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EX-99.8 - EXHIBIT 99.8 - Bluerock Residential Growth REIT, Inc.v485391_exh99-8.htm
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EX-99.5 - EXHIBIT 99.5 - Bluerock Residential Growth REIT, Inc.v485391_exh99-5.htm
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EX-99.3 - EXHIBIT 99.3 - Bluerock Residential Growth REIT, Inc.v485391_exh99-3.htm
EX-99.2 - EXHIBIT 99.2 - Bluerock Residential Growth REIT, Inc.v485391_exh99-2.htm
EX-32.1 - EXHIBIT 32.1 - Bluerock Residential Growth REIT, Inc.v485391_exhx32x1.htm
EX-31.2 - EXHIBIT 31.2 - Bluerock Residential Growth REIT, Inc.v485391_exhx31x2.htm
EX-31.1 - EXHIBIT 31.1 - Bluerock Residential Growth REIT, Inc.v485391_exhx31x1.htm
EX-23.1 - EXHIBIT 23.1 - Bluerock Residential Growth REIT, Inc.v485391_exh23x1.htm
EX-21.1 - EXHIBIT 21.1 - Bluerock Residential Growth REIT, Inc.v485391_exh21x1.htm
EX-12.1 - EXHIBIT 12.1 - Bluerock Residential Growth REIT, Inc.v485391_exh12-1.htm

  

  

 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D. C. 20549



 

FORM 10-K



 

 
(Mark One)
    
x   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017

OR

 
o   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from           to          

Commission file number 001-36369



 

BLUEROCK RESIDENTIAL GROWTH REIT, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)



 

 
Maryland   26-3136483
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

 
712 Fifth Avenue, 9th Floor, New York, NY   10019
(Address or principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

(212) 843-1601

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)



 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 
Title of each class   Name of each exchange on which registered
Class A Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share   New York Stock Exchange American (formerly the NYSE MKT)
Series A Preferred Stock, $0.01 par value per share   New York Stock Exchange American
Series C Preferred Stock, $0.01 par value per share   New York Stock Exchange American
Series D Preferred Stock, $0.01 par value per share   New York Stock Exchange American

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

Title of each class

None



 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o No x

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o No x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x No o

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

       
Large Accelerated Filer   o        Accelerated Filer   x
Non-Accelerated Filer   o   (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)   Smaller reporting company   o
Emerging growth company   o               

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o No x

The aggregate market value of the registrant’s Class A common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of June 30, 2017, the last business day of registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, was $310,553,240 based on the closing price of the Class A common stock on the NYSE American (formerly the NYSE MKT) on such date.

Number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s
classes of common stock, as of February 6, 2018: Class A Common Stock: 24,257,551 shares

 


 
 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

BLUEROCK RESIDENTIAL GROWTH REIT, INC.

FORM 10-K
December 31, 2017

 
PART I
        

Item 1.

Business

    1  

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

    9  

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

    52  

Item 2.

Properties

    53  

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

    54  

Item 4.

Mining Safety Disclosures

    54  
PART II
        

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

    55  

Item 6.

Selected Financial Data

    60  

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

    61  

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

    85  

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

    85  

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

    86  

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures

    86  

Item 9B.

Other Information

    86  
PART III
        

Item 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

    87  

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

    93  

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

    113  

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

    115  

Item 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

    127  
PART IV
        

Item 15.

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

    128  
SIGNATURES     129  

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Forward-Looking Statements

Statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K that are not historical facts (including any statements concerning investment objectives, other plans and objectives of management for future operations or economic performance, or assumptions or forecasts related thereto) are forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”); and pursuant to the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “PSLRA”). These statements are only predictions. We caution that forward-looking statements are not guarantees. Actual events or our investments and results of operations could differ materially from those expressed or implied in any forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are typically identified by the use of terms such as “may,” “should,” “expect,” “could,” “intend,” “plan,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “believe,” “continue,” “predict,” “potential” or the negative of such terms and other comparable terminology. We intend for these forward-looking statements to be covered by the applicable safe harbor provisions created by Section 27A of the Securities Act and Section 21E of the Exchange Act and the PSLRA.

The forward-looking statements included herein are based upon our current expectations, plans, estimates, assumptions and beliefs that involve numerous risks and uncertainties. Assumptions relating to the foregoing involve judgments with respect to, among other things, future economic, competitive and market conditions and future business decisions, all of which are difficult or impossible to predict accurately and many of which are beyond our control. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are based on reasonable assumptions, our actual results and performance could differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements. Factors that could have a material adverse effect on our operations and future prospects include, but are not limited to:

the competitive environment in which we operate;
real estate risks, including fluctuations in real estate values and the general economic climate in local markets and competition for tenants in such markets;
decreased rental rates or increasing vacancy rates;
our ability to lease units in newly acquired or newly constructed apartment properties;
potential defaults on or non-renewal of leases by tenants;
creditworthiness of tenants;
our ability to obtain financing for and complete acquisitions under contract under the contemplated terms, or at all;
development and acquisition risks, including rising and unanticipated costs and failure of such acquisitions and developments to perform in accordance with projections;
the timing of acquisitions and dispositions;
the performance of our network of leading regional apartment owner/operators with which we invest through controlling positions in joint ventures;
potential natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes and floods;
national, international, regional and local economic conditions;
board determination as to timing and payment of dividends, and our ability to pay future distributions at the dividend rates we have paid historically;
the general level of interest rates;
potential changes in the law or governmental regulations that affect us and interpretations of those laws and regulations, including changes in real estate and zoning or tax laws, and potential increases in real property tax rates;

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financing risks, including the risks that our cash flows from operations may be insufficient to meet required payments of principal and interest and we may be unable to refinance our existing debt upon maturity or obtain new financing on attractive terms or at all;
lack of or insufficient amounts of insurance;
our ability to maintain our qualification as a REIT;
litigation, including costs associated with prosecuting or defending claims and any adverse outcomes;
possible environmental liabilities, including costs, fines or penalties that may be incurred due to necessary remediation of contamination of properties presently owned or previously owned by us or a subsidiary owned by us or acquired by us.
The possibility that the anticipated benefits from the internalization of our former external Manager, or the Internalization, may not be realized or may take longer to realize than expected, or that unexpected costs or unexpected liabilities may arise from the Internalization;
Our ability to manage the Internalization effectively or efficiently; and
The outcome of any legal proceedings that may be instituted against us or others following the announcement of the Internalization.

Forward-looking statements are found throughout this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including under the headings “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We caution investors not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements, which reflect our management’s view only as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We undertake no obligation to update or revise forward-looking statements to reflect changed assumptions, the occurrence of unanticipated events or changes to future operating results.

Cautionary Note

The representations, warranties, and covenants made by us in any agreement filed as an exhibit to this Annual Report on Form 10-K are made solely for the benefit of the parties to the agreement, including, in some cases, for the purpose of allocating risk among the parties to the agreement, and should not be deemed to be representations, warranties, or covenants to or with any other parties. Moreover, these representations, warranties, or covenants should not be relied upon as accurately describing or reflecting the current state of our affairs.

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PART I

Item 1. Business

Organization

Bluerock Residential Growth REIT, Inc. (“we,” “us,” or the “Company”) was incorporated on July 25, 2008 under the laws of the state of Maryland.

We have elected to be treated, and currently qualify, as a real estate investment trust (or “REIT”) for federal income tax purposes. As a REIT, we generally are not subject to corporate-level income taxes. To maintain our REIT status, we are required, among other requirements, to distribute annually at least 90% of our “REIT taxable income,” as defined by the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), to our stockholders. If we fail to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year, we would be subject to federal income tax on our taxable income at regular corporate tax rates. We were incorporated to raise capital and acquire a diverse portfolio of residential real estate assets.

On August 4, 2017, we announced that we, Bluerock Residential Holdings, L.P., the Company’s operating partnership (the “Operating Partnership”), and Bluerock TRS Holdings, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company and wholly-owned subsidiary of the Operating Partnership (the “OP Sub”) had entered into a Contribution and Sale Agreement (as amended by that certain Amendment No. 1 thereto, dated August 9, 2017) (the “Contribution Agreement”) with BRG Manager, LLC (our “former Manager”), Bluerock REIT Operator, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company and wholly owned subsidiary of our former Manager (the “Manager Sub”), and Bluerock Real Estate, L.L.C., a Delaware limited liability company controlled by our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, R. Ramin Kamfar (“BRRE”), our Chief Investment Officer, James G. Babb, III (“Mr. Babb”); our Chief Operating Officer and President, Jordan B. Ruddy (“Mr. Ruddy”); our Chief Acquisitions Officer, Ryan S. MacDonald (“Mr. MacDonald”); and Konig & Associates, LLC, a New Jersey limited liability company controlled by our Chief Legal Officer and Secretary, Michael L. Konig (“Konig & Associates”); Jenco Business Advisors, Inc., a New York corporation controlled by Jerold E. Novack (“Jenco”); and The Kachadurian Group, LLC, an Illinois limited liability company controlled by a member of our board of directors, Gary T. Kachadurian (“Kachadurian Group,” and collectively with BRRE, Mr. Babb, Mr. Ruddy, Mr. MacDonald, Konig & Associates, and Jenco, the “Contributors”). The Contribution Agreement, and other definitive agreements entered into by the parties, provided for our acquisition of a newly-formed entity to own the assets used by the former Manager in its performance of the management functions then provided to us pursuant to a Management Agreement (the “Internalization”). A special committee comprised entirely of independent and disinterested members of our board of directors (the “Special Committee”), which retained independent legal and financial advisors, unanimously determined that the entry into the Contribution Agreement and the completion of the Internalization were in the best interests of the Company. Our board of directors, by unanimous vote, made a similar determination, and on October 26, 2017, the Company held its annual meeting of stockholders, at which our stockholders approved the proposals necessary for the completion of the Internalization.

On October 31, 2017, we completed the Internalization pursuant to the Contribution Agreement for total consideration of approximately $41.24 million, as determined pursuant to a formula established in the Management Agreement at the time of our initial public offering (the “IPO”) in April 2014. Upon completion of the Internalization, our current management and investment teams, who were previously employed by an affiliate of our former Manager, became employed by our indirect subsidiary, and we become an internally managed real estate investment trust. In order to further align the interests of our management with those of our stockholders, payment of the aggregate Internalization consideration was paid 99.9% in equity: we caused our Operating Partnership to issue an aggregate of 3,753,593 units of limited partnership interest in our Operating Partnership (“OP Units”), and we issued an aggregate of 76,603 shares of a newly reclassified Class C common stock and paid an aggregate of approximately $40,794 in cash to the applicable Contributor and its affiliates and related persons in connection with the Internalization.

Following the Internalization, our senior management team continues to oversee, manage and operate the Company, and we are no longer externally managed by our former Manager. As an internally managed company, we no longer pay the former Manager any fees or expense reimbursements arising from the Management Agreement.

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Substantially all our business is conducted through our Operating Partnership.

The principal executive offices of our Company and the former Manager are located at 712 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10019. Our telephone number is (212) 843-1601.

Investments in Real Estate

As of December 31, 2017, we owned interests in thirty-nine real estate properties, twenty-eight consolidated operating properties and eleven through preferred equity and mezzanine loan investments. Of the property interests held through preferred equity and mezzanine loan investments, six are under development, four are in leaseup and one property is stabilized. The thirty-nine properties contain an aggregate of 12,408 units, comprised of 9,608 consolidated operating units and 2,800 units through preferred equity and mezzanine loan investments. As of December 31, 2017, our consolidated operating properties were approximately 94% occupied. For more information regarding our investments, see “Item 2. Properties”.

