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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 

FORM 10-Q

 
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2018
 
or
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from                     to__________
 
Commission File Number: 001-38095
 

Gardner Denver Holdings, Inc.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 
Delaware
 
46-2393770
(State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
222 East Erie Street, Suite 500
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202
(Address of Principal Executive Offices) (Zip Code)
 
(414) 212-4700
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes      No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

Large accelerated filer
Accelerated filer
       
Non-accelerated filer
  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company
       
   
Emerging growth Company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes      No 

The registrant had outstanding 198,104,494 shares of Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share, as of April 24, 2018.
 


Table of Contents

GARDNER DENVER HOLDINGS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

FORM 10-Q

INDEX

 
Page
No.
PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
 
6
 
41
 
58
 
59
PART II. OTHER INFORMATION
 
 
59
 
60
 
60
 
60
 
60
 
60
 
60
61
 
2

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

In addition to historical information, this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (this “Form 10-Q”) may contain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), which are subject to the “safe harbor” created by those sections.  All statements, other than statements of historical facts included in this Form 10-Q, including statements concerning our plans, objectives, goals, beliefs, business strategies, future events, business conditions, results of operations, financial position, business outlook, business trends and other information, may be forward-looking statements.  Words such as “estimates,” “expects,” “contemplates,” “will,” “anticipates,” “projects,” “plans,” “intends,” “believes,” “forecasts,” “may,” “should” and variations of such words or similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements.  The forward-looking statements are not historical facts, and are based upon our current expectations, beliefs, estimates and projections, and various assumptions, many of which, by their nature, are inherently uncertain and beyond our control.  Our expectations, beliefs, estimates and projections are expressed in good faith and we believe there is a reasonable basis for them.  However, there can be no assurance that management’s expectations, beliefs, estimates and projections will result or be achieved and actual results may vary materially from what is expressed in or indicated by the forward-looking statements.

There are a number of risks, uncertainties and other important factors, many of which are beyond our control, that could cause our actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements contained in this Form 10-Q.  Such risks, uncertainties and other important factors that could cause actual results to differ include, among others, the risks, uncertainties and factors set forth under “Item 1A. Risk Factors” of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017, and in this report, as such risk factors may be updated from time to time in our periodic filings with the SEC, and are accessible on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov, and also include the following:

·
We have exposure to the risks associated with instability in the global economy and financial markets, which may negatively impact our revenues, liquidity, suppliers and customers.

·
More than half of our sales and operations are in non-U.S. jurisdictions and we are subject to the economic, political, regulatory and other risks of international operations.

·
Our revenues and operating results, especially in the Energy segment, depend on the level of activity in the energy industry, which is significantly affected by volatile oil and gas prices.

·
Our results of operations are subject to exchange rate and other currency risks.  A significant movement in exchange rates could adversely impact our results of operations and cash flows.

·
Potential governmental regulations restricting the use, and increased public attention to and litigation regarding the impacts of hydraulic fracturing or other processes on which it relies could reduce demand for our products.

·
We face competition in the markets we serve, which could materially and adversely affect our operating results.

·
Large or rapid increases in the cost of raw materials and component parts, substantial decreases in their availability or our dependence on particular suppliers of raw materials and component parts could materially and adversely affect our operating results.

·
Our operating results could be adversely affected by a loss or reduction of business with key customers or consolidation or the vertical integration of our customer base.

·
The loss of, or disruption in, our distribution network could have a negative impact on our abilities to ship products, meet customer demand and otherwise operate our business.

·
Our ongoing and expected restructuring plans and other cost savings initiatives may not be as effective as we anticipate, and we may fail to realize the cost savings and increased efficiencies that we expect to result from these actions.  Our operating results could be negatively affected by our inability to effectively implement such restructuring plans and other cost savings initiatives.

·
Our success depends on our executive management and other key personnel.
 
3

·
Credit and counterparty risks could harm our business,

·
If we are unable to develop new products and technologies, our competitive position may be impaired, which could materially and adversely affect our sales and market share.

·
Cost overruns, delays, penalties or liquidated damages could negatively impact our results, particularly with respect to fixed-price contracts for custom engineered products.

·
The risk of non-compliance with U.S. and foreign laws and regulations applicable to our international operations could have a significant impact on our results of operations, financial condition or strategic objectives.

·
U.S. Federal income tax reform could adversely affect us.

·
A significant portion of our assets consists of goodwill and other intangible assets, the value of which may be reduced if we determine that those assets are impaired.

·
Our business could suffer if we experience employee work stoppages, union and work council campaigns or other labor difficulties.

·
We are a defendant in certain asbestos and silica-related personal injury lawsuits, which could adversely affect our financial condition.

·
Acquisitions and integrating such acquisitions create certain risks and may affect our operating results.

·
A natural disaster, catastrophe or other event could result in severe property damage, which could adversely affect our operations.

·
Information systems failure may disrupt our business and result in financial loss and liability to our customers.

·
The nature of our products creates the possibility of significant product liability and warranty claims, which could harm our business.

·
Environmental compliance costs and liabilities could adversely affect our financial condition.

·
Third parties may infringe upon our intellectual property or may claim we have infringed their intellectual property, and we may expend significant resources enforcing or defending our rights or suffer competitive injury.

·
We face risks associated with our pension and other postretirement benefit obligations.

·
Our substantial indebtedness could have important adverse consequences and adversely affect our financial condition.

·
We may not be able to generate sufficient cash to service all of our indebtedness, and may be forced to take other actions to satisfy our obligations under our indebtedness, which may not be successful.

·
Despite our level of indebtedness, we and our subsidiaries may still be able to incur substantially more debt, including off-balance sheet financing, contractual obligations and general and commercial liabilities.  This could further exacerbate the risks to our financial condition described above.

·
The terms of the credit agreement governing the Senior Secured Credit Facilities may restrict our current and future operations, particularly our ability to respond to changes or to take certain actions.

·
Our variable rate indebtedness subjects us to interest rate risk, which could cause our debt service obligations to increase significantly.
 
4

·
We utilize derivative financial instruments to reduce our exposure to market risks from changes in interest rates on our variable rate indebtedness and we will be exposed to risks related to counterparty credit worthiness or non-performance of these instruments.

·
If the financial institutions that are part of the syndicate of our Revolving Credit Facility fail to extend credit under our facility or reduce the borrowing base under our Revolving Credit Facility, our liquidity and results of operations may be adversely affected.

We caution you that the risks, uncertainties and other factors referenced above may not contain all of the risks, uncertainties and other factors that are important to you.  In addition, we cannot assure you that we will realize the results, benefits or developments that we expect or anticipate or, even if substantially realized, that they will result in the consequences or affect us or our business in the way expected.  There can be no assurance that (i) we have correctly measured or identified all of the factors affecting our business or the extent of these factors’ likely impact, (ii) the available information with respect to these factors on which such analysis is based is complete or accurate, (iii) such analysis is correct or (iv) our strategy, which is based in part on this analysis, will be successful.  All forward-looking statements in this report apply only as of the date of this report or as of the date they were made and, except as required by applicable law, we undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.

All references to “we,” “us,” “our,” the “Company” or “Gardner Denver” in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q mean Gardner Denver Holdings, Inc. and its subsidiaries, unless the context otherwise requires.

Website Disclosure

We use our website www.gardnerdenver.com as a channel of distribution of Company information.  Financial and other important information regarding the Company is routinely accessible through and posted on our website.  Accordingly, investors should monitor our website, in addition to following our press releases, SEC filings and public conference calls and webcasts.  In addition, you may automatically receive e-mail alerts and other information about Gardner Denver Holdings, Inc when you enroll your email address by visiting the “Email Alerts” section of our website at www.investors.gardnerdenver.com.  The contents of our website is not, however, a part of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.
 
5

PART 1. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

GARDNER DENVER HOLDINGS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(Dollars in millions, except per share amounts)
(Unaudited)

   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2017
 
Revenues
 
$
619.6
   
$
481.7
 
Cost of sales
   
387.7
     
307.1
 
Gross Profit
   
231.9
     
174.6
 
Selling and administrative expenses
   
106.9
     
102.3
 
Amortization of intangible assets
   
30.9
     
27.6
 
Other operating expense, net
   
4.3
     
7.9
 
Operating Income
   
89.8
     
36.8
 
Interest expense
   
26.0
     
45.9
 
Other income, net
   
(2.0
)
   
(0.5
)
Income (Loss) Before Income Taxes
   
65.8
     
(8.6
)
Provision (benefit) for income taxes
   
23.4
     
(1.6
)
Net Income (Loss)
   
42.4
     
(7.0
)
Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
   
-
     
0.1
 
Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Gardner Denver Holdings, Inc.
 
$
42.4
   
$
(7.1
)
Basic earnings (loss) per share
 
$
0.21
   
$
(0.05
)
Diluted earnings (loss) per share
 
$
0.20
   
$
(0.05
)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
6

GARDNER DENVER HOLDINGS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(Dollars in millions)
(Unaudited)

   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2017
 
Comprehensive Income Attributable to Gardner Denver Holdings, Inc.
           
Net income (loss) attributable to Gardner Denver Holdings, Inc.
 
$
42.4
   
$
(7.1
)
Other comprehensive income, net of tax:
               
Foreign currency translation adjustments, net
   
51.4
     
25.7
 
Foreign currency losses, net
   
(17.0
)
   
(3.9
)
Unrecognized gains on cash flow hedges, net
   
11.4
     
3.0
 
Pension prior service cost and gain or loss, net
   
0.4
     
0.2
 
Total other comprehensive income, net of tax
   
46.2
     
25.0
 
Comprehensive income attributable to Gardner Denver Holdings, Inc.
 
$
88.6
   
$
17.9
 
Comprehensive Income Attributable to Noncontrolling Interests
               
Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
 
$
-
   
$
0.1
 
Other comprehensive income, net of tax:
               
Foreign currency translation adjustments, net
   
-
     
-
 
Total other comprehensive income, net of tax
   
-
     
-
 
Comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interests
 
$
-
   
$
0.1
 
Total Comprehensive Income
 
$
88.6
   
$
18.0
 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
7

GARDNER DENVER HOLDINGS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Dollars in millions, except share and per share amounts)
(Unaudited)

   
March 31,
2018
   
December 31,
2017
 
Assets
           
Current assets:
           
Cash and cash equivalents
 
$
353.8
   
$
393.3
 
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $19.5 and $18.7, respectively
   
541.6
     
536.3
 
Inventories
   
567.2
     
494.5
 
Other current assets
   
50.8
     
39.5
 
Total current assets
   
1,513.4
     
1,463.6
 
Property, plant and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation of $219.6 and $203.8, respectively
   
365.3
     
363.2
 
Goodwill
   
1,308.3
     
1,227.6
 
Other intangible assets, net
   
1,449.2
     
1,431.2
 
Deferred tax assets
   
1.1
     
1.0
 
Other assets
   
138.1
     
134.6
 
Total assets
 
$
4,775.4
   
$
4,621.2
 
Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity
               
Current liabilities:
               
Short-term borrowings and current maturities of long-term debt
 
$
21.1
   
$
20.9
 
Accounts payable
   
284.6
     
269.7
 
Accrued liabilities
   
305.4
     
271.2
 
Total current liabilities
   
611.1
     
561.8
 
Long-term debt, less current maturities
   
2,034.0
     
2,019.3
 
Pensions and other postretirement benefits
   
100.2
     
99.8
 
Deferred income taxes
   
248.3
     
237.5
 
Other liabilities
   
214.1
     
226.0
 
Total liabilities
   
3,207.7
     
3,144.4
 
Commitments and contingencies (Note 15)
               
Stockholders' equity:
               
Common stock, $0.01 par value; 1,000,000,000 shares authorized; 199,434,219 and 198,377,237 shares issued at March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively
   
2.0
     
2.0
 
Capital in excess of par value
   
2,282.3
     
2,275.4
 
Accumulated deficit
   
(535.7
)
   
(577.8
)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss
   
(153.3
)
   
(199.8
)
Treasury stock at cost; 2,208,106 and 2,159,266 shares at March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively
   
(27.6
)
   
(23.0
)
Total stockholders' equity
   
1,567.7
     
1,476.8
 
Total liabilities and stockholders' equity
 
$
4,775.4
   
$
4,621.2
 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
8

GARDNER DENVER HOLDINGS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
(Dollars in millions)
(Unaudited)

   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2018
 
Number of Common Shares Issued (in millions)
     
Balance at beginning of period
   
198.4
 
Exercise of stock options
   
0.4
 
Issuance of common stock for stock-based compensation plans
   
0.6
 
Balance at end of period
   
199.4
 
Common Stock
       
Balance at beginning of period
 
$
2.0
 
Exercise of stock options
   
-
 
Issuance of common stock for stock-based compensation plans
   
-
 
Balance at end of period
 
$
2.0
 
Capital in Excess of Par Value
       
Balance at beginning of period
 
$
2,275.4
 
Stock-based compensation
   
5.2
 
Exercise of stock options
   
3.3
 
Issuance of treasury stock for stock-based compensation plans
   
(1.6
)
Balance at end of period
 
$
2,282.3
 
Accumulated Deficit
       
Balance at beginning of period
 
$
(577.8
)
Net income attributable to Gardner Denver Holdings, Inc.
   
42.4
 
Cumulative-effect adjustment upon adoption of new accounting standard (ASU 2017-12)
   
(0.3
)
Balance at end of period
 
$
(535.7
)
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss
       
Balance at beginning of period
 
$
(199.8
)
Foreign currency translation adjustments, net
   
51.4
 
Foreign currency losses, net
   
(17.0
)
Unrecognized losses on cash flow hedges, net
   
11.4
 
Pension and other postretirement prior service cost and gain or loss, net
   
0.4
 
Cumulative-effect adjustment upon adoption of new accounting standard (ASU 2017-12)
   
0.3
 
Balance at end of period
 
$
(153.3
)
Treasury Stock
       
Balance at beginning of period
 
$
(23.0
)
Purchases of treasury stock
   
(6.2
)
Issuance of treasury stock for stock-based compensation plans
   
1.6
 
Balance at end of period
 
$
(27.6
)
Total Stockholders' Equity
 
$
1,567.7
 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
9

GARDNER DENVER HOLDINGS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Dollars in millions)
(Unaudited)
 
   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2017
 
Cash Flows From Operating Activities:
           
Net income (loss)
 
$
42.4
   
$
(7.0
)
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:
               
Amortization of intangible assets
   
30.9
     
27.6
 
Depreciation in cost of sales
   
11.4
     
10.3
 
Depreciation in selling and administrative expenses
   
2.7
     
1.8
 
Stock-based compensation expense
   
3.4
     
-
 
Foreign currency transaction losses, net
   
2.6
     
0.6
 
(Gains) losses on asset and business disposals
   
(1.2
)
   
3.0
 
Deferred income taxes
   
2.8
     
(6.2
)
Changes in assets and liabilities:
               
Receivables
   
10.0
     
11.1
 
Inventories
   
(42.9
)
   
(15.4
)
Accounts payable
   
8.4
     
3.2
 
Accrued liabilities
   
2.0
     
(20.6
)
Other assets and liabilities, net
   
(12.3
)
   
(11.0
)
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
   
60.2
     
(2.6
)
Cash Flows From Investing Activities:
               
Capital expenditures
   
(10.1
)
   
(16.4
)
Net cash paid in business combinations
   
(94.9
)
   
(0.3
)
Disposals of property, plant and equipment
   
3.0
     
0.1
 
Net cash used in investing activities
   
(102.0
)
   
(16.6
)
Cash Flows From Financing Activities:
               
Principal payments on long-term debt
   
(5.3
)
   
(6.1
)
Purchase of treasury stock
   
(6.2
)
   
(2.5
)
Proceeds from stock option exercises
   
3.3
     
-
 
Purchase of shares from noncontrolling interests
   
-
     
(4.6
)
Other
   
-
     
(0.1
)
Net cash used in financing activities
   
(8.2
)
   
(13.3
)
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
   
10.5
     
2.3
 
Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents
   
(39.5
)
   
(30.2
)
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period
   
393.3
     
255.8
 
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period
 
$
353.8
   
$
225.6
 
Supplemental Cash Flow Information
               
Cash paid for income taxes
 
$
13.8
   
$
9.3
 
Cash paid for interest
 
$
25.7
   
$
51.6
 
Capital expenditures in accounts payable
 
$
6.0
   
$
5.2
 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
10

GARDNER DENVER HOLDINGS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Amounts in millions, except share and per share amounts)
(Unaudited)

Note 1. Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

Basis of Presentation

Gardner Denver Holdings, Inc. is a holding company whose operating subsidiaries are Gardner Denver, Inc. (“GDI”) and certain of GDI’s subsidiaries.  GDI is a diversified, global manufacturer of highly engineered, application-critical flow control products and provider of related aftermarket parts and services. The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Gardner Denver Holdings, Inc. and its majority-owned subsidiaries (collectively referred to herein as “Gardner Denver” or the “Company”).  The financial information presented as of any date other than December 31, 2017 has been prepared from the books and records of the Company without audit.  The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) for interim financial information.  Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and notes required by GAAP for complete financial statements.  In the opinion of management, the condensed consolidated financial statements include all adjustments, consisting of adjustments associated with acquisition accounting and normal recurring adjustments, necessary for the fair presentation of such financial statements.  All intercompany transactions and accounts have been eliminated in consolidation.

