appropriate rates of interest and taking into account prepayment assumptions. For such loans, the excess of cash flows expected at acquisition over the estimated fair value is recognized as interest income over the remaining lives of the loans and is called accretable yield. The difference between contractually required payments at acquisition and the cash flows expected to be collected at acquisition reflects the impact of estimated credit losses and is called the nonaccretable difference. In accordance with GAAP, there was no carryover of previously established allowance for loan losses from acquisition. In conjunction with the acquisition of County First Bank, the PCI loan portfolio was accounted for at the fair values as follows:

 

(dollars in thousands)  January 1, 2018 
     
Contractual principal and interest at acquisition  $6,126 
Nonaccretable difference   (1,093)
Expected cash flows at acquisition   5,033 
Accretable yield   (517)
Basis in PCI loans at acquisition - estimated fair value  $4,517 

 

A summary of changes in the accretable yield for PCI loans for the three months ended March 31, 2018 follows:

 

   Three Months Ended 
(dollars in thousands)  March 31, 2018 
Accretable yield, beginning of period  $- 
Additions   517 
Accretion   (58)
Reclassification from (to) nonaccretable difference   - 
Other changes, net   - 
Accretable yield, end of period  $459 

 

In terms of accounting designations, compared to December 31, 2017, (i) non-acquired loans, which include certain renewed and/or restructured acquired performing loans that are re-designated as non-acquired, increased $4.1 million, or 3.6%, to $1,154.2 million; (ii) acquired performing loans increased $121.6 million to $121.6 million; and (iii) purchase credit impaired (“PCI”) loans increased $3.9 million to $3.9 million. At March 31, 2018, performing acquired loans, which totaled $121.6 million, included a $2.3 million net acquisition accounting fair market value adjustment, representing a 1.87% “mark;” and PCI loans which totaled $3.9 million, included a $666,000 adjustment, representing a 14.68% “mark.” During the three months ended March 31, 2018 there was $321,000 of accretion interest.

 

The following is a summary of acquired and non-acquired loans as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017:

 

BY ACQUIRED AND NON-ACQUIRED  March 31, 2018   %   December 31, 2017