Business and Growth Strategies

Our principal business objective is to generate attractive risk-adjusted investment returns by assembling a high-quality portfolio of apartment properties located in demographically attractive growth markets and by implementing our investment strategies and our Live/Work/Play Initiatives to achieve sustainable long-term growth in both our funds from operations and net asset value.

Invest in Institutional-Quality Apartment Properties.  We acquire institutional-quality apartment properties where we believe we can create long-term value for our stockholders utilizing our Core-Plus, Value-Add, Opportunistic and Invest-to-Own investment strategies.

Core-Plus.  We invest in institutional-quality apartment properties with strong and stable cash flows in target markets where we believe there exists opportunity for rental growth and with potential for further value creation.
Value-Add.  We invest in well-located apartment properties that offer significant potential for medium-term capital appreciation through repositioning, renovation or redevelopment, to reposition the asset and drive future rental growth.
Opportunistic.  We invest in properties available at opportunistic prices (i.e., at prices we believe are below those available in an otherwise efficient market) that exhibit some characteristics of distress, such as operational inefficiencies, significant deferred capital maintenance or broken capital structures providing an opportunity for a substantial portion of total return attributable to appreciation in value.
Invest-to-Own.  We selectively invest in development of Class A properties in target markets where we believe we can capture significant development premiums upon completion. We generally use a mezzanine loan with an option to purchase common equity in the project or convertible preferred equity structure, both of which provide income during the development stage, while providing us the ability to capture development premiums at completion by exercising our rights to take ownership.

Invest in Class A Apartment Properties.  We intend to continue to acquire primarily Class A apartment properties targeting the high disposable income renter by choice, where we believe we can create long-term value growth for our stockholders.

Focus on Growth Markets.  We intend to continue to focus on demographically attractive growth markets, which we define as markets with strong employment drivers in industries creating high disposable income jobs over the long term. Employment growth is highly correlated with apartment demand; therefore, we believe that selecting markets with job growth significantly above the national average will provide high potential for increase rental demand leading to revenue growth and attractive risk-adjusted returns.

Implement our Value Creation Strategies.  We intend to continue to focus on creating value at our properties utilizing our Core-Plus, Value-Add, Opportunistic and Invest-to-Own investment strategies in order to maximize our return on investment. We will work with each member of our network to evaluate property needs along with value-creation opportunities and create an asset-specific business plan to best position or

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reposition each property to drive rental growth and asset values. We then provide an aggressive asset management presence to manage our network partner and ensure execution of the plan, with the goal of driving rental growth and values.

Implement our Live/Work/Play Initiatives.  We intend to continue to implement our amenities and attributes to transform the apartment community from a purely functional product (i.e., as solely a place to live), to a lifestyle product (i.e., as a place to live, interact, and socialize). Our Live/Work/Play initiatives are property specific, and generally consist of attributes that go beyond traditional features, including highly amenitized common areas, cosmetic and architectural improvements, technology, music and other community-oriented activities to appeal to our residents’ desire for a “sense of community” by creating places to gather, socialize and interact in an amenity-rich environment. We believe this creates an enhanced perception of value among residents, allowing for premium rental rates and improved resident retention.

Diversify Across Markets, Strategies and Investment Size.  We will seek to grow our high-quality portfolio of apartment properties diversified by geography and by investment strategy and by size (typically ranging from $50 to $100 million) in order to manage concentration risk, while driving both current income and capital appreciation throughout the portfolio. Our network enables us to diversify across multiple markets and multiple strategies efficiently, without the logistical burden and time delay of building operating infrastructure in multiple markets and across multiple investment strategies.

Selectively Harvest and Redeploy Capital.  On an opportunistic basis and subject to compliance with certain REIT restrictions, we intend to sell properties in cases where we have successfully executed our value creation plans and where we believe the investment has limited additional upside relative to other opportunities, in order to harvest profits and to reinvest proceeds to maximize stockholder value.

Summary of Investments and Dispositions

The following table presents a summary of our investments for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015:

       
Properties Acquired   Location   Date Acquired   Ownership Interest   Number of Units
Alexan Southside Place     Houston, TX       1/12/2015       (1)       270  
Park & Kingston(2)     Charlotte, NC       3/16/2015       100.0 %      153  
Fox Hill(3)     Austin, TX       3/26/2015       94.6 %      288  
Whetstone     Durham, NC       5/20/2015       (4)       204  
Helios     Atlanta, GA       5/29/2015       (1)       282  
Ashton I     Charlotte, NC       8/19/2015       100.0 %      322  
ARIUM Palms     Orlando, FL       8/20/2015       95.0 %      252  
Sorrel     Frisco, TX       10/29/2015       95.0 %      352  
Sovereign     Fort Worth, TX       10/29/2015       95.0 %      322  
Domain Phase 1     Garland, TX       11/20/2015       (5)       299  
Park & Kingston Phase II     Charlotte, NC       11/30/2015       100.0 %      15  
Ashton II     Charlotte, NC       12/14/2015       100.0 %      151  
Flagler Village     Ft. Lauderdale, FL       12/18/2015       (6)       385  
Lake Boone Trail     Raleigh, NC       12/18/2015       (1)       245  
ARIUM Gulfshore     Naples, FL       1/5/2016       95.0 %      368  
ARIUM at Palmer Ranch     Sarasota, FL       1/5/2016       95.0 %      320  
West Morehead     Charlotte, NC       1/6/2016       (5)       286  
The Preserve at Henderson Beach     Destin, FL       3/15/2016       100.0 %      340  
ARIUM Westside     Atlanta, GA       7/14/2016       90.0 %      336  
APOK Townhomes     Boca Raton, FL       9/1/2016       (5)       90  
ARIUM Glenridge, formerly referred to as Nevadan     Atlanta, GA       10/13/2016       90.0 %      480  
ARIUM Pine Lakes     Port St. Lucie, FL       10/31/2016       85.0 %      320  

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Properties Acquired   Location   Date Acquired   Ownership Interest   Number of Units
The Brodie     Austin, TX       11/10/2016       92.5 %      324  
Roswell City Walk     Roswell, GA       12/1/2016       98.0 %      320  
Crescent Perimeter     Atlanta, GA       12/12/2016       (7)       320  
James at South First     Austin, TX       12/15/2016       90.0 %      250  
Vickers Village     Roswell, GA       12/20/2016       (7)       79  
Preston View(8)     Morrisville, NC       2/17/2017       100.0 %      382  
Wesley Village(8)     Charlotte, NC       3/9/2017       100.0 %      301  
Marquis at Crown Ridge     San Antonio, TX       6/9/2017       90.0 %      352  
Marquis at Stone Oak     San Antonio, TX       6/9/2017       90.0 %      335  
Marquis at the Cascades     Tyler, TX       6/9/2017       90.0 %      582  
Marquis at TPC     San Antonio, TX       6/9/2017       90.0 %      139  
Villages at Cypress Creek     Houston, TX       9/8/2017       80.0 %      384  
Citrus Tower     Orlando, FL       9/28/2017       96.8 %      336  
Outlook at Greystone     Birmingham, AL       10/19/2017       100.0 %      300  
ARIUM Hunter’s Creek     Orlando, FL       10/30/2017       100.0 %      532  
ARIUM Metrowest     Orlando, FL       10/30/2017       100.0 %      510  
The Mills     Greenville, SC       11/29/2017       100.0 %      304  

(1) The Company’s investment in the property is through a preferred equity investment in an indirect equity owner of the property, which earns a preferred return of 15% and is convertible to common equity at BRG’s option upon stabilization.
(2) Increased ownership in Park & Kingston in May 2015 by 49.0% to total ownership of 96.0%. Increased ownership in Park & Kingston in December 2017 by 4% to total ownership of 100.0%.
(3) Increased ownership in Fox Hill in May 2015 by 9.4% to total ownership of 94.6%. Sold Fox Hill in May 2017.
(4) The Company’s investment in the property is through a preferred equity investment in an indirect equity owner of the property, which earns a preferred return of 6.5%.
(5) The Company’s investment in the property through a note receivable from a related party that is an indirect owner of the property and in which related party the Company has an option to purchase a common equity investment.
(6) The Company’s investment in the property through a note receivable from a related party that is an indirect owner of the property. The Company has the right of first offer to purchase the JV member’s ownership interests, or, if applicable, to purchase Flagler Village if the JV Member exercises its rights under the Flagler JV to cause the sale of Flagler Village.
(7) The Company’s investment in the property through a note receivable from a related party that is an indirect owner of the property.
(8) Increased ownership in December 2017 from 91.8% to 100.0%.

The following table presents a summary of our dispositions for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015:

       
Property Dispositions   Location   Date Sold   Ownership Interest in Property   Number of Units
23Hundred@Berry Hill     Nashville, TN       1/14/2015       19.8 %      266  
Villas at Oak Crest     Chattanooga, TN       9/1/2015       67.2 %      209  
North Park Towers     Southfield, MI       10/16/2015       100.0 %      313  
Springhouse at Newport News     Newport News, VA       8/10/2016       75.0 %      432  
EOS     Orlando, FL       12/19/2016       26.3 %      296  
Village Green of Ann Arbor     Ann Arbor, MI       2/22/2017       48.6 %      520  
Lansbrook Village     Palm Harbor, FL       4/26/2017       90.0 %      621  
Fox Hill     Austin, TX       5/24/2017       94.6 %      288  

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Property Dispositions   Location   Date Sold   Ownership Interest in Property   Number of Units
MDA Apartments(1)     Chicago, IL       6/30/2017       35.3 %      190  

(1) Represents sale of the Company’s 35.3% joint venture interest in MDA Apartments.

Management Internalization

On August 4, 2017, we announced that we, Bluerock Residential Holdings, L.P., the Company’s operating partnership (the “Operating Partnership”), and Bluerock TRS Holdings, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company and wholly-owned subsidiary of the Operating Partnership (the “OP Sub”), and our former Manager and the contributors had entered into definitive agreements, as amended, (the “Contribution Agreement”) which provided for the acquisition (the “Internalization”) by the Company of a newly-formed entity that will own the assets that our former Manager used to operate the business of the Company.

A special committee comprised entirely of independent and disinterested members of our board of directors (the “Special Committee”), which retained independent legal and financial advisors, unanimously determined that the entry into the Contribution Agreement and the completion of the Internalization are in the best interests of the Company. Our board of directors, by unanimous vote, made a similar determination.

The closing of the Internalization was subject to certain approvals of the Company’s stockholders on certain matters contemplated by the Contribution Agreement. The Company held its Annual Meeting on October 26, 2017, at which the Company’s stockholders approved the proposal authorizing the issuances, pursuant to the Contribution Agreement, of (i) the Internalization OP Units, and shares of our Class A Common Stock that may be issued in the Company’s discretion upon redemption of such Internalization OP Units on a one-for-one basis in certain circumstances contemplated by the Contribution Agreement, and (ii) the Internalization Class C Shares, and shares of our Class A Common Stock that may be issued upon conversion of such Internalization Class C Shares on a one-for-one basis in certain circumstances contemplated by the Contribution Agreement.

The Internalization was consummated for a purchase price of approximately $41.24 million, payable 99.9% in equity and 0.1% in cash. Pursuant to the Contribution Agreement, the aggregate amount of consideration payable in connection with the Internalization (the “Internalization Consideration”) was determined pursuant to a formula established in the Management Agreement at the time of the Company’s IPO in April 2014. Specifically, the Internalization Consideration was an amount equal to three (3) times the sum of (i) the Base Management Fee and (ii) the Incentive Fee, in each case earned by the former Manager pursuant to the Management Agreement during the 12-month period ending on September 30, 2017 (the last day of the most recently-completed fiscal quarter prior to closing), which amount was reduced by the portion of actual former Manager costs to be paid by the Company up to $450,000. This amount was further reduced by the value of such Internalization Consideration payable in cash in the approximate amount of $40,794 (the “Cash Consideration”) to arrive at the value of the Internalization Consideration payable in OP Units and shares of Class C Common Stock, in the approximate amount of $40.75 million (the “Contribution Consideration”).