The Company’s unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with our audited consolidated financial statements and related notes included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).

The results of operations for the three month period ended March 31, 2018 is not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year.  The balance sheet as of December 31, 2017 has been derived from the Company’s audited financial statements as of that date but does not include all of the information and notes required by GAAP for complete financial statements.

In May 2017, the Company sold a total of 47,495,000 shares of common stock in an initial public offering of shares of common stock.  On November 15, 2017, the Company completed a secondary offering for a total of 25,300,000 shares of common stock held by affiliates of Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. L.P.  After completion of the initial public offering and the secondary offering, affiliates of Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. L.P. continue to control a majority of the voting power of the Company’s common stock.  As a result, the Company is considered a “controlled company” within the meaning of the corporate governance standards of the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”).

Prior Year Reclassification

In the first quarter of fiscal year 2018, the Company adopted the provisions of ASU 2017-07, Compensation – Retirement Benefits (Topic 715): Improving the Presentation of Net Periodic Pension Cost and Net periodic Postretirement Benefit Cost (“ASU 2017-07”).  The reclassification of certain prior year amounts as a result of the adoption of ASU 2017-07 is detailed below in the section “Adopted Accounting Standard Updates” within this Note 1 “Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.”

Adopted Accounting Standard Updates (“ASU”)

ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606)

On January 1, 2018, the Company adopted Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) (“ASC 606”) using the modified retrospective approach.  Under the modified retrospective approach, the Company is required to recognize the cumulative effect of initially applying ASC 606 as an adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings as of January 1, 2018, the date of initial application.  The cumulative effect of initially applying ASC 606 was immaterial to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements, therefore the Company did not record a cumulative transition adjustment.
 
11

In conjunction with adoption of ASC 606, the Company updated its significant accounting policy related to revenue recognition disclosed in Note 1 “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” of the Consolidated Financial Statements in the Company’s annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017. An overview of the Company’s revenue recognition policy under ASC 606 is included in Note 12 “Revenue from Contracts with Customers.”

Results for the three month period ended March 31, 2018 is presented under ASC 606.  Prior periods are not adjusted and will continue to be reported in accordance with ASC 605 Revenue Recognition (“ASC 605”).  However, during fiscal year 2018, the Company is required to provide additional disclosures presenting the amount by which each 2018 financial statement line item was affected as a result of applying ASC 606 and an explanation of significant changes in order to present 2018 on a comparative basis under ASC 605.

The following tables summarize the impacts of adopting ASC 606 on the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for the three month period ended March 31, 2018.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations
             
Balance Without
 
   
As Reported
   
Adjustments
   
Adoption of
ASC 606
 
Revenues
 
$
619.6
   
$
(3.9
)
 
$
615.7
 
Cost of sales
   
387.7
     
(2.7
)
   
385.0
 
Provision (benefit) for income taxes
   
23.4
     
(0.3
)
   
23.1
 
Net Income (Loss)
   
42.4
     
(0.9
)
   
41.5
 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
             
Balance Without
 
   
As Reported
   
Adjustments
   
Adoption of
ASC 606
 
Assets
                 
Inventories
 
$
567.2
   
$
2.7
   
$
569.9
 
Other current assets(1)
   
50.8
     
(2.7
)
   
48.1
 
                         
Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity
                       
Accrued liabilities
   
305.4
     
0.9
     
306.3
 
Accumulated deficit
   
(535.7
   
(0.9
)
   
(536.6

(1)
Adjustment represents “Contract assets”.  See Note 12 “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” for an explanation of the Contract assets account included in “Other Current assets” in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

ASU 2017-07 Compensation – Retirement Benefits (Topic 715) – Improving the Presentation of Net Periodic Pension Cost and Net Periodic Postretirement Benefit Cost

The Company adopted FASB ASU 2017-07 on January 1, 2018, the adoption date.  The Company applied ASU 2017-07 retrospectively for the presentation of the service cost component and the other components of net periodic benefit cost in the income statement and prospectively for the capitalization of the service cost component of net periodic benefit cost in assets.  ASU 2017-07 allows the Company to use the amounts disclosed in its pension and other postretirement benefit plan note for the prior comparative periods as the estimation basis for applying the retrospective presentation requirements.  Applying the practical expedient, the Company reclassified $0.1 million of expense from “Selling and administrative expenses” to “Other income, net” within the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three month period ended March 31, 2017.

ASU 2017-12 Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815) – Targeted Improvements to Accounting for Hedging Activities

The Company early adopted FASB ASU 2017-12, Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815) – Targeted Improvements to Accounting for Hedging Activities (“ASU 2017-12”) on January 1, 2018, the adoption date, using the modified retrospective approach.  As of the adoption date, the Company was the fixed rate payor on 12 interest rate swap contracts that fixed the LIBOR-based index used to determine the interest rates charged on a total of $1,125.0 million of the Company’s LIBOR-based variable rate borrowings.  The Company recorded a cumulative-effect adjustment on the adoption date increasing the opening balance of the “Accumulated deficit” line of the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets by $0.3 million and decreasing the “Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss” line of the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets by $0.3 million.
 
12

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842).  The amendments in this update will replace most of the existing GAAP lease accounting guidance in order to increase transparency and comparability among organizations by recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet and disclosing key information about leasing arrangements.  The ASU is effective for public companies beginning in the first quarter of 2019.  The ASU requires lessees and lessors to recognize and measure leases at the beginning of the earliest period presented using a modified retrospective approach.  During March 2018 the FASB approved amendments to create an optional transition method that will provide an option to use the effective date of Topic 842 as the date of initial application of the transition. The Company is currently assessing the impact of this ASU on its condensed consolidated financial statements and evaluating the method of adoption.

In March 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-02, Income Statement – Reporting Comprehensive Income (Topic 220). The amendments in this update allow a reclassification from accumulated other comprehensive income to retained earnings for stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.  Consequently, the amendments eliminate the stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act and will improve the usefulness of information reported to financial statement users.  However, because the amendments only relate to the reclassification of the income tax effects of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the underlying guidance that requires the effect of a change in tax laws or rates be included in income from continuing operations is not affected.  The ASU is effective for public companies beginning in the first quarter of 2019.  The Company is currently assessing the impact of this ASU on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

Note 2. Business Combinations

Acquisition of Runtech Systems Oy

On February 8, 2018, the Company acquired 100% of the stock of Runtech Systems Oy (“Runtech”), a leading global manufacturer of turbo vacuum technology systems and optimization solutions for industrial applications.  The Company acquired all of the assets and assumed certain liabilities of Runtech for total cash consideration of $94.9 million, net of cash acquired.  The revenues and operating income of Runtech are included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements from the acquisition date and are included in the Industrials segment.  The preliminary purchase price allocation resulted in the recording of $63.6 million of goodwill and $31.3 million of amortizable intangible assets as of the acquisition date.  None of the goodwill resulting from this acquisition is deductible for tax purposes.

Acquisition of LeROI Compressors

On June 5, 2017, the Company acquired 100% of the stock of LeROI Compressors (“LeROI”), a leading North America manufacturer of gas compression equipment and solutions for vapor recovery, biogas, and other process and industrials applications.  The Company acquired all of the assets and assumed certain liabilities of LeROI for total cash consideration of $20.4 million, net of cash acquired.  Included in the cash consideration is an indemnity holdback of $1.9 million recorded in “Accrued liabilities” and expected to be paid by the end of 2021.  The revenues and operating income of LeROI are included in the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements from the acquisition date and are included in the Industrials segment.  None of the goodwill resulting from this acquisition is deductible for tax purposes.

Acquisition of the Non-Controlling Interest in Tamrotor Kompressorit Oy

On March 3, 2017, the Company acquired the remaining 49% non-controlling interest of Tamrotor Kompressorit Oy (“Tamrotor”), a distributor of the Company’s Industrials segment air compression products.  The Company acquired the remaining interest in Tamrotor for total cash consideration of $5.2 million, consisting entirely of payments to the former shareholders.  Included in the cash consideration was a holdback of $0.5 million that was paid in the third quarter of 2017.  This transaction resulted in an increase to “Capital in excess of par value” of $2.3 million and an increase to “Accumulated other comprehensive loss” of $1.5 million in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.
 
13

Acquisition Revenues and Operating Income

Included in the financial statements for these acquisitions subsequent to their date of acquisition was revenue and operating income of $15.2 million and $0.4 million, respectively, for the three month period ended March 31, 2018.  No revenue or operating income was recorded for these acquisitions in the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations for the three month period ended March 31, 2017.

Pro forma information regarding these acquisitions have not been provided as they did not have a material impact on our consolidated results of operations individually or in the aggregate.

Note 3. Restructuring

Industrials Restructuring Program

The Industrials restructuring program in the Industrials segment, announced in the third quarter of 2014 and revised and expanded during the second quarter of 2016, was substantially completed as of December 31, 2017.  Through December 31, 2017, $38.5 million had been charged to expense through “Other operating expense, net” in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.  The Company does not anticipate any material future expense related to the Industrials restructuring program and any remaining liabilities will be paid as contractually obligated.

Energy Restructuring Program

The Energy restructuring program in the Energy segment, announced in the fourth quarter of 2016, was substantially completed as of December 31, 2017.  Through December 31, 2017, $6.3 million had been charged to expense through “Other operating expense, net” in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.  The Company does not anticipate any material future expense related to the Energy restructuring program and any remaining liabilities will be paid as contractually obligated.

Medical Restructuring Program

The Medical restructuring program in the Medical segment, announced in the fourth quarter of 2016, was substantially completed as of December 31, 2017.  Through December 31, 2017, $3.2 million had been charged to expense through “Other operating expense, net” in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.  The Company does not anticipate any material future expense related to the Medical restructuring program and any remaining liabilities will be paid as contractually obligated.

The activity associated with the Company’s restructuring programs for the three month period ended March 31, 2018 was immaterial.

The following table summarizes the activity associated with the Company’s restructuring programs by segment for the three month period ended March 31, 2017.

   
Industrials
Program
   
Energy
Program
   
Medical
Program
   
Total
 
Balance at December 31, 2016
 
$
11.1
   
$
5.6
   
$
4.2
   
$
20.9
 
Charged to expense - Termination benefits
   
0.6
     
(0.2
)
   
(0.1
)
   
0.3
 
Charged to expense - Other
   
0.8
     
0.6
     
-
     
1.4
 
Payments
   
(4.6
)
   
(2.1
)
   
(0.5
)
   
(7.2
)
Other, net
   
0.1
     
(0.1
)
   
0.1
     
0.1
 
Balance at March 31, 2017
 
$
8.0
   
$
3.8
   
$
3.7
   
$
15.5
 

As of March 31, 2018, restructuring reserves of $4.1 million are included in “Accrued liabilities” and restructuring reserves of $0.2 million are included in “Other liabilities” in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.  As of December 31, 2017, restructuring reserves of $6.5 million were included in “Accrued liabilities” and restructuring reserves of $0.2 million were included in “Other liabilities” in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.
 
14

Note 4. Inventories

Inventories as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 consisted of the following.

   
March 31,
2018
   
December 31,
2017
 
Raw materials, including parts and subassemblies
 
$
388.1
   
$
362.6
 
Work-in-process
   
79.7
     
57.9
 
Finished goods
   
86.0
     
60.6
 
     
553.8
     
481.1
 
Excess of LIFO costs over FIFO costs
   
13.4
     
13.4
 
Inventories
 
$
567.2
   
$
494.5
 

Note 5. Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

The changes in the carrying amount of goodwill attributable to each reportable segment for the three month period ended March 31, 2018 is presented in the table below.

   
Industrials
   
Energy
   
Medical
   
Total
 
Balance as of December 31, 2017
 
$
561.6
   
$
460.2
   
$
205.8
   
$
1,227.6
 
Acquisition
   
63.6
     
-
     
-
     
63.6
 
Foreign currency translation
   
9.6
     
4.9
     
2.6
     
17.1
 
Balance as of March 31, 2018
 
$
634.8
   
$
465.1
   
$
208.4
   
$
1,308.3
 

On February 8, 2018, the Company acquired Runtech which is included in the Industrials segment.  The excess of the purchase price over the estimated fair values of tangible assets, identifiable assets, and assumed liabilities was recorded as goodwill.  As of March 31, 2018, the preliminary purchase price allocation resulted in a total of $63.6 million of goodwill.  The allocation of the purchase price is preliminary and subject to refinement based on final fair values of the identified assets acquired and liabilities assumed.

As of March 31, 2018, goodwill included $563.9 million of accumulated impairment losses within the Energy segment since the date of the transaction in which the Company was acquired by an affiliate of Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. L.P. on July 30, 2013 (the “KKR Transaction”).  There were no goodwill impairment charges recorded during the three month period ended March 31, 2018.
 
15

Other intangible assets as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 consisted of the following.

    
March 31, 2018
   
December 31, 2017
 
   
Gross
Carrying
Amount
   
Accumulated
Amortization
   
Gross
Carrying
Amount
   
Accumulated
Amortization
 
Amortized intangible assets:
                       
Customer lists and relationships
 
$
1,248.7
   
$
(507.0
)
 
$
1,226.8
   
$
(473.0
)
Technology
   
23.3
     
(4.3
)
   
8.1
     
(4.0
)
Trademarks
   
38.4
     
(11.5
)
   
30.3
     
(10.6
)
Backlog
   
70.5
     
(67.4
)
   
65.5
     
(65.5
)
Other
   
55.3
     
(25.5
)
   
53.6
     
(23.5
)
Unamortized intangible assets:
                               
Trademarks
   
628.7
     
-
     
623.5
     
-
 
Total other intangible assets
 
$
2,064.9
   
$
(615.7
)
 
$
2,007.8
   
$
(576.6
)

Amortization of intangible assets was $30.9 million for the three month period ended March 31, 2018 and $27.6 million for the three month period ended March 31, 2017.