Pursuant to the Contribution Agreement, the number of OP Units and shares of Class C Common Stock issuable as Internalization Consideration was determined by dividing the proportionate amounts of such Contribution Consideration payable (a) in OP Units, in the approximate amount of $39.94 million, and (b) in shares of Class C Common Stock, in the approximate amount of $815,060, in each case by the volume-weighted average price of the Company’s Class A Common Stock on the NYSE American (formerly the NYSE MKT) for the twenty (20) trading days beginning on and including September 11, 2017, through and including October 6, 2017, of $10.64 per share (the “VWAP”). In payment of the Internalization Consideration, the Company has caused the Operating Partnership to issue to the Contributors an aggregate of 3,753,593 OP Units (the “Internalization OP Units”), and the Company has issued to the Contributors an aggregate of 76,603 shares of its newly reclassified Class C Common Stock (the “Internalization Class C Shares”) and an aggregate of approximately $40,794 in cash. Payment of the Internalization Consideration primarily in OP Units and Class C Common Stock, rather than principally in cash, was intended to further align the interests of our management with those of our stockholders.

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Upon closing of the Internalization, the Company became a self-managed real estate investment trust. The following key executives and officers of the former Manager assumed the following titles and duties with the Company: Mr. R. Ramin Kamfar serves as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer; Mr. James G, Babb, III, serves as Chief Investment Officer; Mr. Ryan S. MacDonald serves as Chief Acquisitions Officer; Mr. Jordan B. Ruddy serves as Chief Operating Officer and President; Mr. Christopher J. Vohs serves as Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer; and Mr. Michael L. Konig serves as Chief Legal Officer and Secretary. Messrs. Kamfar, Babb, MacDonald, Ruddy and Vohs have entered into employment agreements with an indirect subsidiary of the Company, and Mr. Konig has likewise entered into a services agreement with that subsidiary through his wholly-owned law firm, Konig & Associates, LLC, on substantially the same terms as the employment agreements. Each such agreement became effective upon closing, and has an initial term through and including December 31, 2020. As such, following the Internalization, the Company’s senior management team continues to oversee, manage and operate the Company, and the Company is no longer externally managed by the former Manager. As an internally managed company, the Company no longer pays our former Manager any fees or expense reimbursements arising from the Management Agreement.

Distribution Policy

We intend to continue to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes. The Code generally requires that a REIT annually distribute at least 90% of its REIT taxable income, determined without regard to the deduction for dividends paid and excluding any net capital gain, and imposes tax on any taxable income retained by a REIT, including capital gains.

To satisfy the requirements for qualification as a REIT and generally not be subject to federal income and excise tax, we intend to continue to make regular distributions of all or substantially all of our REIT taxable income, determined without regard to dividends paid, to our stockholders out of assets legally available for such purposes. All future distributions will be determined at the sole discretion of our board of directors on a quarterly basis. When determining the amount of future distributions, we expect that our board of directors will consider, among other factors, (i) the amount of cash generated from our operating activities, (ii) our expectations of future operating cash flows, (iii) our determination of near-term cash needs for acquisitions of new properties, development investments general property capital improvements and debt repayments, (iv) our ability to continue to access additional sources of capital, (v) the requirements of Maryland law, (vi) the amount required to be distributed to maintain our status as a REIT and to reduce any income and excise taxes that we otherwise would be required to pay and (vii) any limitations on our distributions contained in our credit or other agreements.

Holders of shares of 8.250% Series A Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock, $0.01 par value per share (the “Series A Preferred Stock”), will be entitled to receive cumulative cash dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock when, as and if authorized by our board of directors and declared by us from the end of the most recent dividend period for which dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock have been paid, payable quarterly in arrears on each January 5th, April 5th, July 5th and October 5th of each year, commencing on January 5, 2016, to holders of record on each December 25th, March 25th, June 25th and September 25th, respectively. From the date of original issue to, but not including, October 21, 2022, we will pay dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock at the rate of 8.250% per annum of the $25.00 liquidation preference per share (equivalent to the fixed annual amount of $2.0625 per share). Commencing October 21, 2022, we will pay cumulative cash dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock at an annual dividend rate of the initial rate increased by 2.0% of the liquidation preference per annum, which will increase by an additional 2.0% of the liquidation preference per annum on each subsequent anniversary thereafter, subject to a maximum annual dividend rate of 14.0%.

Holders of shares of Series B Redeemable Preferred Stock, $0.01 par value per share (the “Series B Preferred Stock”), are entitled to receive, when and as authorized by our board of directors and declared by us out of legally available funds, cumulative cash dividends on each share of Series B Preferred Stock at an annual rate of six percent (6%) of the initial stated value of $1,000 per share (the “Stated Value”). Dividends on each share of Series B Preferred Stock will begin accruing on, and will be cumulative from, the date of issuance or the end of the most recent dividend period for which dividends on the Series B Preferred Stock have been paid, payable monthly in arrears on the 5th day of each month to holders of record on the 25th day of the prior month.

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Holders of shares of 7.625% Series C Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock, $0.01 par value per share (the “Series C Preferred Stock”), will be entitled to receive cumulative cash dividends on the Series C Preferred Stock when, as and if authorized by our board of directors and declared by us from and including the date of original issue or the end of the most recent dividend period for which dividends on the Series C Preferred Stock have been paid, payable quarterly in arrears on each January 5th, April 5th, July 5th and October 5th of each year, commencing on October 5, 2016, to holders of record on each December 25th, March 25th, June 25th and September 25th, respectively. From the date of original to, but not including, July 19, 2023, we will pay dividends on the Series C Preferred Stock at the rate of 7.625% per annum of the $25.00 liquidation preference per share (equivalent to the fixed annual amount of $1.90625 per share). Commencing July 19, 2023, we will pay cumulative cash dividends on the Series C Preferred Stock at an annual dividend rate of the initial rate increased by 2.0% of the liquidation preference per annum, which will increase by an additional 2.0% of the liquidation preference per annum on each subsequent anniversary thereafter, subject to a maximum annual dividend rate of 14.0%.

Holders of shares of 7.125% Series D Cumulative Preferred Stock, $0.01 par value per share (the “Series D Preferred Stock”), will be entitled to receive cumulative cash dividends on the Series D Preferred Stock when, as and if authorized by our board of directors and declared by us from and including the date of original issue or the end of the most recent dividend period for which dividends on the Series D Preferred Stock have been paid, payable quarterly in arrears on each January 5th, April 5th, July 5th and October 5th of each year, commencing on January 5, 2017, to holders of record on each December 25th, March 25th, June 25th and September 25th, respectively. From the date of original issue, we will pay dividends on the Series D Preferred Stock at the rate of 7.1250% per annum of the $25.00 liquidation preference per share (equivalent to the fixed annual amount of $1.78125 per share).

Holders of shares of Class A common stock, $0.01 par value per share (the “Class A common stock”), and Class C common stock $0.01 par value per share (the “Class C common stock”), will be entitled to receive cash dividends when, as and if authorized by our board of directors and declared by us.

On December 20, 2017, the Company announced a revised dividend policy for the Company’s Class A common stock, which will also be applicable to the Class C common stock, and set an annual dividend rate of $0.65 per common share. The common share dividend will be paid on a quarterly basis, a change from previously being paid on a monthly basis. The board of directors considered a number of factors in setting the new common stock dividend rate, including but not limited to achieving a sustainable dividend covered by current recurring AFFO (vs. pro forma AFFO), multifamily and small cap peer dividend rates and payout ratios, providing financial flexibility for the Company, and achieving an appropriate balance between the retention of capital to invest and grow net asset value and the importance of current distributions.

We cannot assure you that we will generate sufficient cash flows to make distributions to our stockholders, or that we will be able to sustain those distributions. If our operations do not generate sufficient cash flow to allow us to satisfy the REIT distribution requirements, we may be required to fund distributions from working capital, offering proceeds, borrow funds, sell assets, make a taxable distribution of our equity or debt securities, or reduce such distributions. Our distribution policy enables us to review the alternative funding sources available to us from time to time. Our actual results of operations will be affected by a number of factors, including the revenues we receive from our properties, our operating expenses, interest expense, the ability of our tenants to meet their obligations and unanticipated expenditures. For more information regarding risk factors that could materially adversely affect our actual results of operations, please see “Item 1A — Risk Factors.”

Regulations

Our investments are subject to various federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, including, among other things, zoning regulations, land use controls, environmental controls relating to air and water quality, noise pollution and indirect environmental impacts such as increased motor vehicle activity. We believe that we have all permits and approvals necessary under current law to operate our investments.

Environmental

As an owner of real estate, we are subject to various environmental laws of federal, state and local governments. Compliance with existing laws has not had a material adverse effect on our financial condition

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or results of operations, and management does not believe it will have such an impact in the future. However, we cannot predict the impact of unforeseen environmental contingencies or new or changed laws or regulations on properties in which we hold an interest, or on properties that may be acquired directly or indirectly in the future.

Industry Segment

Our current business consists of investing in and operating multifamily communities. A significant portion of our consolidated net income (loss) is from investments in real estate properties that we own through joint ventures. We internally evaluate operating performance on an individual property level and view our real estate assets as one industry segment, and, accordingly, our properties are aggregated into one reportable segment.

Available Information

We electronically file annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and all amendments to those reports with the SEC. We also have filed with the SEC registration statements on Form S-3 (File Nos. 333-200359, 333-203415, 333-208956, and 333-208988) and Form S-8 (333-202569 and 333-222255). Copies of our filings with the SEC may be obtained from the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov, or downloaded from our website at www.bluerockresidential.com, as soon as reasonably practicable after such material has been filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. Access to these filings is free of charge.

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Item 1A. Risk Factors

Risks Related to our Business and Properties

We face numerous risks associated with the real estate industry that could adversely affect our results of operations through decreased revenues or increased costs.

As a real estate company, we are subject to various changes in real estate conditions, and any negative trends in such real estate conditions may adversely affect our results of operations through decreased revenues or increased costs. These conditions include:

changes in national, regional and local economic conditions, which may be negatively impacted by concerns about inflation, deflation, government deficits, high unemployment rates, decreased consumer confidence and liquidity concerns, particularly in markets in which we have a high concentration of properties;
fluctuations in interest rates, which could adversely affect our ability to obtain financing on favorable terms or at all;
the inability of residents and tenants to pay rent;
the existence and quality of the competition, such as the attractiveness of our properties as compared to our competitors’ properties based on considerations such as convenience of location, rental rates, amenities and safety record;
increased operating costs, including increased real property taxes, maintenance, insurance and utilities costs;
weather conditions that may increase or decrease energy costs and other weather-related expenses;
oversupply of apartments, commercial space or single-family housing or a reduction in demand for real estate in the markets in which our properties are located;
a favorable interest rate environment that may result in a significant number of potential residents of our apartment communities deciding to purchase homes instead of renting;
changes in, or increased costs of compliance with, laws and/or governmental regulations, including those governing usage, zoning, the environment and taxes; and
rent control or stabilization laws, or other laws regulating rental housing, which could prevent us from raising rents to offset increases in operating costs.