Amortization of intangible assets is anticipated to be approximately $125.1 million annually in 2019 through 2023 based upon exchange rates as of March 31, 2018.

Note 6. Accrued Liabilities

Accrued liabilities as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 consisted of the following.

   
March 31,
2018
   
December 31,
2017
 
             
Salaries, wages and related fringe benefits
 
$
86.4
   
$
97.3
 
Restructuring
   
4.1
     
6.5
 
Taxes
   
48.2
     
34.5
 
Contract liabilities(1)
   
82.3
     
42.7
 
Product warranty
   
24.3
     
22.3
 
Accrued interest
   
0.9
     
0.8
 
Other
   
59.2
     
67.1
 
Total accrued liabilities
 
$
305.4
   
$
271.2
 

(1)
For purposes of comparability, “Advance payments on sales contracts” as of December 31, 2017 was reclassified to “Contract liabilities.”  See Note 12 “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” for an explanation of the Contract liabilities account included in “Accrued liabilities” in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.
 
16

A reconciliation of the changes in the accrued product warranty liability for the three month periods ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 are as follows.

   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2017
 
                 
Balance at beginning of period
 
$
22.3
   
$
21.7
 
Product warranty accruals
   
6.1
     
5.9
 
Settlements
   
(5.4
)
   
(5.4
)
Charged to other accounts(1)
   
1.3
     
0.3
 
Balance at end of period
 
$
24.3
   
$
22.5
 

(1)
Includes primarily the effects of foreign currency translation adjustments for the Company’s subsidiaries with functional currencies other than the USD and changes in the accrual related to acquisitions.

Note 7. Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits

The following table summarizes the components of net periodic benefit cost for the Company’s defined benefit pension plans and other postretirement benefit plans recognized for the three month periods ended March 31, 2018 and 2017.

   
Pension Benefits
   
Other Postretirement
 
   
U.S. Plans
   
Non-U.S. Plans
   
Benefits
 
   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2018
 
                         
Service cost
 
$
-
   
$
0.5
   
$
-
 
Interest cost
   
0.5
     
1.9
     
-
 
Expected return on plan assets
   
(1.2
)
   
(3.0
)
   
-
 
Recognition of:
                       
Unrecognized prior service cost
   
-
     
-
     
-
 
Unrecognized net actuarial loss
   
-
     
0.5
     
-
 
   
$
(0.7
)
 
$
(0.1
)
 
$
-
 
 
17

   
Pension Benefits
   
Other Postretirement
 
   
U.S. Plans
   
Non-U.S. Plans
   
Benefits
 
   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2017
   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2017
   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2017
 
                         
Service cost
 
$
-
   
$
0.4
   
$
-
 
Interest cost
   
0.6
     
1.9
     
-
 
Expected return on plan assets
   
(1.1
)
   
(2.5
)
   
-
 
Recognition of:
                       
Unrecognized prior service cost
   
-
     
-
     
-
 
Unrecognized net actuarial loss
   
-
     
1.2
     
-
 
   
$
(0.5
)
 
$
1.0
   
$
-
 

The components of net periodic benefit cost other than the service cost component are included in “Other income, net” in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Note 8. Debt

The Company’s debt as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 is summarized as follows.

   
March 31,
2018
   
December 31,
2017
 
                 
Short-term borrowings
 
$
-
   
$
-
 
Long-term debt:
               
Revolving credit facility, due 2020
 
$
-
   
$
-
 
Receivables financing agreement, due 2020
   
-
     
-
 
Term loan denominated in U.S. dollars, due 2024(1)
   
1,279.1
     
1,282.3
 
Term loan denominated in Euros, due 2024(2)
   
753.9
     
735.9
 
Capitalized leases and other long-term debt
   
26.7
     
26.9
 
Unamortized debt issuance costs
   
(4.6
)
   
(4.9
)
     
2,055.1
     
2,040.2
 
Current maturities of long-term debt
   
21.1
     
20.9
 
Total long-term debt, net
 
$
2,034.0
   
$
2,019.3
 

(1)
As of March 31, 2018, the applicable interest rate was 5.05% and the weighted-average interest rate was 4.46% for the three month period ended March 31, 2018.

(2)
As of March 31, 2018, the applicable interest rate was 3.00% and the weighted-average interest rate was 3.00% for the three month period ended March 31, 2018.
 
18

Senior Secured Credit Facilities

In connection with the KKR transaction, the Company entered into a senior secured credit agreement with UBS AG, Stamford Branch, as administrative agent, and other agents and lenders party thereto (the “Senior Secured Credit Facilities”) on July 30, 2013.

The Senior Secured Credit Facilities entered into on July 30, 2013 provided senior secured financing in the equivalent of approximately $2,825.0 million, consisting of: (i) a senior secured term loan facility (the “Original Dollar Term Loan Facility”) in an aggregate principal amount of $1,900.0 million; (ii) a senior secured term loan facility (the “Original Euro Term Loan Facility,” together with the Dollar Term Loan Facility, the “Term Loan Facilities”) in an aggregate principal amount of €400.0 million; and (iii) a senior secured revolving credit facility (the “Revolving Credit Facility”) in an aggregate principal amount of $400.0 million available to be drawn in U.S. dollars (“USD”), Euros (“EUR”), Great British Pounds (“GBP”) and other reasonably acceptable foreign currencies, subject to certain sublimits for the foreign currencies.

The Company entered into Amendment No. 1 to the Senior Secured Credit Facilities with UBS AG, Stamford Branch, as administrative agent, and the lenders and other parties thereto on March 4, 2016 (“Amendment No.1”) and Amendment No. 2 to the Senior Secured Credit Facilities with UBS AG, Stamford Branch, as administrative agent, and other agents, lenders and parties thereto on August 17, 2017 (“Amendment No. 2”).

Amendment No. 1 reduced the aggregate principal borrowing capacity of the Revolving Credit Facility by $40.0 million to $360.0 million, extended the term of the Revolving Credit Facility to April 30, 2020 with respect to consenting lenders and provided for customary bail-in provisions to address certain European regulatory requirements.

Amendment No. 2 refinanced the Original Dollar Term Loan Facility with a replacement $1,285.5 million senior secured U.S. dollar term loan facility (the ‘‘Dollar Term Loan Facility’’) and the Original Euro Term Loan Facility with a replacement €615.0 million senior secured euro term loan facility (the ‘‘Euro Term Loan Facility’’).  Further the maturity for both term loan facilities was extended to July 30, 2024 and LIBOR Floor was reduced from 1.0% to 0.0%.

On July 30, 2018, the Revolving Credit Facility principal amount will decrease to $269.9 million resulting from the maturity of the tranches of the Revolving Credit Facility which are owned by lenders which elected not to modify the original Revolving Credit Facility maturity date, and any amounts then outstanding in excess of $269.9 million will be required to be paid.  Any principal amounts outstanding as of April 30, 2020 will be due at that time and required to be paid in full.

The borrower of the Dollar Term Loan Facility and the Euro Term Loan Facility is Gardner Denver, Inc.  Prior to the Company entering into Amendment No. 1, GD German Holdings II GmbH became an additional borrower and successor in interest to Gardner Denver Holdings GmbH & Co. KG. GD German Holdings II GmbH, GD First (UK) Limited and Gardner Denver, Inc. are the listed borrowers under the Revolving Credit Facility. The Revolving Credit Facility includes borrowing capacity available for letters of credit up to $200.0 million and for borrowings on same-day notice, referred to as swingline loans. As of March 31, 2018, the Company had $7.4 million of outstanding letters of credit under the Revolving Credit Facility and unused availability of $352.6 million.

The Senior Secured Credit Facilities provide that the Company will have the right at any time to request incremental term loans and/or revolving commitments in an aggregate principal amount of up to (i) if as of the last day of the most recently ended test period the Consolidated Senior Secured Debt to Consolidated EBITDA Ratio (as defined in the Senior Secured Credit Facilities) is equal to or less than 5.50 to 1.00, $250.0 million plus (ii) voluntary prepayments and voluntary commitment reductions of the Senior Secured Credit Facilities prior to the date of any such incurrence plus (iii) an additional amount if, after giving effect to the incurrence of such additional amount, the Company does not exceed a Consolidated Senior Secured Debt to Consolidated EBITDA Ratio of 4.50 to 1.00. The lenders under the Senior Secured Credit Facilities are not under any obligation to provide any such incremental commitments or loans, and any such addition of, or increase in commitments or loans, will be subject to certain customary conditions.

To the extent that revolving credit loans and swingline loans plus non-cash collateralized letters of credit under the Revolving Credit Facility are outstanding in an amount exceeding $300.0 million, compliance with a Consolidated Senior Secured Debt to Consolidated EBITDA Ratio of 7.00 to 1.00 is required for borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facility.
 
19

Interest Rate and Fees

Borrowings under the Dollar Term Loan Facility, the Euro Term Loan Facility and the Revolving Credit Facility bear interest at a rate equal to, at the Company’s option, either (a) the greater of LIBOR for the relevant interest period or 0.00% per annum, in each case adjusted for statutory reserve requirements, plus an applicable margin or (b) a base rate (the ‘‘Base Rate’’) equal to the highest of (1) the rate of interest publicly announced by the administrative agent as its prime rate in effect at its principal office in Stamford, Connecticut, (2) the federal funds effective rate plus 0.50% and (3) LIBOR for an interest period of one month, adjusted for statutory reserve requirements, plus 1.00%, in each case, plus an applicable margin. The applicable margin for (i) the Dollar Term Loan Facility is 2.75% for LIBOR loans and 1.75% for Base Rate loans, (ii) the Revolving Credit Facility is 2.75% for LIBOR loans and 1.75% for Base Rate loans and (iii) the Euro Term Loan is 3.00% for LIBOR loans.

The applicable margins under the Revolving Credit Facility may decrease based upon our achievement of certain Consolidated Senior Secured Debt to Consolidated EBITDA Ratios. In addition to paying interest on outstanding principal under the Senior Secured Credit Facilities, the Company is required to pay a commitment fee of 0.50% per annum to the lenders under the Revolving Credit Facility in respect of the unutilized commitments thereunder. The commitment fee rate was reduced to 0.375% because our Consolidated Senior Secured Debt to Consolidated EBITDA Ratio is less than or equal to 3.0 to 1.0. The Company must also pay customary letter of credit fees.

Prepayments

The Senior Secured Credit Facilities require the Company to prepay outstanding term loans, subject to certain exceptions, with: (i) 50% of annual excess cash flow (as defined in the Senior Secured Credit Facilities) commencing with the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014 (which percentage will be reduced to 25% if the Company’s  Secured Debt to Consolidated EBITDA Ratio (as defined in the Senior Secured Credit Facilities) is less than or equal to 3.50 to 1.00 but greater than 3.00 to 1.00, and which prepayment will not be required if the Secured Debt to Consolidated EBITDA Ratio is less than or equal to 3.00 to 1.00); (ii) 100% of the net cash proceeds of non-ordinary course asset sales or other dispositions of property, subject to reinvestment rights; and (iii) 100% of the net cash proceeds of any incurrence of debt, other than proceeds from debt permitted under the Senior Secured Credit Facilities.

The foregoing mandatory prepayments will be applied to the scheduled installments of principal of the Term Loan Facilities in direct order of maturity.

Subject to the following sentence, the Company may voluntarily repay outstanding loans under the Senior Secured Credit Facilities at any time without premium or penalty, subject to certain customary conditions, including reimbursements of the lenders’ redeployment costs actually incurred in the case of a prepayment of LIBOR borrowings other than on the last day of the relevant interest period. Voluntary prepayments of the Dollar Term Loan Facility and/or the Euro Term Loan Facility prior to the date that is six months after the effective date of Amendment No. 2 in connection with any repricing transaction, the primary purpose of which is to decrease the effective yield of the Dollar Term Loan Facility or the Euro Term Loan Facility, as applicable, will require payment of a 1.00% prepayment premium.

Amortization and Final Maturity

The Dollar Term Loan Facility amortizes in equal quarterly installments in aggregate annual amounts equal to 1.00% of the original principal amount of the Dollar Term Loan Facility, with the balance being payable on July 30, 2024. The Euro Term Loan Facility includes repayments in equal quarterly installments in aggregate annual amounts equal to 1.00% of the original principal amount of the Euro Term Loan Facility, with the balance being payable on July 30, 2024.

Principal amounts outstanding under the Revolving Credit Facility are due and payable in full at maturity on July 30, 2018, in the case of portions held by non-consenting lenders, and April 30, 2020 with respect to all other borrowings thereunder.

Amendment No. 1 reduced the minimum aggregate principal amount for extension amendments to the facilities from $50.0 million to $35.0 million.
 
20

Guarantee and Security

All obligations of the borrowers under the Senior Secured Credit Facilities are unconditionally guaranteed by the Company and all of its material, wholly-owned U.S. restricted subsidiaries, with customary exceptions including where providing such guarantees are not permitted by law, regulation or contract or would result in adverse tax consequences.

All obligations of the borrowers under the Senior Secured Credit Facilities, and the guarantees of such obligations, are secured, subject to permitted liens and other exceptions, by substantially all of the assets of the borrowers and each guarantor, including but not limited to: (i) a perfected pledge of the capital stock issued by the borrowers and each subsidiary guarantor and (ii) perfected security interests in substantially all other tangible and intangible assets of the borrowers and the guarantors (subject to certain exceptions and exclusions). The obligations of the non-U.S. borrowers are secured by certain assets in jurisdictions outside of the United States.

Certain Covenants and Events of Default

The Senior Secured Credit Facilities contain a number of covenants that, among other things, restrict, subject to certain exceptions, the Company’s ability to: incur additional indebtedness and guarantee indebtedness; create or incur liens; engage in mergers or consolidations; sell, transfer or otherwise dispose of assets; create limitations on subsidiary distributions; pay dividends and distributions or repurchase its own capital stock; and make investments, loans or advances, prepayments of junior financings, or other restricted payments. In addition, certain restricted payments constituting dividends or distributions (subject to certain exceptions) are subject to compliance with a Consolidated Total Debt to Consolidated EBITDA Ratio (as defined in the Senior Secured Credit Facilities) of 5.00 to 1.00. Investments in unrestricted subsidiaries are permitted up to an aggregate amount that does not exceed the greater of $100.0 million and 25% of Consolidated EBITDA.

The Revolving Credit Facility also requires the Company’s Consolidated Senior Secured Debt to Consolidated EBITDA Ratio to not exceed 7.50 to 1.00 for each fiscal quarter when outstanding revolving credit loans and swingline loans plus non-cash collateralized letters of credit under the Revolving Credit Facility (excluding (i) letters of credit in an aggregate amount not to exceed $80.0 million existing on the date of the closing of the Senior Secured Credit Facilities and any extensions thereof, replacement letters of credit or letters of credit issued in lieu thereof, in each case, to the extent the face amount of such letters of credit is not increased above the face amount of the letter of credit being extended, replaced or substituted and (ii) other non-cash collateralized letters of credit in an aggregate amount not to exceed $25.0 million, provided that the aggregate amount of non-cash collateralized letters of credit outstanding excluded pursuant to this provision shall not exceed $50.0 million) exceed $120.0 million.

The Senior Secured Credit Facilities also contain certain customary affirmative covenants and events of default, including a change of control.

Receivables Financing Agreement

In May 2016, the Company entered into the Receivables Financing Agreement, providing for aggregated borrowing of up to $75.0 million governed by a borrowing base. The Receivables Financing Agreement provides for a lower cost alternative in the issuance of letters of credit with the remaining unused capacity providing additional liquidity.  On June 30, 2017, the Company signed the first amendment of the Receivables Financing Agreement which increased the aggregated borrowing capacity by $50.0 million to $125.0 million governed by a borrowing base and extended the term to June 30, 2020.  The Receivables Financing Agreement terminates on June 30, 2020, unless terminated earlier pursuant to its terms.  As of March 31, 2018, the Company had no outstanding borrowings under the Receivables Financing Agreement and $33.3 million of letters of credit outstanding. As of March 31, 2018 there was $72.3 million of capacity available under the Receivables Financing Agreement.

Borrowings under the Receivables Financing Agreement accrue interest at a reserve-adjusted LIBOR or a base rate, plus 1.6%. Letters of credit accrue interest at 1.6%.  The Company may prepay borrowings or letters of credit or draw on the Receivables Financing Agreement upon one business day prior written notice and may terminate the Receivables Financing Agreement with 15 days’ prior written notice.

As part of the Receivables Financing Agreement, eligible accounts receivable of certain of our subsidiaries are sold to a wholly owned “bankruptcy remote” special purpose vehicle (“SPV”). The SPV pledges the receivables as security for loans and letters of credit. The SPV is included in our consolidated financial statements and therefore, the accounts receivable owned by it are included in our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. However, the accounts receivable owned by the SPV are separate and distinct from our other assets and are not available to our other creditors should we become insolvent.
 
21

The Receivables Financing Agreement contains various customary representations and warranties and covenants, and default provisions which provide for the termination and acceleration of the commitments and loans under the agreement in circumstances including, but not limited to, failure to make payments when due, breach of representations, warranties or covenants, certain insolvency events or failure to maintain the security interest in the trade receivables, a change in control and defaults under other material indebtedness.

Note 9. Stock-Based Compensation Plans

2013 Stock Incentive Plan

The Company adopted the 2013 Stock Incentive Plan (“2013 Plan”) on October 14, 2013 as amended on April 27, 2015 under which the Company may grant stock-based compensation awards to employees, directors and advisors.  The total number of shares available for grant under the 2013 Plan and reserved for issuance was 20.9 million shares.  All stock options were granted to employees, directors, and advisors with an exercise price equal to the fair value of the Company’s per share common stock at the date of grant.  Following the Company’s initial public offering, the Company may grant stock-based compensation awards pursuant to the 2017 Plan (defined below) and ceased granting new awards pursuant to the 2013 Plan.

Stock options awards under the 2013 Plan vest over either three, four or five years with 50% of each award vesting based on time and 50% of each award vesting based on the achievement of certain financial targets.

Prior to the Company’s initial public offering in May 2017, the Company had certain repurchase rights on stock acquired through the exercise of a stock option that created an implicit service period and created a condition in which an optionee may not receive the economic benefits of the option until the repurchase rights are eliminated. The repurchase rights creating the implicit service period are eliminated at the earlier of an initial public offering or change of control event.  Before the elimination of the repurchase rights, because an initial public offering or change of control were not probable of occurring, no compensation expense was recorded for equity awards.

The Company recognized a liability for compensation expense measured at intrinsic value when it was probable that an employee would receive benefits under the terms of the plan due to termination of employment.

Under the terms of the 2013 Plan, concurrent with the initial public offering, the Company no longer retains repurchase rights on stock acquired through the exercise of a stock option and the implicit service period was eliminated on outstanding stock options.

2017 Omnibus Incentive Plan

In May 2017, the Company’s Board approved the 2017 Omnibus Incentive Plan (“2017 Plan”) under which the Company may grant stock-based compensation awards to employees, directors and advisors.  The total number of shares originally available for grant under the 2017 Plan and reserved for issuance was 8.6 million shares.  Any shares of common stock subject to outstanding awards granted under the Company’s 2013 Stock Incentive Plan that, after the effective date of the 2017 Plan, expire or are otherwise forfeited or terminated in accordance with their terms are also available for grant under the 2017 Plan.  As of March 31, 2018, 7.9 million shares are available for grant under the 2017 Plan.  All stock option awards were granted to employees, directors, and advisors with an exercise price equal to the fair value per share of the Company’s common stock at the date of grant.   All restricted stock awards were granted to employees, directors, and advisors with a price equal to fair value per share of the Company’s common stock at the date of the grant.

Stock options and restricted stock unit awards under the 2017 Plan generally vest over either four or five years based on time.

Certain stock awards under the 2013 Plan are expected to be settled in cash (stock appreciation rights “SAR”) and are accounted for as liability awards. As of March 31, 2018, a liability of approximately $15.0 million for SARs is included in “Accrued liabilities” in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Under the 2013 and 2017 Plans, the Company recognized stock-based compensation expense of approximately $3.4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2018.  The $3.4 million of stock-based compensation includes expense for modifications of equity awards for certain former employees of $3.8 million and expense for equity awards granted under the 2013 Plan and 2017 Plan of $1.4 million reduced by a benefit for a reduction in the liability for SARs of $1.8 million.
 
22

The $3.8 million stock-based compensation for modifications for the three month period ended March 31, 2018 provided continued vesting through scheduled vesting dates and extended expiration dates for certain former employees.  The incremental stock-based compensation was determined using the Black-Scholes option pricing model based on assumptions which included expected lives of 1.00 to 1.25 years, a risk-free interest rate of 2.03%, assumed volatility of 26.8% to 27.3% and an expected dividend rate of 0.0%.  These costs are included in “Other operating expense, net” in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.

As of March 31, 2018, there was $28.1 million of total unrecognized compensation expense related to outstanding stock options and restricted stock unit awards.

Stock Option Awards

A summary of the Company’s stock option (including SARs) activity for the three month period ended March 31, 2018 is presented in the following table (underlying shares in thousands).

   
Shares
   
Weighted-Average
Exercise Price
(per share)
 
Outstanding at December 31, 2017
   
12,834
   
$
9.54
 
Granted
   
766
   
$
32.06
 
Exercised or settled
   
(391
)
 
$
8.42
 
Forfeited
   
(85
)
 
$
8.43
 
Outstanding at March 31, 2018
   
13,124
   
$
10.89
 
Vested at March 31, 2018
   
9,068
   
$
9.07
 

The following assumptions were used to estimate the fair value of options granted (excluding previously disclosed modified awards) during the three month period ended March 31, 2018 using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model.

   
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2018
 
Assumptions:
     
Expected life of options (in years)
   
7.00 - 7.50
 
Risk-free interest rate
   
2.9
%
Assumed volatility
   
35.1 - 35.4
%
Expected dividend rate
   
0.0
%
 
23

Restricted Stock Unit Awards

A summary of the Company’s restricted stock unit activity for the three month period ended March 31, 2018 is presented in the following table (underlying shares in thousands).

   
Shares
   
Weighted-Average
Grant-Date
Fair Value
 
Non-vested at December 31, 2017
   
-
   
$
-
 
Granted
   
337
   
$
32.06
 
Vested
   
-
   
$
-
 
Forfeited
   
-
   
$
-
 
Non-vested at March 31, 2018
   
337
   
$
32.06
 

Note 10. Accumulated Other Comprehensive (Loss) Income

The Company’s other comprehensive (loss) income consists of (i) unrealized foreign currency net gains and losses on the translation of the assets and liabilities of its foreign operations; (ii) realized and unrealized foreign currency gains and losses on intercompany notes of a long-term nature and certain hedges of net investments in foreign operations, net of income taxes; (iii) unrealized gains and losses on cash flow hedges (consisting of interest rate swaps), net of income taxes; and (iv) pension and other postretirement prior service cost and actuarial gains or losses, net of income taxes.

The before tax income (loss) and related income tax effect are as follows.

   
For the Three Month Period Ended
March 31, 2018
   
For the Three Month Period Ended
March 31, 2017
 
   
Before-Tax
Amount
   
Tax
(Expense)
or Benefit
   
Net of Tax
Amount
   
Before-Tax
Amount
   
Tax
Benefit
or (Expense)
   
Net of Tax
Amount
 
Foreign currency translation adjustments, net
 
$
51.4
   
$
-
   
$
51.4
   
$
25.7
   
$
-
   
$
25.7
 
Foreign currency (losses) gains, net
   
(21.7
)
   
4.7
     
(17.0
)
   
(6.2
)
   
2.3
     
(3.9
)
Unrecognized gains (losses) on cash flow hedges, net
   
15.1
     
(3.7
)
   
11.4
     
4.9
     
(1.9
)
   
3.0
 
Pension and other postretirement benefit prior service cost and gain or loss, net
   
(1.2
)
   
1.6
     
0.4
     
(0.1
)
   
0.3
     
0.2
 
Other comprehensive income
 
$
43.6
   
$
2.6
   
$
46.2
   
$
24.3
   
$
0.7
   
$
25.0
 
 
24

Changes in accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income by component for the three month periods ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 are presented in the following table(1).

   
Cumulative
Currency
Translation
Adjustment
   
Foreign
Currency
Gains and
(Losses)
   
Unrealized
(Losses) Gains
on Cash Flow
Hedges
   
Pension and
Postretirement
Benefit Plans
   
Total
 
                               
Balance at December 31, 2017
 
$
(166.6
)
 
$
37.0
   
$
(29.8
)
 
$
(40.4
)
 
$
(199.8
)
Other comprehensive income (loss) before reclassifications
   
51.4
     
(17.0
)
   
7.8
     
-
     
42.2
 
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
   
-
     
-
     
3.6
     
0.4
     
4.0
 
Other comprehensive income (loss)
   
51.4
     
(17.0
)
   
11.4
     
0.4
     
46.2
 
Cumulative effect adjustment upon adoption of new accounting standard (ASU 2017-12)
   
-
     
-
     
0.3
     
-
     
0.3
 
Balance at March 31, 2018
 
$
(115.2
)
 
$
20.0
   
$
(18.1
)
 
$
(40.0
)
 
$
(153.3
)

   
Cumulative
Currency
Translation
Adjustment
   
Foreign
Currency
Gains and
(Losses)
   
Unrealized
(Losses) Gains
on Cash Flow
Hedges
   
Pension and
Postretirement
Benefit Plans
   
Total
 
                               
Balance at December 31, 2016
 
$
(324.2
)
 
$
88.6
   
$
(42.2
)
 
$
(64.6
)
 
$
(342.4
)
Other comprehensive income (loss) before reclassifications
   
25.7
     
(3.9
)
   
(0.2
)
   
(0.5
)
   
21.1
 
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
   
-
     
-
     
3.2
     
0.7
     
3.9
 
Other comprehensive income (loss)
   
25.7
     
(3.9
)
   
3.0
     
0.2
     
25.0
 
Balance at March 31, 2017
 
$
(298.5
)
 
$
84.7
   
$
(39.2
)
 
$
(64.4
)
 
$
(317.4
)

(1)
All amounts are net of tax.  Amounts in parentheses indicate debits.
 
25

Reclassifications out of accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income for the three month periods ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 are presented in the following table:

Amount Reclassified from Accumulated Other Comprehensive (Loss) Income
 
Details about Accumulated
Other Comprehensive
(Loss) Income Components
 
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2017
   
Affected Line in the
Statement Where Net
Income is Presented
 
Loss on cash flow hedges
                 
Interest rate swaps
 
$
4.8
   
$
5.1
   
Interest expense
 
     
4.8
     
5.1
   
Total before tax
 
     
(1.2
)
   
(1.9
)
 
Income tax benefit
 
   
$
3.6
   
$
3.2
   
Net of tax
 
Amortization of defined benefit pension and other postretirement benefit items
 
$
0.5
   
$
1.2
   
(1) 
 
     
0.5
     
1.2
   
Total before tax
 
     
(0.1
)
   
(0.5
)
 
Income tax benefit
 
   
$
0.4
   
$
0.7
   
Net of tax
 
Total reclassifications for the period
 
$
4.0
   
$
3.9
   
Net of tax
 

(1)
These components are included in the computation of net periodic benefit cost.  See Note 7 “Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits” for additional details.

Note 11. Hedging Activities and Fair Value Measurements

Hedging Activities

The Company is exposed to certain market risks during the normal course of its business arising from adverse changes in interest rates and foreign currency exchange rates.  The Company selectively uses derivative financial instruments (“derivatives”), including foreign currency forward contracts and interest rate swaps, to manage the risks from fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates and interest rates, respectively.  The Company does not purchase or hold derivatives for trading or speculative purposes.  Fluctuations in interest rates and foreign currency exchange rates can be volatile, and the Company’s risk management activities do not totally eliminate these risks.  Consequently, these fluctuations could have a significant effect on the Company’s financial results.

The Company’s exposure to interest rate risk results primarily from its variable-rate borrowings.  The Company manages its debt centrally, considering tax consequences and its overall financing strategies.  The Company manages its exposure to interest rate risk by maintaining a mixture of fixed and variable rate debt and, from time to time, using pay-fixed interest rate swaps as cash flow hedges of variable rate debt in order to adjust the relative fixed and variable proportions.

A substantial portion of the Company’s operations is conducted by its subsidiaries outside of the United States in currencies other than the USD.  Almost all of the Company’s non-U.S. subsidiaries conduct their business primarily in their local currencies, which are also their functional currencies. Other than the USD, the EUR, GBP, and Chinese Yuan are the principal currencies in which the Company and its subsidiaries enter into transactions.  The Company is exposed to the impacts of changes in foreign currency exchange rates on the translation of its non-U.S. subsidiaries’ assets, liabilities and earnings into USD.  The Company has certain U.S. subsidiaries borrow in currencies other than the USD.

The Company and its subsidiaries are also subject to the risk that arises when they, from time to time, enter into transactions in currencies other than their functional currency.  To mitigate this risk, the Company and its subsidiaries typically settle intercompany trading balances monthly. The Company also selectively uses forward currency contracts to manage this risk. These contracts for the sale or purchase of European and other currencies generally mature within one year.
 
26

Derivative Instruments

The following table summarizes the notional amounts, fair values and classification of the Company’s outstanding derivatives by risk category and instrument type within the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017.