Moreover, other factors may adversely affect our results of operations, including potential liability under environmental and other laws and other unforeseen events, many of which are discussed elsewhere in the following risk factors. Any or all of these factors could materially adversely affect our results of operations through decreased revenues or increased costs.

Our current portfolio consists of interests in twenty-eight apartment communities and eleven development communities located primarily in markets in the Southeastern United States. Any adverse developments in local economic conditions or the demand for apartment units in these markets may negatively impact our results of operations.

Our current portfolio of properties consists primarily of apartment communities and development communities geographically concentrated in the Southeastern United States, and our portfolio going forward may consist primarily of the same. For the year ended December 31, 2017, properties in Florida, Texas, Georgia, and North Carolina comprised 36%, 30%, 17%, and 16%, respectively, of our total rental revenue, excluding Village Green of Ann Arbor, Lansbrook Village, Fox Hill and MDA Apartments which were sold in 2017. As such, we are currently susceptible to local economic conditions and the supply of and demand for apartment units in these markets. If there is a downturn in the economy or an oversupply of or decrease in demand for apartment units in these markets, our business could be materially adversely affected to a greater extent than if we owned a real estate portfolio that was more diversified in terms of both geography and industry focus.

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We may not be successful in identifying and consummating suitable investment opportunities.

Our investment strategy requires us to identify suitable investment opportunities compatible with our investment criteria. We may not be successful in identifying suitable opportunities that meet our criteria or in consummating investments, including those identified as part of our investment pipeline, on satisfactory terms or at all. Our ability to make investments on favorable terms may be constrained by several factors including, but not limited to, competition from other investors with significant capital, including other publicly-traded REITs and institutional investment funds, which may significantly increase investment costs; and/or the inability to finance an investment on favorable terms or at all. The failure to identify or consummate investments on satisfactory terms, or at all, may impede our growth and negatively affect our cash available for distribution to our stockholders.

Adverse economic conditions may negatively affect our results of operations and, as a result, our ability to make distributions to our stockholders or to realize appreciation in the value of our properties.

Our operating results may be adversely affected by market and economic challenges, which may negatively affect our returns and profitability and, as a result, our ability to make distributions to our stockholders or to realize appreciation in the value of our properties. These market and economic challenges include, but are not limited to, the following:

any future downturn in the U.S. economy and the related reduction in spending, reduced home prices and high unemployment could result in tenant defaults under leases, vacancies at our apartment communities and concessions or reduced rental rates under new leases due to reduced demand;
the rate of household formation or population growth in our target markets or a continued or exacerbated economic slow-down experienced by the local economies where our properties are located or by the real estate industry generally may result in changes in supply of or demand for apartment units in our target markets; and
the failure of the real estate market to attract the same level of capital investment in the future that it attracts at the time of our purchases or a reduction in the number of companies seeking to acquire properties may result in the value of our investments not appreciating or decreasing significantly below the amount we pay for these investments.

The length and severity of any economic slow-down or downturn cannot be predicted. Our operations and, as a result, our ability to make distributions to our stockholders and/or our ability to realize appreciation in the value of our properties could be materially and adversely affected to the extent that an economic slow-down or downturn is prolonged or becomes severe.

Our revenues are significantly influenced by demand for apartment properties generally, and a decrease in such demand will likely have a greater adverse effect on our revenues than if we owned a more diversified real estate portfolio.

Our current portfolio is focused predominately on apartment properties, and we expect that our portfolio going forward will focus predominately on the same. As a result, we are subject to risks inherent in investments in a single industry, and a decrease in the demand for apartment properties would likely have a greater adverse effect on our rental revenues than if we owned a more diversified real estate portfolio. Resident demand at apartment properties was adversely affected by the most recent U.S. recession, including the reduction in spending, reduced home prices and high unemployment, together with the price volatility, dislocations and liquidity disruptions in the debt and equity markets, as well as the rate of household formation or population growth in our markets, changes in interest rates or changes in supply of, or demand for, similar or competing apartment properties in an area. If economic recovery slows or stalls, these conditions could persist and we could experience downward pressure on occupancy and market rents at our apartment properties, which could cause a decrease in our rental revenue. Any such decrease could impair our ability to satisfy our substantial debt service obligations or make distributions to our stockholders.

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The properties in our investment pipeline are subject to contingencies that could delay or prevent acquisition or investment in those properties.

At any given time, we are generally in discussions regarding a number of apartment properties for acquisition or investment, which we refer to as our investment pipeline. However, we may not have completed our diligence process on these properties or development projects or have definitive investment or purchase and sale agreements, as applicable, and several other conditions may be required to be met in order for us to complete these acquisitions or developments, including approval by our investment committee or board of directors. If we are planning to use proceeds of an offering of our securities to fund these acquisitions or investments and are unable to complete the acquisition of the interests or investment in any of these properties or experience significant delays in executing any such acquisition or investment, we will have issued securities in an offering without realizing a corresponding current or future increase in earnings and cash flow from acquiring those interests or developing those properties, and may incur expenses in connection with our attempts in consummating such acquisition or investment, which could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, to the extent the uses of proceeds from an offering are designated for the acquisition of or investment in these properties, we will have no specific designated use for the net proceeds from the offering allocated to the purchase or development and investors will be unable to evaluate in advance the manner in which we will invest, or the economic merits of the properties we may ultimately acquire or develop with such proceeds.

Our expenses may remain constant or increase, even if our revenues decrease, causing our results of operations to be adversely affected.

Costs associated with our business, such as mortgage payments, real estate taxes, insurance premiums and maintenance costs, are relatively inflexible and generally do not decrease, and may increase, when a property is not fully occupied, rental rates decrease, a tenant fails to pay rent or other circumstances cause a reduction in property revenues. As a result, if revenues drop, we may not be able to reduce our expenses accordingly, which would adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

We compete with numerous other parties or entities for real estate assets and tenants and may not compete successfully.

We compete with numerous other persons or entities engaged in real estate investment activities, many of which have greater resources than we do. Some of these investors may enjoy significant competitive advantages that result from, among other things, a lower cost of capital and enhanced operating efficiencies. Our competitors may be willing to offer space at rates below our rates, causing us to lose existing or potential tenants.

Competition from other apartment properties for tenants could reduce our profitability and the return on your investment.

The apartment property industry is highly competitive. Our competitors may be willing to offer space at rates below our rates, causing us to lose existing or potential tenants. This competition could reduce occupancy levels and revenues at our apartment properties, which would adversely affect our results of operations. We expect to face competition for tenants from many sources. We will face competition from other apartment communities both in the immediate vicinity and in the larger geographic market where our apartment communities will be located. If overbuilding of apartment properties occurs at our properties it will increase the number of apartment units available and may decrease occupancy and apartment rental rates at our properties.

Increased competition and increased affordability of single-family homes could limit our ability to retain residents, lease apartment units or increase or maintain rents.

Any apartment properties we may acquire will most likely compete with numerous housing alternatives in attracting residents, including single-family homes, as well as owner-occupied single and multifamily homes available to rent. Competitive housing in a particular area and the increasing affordability of owner occupied single and multifamily homes available to rent or buy caused by declining mortgage interest rates and government programs to promote home ownership could adversely affect our ability to retain our residents, lease apartment units and increase or maintain rental rates.

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Increased construction of similar properties that compete with our properties in any particular location could adversely affect the operating results of our properties and our cash available for distribution to our stockholders.

We may acquire properties in locations which experience increases in construction of properties that compete with our properties. This increased competition and construction could:

make it more difficult for us to find tenants to lease units in our apartment properties;
force us to lower our rental prices in order to lease units in our apartment properties; and/or
substantially reduce our revenues and cash available for distribution to our stockholders.

Our investments will be dependent on tenants for revenue, and lease terminations could reduce our revenues from rents, resulting in the decline in the value of your investment.

The underlying value of our properties and the ability to make distributions to you depend upon the ability of the tenants of our properties to generate enough income to pay their rents in a timely manner, and the success of our investments depends upon the occupancy levels, rental income and operating expenses of our properties and our Company. Tenants’ inability to timely pay their rents may be impacted by employment and other constraints on their personal finances, including debts, purchases and other factors. These and other changes beyond our control may adversely affect our tenants’ ability to make lease payments. In the event of a tenant default or bankruptcy, we may experience delays in enforcing our rights as landlord and may incur costs in protecting our investment and re-leasing our property. We may be unable to re-lease the property for the rent previously received. We may be unable to sell a property with low occupancy without incurring a loss. These events and others could cause us to reduce the amount of distributions we make to stockholders and may also cause the value of your investment to decline.

Our operating results and distributable cash flow depend on our ability to generate revenue from leasing our properties to tenants on terms favorable to us.

Our operating results depend, in large part, on revenues derived from leasing space in our properties. We are subject to the credit risk of our tenants, and to the extent our tenants default on their leases or fail to make rental payments we may suffer a decrease in our revenue. In addition, if a tenant does not pay its rent, we may not be able to enforce our rights as landlord without delays and we may incur substantial legal costs. We are also subject to the risk that we will not be able to lease space in our value-added or opportunistic properties or that, upon the expiration of leases for space located in our properties, leases may not be renewed, the space may not be re-leased or the terms of renewal or re-leasing (including the cost of required renovations or concessions to customers) may be less favorable to us than current lease terms. If vacancies continue for a long period of time, we may suffer reduced revenues resulting in decreased distributions to our stockholders. In addition, the resale value of the property could be diminished because the market value of a particular property will depend principally upon the value of the leases of such property. Further, costs associated with real estate investment, such as real estate taxes and maintenance costs, generally are not reduced when circumstances cause a reduction in revenue. These events would cause a significant decrease in revenues and could cause us to reduce the amount of distributions to our stockholders.

Short-term apartment leases expose us to the effects of declining market rent, which could adversely impact our ability to make cash distributions to our stockholders.

We expect that substantially all of our apartment leases will be for a term of one year or less. Because these leases generally permit the residents to leave at the end of the lease term without penalty, our rental revenues may be impacted by declines in market rents more quickly than if our leases were for longer terms.

Costs incurred in complying with governmental laws and regulations may reduce our net income and the cash available for distributions.

Our company and the properties we own and expect to own are subject to various federal, state and local laws and regulations relating to environmental protection and human health and safety. Federal laws such as the National Environmental Policy Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and

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Liability Act, the Solid Waste Disposal Act as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the Federal Clean Air Act, the Toxic Substances Control Act, the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act and the Hazard Communication Act and their resolutions and corresponding state and local counterparts govern such matters as wastewater discharges, air emissions, the operation and removal of underground and above-ground storage tanks, the use, storage, treatment, transportation and disposal of solid and hazardous materials and the remediation of contamination associated with disposals. The properties we own and acquire must comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 which generally requires that certain types of buildings and services be made accessible and available to people with disabilities. Additionally, we must comply with the Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988, which requires that apartment properties first occupied after March 13, 1991 be accessible to handicapped residents and visitors. These laws may require us to make modifications to our properties. Some of these laws and regulations impose joint and several liability on tenants, owners or operators for the costs to investigate or remediate contaminated properties, regardless of fault or whether the acts causing the contamination were illegal. Compliance with these laws and any new or more stringent laws or regulations may require us to incur material expenditures. Future laws, ordinances or regulations may impose material environmental liability. In addition, there are various federal, state and local fire, health, life-safety and similar regulations with which we may be required to comply, and which may subject us to liability in the form of fines or damages for noncompliance.

Our properties may be affected by our tenants’ activities or actions, the existing condition of land when we buy it, operations in the vicinity of our properties, such as the presence of underground storage tanks, or activities of unrelated third parties. The presence of hazardous substances, or the failure to properly remediate these substances, may make it difficult or impossible to sell or rent such property. Any material expenditures, fines, or damages we must pay will reduce our ability to make distributions and may reduce the value of your investment.