   
  
 
March 31, 2018
 
 
Derivative
Classification
 
Notional
Amount (1)
   
Fair Value (1)
Other Current
Assets
   
Fair Value (1)
Other Assets
   
Fair Value (1)
Accrued
Liabilities
   
Fair Value (1)
Other
Liabilities
 
Derivatives Designated as Hedging Instruments
                                 
Interest rate swap contracts
 
Cash Flow
 
$
1,125.0
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
8.4
   
$
23.2
 
Derivatives Not Designated as Hedging Instruments
                                           
Foreign currency forwards
 
Fair Value
 
$
19.3
   
$
0.1
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
-
 
Foreign currency forwards
 
Fair Value
 
$
131.6
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
0.3
   
$
-
 
   
 
     
   
  
 
December 31, 2017
 
 
Derivative
Classification
 
Notional
Amount (1)
   
Fair Value (1)
Other Current
Assets
   
Fair Value (1)
Other Assets
   
Fair Value (1)
Accrued
Liabilities
   
Fair Value (1)
Other
Liabilities
 
Derivatives Designated as Hedging Instruments
                                           
Interest rate swap contracts
 
Cash Flow
 
$
1,125.0
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
16.1
   
$
30.6
 
Derivatives Not Designated as Hedging Instruments
                                           
Foreign currency forwards
 
Fair Value
 
$
94.4
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
1.2
   
$
-
 

(1)
Notional amounts represent the gross contract amounts of the outstanding derivatives excluding the total notional amount of positions that have been effectively closed through offsetting positions.  The net gains and net losses associated with positions that have been effectively closed through offsetting positions but not yet settled are included in the asset and liability derivatives fair value columns, respectively.

Gains and losses on derivatives designated as cash flow hedges included in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive (Loss) Income for the three month periods ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 are as presented in the table below.  See Note 1 “Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements” for a discussion of the adoption of ASU 2017-12.

   
For the Three
Month Period
Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the Three
Month Period
Ended
March 31,
2017
 
Interest rate swap contracts(1)
           
Gain (loss) recognized in AOCI on derivatives
 
$
10.3
   
$
(0.2
)
Loss reclassified from AOCI into income
   
(4.8
)
   
(5.1
)
 
(1)
Losses on derivatives reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”) into income were included in “Interest expense” in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations, the same income statement line item as the earnings effect of the hedged item.

As of March 31, 2018, the Company is the fixed rate payor on 12 interest rate swap contracts that effectively fix the LIBOR-based index used to determine the interest rates charged on a total of $1,125.0 million of the Company’s LIBOR-based variable rate borrowings.  These contracts carry fixed rates ranging from 2.9% to 4.4% and have expiration dates ranging from 2018 to 2020.  These swap agreements qualify as hedging instruments and have been designated as cash flow hedges of forecasted LIBOR-based interest payments.  Based on LIBOR-based swap yield curves as of March 31, 2018, the Company expects to reclassify losses of $13.3 million out of AOCI into earnings during the next 12 months.  The Company’s LIBOR-based variable rate borrowings outstanding as of March 31, 2018 were $1,279.1 million and €611.9 million.
 
27

The Company had three foreign currency forward contracts outstanding as of March 31, 2018 with notional amounts ranging from $19.3 million to $98.9 million.  These contracts are used to hedge the change in fair value of recognized foreign currency denominated assets or liabilities caused by changes in currency exchange rates.  The changes in the fair value of these contracts generally offset the changes in the fair value of a corresponding amount of the hedged items, both of which are included in the “Other operating expense, net” line on the face of the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.  The Company’s foreign currency forward contracts are subject to master netting arrangements or agreements between the Company and each counterparty for the net settlement of all contracts through a single payment in a single currency in the event of default on or termination of any one contract with that certain counterparty.  It is the Company’s practice to recognize the gross amounts in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.  The amount available to be netted is not material.

The Company’s (losses) gains on derivative instruments not designated as accounting hedges and total net foreign currency (losses) gains for the three month periods ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 were as follows:

   
For the Three
Month Period
Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the Three
Month Period
Ended
March 31,
2017
 
Losses on foreign currency forward contracts
 
$
(1.0
)
 
$
(2.2
)
Total foreign currency transaction losses, net
   
(2.6
)
   
(0.6
)

The Company has a significant investment in consolidated subsidiaries with functional currencies other than the USD, particularly the EUR.  The Company designated its Original Euro Term Loan as a hedge of the Company’s net investment in subsidiaries with EUR functional currencies in 2017 until it was extinguished and replaced on August 17, 2017 by a €615.0 million Euro Term Loan, further described in Note 8 “Debt”.  On August 17, 2017, the Company designated the €615.0 million Euro Term Loan as a hedge of the Company’s net investment in subsidiaries with EUR functional currencies.  As of March 31, 2018, the Euro Term Loan of €611.9 million remained designated.

For the period from January 1, 2017 to August 16, 2017, the Company designated two cross currency interest rate swaps, each with a USD notional amount of $100.0 million as hedges of its net investment in EUR functional subsidiaries. Both cross currency interest rate swaps were terminated on August 16, 2017.  The losses and gains from the change in the fair value of the designated net investment hedges were recorded through other comprehensive income.  The recorded Accumulated Other Comprehensive (Loss) Income at the termination of the cross currency interest rate swaps will remain in Accumulated Other Comprehensive (Loss) Income until there is a substantial liquidation of the Company’s net investment in subsidiaries with EUR functional currencies.
 
28

The Company’s gains and (losses), net of income tax, associated with changes in the value of debt and designated cross currency interest rate swaps for the three month periods ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 and the net balance of such gains and (losses) included in accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income as of March 31, 2018 and 2017 were as follows.

   
For the Three
Month Period
Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the Three
Month Period
Ended
March 31,
2017
 
Losses, net of income tax, recorded through other comprehensive income
 
$
(15.2
)
 
$
(3.9
)
Balance included in accumulated other comprehensive income at March 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively
   
17.0
     
78.5
 

For the periods presented all cash flows associated with derivatives are classified as operating cash flows in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows.

Fair Value Measurements

A financial instrument is defined as cash or cash equivalents, evidence of an ownership interest in an entity, or a contract that creates a contractual obligation or right to deliver or receive cash or another financial instrument from another party.  The Company’s financial instruments consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents, trade accounts receivables, trade accounts payables, deferred compensation assets and obligations, derivatives and debt instruments.  The carrying values of cash and cash equivalents, trade accounts receivables, trade accounts payables, and variable rate debt instruments are a reasonable estimate of their respective fair values.

Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (exit price) in the principal or more advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date.  Valuation techniques used to measure fair value must maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs.  The fair value hierarchy is based on three levels of inputs, of which the first two are considered observable and the last unobservable, that may be used to measure fair value as follows:

Level 1
Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the reporting date.

Level 2
Inputs other than Level 1 that are observable, either directly or indirectly, such as quoted prices for similar assets or
liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities as of the reporting date.

Level 3
Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities.
 
29

The following table summarizes the Company’s financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of March 31, 2018.

   
Level 1
   
Level 2
   
Level 3
   
Total
 
Financial Assets
                       
Foreign currency forwards(1)
 
$
-
   
$
0.1
   
$
-
   
$
0.1
 
Trading securities held in deferred compensation plan(2)
   
6.0
     
-
     
-
     
6.0
 
Total
 
$
6.0
   
$
0.1
   
$
-
   
$
6.1
 
Financial Liabilities
                               
Foreign currency forwards(1)
 
$
-
   
$
0.3
   
$
-
   
$
0.3
 
Interest rate swaps(3)
   
-
     
31.6
     
-
     
31.6
 
Deferred compensation plan(2)
   
6.0
     
-
     
-
     
6.0
 
Total
 
$
6.0
   
$
31.9
   
$
-
   
$
37.9
 

(1)
Based on calculations that use readily observable market parameters at their basis, such as spot and forward rates.

(2)
Based on the quoted price of publicly traded mutual funds which are classified as trading securities and accounted for using the mark-to-market method.

(3)
Measured as the present value of all expected future cash flows based on the LIBOR-based swap yield curves as of March 31, 2018.  The present value calculation uses discount rates that have been adjusted to reflect the credit quality of the Company and its counterparties.

Note 12. Revenue from Contracts with Customers

Overview

The Company adopted ASC 606 on January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective method.  See Note 1 “Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements” for further discussion of the adoption.

The Company recognizes revenue when control is transferred to the customer.  The amount of revenue recognized includes adjustments for any variable consideration, such as rebates, sales discounts, liquidated damages, etc., which are included in the transaction price, and allocated to each performance obligation.  The variable consideration is estimated throughout the course of the contract using the Company’s best estimates. Judgements impacting variable consideration related to material rebate and sales discount programs, and significant contracts containing liquidated damage clauses are governed by robust management review processes.

The majority of the Company’s revenues are derived from short duration contracts and revenue is recognized at a single point in time when control is transferred to the customer, generally at shipment or when delivery has occurred or services have been rendered.

The Company has certain long duration contracts that require highly engineered solutions designed to customer specific applications. For contracts where the contractual deliverables have no alternative use and the contract termination clauses provide for the recovery of cost plus a reasonable margin, revenue is recognized over time based on the Company’s progress in satisfying the contractual performance obligations generally measured as the ratio of actual costs incurred to date to the estimated total costs to complete the contract. For contracts with termination provisions that do not provide for recovery of cost and a reasonable margin, revenue is recognized at a point in time, generally at shipment or delivery to the customer. Identification of performance obligations, determination of alterative use, assessment of contractual language regarding termination provisions, and estimation of total project costs are all significant judgements required in the application of ASC 606.

Contractual specifications and requirements may be modified.  The Company considers contract modifications to exist when the modification either creates new or changes the existing enforceable rights and obligations.  In the event a contract modification is for goods or services that are not distinct in the contract, and therefore, form part of a single performance obligation that is partially satisfied as of the modification date, the effect of the contract modification on the transaction price and the Company’s measure of progress for the performance obligation to which it relates, is recognized on a cumulative catch-up basis.
 
30

Taxes assessed by a governmental authority that are both imposed on and concurrent with a specific revenue-producing transaction, that are collected by the Company from a customer, are excluded from revenue. Sales commissions are due at the earlier of collection of payment from customers or recognition of revenue.  Applying the practical expedient from ASC 340-40-25-4, the Company recognizes the incremental costs of obtaining contracts as an expense when incurred if the amortization period of the assets that the Company otherwise would have recognized is one year or less.  These costs are included in the “Selling and administrative expenses” line of the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Disaggregation of Revenue

The following tables provide disaggregated revenue by reportable segment for the three month period ended March 31, 2018.

 
 
Industrials
   
Energy
   
Medical
   
Total
 
Primary Geographic Markets
                       
United States
 
$
90.4
   
$
165.4
   
$
21.3
   
$
277.1
 
Other Americas
   
21.2
     
27.5
     
0.9
     
49.6
 
Total Americas
 
$
111.6
   
$
192.9
   
$
22.2
   
$
326.7
 
EMEA
   
161.0
     
25.2
     
27.0
     
213.2
 
Asia Pacific
   
44.3
     
24.1
     
11.3
     
79.7
 
Total
 
$
316.9
   
$
242.2
   
$
60.5
   
$
619.6
 
 
                               
Product Categories
                               
Original equipment(1)
 
$
215.6
   
$
91.3
   
$
58.1
   
$
365.0
 
Aftermarket(2)
   
101.3
     
150.9
     
2.4
     
254.6
 
Total
 
$
316.9
   
$
242.2
   
$
60.5
   
$
619.6
 
 
                               
Pattern of Revenue Recognition
                               
Revenue recognized at point in time(3)
 
$
307.6
   
$
239.0
   
$
60.5
   
$
607.1
 
Revenue recognized over time(4)
   
9.3
     
3.2
     
-
     
12.5
 
Total
 
$
316.9
   
$
242.2
   
$
60.5
   
$
619.6
 
 
(1)
Revenues from sales of capital equipment within the Industrials and Energy Segments and sales of components to original equipment manufacturers in the Medical Segment.

(2)
Revenues from sales of spare parts, accessories, other components and services in support of maintaining customer owned, installed base of the Company’s original equipment.

(3)
Revenues from short and long duration product and service contracts recognized at a point in time when control is transferred to the customer generally when products delivery has occurred and services have been rendered.

(4)
Revenues primarily from long duration ETO product contracts and certain contracts for delivery of a significant volume of substantially similar products recognized over time as contractual performance obligations are completed.

Performance Obligations

The majority of the Company’s contracts have a single performance obligation as the promise to transfer goods and/or services.  For contracts with multiple performance obligations, the Company utilizes observable prices to determine standalone selling price or cost plus margin if a standalone price is not available. The Company has elected to expense shipping and handling costs as incurred.
 
31

The Company’s primary performance obligations include delivering standard or configured to order (“CTO”) goods to customers, designing and manufacturing a broad range of equipment customized to a customer’s specifications (Engineered to Order (“ETO”), rendering of services (maintenance and repair contracts), and certain extended or service type warranties. For incidental items that are immaterial in the context of the contract, costs are expensed as incurred or accrued at delivery.

As of March 31, 2018, for contracts with an original duration greater than one year, the Company expects to recognize revenue in the future related to unsatisfied (or partially satisfied) performance obligations of $157.4 million in the next twelve months and $64.6 million in periods thereafter. The performance obligations that are unsatisfied (or partially satisfied) are primarily related to orders for goods or services that were placed prior to the end of the reporting period and have not been delivered to the customer, on-going work on ETO contracts where revenue is recognized over time, and service contracts with an original duration greater than one year.

Contract Balances

The following table provides the contract balances as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 presented on Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

 
March 31,
2018
   
December 31,
2017
 
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $19.5 and $18.7, respectively
 
$
541.6
   
$
536.3
 
Contract assets
   
4.8
     
-
 
Contract liabilities
   
82.3
     
42.7
 

Accounts receivable - Amounts due where the Company’s right to receive cash is unconditional.

Contract assets – The Company’s rights to consideration for the satisfaction of performance obligations subject to constraints apart from timing.  Contract assets are transferred to receivables when the right to collect consideration becomes unconditional.  Contract assets are presented net of progress billings and related advances from customers.

Contract liabilities – Advance payments received from customers for contracts for which revenue is not yet recognized.  The increase in the contract liabilities account at March 31, 2018 from December 31, 2017 was due primarily to the acquisition of Runtech of $24.8 million and the impact of foreign currencies of $1.3 million. The remaining change is due to the timing of milestone payments received related to projects for production later this year, partially offset by contract liability balances converted to revenue in the period. Contract liability balances are generally recognized in revenue within twelve months.

Contract assets and liabilities are reported on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets on a contract-by-contract basis at the end of each reporting period.  Contract assets and liabilities are presented net on a contract level, where required.

Payments from customer are generally due 30-60 days after invoicing. Invoicing for sales of standard products generally coincides with shipment or delivery of goods. Invoicing for CTO and ETO contracts typically follows a schedule for billing at contractual milestones. Payment milestones normally include down payments upon the contract signing, completion of product design, completion of customer’s preliminary inspection, shipment or delivery, completion of installation, and customer’s on-site inspection. The timing of revenue recognition, billings and cash collections results in billed accounts receivable, unbilled receivables (contract assets) and customer advances and deposits (contract liabilities) on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

The Company has elected the practical expedient from ASC 606-10-32-18 and does not adjust the transaction price for the effects of a financing component if, at contract inception, the period between when the Company transfers a promised good or service to a customer and when the customer pays for that good or service will be one year or less.

Note 13. Income Taxes

On December 22, 2017, the U.S. government enacted comprehensive tax legislation commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“Tax Act”). The Tax Act makes broad and complex changes to the U.S. tax code that affected 2017, including, but not limited to, (1) requiring a one-time transition tax on certain unrepatriated earnings of foreign subsidiaries that is payable over eight years and (2) bonus depreciation that will allow for full expensing of qualified property.
 