As the owner of real property, we could become subject to liability for asbestos-containing building materials in the buildings on our properties.

Some of our properties may contain asbestos-containing materials. Environmental laws typically require that owners or operators of buildings with asbestos-containing building materials properly manage and maintain these materials, adequately inform or train those who may come in contact with asbestos and undertake special precautions, including removal or other abatement, in the event that asbestos is disturbed during building renovation or demolition. These laws may impose fines and penalties on building owners or operators for failure to comply with these requirements. In addition, third parties may be entitled to seek recovery from owners or operators for personal injury associated with exposure to asbestos-containing building materials.

In addition, many insurance carriers are excluding asbestos-related claims from standard policies, pricing asbestos endorsements at prohibitively high rates or adding significant restrictions to this coverage. Because of our difficulty in obtaining specialized coverage at rates that correspond to the perceived level of risk, we may not obtain insurance for asbestos-related claims. We will continue to evaluate the availability and cost of additional insurance coverage from the insurance market. If we purchase insurance for asbestos, the cost could have a negative impact on our results of operations.

Costs associated with addressing indoor air quality issues, moisture infiltration and resulting mold remediation may be costly.

As a general matter, concern about indoor exposure to mold or other air contaminants has been increasing as such exposure has been alleged to have a variety of adverse effects on health. As a result, there have been a number of lawsuits in our industry against owners and managers of apartment communities relating to indoor air quality, moisture infiltration and resulting mold. Some of our properties may contain microbial matter such as mold and mildew. The terms of our property and general liability policies generally exclude certain mold-related claims. Should an uninsured loss arise against us, we would be required to use our funds to resolve the issue, including litigation costs. We can offer no assurance that liabilities resulting from indoor air quality, moisture infiltration and the presence of or exposure to mold will not have a future impact on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

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A change in the United States government policy with regard to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac could impact our financial condition.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are a major source of financing for the apartment real estate sector. We and other apartment companies in the apartment real estate sector depend frequently on Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to finance growth by purchasing or guarantying apartment loans. In February 2011, the Obama Administration released a report to Congress which included options, among others, to gradually shrink and eventually shut down Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. In June 2013, a bipartisan group of senators proposed an overhaul of the housing finance system which would wind down Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac within five years; in August 2013, President Obama announced his support for this legislation. This legislation was ultimately abandoned. Any decision by the government to eliminate or downscale Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, to reduce their acquisitions or guarantees of apartment real estate mortgage loans, or to reduce government support for multi-family housing more generally, may adversely affect interest rates, capital availability, development of multi-family communities and our ability to refinance our existing mortgage obligations as they come due and to obtain additional long-term financing for the acquisition of additional apartment communities on favorable terms or at all.

If we are not able to cost-effectively maximize the life of our properties, we may incur greater than anticipated capital expenditure costs, which may adversely affect our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

While the majority of our properties have undergone substantial renovations by prior owners since they were constructed, older properties may carry certain risks including unanticipated repair costs associated with older properties, increased maintenance costs as older properties continue to age, and cost overruns due to the need for special materials and/or fixtures specific to older properties. Although we take a proactive approach to property preservation, utilizing a preventative maintenance plan, and selective improvements that mitigate the cost impact of maintaining exterior building features and aging building components, if we are not able to cost-effectively maximize the life of our properties, we may incur greater than anticipated capital expenditure costs which may adversely affect our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

Any uninsured losses or high insurance premiums will reduce our net income and the amount of our cash distributions to stockholders.

We will attempt to ensure adequate insurance is obtained to cover significant areas of risk to us as a company and to our properties. However, there are types of losses at the property level, generally catastrophic in nature, such as losses due to wars, acts of terrorism, earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, pollution or environmental matters, which are uninsurable or not economically insurable, or may be insured subject to limitations, such as large deductibles or co-payments. We may not have adequate coverage for such losses. If any of our properties incurs a casualty loss that is not fully insured, the value of our assets will be reduced by any such uninsured loss. In addition, other than any working capital reserve or other reserves we may establish, we have no source of funding to repair or reconstruct any uninsured damaged property. Also, to the extent we must pay unexpectedly large amounts for insurance, we could suffer reduced earnings that would result in lower distributions to stockholders.

We may have difficulty selling real estate investments, and our ability to distribute all or a portion of the net proceeds from such sale to our stockholders may be limited.

Real estate investments are relatively illiquid. We will have a limited ability to vary our portfolio in response to changes in economic or other conditions. We will also have a limited ability to sell assets in order to fund working capital and similar capital needs. When we sell any of our properties, we may not realize a gain on such sale. We may not elect to distribute any proceeds from the sale of properties to our stockholders; for example, we may use such proceeds to:

purchase additional properties;
fund capital commitments to our joint ventures;
repay debt, if any;

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buy out interests of any co-venturers or other partners in any joint venture in which we are a party;
create working capital reserves; and/or
make repairs, maintenance, tenant improvements or other capital improvements or expenditures to our remaining properties.

Our ability to sell our properties may also be limited by our need to avoid a 100% penalty tax that is imposed on gain recognized by a REIT from the sale of property characterized as dealer property. In order to ensure that we avoid such characterization, we may be required to hold our properties for the production of rental income for a minimum period of time, generally two years, and comply with certain other requirements in the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”).

Representations and warranties made by us in connection with sales of our properties may subject us to liability that could result in losses and could harm our operating results and, therefore distributions we make to our stockholders.

When we sell a property, we may be required to make representations and warranties regarding the property and other customary items. In the event of a breach of such representations or warranties, the purchaser of the property may have claims for damages against us, rights to indemnification from us or otherwise have remedies against us. In any such case, we may incur liabilities that could result in losses and could harm our operating results and, therefore distributions we make to our stockholders.

We may be unable to redevelop existing properties successfully and our investments in the development of new properties will be subjected to development risk, which could adversely affect our results of operations due to unexpected costs, delays and other contingencies.

As part of our operating strategy, we intend to selectively expand and/or redevelop existing properties as market conditions warrant, as well as invest in development of new properties through our Invest-to-Own strategy. In addition to the risks associated with real estate investments in general as described above, there are significant risks associated with development activities including the following:

we or the developers that we finance may be unable to obtain, or face delays in obtaining, necessary zoning, land-use, building, occupancy and other required governmental permits and authorizations, which could result in increased development costs and/or lower than expected leases;
developers may incur development costs for a property that exceed original estimates due to increased materials, labor or other costs, changes in development plans or unforeseen environmental conditions, which could make completion of the property more costly or uneconomical;
land, insurance and construction costs may be higher than expected in our markets; therefore, we may be unable to attract rents that compensate for these increases in costs;
we may abandon redevelopment or Invest-to-Own development opportunities that we have already begun to explore, and we may fail to recover expenses already incurred in connection with exploring any such opportunities;
rental rates and occupancy levels may be lower and operating and/or capital cost may be higher than anticipated;
changes in applicable zoning and land use laws may require us to abandon projects prior to their completion, resulting in the loss of development costs incurred up to the time of abandonment; and
possible delays in completion because of construction delays, delays in the receipt of zoning, occupancy and other approvals, or other factors outside of our control.

In addition, if a project is delayed, certain residents and tenants may have the right to terminate their leases. Any one or more of these risks may cause us or the projects in which we invest to incur unexpected development costs, which would negatively affect our results of operations.

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As part of otherwise attractive portfolios of properties, we may acquire some properties with existing lock-out provisions, which may prohibit or inhibit us from selling a property for an indeterminate period of time, or may require us to maintain specified debt levels for a period of years on some properties.

Loan provisions could materially restrict us from selling or otherwise disposing of or refinancing properties. These provisions would affect our ability to turn our investments into cash and thus affect cash available for distributions to you. Loan provisions may prohibit us from reducing the outstanding indebtedness with respect to properties, refinancing such indebtedness on a non-recourse basis at maturity, or increasing the amount of indebtedness with respect to such properties.

Loan provisions could impair our ability to take actions that would otherwise be in the best interests of our stockholders and, therefore, may have an adverse impact on the value of our stock, relative to the value that would result if the loan provisions did not exist. In particular, loan provisions could preclude us from participating in major transactions that could result in a disposition of our assets or a change in control even though that disposition or change in control might be in the best interests of our stockholders.

Our investments could be adversely affected if a member of our Bluerock network performs poorly at one of our projects, which could adversely affect returns to our stockholders.

In general, we expect to rely on members of our network for the day-to-day management and development of our real estate investments. Members of our network are not fiduciaries to us, and generally will have limited capital invested in a project, if any. One or more members of our network may perform poorly in managing one of our project investments for a variety of reasons, including failure to properly adhere to budgets or properly consummate the property business plan. A member of our network may also underperform for strategic reasons related to projects or assets that the partner is involved in with a Bluerock affiliate but not our Company. If a member of our network does not perform well at one of our projects, we may not be able to ameliorate the adverse effects of poor performance by terminating the partner and finding a replacement partner to manage our projects in a timely manner. In such an instance, the returns to our stockholders could be adversely affected.

Actions of our joint venture partners could subject us to liabilities in excess of those contemplated or prevent us from taking actions which are in the best interests of our stockholders, which could result in lower investment returns to our stockholders.

We have entered into, and in the future intend to enter into, joint ventures with affiliates and other third parties, including our members of our network, to acquire or improve properties. We may also purchase properties in partnerships, co-tenancies or other co-ownership arrangements. Such investments may involve risks not otherwise present when acquiring real estate directly, including, for example:

joint venturers may share certain approval rights over major decisions;
that such co-venturer, co-owner or partner may at any time have economic or business interests or goals which are or which become inconsistent with our business interests or goals, including inconsistent goals relating to the sale of properties held in the joint venture or the timing of termination or liquidation of the joint venture;
the possibility that our co-venturer, co-owner or partner in an investment might become insolvent or bankrupt;
the possibility that we may incur liabilities as a result of an action taken by our co-venturer, co-owner or partner;
that such co-venturer, co-owner or partner may be in a position to take action contrary to our instructions or requests or contrary to our policies or objectives, including our policy with respect to maintaining our qualification as a REIT;
disputes between us and our joint venturers may result in litigation or arbitration that would increase our expenses and prevent our officers and directors from focusing their time and effort on our business and result in subjecting the properties owned by the applicable joint venture to additional risk; or

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under certain joint venture arrangements, neither venture partner may have the power to control the venture, and an impasse could be reached which might have a negative influence on the joint venture.

These events might subject us to liabilities in excess of those contemplated and thus reduce your investment returns. If we have a right of first refusal or buy/sell right to buy out a co-venturer, co-owner or partner, we may be unable to finance such a buy-out if it becomes exercisable or we may be required to purchase such interest at a time when it would not otherwise be in our best interest to do so. If our interest is subject to a buy/sell right, we may not have sufficient cash, available borrowing capacity or other capital resources to allow us to elect to purchase an interest of a co-venturer subject to the buy/sell right, in which case we may be forced to sell our interest as the result of the exercise of such right when we would otherwise prefer to keep our interest. Finally, we may not be able to sell our interest in a joint venture if we desire to exit the venture.

Your investment return may be reduced if we are required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act; if we are subject to registration under the Investment Company Act, we will not be able to continue our business.

Neither we, nor our Operating Partnership, nor any of our subsidiaries intend to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act. We expect that our Operating Partnership’s and subsidiaries’ investments in real estate will represent the substantial majority of our total asset mix, which would not subject us to the Investment Company Act. In order to maintain an exemption from regulation under the Investment Company Act, we intend to engage, through our Operating Partnership and our wholly and majority owned subsidiaries, primarily in the business of buying real estate, and qualifying real estate investments must be made within a year after cash is received by us. If we are unable to invest a significant portion of cash proceeds in properties within one year of receipt, we may avoid being required to register as an investment company by temporarily investing any unused proceeds in government securities with low returns, which would reduce the cash available for distribution to stockholders and possibly lower your returns.

We expect that most of our assets will continue to be held through wholly owned or majority owned subsidiaries of our Operating Partnership. We expect that most of these subsidiaries will be outside the definition of investment company under Section 3(a)(1) of the Investment Company Act as they are generally expected to hold at least 60% of their assets in real property or in entities that they manage or co-manage that own real property. Section 3(a)(1)(A) of the Investment Company Act defines an investment company as any issuer that is or holds itself out as being engaged primarily in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities. Section 3(a)(1)(C) of the Investment Company Act defines an investment company as any issuer that is engaged or proposes to engage in the business of investing, reinvesting, owning, holding or trading in securities and owns or proposes to acquire investment securities having a value exceeding 40% of the value of the issuer’s total assets (exclusive of U.S. government securities and cash items) on an unconsolidated basis, which we refer to as the 40% test. Excluded from the term “investment securities,” among other things, are U.S. government securities and securities issued by majority owned subsidiaries that are not themselves investment companies and are not relying on the exception from the definition of investment company set forth in Section 3(c)(1) or Section 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act. We believe that we, our Operating Partnership and most of the subsidiaries of our Operating Partnership will not fall within either definition of investment company as we invest primarily in real property, through our wholly or majority owned subsidiaries, the majority of which we expect to have at least 60% of their assets in real property or in entities that they manage or co-manage that own real property. As these subsidiaries would be investing either solely or primarily in real property, they would be outside of the definition of “investment company” under Section 3(a)(1) of the Investment Company Act. We are organized as a holding company that conducts its businesses primarily through the Operating Partnership, which in turn is a holding company conducting its business through its subsidiaries. Both we and our Operating Partnership intend to conduct our operations so that they comply with the 40% test. We will monitor our holdings to ensure continuing and ongoing compliance with this test. In addition, we believe that neither we nor the Operating Partnership will be considered an investment company under Section 3(a)(1)(A) of the Investment Company Act because neither we nor the Operating Partnership will engage primarily or hold itself out as being engaged primarily in the

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business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities. Rather, through the Operating Partnership’s wholly-owned or majority owned subsidiaries, we and the Operating Partnership will be primarily engaged in the non-investment company businesses of these subsidiaries.

In the event that the value of investment securities held by the subsidiaries of our Operating Partnership were to exceed 40%, we expect our subsidiaries to be able to rely on the exclusion from the definition of “investment company” provided by Section 3(c)(5)(C) of the Investment Company Act. Section 3(c)(5)(C), as interpreted by the staff of the SEC, requires each of our subsidiaries relying on this exception to invest at least 55% of its portfolio in “mortgage and other liens on and interests in real estate,” which we refer to as “qualifying real estate assets” and maintain at least 70% to 90% of its assets in qualifying real estate assets or other real estate-related assets. The remaining 20% of the portfolio can consist of miscellaneous assets. What we buy and sell is therefore limited to these criteria. How we determine to classify our assets for purposes of the Investment Company Act will be based in large measure upon no-action letters issued by the SEC staff in the past and other SEC interpretive guidance. These no-action positions were issued in accordance with factual situations that may be substantially different from the factual situations we may face, and a number of these no-action positions were issued more than ten years ago. Pursuant to this guidance, and depending on the characteristics of the specific investments, certain joint venture investments may not constitute qualifying real estate assets and therefore investments in these types of assets may be limited. No assurance can be given that the SEC will concur with our classification of our assets. Future revisions to the Investment Company Act or further guidance from the SEC may cause us to lose our exclusion from registration or force us to re-evaluate our portfolio and our investment strategy. Such changes may prevent us from operating our business successfully.

In the event that we, or our Operating Partnership, were to acquire assets that could make either entity fall within the definition of investment company under Section 3(a)(1) of the Investment Company Act, we believe that we would still qualify for an exclusion from registration pursuant to Section 3(c)(6). Section 3(c)(6) excludes from the definition of investment company any company primarily engaged, directly or through majority owned subsidiaries, in one or more of certain specified businesses. These specified businesses include the real estate business described in Section 3(c)(5)(C) of the Investment Company Act. It also excludes from the definition of investment company any company primarily engaged, directly or through majority owned subsidiaries, in one or more of such specified businesses from which at least 25% of such company’s gross income during its last fiscal year is derived, together with any additional business or businesses other than investing, reinvesting, owning, holding, or trading in securities. Although the SEC staff has issued little interpretive guidance with respect to Section 3(c)(6), we believe that we and our Operating Partnership may rely on Section 3(c)(6) if 55% of the assets of our Operating Partnership consist of, and at least 55% of the income of our Operating Partnership is derived from, qualifying real estate assets owned by wholly owned or majority owned subsidiaries of our Operating Partnership.

To ensure that neither we, nor our Operating Partnership nor subsidiaries are required to register as an investment company, each entity may be unable to sell assets they would otherwise want to sell and may need to sell assets they would otherwise wish to retain. In addition, we, our operating company or our subsidiaries may be required to acquire additional income or loss-generating assets that we might not otherwise acquire or forego opportunities to acquire interests in companies that we would otherwise want to acquire. Although we, our Operating Partnership and our subsidiaries intend to monitor our respective portfolios periodically and prior to each acquisition or disposition, any of these entities may not be able to maintain an exclusion from registration as an investment company. If we, our Operating Partnership or our subsidiaries are required to register as an investment company but fail to do so, the unregistered entity would be prohibited from engaging in our business, and criminal and civil actions could be brought against such entity. In addition, the contracts of such entity would be unenforceable unless a court required enforcement, and a court could appoint a receiver to take control of the entity and liquidate its business.

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We have experienced losses in the past, and we may experience similar losses in the future.

From inception of our Company through December 31, 2017, we had a cumulative net loss of $29.5 million. Our losses can be attributed, in part, to the initial start-up costs and initially high corporate general and administrative expenses relative to the size of our portfolio. In addition, acquisition costs and depreciation and amortization expenses substantially reduced our income. We cannot assure you that, in the future, we will be profitable or that we will realize growth in the value of our assets.

We previously generated negative operating cash flow, and our corporate general and administrative expenses were high relative to the size of our current portfolio.

In prior years, our corporate general and administrative expenses exceeded the cash flow received from our investments in real estate joint ventures. The primary reason for the previous negative operating cash flow was the amount of our corporate general and administrative expenses relative to the size of the portfolio. Our corporate general and administrative expenses were $7.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2017, which reflected an increase of $1.7 million over the same period in 2016. During 2017 the size of our portfolio increased significantly and cash flow from our investments in real estate joint ventures increased to cover our general and administrative expenses. In addition, due to the Internalization, expenses previously paid to the former Manager as base management fees are now considered general and administrative expenses. There can be no assurance that current period operating cash flow will continue to exceed our general and administrative expenses. If cash flow received from our investments decreases and our corporate general and administrative expenses become high in relation to the size of our portfolio, this would reduce the amount of funds available for us to invest in properties or other investments. These factors could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition and ability to pay distributions to our stockholders.

Our corporate general and administrative costs may remain high relative to the size of our portfolio, which will adversely affect our results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

If we are not successful in investing the net proceeds of an offering in the manner set forth under “Use of Proceeds” in any applicable prospectus or prospectus supplement and continuing to raise capital and invest on an accretive basis, our corporate general and administrative costs will likely remain high relative to the size of our portfolio. If that occurs, it would adversely affect our results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

Our internal control over financial reporting may not be effective, which could adversely affect our reputation, results of operations and stock price.

The accuracy of our financial reporting depends on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Internal control over financial reporting can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements and may not prevent or detect misstatements because of its inherent limitations. These limitations include the possibility of human error, inadequacy or circumvention of internal controls and fraud. If we do not attain and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting or implement controls sufficient to provide reasonable assurance with respect to the preparation and fair presentation of our financial statements, we could be unable to file accurate financial reports on a timely basis, and our reputation, results of operations and stock price could be materially adversely affected.

We have very limited sources of capital other than the proceeds of offerings of our securities to meet our primary liquidity requirements.

We have very limited sources of capital other than cash from property operations and the net proceeds of offerings of our securities to meet our primary liquidity requirements. As a result, we may not be able to pay our liabilities and obligations when they come due other than with the net proceeds of an offering, which may limit our ability to fully consummate our business plan and diversify our portfolio. In the past, we have relied on borrowing from affiliates to help finance our business activities. However, there are no assurances that we will be able to borrow from affiliates in the future, or extend the maturity date of any loans that may be outstanding and due to affiliates.

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You will have limited control over changes in our policies and day-to-day operations, which limited control increases the uncertainty and risks you face as a stockholder. In addition, our board of directors may change our major operational policies without your approval.

Our board of directors determines our major policies, including our policies regarding financing, growth, debt capitalization, REIT qualification and distributions. Our board of directors may amend or revise these and other policies without a vote of the stockholders. Under the Maryland General Corporation Law and our charter, our stockholders have a right to vote only on limited matters. See “Important Provisions of Maryland Corporate Law and Our Charter and Bylaws” in any applicable prospectus or prospectus supplement.

We are responsible for the day-to-day operations of our Company and the selection and management of investments and have broad discretion over the use of proceeds from offerings of our securities. Accordingly, you should not purchase our securities unless you are willing to entrust all aspects of the day-to-day management and the selection and management of investments to us, who will manage our Company. In addition, we may retain independent contractors to provide various services for our Company, and you should note that such contractors will have no fiduciary duty to you or the other stockholders and may not perform as expected or desired.

In addition, while any applicable prospectus or prospectus supplement outlines our investment policies and generally describes our target portfolio, our board of directors may make adjustments to these policies based on, among other things, prevailing real estate market conditions and the availability of attractive investment opportunities. While we have no current intention of changing our investment policies, we will not forego an attractive investment because it does not fit within our targeted asset class or portfolio composition. We may use the proceeds of an offering to purchase or invest in any type of real estate which we determine is in the best interest of our stockholders. As such, our actual portfolio composition may vary substantially from the target portfolio described in the applicable prospectus or prospectus supplement.

Your rights as stockholders and our rights to recover claims against our officers, and directors are limited.

Under Maryland law, our charter, our bylaws and the terms of certain indemnification agreements with our directors, we may generally indemnify our officers, our directors, and their respective affiliates to the maximum extent permitted by Maryland law. Maryland law permits us to indemnify our present and former directors and officers, among others, against judgments, penalties, fines, settlements and reasonable expenses actually incurred by them in connection with any proceeding to which they may be made or threatened to be made a party by reason of their service in those or other capacities unless it is established that: (1) the act or omission of the director or officer was material to the matter giving rise to the proceeding and (i) was committed in bad faith or (ii) was the result of active and deliberate dishonesty; (2) the director or officer actually received an improper personal benefit in money, property or services; or (3) in the case of any criminal proceeding, the director or officer had reasonable cause to believe that the act or omission was unlawful. As a result, we and our stockholders may have more limited rights against our directors, officers, employees and agents, and their affiliates, than might otherwise exist under common law. In addition, we may be obligated to fund the defense costs incurred by our directors, officers, employees and agents in some cases.

A limit on the percentage of our capital stock and common stock a person may own may discourage a takeover or business combination, which could prevent our common stockholders from realizing a premium price for their common stock.