32

The Tax Act also establishes new tax laws that affected 2018, including, but not limited to, (1) reduction of the U.S. federal corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%; (2) elimination of the corporate alternative minimum tax (“AMT”); (3) the creation of the base erosion anti-abuse tax (“BEAT”), a new minimum tax; (4) a general elimination of U.S. federal income taxes on dividends from foreign subsidiaries; (5) a new provision designed to tax global intangible low-taxed income (“GILTI”), which allows for the possibility of using foreign tax credits (“FTC”) and a deduction of up to 50% to offset the income tax liability (subject to some limitations); (6) a new limitation on deductible interest expense; (7) the repeal of the domestic production activity deduction; (8) limitations on the deductibility of certain executive compensation; (9) limitations on the use of FTCs to reduce the U.S. income tax liability; and (10) limitations on net operating losses (“NOL”) generated after December 31, 2017, to 80% of taxable income.

The SEC staff issued SAB 118, which provides guidance on accounting for the tax effects of the Tax Act. SAB 118 provides a measurement period that should not extend beyond one year from the Tax Act enactment date for companies to complete the accounting under ASC 740. In accordance with SAB 118, a company must reflect the income tax effects of those aspects of the Tax Act for which the accounting under ASC 740 is complete. To the extent that a company’s accounting for certain income tax effects of the Tax Act is incomplete but it is able to determine a reasonable estimate, a company must record a provisional estimate in the financial statements. If a company cannot determine a provisional estimate to be included in the financial statements, a company should continue to apply ASC 740 on the basis of the provisions of the tax laws that were in effect immediately before the enactment of the Tax Act.

The Company has not completed the accounting for the income tax effects of certain elements of the Tax Act. If the Company was able to make reasonable estimates of the effects of elements for which an analysis is not yet complete, the Company recorded provisional adjustments, as described above. If the Company was not yet able to make reasonable estimates of the impact of certain elements, the Company has not recorded any adjustments related to those elements and have continued accounting for them in accordance with ASC 740 on the basis of the tax laws in effect before the Tax Act. As the Company completes the accounting of the income tax effects of the Tax Act, the Company anticipates that additional charges or benefits may be recorded at such time as prescribed by ASC 740 and SAB 118, and as further information becomes available regarding the Tax Act, the Company may make further adjustments to the provisions that have been recorded in the financial statements. The Company also continues to examine the impact the Tax Act.

The Tax Act reduces the corporate tax rate to 21%, effective January 1, 2018. While the Company was able to make a reasonable estimate of the impact of the reduction in corporate rate, that estimate may be affected by other analyses related to the Tax Act, including, but not limited to, a calculation of deemed repatriation of deferred foreign income and the state tax effect of adjustments made to federal temporary differences.  In the three month period ended March 31, 2018, no changes were made to the benefit recognized of $89.6 million in 2017. In addition, there was a $69.0 million benefit relating to the reduction of the ASC 740-30 liability also due to the change of the ending deferred tax rate for 2017.  These benefits taken in 2017 have not changed in three months ended March 31, 2018.   This as an estimate at March 31, 2018.

The Deemed Repatriation Transition Tax (“Transition Tax”) is a tax on previously untaxed accumulated and current earnings and profits (“E&P”) of certain of our foreign subsidiaries. To determine the amount of the Transition Tax, we must determine, in addition to other factors, the amount of post-1986 E&P of the relevant subsidiaries, the amount of non-U.S. income taxes paid on such earnings, and the impact of the accumulated overall foreign source loss on our ability to utilize foreign tax credits. The Company was able to make a reasonable estimate at year end 2017 for the Transition Tax and recorded a provisional Transition Tax obligation of $63.3 million. As a result of further technical guidance, an adjustment of additional tax expense of $7.9 million was made in the period relating to the Transition Tax.  This adjustment brings the total impact of Transition Tax to $71.3 million. The Company continues to gather additional information to more precisely compute the amount of the Transition Tax and therefore, this amount still an estimate as of March 31, 2018.

The Company’s accounting for the following elements of the Tax Act is incomplete, and the Company is not yet able to make reasonable estimates of the effects. Therefore, no provisional adjustments, other than the adjustment related to the effects of the Transitional Tax, were recorded related to ASC 740-30.

Due to complexities, the Company has not yet determined if a change to the policy concerning permanent reinvestment is required as a result of the new Tax Act. No additional adjustments relating to ASC 740-30 have been recorded in accordance with SAB 118.

For 2018, the Tax Act creates a new requirement that certain income (i.e., GILTI) earned by controlled foreign corporations (“CFC”) must be included currently in the gross income of the CFCs’ U.S. shareholder. GILTI is the excess of the shareholder’s “net CFC tested income” over the net deemed tangible income return, which is currently defined as the excess of (1) 10% of the aggregate of the U.S. shareholder’s pro rata share of the qualified business asset investment of each CFC with respect to which it is a U.S. shareholder over (2) the amount of certain interest expense taken into account in the determination of net CFC-tested income.
 
33

Under U.S. GAAP, the Company is allowed to make an accounting policy choice of either (1) treating taxes due on future U.S. inclusions in taxable income related to GILTI as a current-period expense when incurred (the “period cost method”) or (2) factoring such amounts into a company’s measurement of its deferred taxes (the “deferred method”).   The Company has determined that it will follow the period costs method (option 1 above) going forward.  The tax provision for the three month period ended March 31, 2018 reflects this decision.  All of the additional calculations and rule changes found in The Tax Act have been considered in the tax provision for the three month period ended March 31, 2018.

The following table summarizes the Company’s provision (benefit) for income taxes and effective income tax provision rate for the three month periods ended March 31, 2018 and 2017.

 
For the Three
Month Period
Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the Three
Month Period
Ended
March 31,
2017
 
             
Income (loss) before income taxes
 
$
65.8
   
$
(8.6
)
Provision (benefit) for income taxes
 
$
23.4
   
$
(1.6
)
Effective income tax benefit rate
   
35.6
%
   
18.9
%

The increase in the provision for income taxes and increase in the effective income tax provision rate for the three month period ended March 31, 2018 when compared to the same three month period of 2017 is primarily due to the change relating to Transition Tax imposed under the Tax Act of $7.9 million that increased the effective tax rate by approximately 12.0%. The remaining increase in the effective rate was due to the overall increase in forecasted global earnings when compared to the prior year.

Note 14. Supplemental Information

The components of “Other operating expense, net” for the three month periods ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 were as follows.

   
For the Three
Month Period
Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the Three
Month Period
Ended
March 31,
2017
 
Other Operating Expense, Net
           
Foreign currency transaction losses, net
 
$
2.6
   
$
0.6
 
Restructuring charges, net(1)
   
-
     
1.7
 
Environmental remediation expenses(2)
   
-
     
1.0
 
Stock-based compensation expense(3)
   
2.7
     
-
 
Shareholder litigation settlement recoveries(4)
   
(4.5
)
   
-
 
Acquisition related expenses and non-cash charges(5)
   
3.0
     
0.8
 
(Gains) losses on asset and business disposals
   
(1.2
)
   
3.0
 
Other, net
   
1.7
     
0.8
 
Total other operating expense, net
 
$
4.3
   
$
7.9
 

(1)
See Note 3 “Restructuring.”
 
34

(2)
Estimated environmental remediation costs recorded on an undiscounted basis for a former production facility.

(3)
Represents stock-based compensation expense recognized for the three month period ended March 31, 2018 of $3.4 million reduced by a $0.7 million decrease in the accrual for employer taxes related to DSUs granted to employees at the date of the initial public offering.  Prior to the Company’s initial public offering which occurred in May 2017, no stock-based compensation expense was recorded because the Company’s repurchase rights created an implicit service period.

(4)
Represents an insurance recovery of the Company’ shareholder litigation settlement in 2014.

(5)
Represents costs associated with successful and/or abandoned acquisitions, including third-party expenses, post-closure integration costs and non-cash charges and credits arising from fair value purchase accounting adjustments.

Note 15. Contingencies

The Company is a party to various legal proceedings, lawsuits and administrative actions, which are of an ordinary or routine nature for a company of its size and sector. The Company believes that such proceedings, lawsuits and administrative actions will not materially adversely affect its operations, financial condition, liquidity or competitive position. A more detailed discussion of certain of these proceedings, lawsuits and administrative actions is set forth below.

Asbestos and Silica Related Litigation

The Company has also been named as a defendant in a number of asbestos-related and silica-related personal injury lawsuits. The plaintiffs in these suits allege exposure to asbestos or silica from multiple sources and typically the Company is one of approximately 25 or more named defendants.

Predecessors to the Company sometimes manufactured, distributed and/or sold products allegedly at issue in the pending asbestos and silica-related lawsuits (the “Products”). However, neither the Company nor its predecessors ever mined, manufactured, mixed, produced or distributed asbestos fiber or silica sand, the materials that allegedly caused the injury underlying the lawsuits. Moreover, the asbestos-containing components of the Products, if any, were enclosed within the subject Products.
 
Although the Company has never mined, manufactured, mixed, produced or distributed asbestos fiber or silica sand nor sold products that could result in a direct asbestos or silica exposure, many of the companies that did engage in such activities or produced such products are no longer in operation. This has led to law firms seeking potential alternative companies to name in lawsuits where there has been an asbestos or silica related injury.

The Company believes that the pending and future asbestos and silica-related lawsuits are not likely to, in the aggregate, have a material adverse effect on its consolidated financial position, results of operations or liquidity, based on: the Company’s anticipated insurance and indemnification rights to address the risks of such matters; the limited potential asbestos exposure from the Products described above; the Company’s experience that the vast majority of plaintiffs are not impaired with a disease attributable to alleged exposure to asbestos or silica from or relating to the Products or for which the Company otherwise bears responsibility; various potential defenses available to the Company with respect to such matters; and the Company’s prior disposition of comparable matters. However, inherent uncertainties of litigation and future developments, including, without limitation, potential insolvencies of insurance companies or other defendants, an adverse determination in the Adams County Case (discussed below), or other inability to collect from the Company’s historical insurers or indemnitors, could cause a different outcome. While the outcome of legal proceedings is inherently uncertain, based on presently known facts, experience, and circumstances, the Company believes that the amounts accrued on its balance sheet are adequate and that the liabilities arising from the asbestos and silica-related personal injury lawsuits will not have a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operations or liquidity. “Accrued liabilities” and “Other liabilities” on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet include a total litigation reserve of $102.8 million and $105.6 million as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, with respect to potential liability arising from the Company’s asbestos-related litigation. Asbestos related defense costs are excluded from the asbestos claims liability and are recorded separately as services are incurred. In the event of unexpected future developments, it is possible that the ultimate resolution of these matters may be material to the Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operation or liquidity.
 
35

The Company has entered into a series of agreements with certain of its or its predecessors’ legacy insurers and certain potential indemnitors to secure insurance coverage and/or reimbursement for the costs associated with the asbestos and silica-related lawsuits filed against the Company. The Company has also pursued litigation against certain insurers or indemnitors, where necessary. The Company has an insurance recovery receivable for probable asbestos related recoveries of approximately $96.4 million and $100.4 million as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, which was included in “Other assets” on the Consolidated Balance Sheets. During the three month period ended March 31, 2018, the Company received asbestos related insurance recoveries of $9.6 million, of which $4.0 million related to the recovery of indemnity payments, and was recorded as a reduction of the insurance recovery receivable in “Other assets” on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets, and $5.6 million related to reimbursement of previously expensed legal defense costs, and was recorded as a reduction of “Selling and administrative expenses” in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.

The largest such recent action, Gardner Denver, Inc. v. Certain Underwriters at Lloyd’s, London, et al., was filed on July 9, 2010, in the Eighth Judicial Circuit, Adams County, Illinois, as case number 10-L-48 (the “Adams County Case”). In the lawsuit, the Company seeks, among other things, to require certain excess insurer defendants to honor their insurance policy obligations to the Company, including payment in whole or in part of the costs associated with the asbestos-related lawsuits filed against the Company. In October 2011, the Company reached a settlement with one of the insurer defendants, which had issued both primary and excess policies, for approximately the amount of such defendant’s policies that were subject to the lawsuit. Since then, the case has been proceeding through the discovery and motions process with the remaining insurer defendants. On January 29, 2016, the Company prevailed on the first phase of that discovery and motions process (“Phase I”). Specifically, the Court in the Adams County Case ruled that the Company has rights under all of the policies in the case, subject to their terms and conditions, even though the policies were sold to the Company’s former owners rather than to the Company itself. On June 9, 2016, the Court denied a motion by several of the insurers who sought permission to appeal the Phase I ruling immediately rather than waiting until the end of the whole case as is normally required. The case is now proceeding through the discovery process regarding the remaining issues in dispute (“Phase II”).

A majority of the Company’s expected future recoveries of the costs associated with the asbestos-related lawsuits are the subject of the Adams County Case.

The amounts recorded by the Company for asbestos-related liabilities and insurance recoveries are based on currently available information and assumptions that the Company believes are reasonable based on an evaluation of relevant factors. The actual liabilities or insurance recoveries could be higher or lower than those recorded if actual results vary significantly from the assumptions. There are a number of key variables and assumptions including the number and type of new claims to be filed each year, the resolution or outcome of these claims, the average cost of resolution of each new claim, the amount of insurance available, allocation methodologies, the contractual terms with each insurer with whom the Company has reached settlements, the resolution of coverage issues with other excess insurance carriers with whom the Company has not yet achieved settlements, and the solvency risk with respect to the Company’s insurance carriers. Other factors that may affect the future liability include uncertainties surrounding the litigation process from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and from case to case, legal rulings that may be made by state and federal courts, and the passage of state or federal legislation. The Company makes the necessary adjustments for the asbestos liability and corresponding insurance recoveries on an annual basis unless facts or circumstances warrant assessment as of an interim date.

Environmental Matters

The Company has been identified as a potentially responsible party (“PRP”) with respect to several sites designated for cleanup under U.S. federal “Superfund” or similar state laws that impose liability for cleanup of certain waste sites and for related natural resource damages. Persons potentially liable for such costs and damages generally include the site owner or operator and persons that disposed or arranged for the disposal of hazardous substances found at those sites. Although these laws impose joint and several liability on PRPs, in application the PRPs typically allocate the investigation and cleanup costs based upon the volume of waste contributed by each PRP. Based on currently available information, the Company was only a small contributor to these waste sites, and the Company has, or is attempting to negotiate, de minimis settlements for their cleanup. The cleanup of the remaining sites is substantially complete and the Company’s future obligations entail a share of the sites’ ongoing operating and maintenance expense. The Company is also addressing four on-site cleanups for which it is the primary responsible party. Three of these cleanup sites are in the operation and maintenance stage and one is in the implementation stage.

The Company has undiscounted accrued liabilities of $7.3 million and $7.5 million as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, on its Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet to the extent costs are known or can be reasonably estimated for its remaining financial obligations for the environmental matters discussed above and does not anticipate that any of these matters will result in material additional costs beyond amounts accrued. Based upon consideration of currently available information, the Company does not anticipate any material adverse effect on its results of operations, financial condition, liquidity or competitive position as a result of compliance with federal, state, local or foreign environmental laws or regulations, or cleanup costs relating to these matters.
 
36

Note 16. Segment Results

A description of the Company’s three reportable segments, including the specific products manufactured and sold follows below.