Our charter restricts direct or indirect ownership by one person or entity to no more than 9.8% in value of the outstanding shares of our capital stock or 9.8% in number of shares or value, whichever is more restrictive, of the outstanding shares of our common stock unless exempted (prospectively or retroactively) by our board of directors. This restriction may have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of us, including an extraordinary transaction (such as a merger, tender offer or sale of all or substantially all of our assets) that might provide a premium price to our stockholders.

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Our charter permits our board of directors to issue stock with terms that may subordinate the rights of our common stockholders or discourage a third party from acquiring us in a manner that could result in a premium price to our stockholders.

Our board of directors may amend our charter from time to time to increase or decrease the aggregate number of shares of stock or the number of shares of stock of any class or series that we have authority to issue and may classify or reclassify any unissued common stock or preferred stock into other classes or series of stock and establish the preferences, conversion or other rights, voting powers, restrictions, limitations as to dividends or other distributions, qualifications and terms or conditions of redemption of any such stock. Our board of directors has authorized a total of 250,000,000 shares of preferred stock for issuance, of which, as of December 31, 2017, there are issued and outstanding 5,721,460 shares of Series A Preferred Stock, 184,130 shares of Series B Preferred Stock, 2,323,750 shares of Series C Preferred Stock, and 2,850,602 shares of Series D Preferred Stock, all of which are senior to our common stock with respect to priority of dividend payments and rights upon liquidation, dissolution or winding up. Our board of directors could also authorize the issuance of up to approximately 230,400,000 additional shares of preferred stock with terms and conditions that could have priority as to distributions and amounts payable upon liquidation over the rights of the holders of our common stock. Such preferred stock could also have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of us, including an extraordinary transaction (such as a merger, tender offer or sale of all or substantially all of our assets) that might provide a premium price to holders of our common stock.

We depend on our key employees. There is no guarantee that our key employees will remain employed with us for any specified period of time, and will not engage in competitive activities if they cease to be employed with us.

We depend on our key employees. In particular, our success depends to a significant degree upon the contributions of Messrs. Kamfar, Babb, MacDonald, Ruddy and Vohs, who each entered into employment agreements with us, and Mr. Konig, who entered into a services agreement with us through his wholly-owned law firm, Konig & Associates, LLC, on substantially the same terms as the employment agreements. Each such agreement became effective upon the closing of the Internalization, and has an initial term through and including December 31, 2020. The departure or the loss of the services of Messrs. Kamfar, Ruddy, Babb, MacDonald, Vohs or Konig could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and ability to effectively operate our business.

Further, the employment and services agreements we entered into with each of Messrs. Kamfar, Babb, MacDonald, Ruddy, Vohs and Konig contain certain restrictions on these executives, including a restriction on engaging in activities that are deemed competitive to our business. Although we believe these covenants to be enforceable under current law in the states in which we do business, there can be no guarantee that if our executives were to breach these covenants and engage in competitive activities, a court of law would fully enforce these restrictions. If these executives were to terminate their employment or service relationship with us and engage in competitive activities, such activities could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our management manages our portfolio pursuant to very broad investment guidelines approved by our board of directors, which does not approve each investment and financing decision made by our management unless required by our investment guidelines.

Our management is authorized to follow very broad investment guidelines established by our board of directors. Our board of directors will periodically review our investment guidelines and our portfolio of assets but will not, and will not be required to, review all of our proposed investments, except in limited circumstances as set forth in our investment guidelines. In addition, in conducting periodic reviews, our board of directors may rely primarily on information provided to them by our management. Furthermore, transactions entered into by our management may be costly, difficult or impossible to unwind by the time they are reviewed by our board of directors. Our management has great latitude within the broad parameters of our investment guidelines in determining the types and amounts of assets in which to invest on our behalf, including making investments that may result in returns that are substantially below expectations or result in losses, which would materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations, or may otherwise not be in the best interests of our stockholders.

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Risks Related to the Internalization Transaction

We may not manage the Internalization effectively or realize its anticipated benefits.

On October 31, 2017, we completed the Internalization of our management in a series of transactions that included the acquisition, directly and indirectly through a subsidiary, of Bluerock REIT Operator, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of our former Manager (“Manager Sub”), which owns the assets previously used by our former Manager in its performance of the management functions previously provided to us pursuant to the Management Agreement. We may not manage the Internalization effectively. As an internally-managed company, we may encounter potential difficulties in the integration process which may result in the inability to successfully internalize our corporate and/or property management functions in a manner that permits us to achieve the cost savings anticipated to result from the Internalization. Following the Internalization, we expect to remain reliant on certain affiliates of Bluerock for certain services such as human resources, investor relations, marketing, legal and other administrative services for a period of time after the closing. If we are unable to internalize these services or find other providers for these services within a reasonable time period, we may not achieve all of the expected benefits of the Internalization. We may not be able to retain all of the current employees who provided services to our former Manager who became our employees upon the Internalization, including our executive officers. Our general and administrative expenses after the Internalization could also be higher than our current expectations. The failure to manage the Internalization effectively, including failure to smoothly transition services or retain employees, could result in the anticipated benefits of the Internalization not being realized in the timeframe currently anticipated or at all. Any of these foregoing risks could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The issuances of shares of our Class C common stock in connection with the Internalization, and the issuances of shares of our Class A common stock upon redemption of OP Units and/or conversion of shares of our Class C common stock issued in connection with the Internalization, had a dilutive effect and reduced the voting power and relative percentage interests of current holders of our Class A common stockholders in our earnings and market value.

The issuance of 76,603 shares of our Class C common stock in connection with the Internalization had a dilutive effect and reduced the voting power and relative percentage interests of current Class A common stockholders in our earnings and market value.

Additionally, part of the Internalization Consideration consisted of 3,753,593 OP Units, which may have a dilutive effect on the voting power and percentage interests of our current Class A common stockholders. Commencing on the one-year anniversary of the closing of the Internalization, each OP Unit may be tendered for redemption, at the holder’s option and subject to the terms and conditions set forth in the limited partnership agreement of our Operating Partnership, for cash equal to the average closing price of Class A common stock for the ten (10) consecutive trading days immediately preceding the date we receive a notice of redemption, or, at our sole option, for shares of Class A common stock on a one-for-one basis, in lieu of cash. If the recipients of OP Units in the Internalization exercise their redemption rights and part or all of their outstanding OP Units are redeemed for shares of our Class A common stock, such redemption will have a dilutive effect on our common stock and reduce the relative percentage interests of existing common stockholders in our voting power.

Future sales of our Class A Common Stock by the Contributors may adversely affect the market price of our Class A Common Stock.

Future sales of our Class A common stock by the Contributors may adversely affect the market price of our Class A common stock. These sales also might make it more difficult for us to sell equity securities in the future at a time and price we deem appropriate. Upon consummation of the Internalization, our Operating Partnership issued a number of OP Units to the Contributors as Internalization Consideration, which OP Units may be redeemed in shares of our Class A common stock rather than cash, at the company’s option. In addition, shares of Class C common stock will be convertible, at the holder’s option (at any time and from time to time), into one (1) fully-paid and non-assessable share of our Class A common stock, and upon the occurrence of certain transfers of OP Units or shares of Class C common stock and similar events, will convert automatically into one (1) fully-paid and non-assessable share of our Class A common stock. Sales of

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a substantial number of shares of our Class A common stock by the Contributors, the perception or expectation that such sales may occur, or sales of shares of our Class A common stock to cover tax obligations, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and the prevailing market price for shares of our Class A common stock.

The Internalization was negotiated between the Special Committee, which is comprised solely of independent and disinterested members of our board of directors; our former Manager, which is affiliated with certain of our officers and directors; and the Contributors, including R. Ramin Kamfar, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, and certain other officers.

The Internalization was negotiated with our former Manager, which is affiliated with certain of our officers and directors, and the Contributors, including Mr. Kamfar, and Michael L. Konig, our Chief Legal Officer and Secretary. As a result, those officers and directors may have different interests than the Company as a whole. This potential conflict would not exist in the case of a transaction negotiated with unaffiliated third parties. Moreover, if the former Manager or any Contributor breaches any of the representations, warranties or covenants made by it in the Contribution Agreement, we may choose not to enforce, or to enforce less vigorously, our rights because of our desire to maintain our ongoing relationship with the Contributors and the interests of certain of our directors and officers. Moreover, the representations, warranties, covenants and indemnities in the Contribution Agreement are subject to limitations and qualifiers, which may also limit our ability to enforce any remedy under the Contribution Agreement.

Certain of our directors and executive officers have interests in the Internalization that are different from, and may potentially conflict with, the interests of us and our stockholders.

Certain of our directors and executive officers have interests in the Internalization that may be different from, or in addition to, the interests of our stockholders generally and that may create potential conflicts of interest, including (i) the payment of consideration in connection with the Internalization directly or indirectly to certain of these individuals, including Messrs. Kamfar, Kachadurian, and Konig, and the entry by the applicable individuals into arrangements relating to the payment of that consideration, and (ii) the entry by Manager Sub, in its post-closing capacity as an indirect subsidiary of the Company, into employment agreements with Messrs. Kamfar and Vohs as well as James G. Babb, III, Jordan B. Ruddy and Ryan S. MacDonald, who are executive officers and principals of our former Manager, and into a services agreement with Mr. Konig through Konig & Associates, all of which became effective upon consummation of the Internalization.

In addition, Mr. Kamfar owns a controlling interest in Bluerock, the sole managing member of our former Manager; Messrs. Babb, MacDonald, Ruddy, Vohs and Konig are also executive officers or principals of our former Manager; and Mr. Kachadurian served as Vice Chairman of our former Manager. The respective roles of these individuals in the former Manager may create additional conflicts of interest in respect of the Internalization.

Following the Internalization, Mr. Kamfar controls a significant number of votes in any matter presented to our Class A common stockholders for approval, including the election of directors.

Although the shares of Class C common stock issued in connection with the Internalization are not designed to provide for disproportionate voting rights, the issuance of the Class C common stock resulted in Mr. Kamfar controlling significant voting power in matters submitted to a vote of our Class A common stockholders as a result of his beneficial ownership of Class C common stock (which gives him voting power equal to the economic interest in the Company issued to Bluerock in the form of OP Units as if all of those OP Units were redeemed for shares of Class A common stock), including the election of directors. Mr. Kamfar may have interests that differ from our other stockholders, including by reason of his direct or indirect interest in our Operating Partnership, and may accordingly vote in ways that may not be consistent with the interests of those other stockholders.

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Our net income, FFO and AFFO may decrease in the near term as a result of the Internalization.

We will expense all cash and non-cash costs involved in the Internalization. As a result, our statement of operations and FFO will be negatively impacted, driven predominately by the non-cash charges related to the issuance of OP Units and shares of Class C common stock as Internalization consideration and, to a lesser extent, other transaction-related costs. In addition, while we will no longer effectively bear the costs of the various fees and expense reimbursements previously paid to our former Manager while we were externally managed, our expenses will now include the compensation and benefits of our executive officers and the employees of Manager Sub, which is now our indirect subsidiary, as well as overhead previously paid by our former Manager or its affiliates in managing our business and operations. Furthermore, these employees and consultants of Manager Sub will be providing us with services historically provided by the former Manager. There are no assurances that, following the Internalization, these employees and consultants will be able or incentivized to provide services at the same level or for the same costs as were previously provided to us by the former Manager, and there may be other unforeseen costs, expenses and difficulties associated with operating as an internally managed company. If the expenses we assume as a result of the Internalization are higher than the fees that we have historically paid to the former Manager or otherwise higher than we anticipate, we may not realize the anticipated cost savings and other benefits from the Internalization and our net income, FFO and AFFO could decrease further, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The Internalization may not be accretive to our stockholders.