In the Industrials segment, the Company designs, manufactures, markets and services a broad range of air compression, vacuum and blower products across a wide array of technologies and applications. Almost every manufacturing and industrial facility, and many service and process industries, use air compression and vacuum products in a variety of applications such as operation of pneumatic air tools, vacuum packaging of food products and aeration of waste water. The Company maintains a leading position in its markets and serves customers globally. The Company offers comprehensive aftermarket parts and an experienced direct and distributor-based service network world-wide to complement all of its products.

In the Energy segment, the Company designs, manufactures, markets and services a diverse range of positive displacement pumps, liquid ring vacuum pumps and compressors, and engineered loading systems and fluid transfer equipment, consumables, and associated aftermarket parts and services. It serves customers in the upstream, midstream, and downstream oil and gas markets, and various other markets including petrochemical processing, power generation, transportation, and general industrial. The Company is one of the largest suppliers in these markets and has long-standing customer relationships. Its positive displacement pumps are used in the oilfield for drilling, hydraulic fracturing, completion and well servicing. Its liquid ring vacuum pumps and compressors are used in many power generation, mining, oil and gas refining and processing, chemical processing and general industrial applications including flare gas and vapor recovery, geothermal gas removal, vacuum de-aeration, enhanced oil recovery, water extraction in mining and paper and chlorine compression in petrochemical operations. Its engineered loading systems and fluid transfer equipment ensure the safe handling and transfer of crude oil, liquefied natural gas, compressed natural gas, chemicals, and bulk materials.

In the Medical segment, the Company designs, manufactures and markets a broad range of highly specialized gas, liquid and precision syringe pumps and compressors primarily for use in the medical, laboratory and biotechnology end markets. The Company’s customers are mainly medium and large durable medical equipment suppliers that integrate the Company’s products into their final equipment for use in applications such as oxygen therapy, blood dialysis, patient monitoring, wound treatment, and others. Further, with the recent acquisitions, the Company has expanded into liquid handling components and systems used in biotechnology applications including clinical analysis instrumentation. The Company also has a broad range of end use deep vacuum products for laboratory science applications.

The Chief Operating Decision Maker (“CODM”) evaluates the performance of the Company’s reportable segments based on, among other measures, Segment Adjusted EBITDA. Management closely monitors the Segment Adjusted EBITDA of each reportable segment to evaluate past performance and actions required to improve profitability. Inter-segment sales and transfers are not significant. Administrative expenses related to the Company’s corporate offices and shared service centers in the United States and Europe, which includes transaction processing, accounting and other business support functions, are allocated to the business segments. Certain administrative expenses, including senior management compensation, treasury, internal audit, tax compliance, certain information technology, and other corporate functions, are not allocated to the business segments.
 
37

The following table provides summarized information about the Company’s operations by reportable segment and reconciles Segment Adjusted EBITDA to Income (Loss) Before Income Taxes for the three month periods ended March 31, 2018 and 2017.

   
For the Three
Month Period
Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the Three
Month Period
Ended
March 31,
2017
 
             
Revenue
           
Industrials
 
$
316.9
   
$
248.0
 
Energy
   
242.2
     
178.3
 
Medical
   
60.5
     
55.4
 
Total Revenue
 
$
619.6
   
$
481.7
 
Segment Adjusted EBITDA
               
Industrials
 
$
66.8
   
$
47.2
 
Energy
   
68.0
     
38.5
 
Medical
   
15.9
     
14.6
 
Total Segment Adjusted EBITDA
 
$
150.7
   
$
100.3
 
Less items to reconcile Segment Adjusted EBITDA to
               
Income (Loss) Before Income Taxes(1):
               
Corporate expenses not allocated to segments(a)
 
$
2.5
   
$
8.2
 
Interest expense
   
26.0
     
45.9
 
Depreciation and amortization expense
   
45.0
     
39.7
 
Sponsor fees and expenses(b)
   
-
     
1.1
 
Restructuring and related business transformation costs(c)
   
4.5
     
8.6
 
Acquisition related expenses and non-cash charges(d)
   
4.6
     
0.7
 
Environmental remediation loss reserve(e)
   
-
     
1.0
 
Expenses related to public stock offerings(f)
   
1.4
     
1.3
 
Establish public company financial reporting compliance(g)
   
0.8
     
1.3
 
Stock-based compensation(h)
   
2.7
     
-
 
Foreign currency transaction losses, net
   
2.6
     
0.6
 
Shareholder litigation settlement recoveries(i)
   
(4.5
)
   
-
 
Other adjustments(j)
   
(0.7
)
   
0.5
 
Income (Loss) Before Income Taxes
 
$
65.8
   
$
(8.6
)
 
(1)
The reconciling items for the three month period ended March 31, 2017 have been reclassified to conform to the methodology used in the three month period ended March 31, 2018, and include the following.

(a)
Includes insurance recoveries of asbestos legal fees of $5.6 million in the first quarter of 2018.

(b)
Represents management fees and expenses paid to the Company’s Sponsor.
 
38

(c)
Restructuring and related business transformation costs consist of the following.

   
For the Three
Month Period
Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the Three
Month Period
Ended
March 31,
2017
 
             
Restructuring charges
 
$
-
   
$
1.7
 
Severance, sign-on, relocation and executive search costs
   
2.0
     
1.0
 
Facility reorganization, relocation and other costs
   
0.6
     
1.1
 
Information technology infrastructure transformation
   
-
     
0.7
 
(Gains) losses on asset and business disposals
   
(1.2
)
   
3.0
 
Consultant and other advisor fees
   
2.6
     
0.4
 
Other, net
   
0.5
     
0.7
 
Total restructuring and related business transformation costs
 
$
4.5
   
$
8.6
 

(d)
Represents costs associated with successful and/or abandoned acquisitions, including third-party expenses, post-closure integration costs and non-cash charges and credits arising from fair value purchase accounting adjustments.  For the three month period ended March 31, 2018 and March 31, 2017, respectively, $3.0 million and $0.8 million, respectively, of acquisition related expenses and non-cash charges were recorded to the line “Other Operating Expense, net” in the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations.

(e)
Represents estimated environmental remediation costs and losses relating to a former production facility.

(f)
Represents certain expenses related to the Company’s initial public offering and subsequent secondary offerings.

(g)
Represents third party expenses to comply with the requirements of Sarbanes-Oxley in 2018 and the accelerated adoption of the new revenue recognition standard (ASC 606 – Revenue from Contracts with Customers) in the first quarter of 2018, one year ahead of the required adoption date for a private company.

(h)
Represents stock-based compensation expense recognized for the three month period ended March 31, 2018 of $3.4 million reduced by a $0.7 million decrease in the accrual for employer taxes related to DSUs granted to employees at the date of the initial public offering.  Prior to the Company’s initial public offering which occurred in May 2017, no stock-based compensation expense was recorded because the Company’s repurchase rights created an implicit service period.

(i)
Represents an insurance recovery of the Company’ shareholder litigation settlement in 2014.

(j)
Includes (i) the effects of the amortization of prior service costs and the amortization of gains in pension and other postretirement benefits (OPEB) expense, (ii) certain legal and compliance costs and (iii) other miscellaneous adjustments.

Note 17. Related Party Transactions

Affiliates of KKR participated as (i) a lender in the Company’s Senior Secured Credit Facilities discussed in Note 8, “Debt,” (ii) an underwriter in the Company’s initial public offering, and (iii) a provider of services for the fiscal year 2017 debt refinancing transaction.  KKR held a position in the Euro Term Loan Facility of €49.8 million as of March 31, 2018.
 
39

The Company entered into a monitoring agreement, dated July 30, 2013, with KKR pursuant to which KKR will provide management, consulting and financial advisory services to the Company and its divisions, subsidiaries, parent entities and controlled affiliates.  Under the terms of the monitoring agreement the Company was, among other things, obligated to pay KKR (or such affiliate(s) as KKR designates) an aggregate annual management fee in the initial annual amount of $3.5 million, payable in arrears at the end of each fiscal quarter, plus upon request all reasonable out of pocket expenses incurred in connection with the provision of services under the agreement.  The management fee increases at a rate of 5% per year effective on January 1, 2014.  In May 2017, in connection with the Company’s initial public offering, the monitoring agreement was terminated.  The Company incurred management fees to KKR of $1.1 million and no out of pocket expenses for the three month period ended March 31, 2017.

Note 18. Earnings (Loss) Per Share

The computations of basic and diluted income (loss) per share are as follows.

   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2017
 
             
Net income (loss)
 
$
42.4
   
$
(7.0
)
Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
   
-
     
0.1
 
Net income (loss) attributable to Gardner Denver Holdings, Inc.
 
$
42.4
   
$
(7.1
)
Average shares outstanding:
               
Basic
   
201.6
     
148.5
 
Diluted
   
209.9
     
148.5
 
Earnings (loss) per share:
               
Basic
 
$
0.21
   
$
(0.05
)
Diluted
 
$
0.20
   
$
(0.05
)

The DSUs described in Note 15, “Stock-Based Compensation” of the Consolidated Financial Statements in our annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017 are considered outstanding shares for the purpose of computing basic earnings (loss) per share because they will become issued solely upon the passage of time.

For the three month period ended March 31, 2018, there were 0.7 million anti-dilutive shares that were not included in the computation of diluted earnings per share.  For the three month period ended March 31, 2017, there was 12.6 million potentially dilutive stock-based awards that were not included in the computation of diluted loss per share because their inclusion would be anti-dilutive.
 
40

ITEM 2.
MANGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion contains management’s discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations and should be read together with the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.  This discussion contains forward-looking statements that reflect our plans, estimates and beliefs and involve numerous risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to, those described in the “Risk Factors” section of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017.  Actual results may differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements.  You should carefully read “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

Overview

Our Company

We are a leading global provider of mission-critical flow control and compression equipment and associated aftermarket parts, consumables and services, which we sell across multiple attractive end-markets within the industrial, energy and medical industries. We manufacture one of the broadest and most complete ranges of compressor, pump, vacuum and blower products in our markets, which, combined with our global geographic footprint and application expertise, allows us to provide differentiated product and service offerings to our customers. Our products are sold under a collection of premier, market-leading brands, including Gardner Denver, CompAir, Nash, Emco Wheaton, Robuschi, Elmo Rietschle and Thomas, which we believe are globally recognized in their respective end-markets and known for product quality, reliability, efficiency and superior customer service.

Our Segments

We report our results of operations through three reportable segments: Industrials, Energy and Medical.

Industrials

We design, manufacture, market and service a broad range of air compression, vacuum and blower products, including associated aftermarket parts, consumables and services, across a wide array of technologies and applications for use in diverse end-markets. Compressors are used to increase the pressure of air or gas, vacuum products are used to remove air or gas in order to reduce the pressure below atmospheric levels and blower products are used to produce a high volume of air or gas at low pressure. We sell our Industrials products through an integrated network of direct sales representatives and independent distributors, which is strategically tailored to meet the dynamics of each target geography or end-market.

Energy

We design, manufacture, market and service a diverse range of positive displacement pumps, liquid ring vacuum pumps, compressors and integrated systems, engineered fluid loading and transfer equipment and associated aftermarket parts, consumables and services. The highly engineered products offered by our Energy segment serve customers across upstream, midstream and downstream energy markets, as well as petrochemical processing, transportation and general industrial sectors.

Medical

We design, manufacture and market a broad range of highly specialized gas, liquid and precision syringe pumps and compressors that are specified by medical and laboratory equipment suppliers and integrated into their final equipment for use in applications, such as oxygen therapy, blood dialysis, patient monitoring, laboratory sterilization and wound treatment, among others. We offer a comprehensive product portfolio across a breadth of technologies to address the medical and laboratory sciences pump and fluid handling industry, as well as a range of end-use vacuum products for laboratory science applications, and we recently expanded into liquid pumps and automated liquid handling components and systems.
 
41

Components of Our Revenue and Expenses

Revenues

We generate revenue from sales of our highly engineered, application-critical products and by providing associated aftermarket parts, consumables and services. We sell our products and deliver aftermarket services both directly to end-users and through independent distribution channels, depending on the product line and geography. Below is a description of our revenues by segment and factors impacting total revenues.

Industrials Revenue

Our Industrials Segment Revenues are generated primarily through sales of air compression, vacuum and blower products to customers in multiple industries and geographies. A significant portion of our sales in the Industrials segment are made to independent distributors. The majority of Industrials segment revenues are derived from short duration contracts and revenue is recognized at a single point in time when control is transferred to the customer, generally at shipment or when delivery has occurred or services have been rendered.  Certain contracts may involve significant design engineering to customer specifications, and depending on the contractual terms, revenue is recognized either over the duration of the contract or at contract completion when equipment is delivered to the customer. Our large installed base of products in our Industrials segment drives demand for recurring aftermarket support services primarily composed of replacement parts sales to our distribution partners and, to a lesser extent, by directly providing replacement parts and repair and maintenance services to end customers. Revenue for services is recognized when services are performed. Historically, our shipments and revenues have peaked during the fourth quarter as our customers seek to fully utilize annual capital spending budgets.

Energy Revenue

Our Energy Segment Revenues are generated primarily through sales of positive displacement pumps, liquid ring vacuum pumps, compressors and integrated systems and engineered fluid loading and transfer equipment and associated aftermarket parts, consumables and services for use primarily in upstream, midstream, downstream and petrochemical end-markets across multiple geographies. The majority of Energy segment is derived from short duration contracts and revenue is recognized at a single point in time when control is transferred to the customer, generally at shipment or when delivery has occurred or services have been rendered. Certain contracts with customers in the mid- and downstream and petrochemical markets are higher sales value and often have longer lead times and involve more application specific engineering. Depending on the contractual terms, revenue is recognized either over the duration of the contract or at contract completion when equipment is delivered to the customer. Provisions for estimated losses on uncompleted contracts are recognized in the period in which such losses are determined to be probable. As a result, the timing of these contracts can result in significant variation in reported revenue from quarter to quarter. Our large installed base of products in our Energy segment drives demand for recurring aftermarket support services to customers, including replacement parts, consumables and repair and maintenance services. The mix of aftermarket to original equipment revenue within the Energy segment is impacted by trends in upstream energy activity in North America. Revenue for services is recognized when services are performed. In response to customer demand for faster access to aftermarket parts and repair services, we expanded our direct aftermarket service locations in our Energy segment, particularly in North American markets driven by upstream energy activity. Energy segment products and aftermarket parts, consumables and services are sold both directly to end customers and through independent distributors, depending on the product category and geography.

Medical Revenue

Our Medical Segment Revenues are generated primarily through sales of highly specialized gas, liquid and precision syringe pumps that are specified by medical and laboratory equipment suppliers for use in medical and laboratory applications. Our products are often subject to extensive collaborative design and specification requirements, as they are generally components specifically designed for, and integrated into, our customers’ products. Revenue is recognized when control is transferred to the customer, generally at shipment or when delivery has occurred. Our Medical segment has no substantive aftermarket revenues.

Expenses

Cost of Sales

Cost of sales includes the costs we incur, including purchased materials, labor and overhead related to manufactured products and aftermarket parts sold during a period. Depreciation related to manufacturing equipment and facilities is included in cost of sales. Purchased materials represent the majority of costs of sales, with steel, aluminum, copper and partially finished castings representing our most significant materials inputs. We have instituted a global sourcing strategy to take advantage of coordinated purchasing opportunities of key materials across our manufacturing plant locations.
 
42

Cost of sales for services includes the direct costs we incur, including direct labor, parts and other overhead costs including depreciation of equipment and facilities, to deliver repair, maintenance and other field services to our customers.

Selling and Administrative Expenses

Selling and administrative expenses consist of (i) salaries and other employee-related expenses for our selling and administrative functions and other activities not associated with the manufacture of products or delivery of services to customers; (ii) facility operating expenses for selling and administrative activities, including office rent, maintenance, depreciation and insurance; (iii) marketing and direct costs of selling products and services to customers including internal and external sales commissions; (iv) research and development expenditures; (v) professional and consultant fees; (vi) Sponsor fees and expenses; (vii) expenses related to our  public stock offerings and to establish public company reporting compliance; and (viii) other miscellaneous expenses. Certain corporate expenses, including those related to our shared service centers in the United States and Europe, that directly benefit our businesses are allocated to our business segments. Certain corporate administrative expenses, including corporate executive compensation, treasury, certain information technology, internal audit and tax compliance, are not allocated to the business segments.

Amortization of Intangible Assets

Amortization of intangible assets includes the periodic amortization of intangible assets recognized when an affiliate of our Sponsor acquired us on July 30, 2013 and intangible assets recognized in connection with businesses we acquired since July 30, 2013, including customer relationships and trademarks.

Other Operating Expense, Net

Other operating expense, net includes foreign currency gains and losses, restructuring charges, certain litigation and contract settlement losses and recoveries, environmental remediation, stock-based compensation expense and other miscellaneous operating expenses.

Benefit or Provision for Income Taxes

The benefit or provision for income taxes includes U.S. federal, state and local income taxes and all non-U.S. income taxes. We are subject to income tax in approximately 33 jurisdictions outside of the United States. Because we conduct operations on a global basis, our effective tax rate depends, and will continue to depend, on the geographic distribution of our pre-tax earnings among several different taxing jurisdictions. Our effective tax rate can also vary based on changes in the tax rates of the different jurisdictions, the availability of tax credits and non-deductible items.
 
Items Affecting our Reported Results

General Economic Conditions and Capital Spending in the Industries We Serve

Our financial results closely follow changes in the industries and end-markets we serve. Demand for most of our products depends on the level of new capital investment and planned and unplanned maintenance expenditures by our customers. The level of capital expenditures depends, in turn, on the general economic conditions as well as access to capital at reasonable cost. In particular, demand for our Industrials products generally correlates with the rate of total industrial capacity utilization and the rate of change of industrial production. Capacity utilization rates above 80% have historically indicated a strong demand environment for industrial equipment. In our Energy segment, demand for our products that serve upstream energy end-markets are influenced heavily by energy prices and the expectation as to future trends in those prices. Energy prices have historically been cyclical in nature and are affected by a wide range of factors. As energy prices start improving from low levels observed in the first half of 2016, we have observed increases in drilled but uncompleted wells, global land rig count, wells and footage drilled as well as drilling and completion capital expenditures to positively impact our results of operations. In the midstream and downstream portions of our Energy segment, overall economic growth and industrial production, as well as secular trends, impact demand for our products. In our Medical segment we expect demand for our products to be driven by favorable trends, including the growth in healthcare spend and expansion of healthcare systems due to an aging population requiring medical care and increased investment in health solutions and safety infrastructures in emerging economies. Over longer time periods, we believe that demand for all of our products also tends to follow economic growth patterns indicated by the rates of change in the GDP around the world, as augmented by secular trends in each segment. Our ability to grow and our financial performance will also be affected by our ability to address a variety of challenges and opportunities that are a consequence of our global operations, including efficiently utilizing our global sales, manufacturing and distribution capabilities and engineering innovative new product applications for end-users in a variety of geographic markets.
 
43

Foreign Currency Fluctuations

A significant portion of our revenues, approximately 51% for the three month period ended March 31, 2018, were denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. Because much of our manufacturing facilities and labor force costs are outside of the United States, a significant portion of our costs are also denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. Changes in foreign exchange rates can therefore impact our results of operations and are quantified when significant to our discussion.

Seasonality

Historically, our shipments and revenues have peaked during the fourth quarter as our customers seek to fully utilize annual capital spending budgets. Also, our EMEA operations generally experience a slowdown during the July, August and December holiday seasons. General economic conditions may, however, impact future seasonal variations.

Factors Affecting the Comparability of our Results of Operations

As a result of a number of factors, our historical results of operations are not comparable from period to period and may not be comparable to our financial results of operations in future periods. Key factors affecting the comparability of our results of operations are summarized below.

Upstream Energy

We sell products and provide services to customers in upstream energy markets, primarily in the United States. For the upstream energy end-market, in our Energy segment we manufacture pumps and associated aftermarket products and services used in drilling, hydraulic fracturing and well service applications, while in our Industrials segment we sell dry bulk frac sand blowers, which are used in hydraulic fracturing operations. We refer to these products and services in the Energy and Industrial segments as “upstream energy.” Our Medical segment is not exposed to the upstream energy industry.

Our exposure to upstream energy production levels, coupled with reduced exploration activity and the deferral of maintenance and growth capital expenditures by upstream energy companies, favorably impacted our financial results in the first three months of 2018.

The average daily closing of West Texas Intermediate spot market crude oil prices for the three month period ended March 31, 2018 increased to $62.47 from $51.77 in the same period in 2017. As a result, there has been increased exploration activity and capital expenditures by upstream energy companies. According to Baker Hughes, Inc., the average weekly U.S. land rig count increased to 966 during the three month period ended March 31, 2018 from 742 in 2017, and, according to Spears & Associates, Inc., the annual average monthly new wells drilled in the United States increased to 2,066 for the three month period ended March 31, 2018 compared to 1,666 in the same period in 2017. We have experienced increased demand for our upstream energy products and services in the three month period ended March 31, 2018.

Restructuring and Other Business Transformation Initiatives

Our top priority since the completion of the KKR Transaction in 2013 has been the transformation of our business. In 2014, we commenced operational excellence initiatives to streamline our cost structure and support margin expansion, including through manufacturing footprint reduction, selling and administrative expense efficiency, and strategic sourcing in our Industrials, Energy and Medical segments.
 
44

A key element of our business transformation initiatives are restructuring programs within our Industrials, Energy, and Medical segments. Restructuring charges, program related facility reorganization, relocation and other costs, and related capital expenditures were impacted most significantly by these business transformation initiatives. Under these restructuring programs, we incurred restructuring charges of $0.0 million and $1.7 million in the three month periods ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. These restructuring programs were completed in 2017. We generally expect that the savings associated with these restructuring programs will recover the associated costs within two to three years of such costs being incurred. In addition, we incurred program related facility reorganization, relocation and other costs of $4.5 million and $6.9 million in the three month periods ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

Acquisitions

Given our global reach, market leading position in our various product categories, strong channel access and aftermarket presence and operational excellence competency, our Company provides an attractive acquisition platform in the flow control and compression equipment sectors. Part of our strategy for growth is to acquire complementary flow control and compression equipment businesses, which provide access to new technologies or geographies or improve our aftermarket offerings.

In June 2017, within our Industrials segment, we acquired a leading North American manufacturer of gas compression equipment and solutions for vapor recovery, biogas and other process and industrial applications for approximately $20.4 million (inclusive of an indemnity holdback of $1.9 million recorded in “Accrued liabilities”).  In February 2018, within our industrials segment, we acquired a leading global manufacturer of turbo vacuum technology systems and optimization solutions for industrial applications for approximately $94.9 million net of cash acquired.

Included in the financial statements for these acquisitions subsequent to their date of acquisition was revenue and operating income of $15.2 million and $0.4 million, respectively, for the three month period ended March 31, 2018.  No revenue or operating income was recorded for these acquisitions in the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations for the three month period ended March 31, 2017.

Sponsor Management Fees and Expenses

Through the date of our initial public offering, our Sponsor charged an annual management fee, as well as fees and expenses for services provided.  In May, 2017, in connection with the Company’s initial public offering, the monitoring agreement was terminated.  Sponsor fees and expenses were $1.1 million for the three month periods ended March 31, 2017.

Stock-Based Compensation Expense

Under the terms of the 2013 Stock Incentive Plan and the 2017 Omnibus Incentive Plans stock-based compensation expense of $3.4 million recognized for the three month period ended March 31, 2018.  Prior to the Company’s initial public offering which occurred in May 2017, no stock-based compensation expense was recognized.

Income Taxes

On December 22, 2017, the U.S. government enacted comprehensive tax legislation commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“Tax Act”). The Tax Act makes broad and complex changes to the U.S. tax code that impact the fourth quarter of 2017 and full year 2018.

See Note 13 “Income Taxes” to our condensed consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Form 10-Q.

Outlook

Industrials Segment

The mission-critical nature of our Industrials products across manufacturing processes drives a demand environment and outlook that are highly correlated with global and regional industrial production, capacity utilization and long-term GDP growth. In the United States and Europe, we are poised to continue benefiting from expected growth in real GDP, along with a continued rebound in industrial production activity in 2018. In APAC, despite the recent deceleration, GDP growth remains robust. In the first quarter of 2018, we had $337.8 million of orders in our Industrials segment, an increase of 18.2% over the first quarter of 2017, or a 9.6% increase on a constant currency basis.
 
45

Energy Segment

Our Energy segment has a diverse range of equipment and associated aftermarket parts, consumables and services for a number of market sectors with energy exposure, spanning upstream, midstream, downstream and petrochemical applications. Demand for certain of our Energy products has historically corresponded to the supply and demand dynamics related to oil and natural gas products, and has been influenced by oil and natural gas prices, the level and intensity of hydraulic fracturing activity, rig count, drilling activity and other economic factors. These factors have caused the level of demand for certain of our Energy products to change at times (both positively and negatively) and we expect these trends to continue in the future. In the first quarter of 2018, we had $291.0 million of orders in our Energy segment, an increase of 19.3% over the first quarter of 2017, or a 16.2% increase on a constant currency basis.

An increased number of drilling rigs have reentered the market as crude oil prices have improved from low points observed during the first half of 2016 and the number of drilled but uncompleted wells has grown 84% from December 2013 to March 2018. Land rig count in the United States has increased 159% from 384 rigs in May 2016 to 993 rigs in March 2018 compared to a relatively flat rig count growth in the rest of the world over this same time period. This trend is expected to continue, as Spears & Associates, Inc. projects the U.S. land rig count to grow 16% from the first quarter of 2018 to the fourth quarter of 2018, compared to 5% for the rest of the world (excluding Canada) over this same time period. We believe we are well positioned to benefit from the expected growth in drilling rigs and improvements in crude oil prices. In addition, secular industry trends that are driving increased demand of newer, fit-for-purpose equipment with innovations that increase productivity. As a result of our expanded direct aftermarket service locations, particularly within North America, we believe we are well positioned to benefit from both the increasing intensity of hydraulic fracturing activity and the increase in the backlog of drilled but uncompleted wells.

Our midstream and downstream products provide relatively stable demand with attractive, long-term growth trends related to an expected increase in the production and transportation of hydrocarbons. Demand for our petrochemical industry products correlates with growth in the development of new petrochemical plants as well as activity levels therein. Advancements in the development of unconventional natural gas resources in North America over the past decade have resulted in the abundant availability of locally sourced natural gas as feedstock for petrochemical plants in North America, supporting long-term growth.

Medical Segment

During 2016, we focused on the development and introduction of new products and applications to access the liquid pump market, leveraging our technology and expertise in gas pumps. We believe 2017 was a transition year; while a large customer has elected to dual source its requirements for gas pumps, we expanded into the liquid pump market and diversified our customer base. Entering 2018, we believe that demand for products and services in the Medical space will continue to benefit from attractive secular growth trends in the aging population requiring medical care, emerging economies modernizing and expanding their healthcare systems and increased investment globally in health solutions. In addition, we expect growing demand for higher healthcare efficiency, requiring premium and high performance systems. In the first quarter of 2018, we had $75.0 million of orders in our Medical segment, an increase of 18.6% over the first quarter of 2017, or a 10.8% increase on a constant currency basis.

How We Assess the Performance of Our Business

We manage operations through the three business segments described above. In addition to our consolidated GAAP financial measures, we review various non-GAAP financial measures, including Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted Net Income and Free Cash Flow.

We believe Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted Net Income are helpful supplemental measures to assist us and investors in evaluating our operating results as they exclude certain items whose fluctuation from period to period do not necessarily correspond to changes in the operations of our business. Adjusted EBITDA represents net loss before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization and certain non-cash, non-recurring and other adjustment items. We believe that the adjustments applied in presenting Adjusted EBITDA are appropriate to provide additional information to investors about certain material non-cash items and about non-recurring items that we do not expect to continue at the same level in the future. Adjusted Net Income is defined as net loss including interest, depreciation and amortization of non-acquisition related intangible assets and excluding other items used to calculate Adjusted EBITDA and further adjusted for the tax effect of these exclusions.
 
46

We use Free Cash Flow to review the liquidity of our operations. We measure Free Cash Flow as cash flows from operating activities less capital expenditures. We believe Free Cash Flow is a useful supplemental financial measure for us and investors in assessing our ability to pursue business opportunities and investments and to service our debt. Free Cash Flow is not a measure of our liquidity under GAAP and should not be considered as an alternative to cash flows from operating activities.

Management and our board of directors regularly use these measures as tools in evaluating our operating and financial performance and in establishing discretionary annual compensation. Such measures are provided in addition to, and should not be considered to be a substitute for, or superior to, the comparable measures under GAAP. In addition, we believe that Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted Net Income and Free Cash Flow are frequently used by investors and other interested parties in the evaluation of issuers, many of which also present Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted Net Income and Free Cash Flow when reporting their results in an effort to facilitate an understanding of their operating and financial results and liquidity.

Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted Net Income and Free Cash Flow should not be considered as alternatives to net income (loss) or any other performance measure derived in accordance with GAAP, or as alternatives to cash flow from operating activities as a measure of our liquidity. Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted Net Income and Free Cash Flow have limitations as analytical tools, and you should not consider such measures either in isolation or as substitutes for analyzing our results as reported under GAAP.

Included in our discussion of our consolidated and segment results below are changes in revenues and Adjusted EBITDA on a Constant Currency basis. Constant Currency information compares results between periods as if exchange rates had remained constant period over period. We define Constant Currency revenues and Adjusted EBITDA as total revenues and Adjusted EBITDA excluding the impact of foreign exchange rate movements and use it to determine the Constant Currency revenue and Adjusted EBITDA growth on a year-over-year basis. Constant Currency revenues and Adjusted EBITDA are calculated by translating current period revenues and Adjusted EBITDA using corresponding prior period exchange rates. These results should be considered in addition to, not as a substitute for, results reported in accordance with GAAP. Results on a Constant Currency basis, as we present them, may not be comparable to similarly titled measures used by other companies and are not a measure of performance presented in accordance with GAAP.

See “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” below for reconciliation information.

Results of Operations

Consolidated results should be read in conjunction with the segment results section herein and Note 16 “Segment Results” of our unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this report, which provides more detailed discussions concerning certain components of our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.  All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated within the consolidated results.
 
47

The following table presents selected Consolidated Results of Operations of our business for the three month periods ended March 31, 2018 and 2017.

   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2018
   
For the
Three Month
Period Ended
March 31,
2017
 
Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations:
           
Revenues
 
$
619.6
   
$
481.7
 
Cost of sales
   
387.7
     
307.1
 
Gross profit
   
231.9
     
174.6
&