The Internalization may not be accretive to our stockholders. While it is intended that the Internalization be accretive to our net income, earnings and AFFO, there can be no assurance that this will be the case, as, among other things, the expenses we assume as a result of the Internalization may be higher than we anticipate and we may not achieve our anticipated cost savings from the Internalization. The failure of the Internalization to be accretive to our stockholders could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may be exposed to risks to which we have not historically been exposed, including liabilities with respect to the assets acquired from the former Manager.

The Internalization will expose us to risks to which we have not historically been exposed. Pursuant to the Contribution Agreement, we incurred liabilities with respect to the assets acquired from the former Manager and certain of its affiliates. In addition, our overhead has increased as a result of our becoming internally managed, as the responsibility for overhead relating to management of our business formerly borne by the former Manager is now our own responsibility. In addition, in our former externally-advised structure, we did not directly employ any employees. As a result of the Internalization, we now indirectly, through Manager Sub, employ persons who were associated with the former Manager or its affiliates. As their employer, we are indirectly, through Manager Sub, subject to those potential liabilities that are commonly faced by employers, such as workers’ disability and compensation claims, potential labor disputes and other employee-related liabilities and grievances, and we will bear the costs of the establishment and maintenance of employee benefit plans, if established. Furthermore, these employees are now providing us services historically provided by the former Manager, which are provided with the support of the Administrative Services Agreement. There are no assurances that these employees of Manager Sub will be able to provide us with the same level of services as were previously provided to us by the former Manager, and there may be other unforeseen costs, expenses and difficulties associated with operating as an internally managed company.

The representations, warranties, covenants and indemnities in the Contribution Agreement and related agreements are subject to limitations and qualifiers, which may limit our ability to enforce any remedy under these agreements.

The representations, warranties, covenants and indemnities in the Contribution Agreement, the related Administrative Services Agreement and other agreements related to the Internalization are subject to limitations and qualifiers, which may limit our ability to enforce any remedy under these agreements. These include, without limitation, limitations on liability and materiality qualifiers on certain representations and covenants.

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Conflicts of interest may exist or could arise in the future with our Operating Partnership and its limited partners, which may impede business decisions that could benefit our stockholders.

Following the implementation of our Company’s structure as a result of the Internalization, conflicts of interest may exist or could arise as a result of the relationships between us and our affiliates, on the one hand, and our Operating Partnership or any member thereof, on the other. Our directors and officers have duties to our Company and our stockholders under applicable Maryland law in connection with their management of our Company. At the same time, we, as general partner of our Operating Partnership, have fiduciary duties to our Operating Partnership and to its limited partners under Delaware law in connection with the management of our Operating Partnership. Our duties to our Operating Partnership and its limited partners as the general partner may come into conflict with the duties of our directors and officers to our Company and our stockholders. These conflicts may be resolved in a manner that is not in the best interest of our stockholders.

Risks Related to Related Party Transactions

We may pursue less vigorous enforcement of the terms of certain agreements in connection with related party transactions because of conflicts of interest with certain of our officers and directors, and the terms of those agreements may be less favorable to us than they might otherwise be in an arm’s-length transaction.

The agreements we enter into in connection with related party transactions are expected to contain limited representations and warranties and have limited express indemnification rights in the event of a breach of those agreements. Furthermore, Mr. Kamfar, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, currently serves as an officer of Bluerock Real Estate, L.L.C., an affiliate of our former Manager, or Bluerock, and Mr. Kachadurian, a director and our former Manager’s Vice Chairman, is affiliated with Bluerock, and each will have a conflict with respect to any matters that require consideration by our board of directors that occur between us and Bluerock. Even if we have actionable rights, we may choose not to enforce, or to enforce less vigorously, our rights under these agreements or under other agreements we may have with these parties, because of our desire to maintain positive relationships with these individuals.

Risks Related to Conflicts of Interest

Conflicts of interest exist between our interests and the interests of Bluerock and its affiliates.

Examples of these potential conflicts of interest include:

The possibility that certain of our officers and their respective affiliates will face conflicts of interest relating to the purchase and leasing of properties, and that such conflicts may not be resolved in our favor;
The possibility that the competing demands for the time of certain of our officers may result in them spending insufficient time on our business, which may result in our missing investment opportunities or having less efficient operations, which could reduce our profitability and result in lower distributions to you;
Some of our current investments, generally in development projects, have been made through joint venture arrangements with Bluerock Funds (in addition to unaffiliated third parties), which arrangements were not the result of arm’s-length negotiations of the type normally conducted between unrelated co-venturers, and which could result in a disproportionate benefit to affiliates of our former Manager; and
Competition for the time and services of Bluerock personnel that work for us and our affiliates under the Administrative Services Agreement.

Any of these and other conflicts of interest could have a material adverse effect on the returns on our investments, our ability to make distributions to stockholders and the trading price of our stock.

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The ownership by Bluerock and our executive officers of a significant portion of the outstanding shares of our common stock on a fully diluted basis could give Bluerock and/or our executive officers the ability to control the outcome of matters submitted for stockholder approval and otherwise allow Bluerock and/or our executive officers to exert significant influence over our Company in a manner that may not be in the best interests of our other stockholders.

As of February 6, 2018, Bluerock, in which Mr. Kamfar owns a 99.90% equity interest, beneficially owned approximately 16.4% of our outstanding Class A common stock and Class C common stock on a fully diluted basis. In addition, our other executive officers beneficially own approximately 7.4% of our outstanding Class A common stock and Class C common stock on a fully diluted basis. As a result of Bluerock and our executive officers’ significant ownership in our Company, Bluerock and/or our executive officers will have significant influence over our affairs and could exercise such influence in a manner that is not in the best interests of our other stockholders, including the ability to control the outcome of matters submitted to our stockholders for approval such as the election of directors and any merger, consolidation or sale of all or substantially all of our assets. In particular, this concentrated voting control could delay, defer or prevent a change of control, merger, consolidation or sale of all or substantially all of our assets that our other stockholders and our board of directors support. Conversely, the concentrated voting control held by Bluerock and/or our executive officers could result in the consummation of such a transaction that our other stockholders and our board of directors do not support.

Certain of our executive officers have interests that may conflict with the interests of stockholders.

Messrs. Kamfar, MacDonald, Ruddy, Vohs and Konig are also affiliated with or are executive and/or senior officers of Bluerock and their affiliates. These individuals may have personal and professional interests that conflict with the interests of our stockholders with respect to business decisions affecting us and our Operating Partnership. As a result, the effect of these conflicts of interest on these individuals may influence their decisions affecting the negotiation and consummation of the transactions whereby we acquire apartment properties in the future from Bluerock or its affiliates, or in the allocation of investment opportunities to us by Bluerock or its affiliates.

Messrs. Kamfar, MacDonald, Ruddy, Vohs and Konig will have competing demands on their time and attention.

Messrs. Kamfar, MacDonald, Ruddy, Vohs and Konig have competing demands on their respective time and attention, principally with respect to the provision of services to certain outside entities affiliated with BRRE. Such competing demands are not expected to be different from those that existed prior to the Internalization, but there is no assurance those demands will not increase and may result in these individuals devoting time to such outside entities in a manner that could adversely affect our business. Under their respective employment or services agreements (as applicable), Mr. Kamfar and certain of our other executive officers are permitted to devote time to certain outside activities, so long as those duties and activities do not unreasonably interfere with the performance of their respective duties to us.

If we acquire direct or indirect interests in properties from a Bluerock Fund with which we have joint ventured in a development deal, the price may be higher than we would pay if the transaction were the result of arm’s-length negotiations.

We are a party to certain development joint ventures with the Bluerock Funds, among other third parties, and under the terms of such joint ventures, we may, from time to time, seek to acquire the minority interest held by such Bluerock Fund. The prices we pay for such interests will not be the subject of arm’s-length negotiations, which means that the acquisitions may be on terms less favorable to us than those negotiated in an arm’s-length transaction. We may pay more for such interests than we would have in an arm’s-length transaction, which would reduce our cash available for investment in other properties or distribution to our stockholders.

Legal counsel for us, Bluerock and some of our affiliates is the same law firm.

Kaplan Voekler Cunningham & Frank, PLC acts as legal counsel to us, Bluerock, Fund I and the Bluerock Funds, and some of our affiliates. Kaplan Voekler Cunningham & Frank, PLC is not acting as

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counsel for any specific group of stockholders or any potential investor. There is a possibility in the future that the interests of the various parties may become adverse and, under the Code of Professional Responsibility of the legal profession, Kaplan Voekler Cunningham & Frank, PLC may be precluded from representing any one or all of such parties. If any situation arises in which our interests appear to be in conflict with those of our affiliates, additional counsel may be retained by one or more of the parties to assure that their interests are adequately protected. Moreover, should such a conflict not be readily apparent, Kaplan Voekler Cunningham & Frank, PLC may inadvertently act in derogation of the interest of parties which could adversely affect us, and our ability to meet our investment objectives and, therefore, our stockholders.

We have entered into joint venture investments with affiliates of Bluerock and may continue to do so in the future.

As of December 31, 2017, twelve of our investments in equity interests in real property have been made through joint venture arrangements with affiliates of Bluerock, as well as unaffiliated third parties. While we have no current expectation of investing in additional development projects with affiliates of Bluerock in the future, in the event such opportunities arise that we determine to be in the best interest of our stockholders, it is likely that we will work together with such Bluerock affiliates to apportion the investments among us and such other programs in accordance with the investment objectives of the various programs, with our Company initially taking a senior or preferred capital position to such affiliates in the development project and having the right to elect into common ownership with such programs under certain conditions. The negotiation of such investments will not be at arm’s-length and conflicts of interest will arise in the process. We cannot assure you that we will be as successful as we otherwise would be if we enter into joint venture arrangements with programs sponsored by Bluerock or with affiliates of Bluerock. It is possible that we could pay more for an asset in this type of transaction than we would pay in an arm’s-length transaction with an unaffiliated third party.

In addition, the co-venturer may have economic or business interests or goals that are or may become inconsistent with our business interests or goals. Since Bluerock and its affiliates have an interest in us and control any affiliated co-venturer, agreements and transactions between the co-venturers with respect to any such joint venture do not have the benefit of arm’s-length negotiation of the type normally conducted between unrelated co-venturers.

Risks Related To Debt Financing

We have used and may continue to use mortgage and other debt financing to acquire properties or interests in properties and otherwise incur other indebtedness, which increases our expenses and could subject us to the risk of losing properties in foreclosure if our cash flow is insufficient to make loan payments.

We are permitted to acquire real properties and other real estate-related investments, including entity acquisitions, by assuming either existing financing secured by the asset or by borrowing new funds. In addition, we may incur or increase our mortgage debt by obtaining loans secured by some or all of our assets to obtain funds to acquire additional investments or to pay distributions to our stockholders. We also may borrow funds if necessary to satisfy the requirement that we distribute at least 90% of our annual “REIT taxable income,” or otherwise as is necessary or advisable to assure that we maintain our qualification as a REIT for federal income tax purposes.

There is no limit on the amount we may invest in any single property or other asset or on the amount we can borrow to purchase any individual property or other investment. If we mortgage a property and have insufficient cash flow to service the debt, we risk an event of default which may result in our lenders foreclosing on the properties securing the mortgage.

If we cannot repay or refinance loans incurred to purchase our properties, or interests therein, then we may lose our interests in the properties secured by the loans we are unable to repay or refinance.

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High levels of debt or increases in interest rates could increase the amount of our loan payments, which could reduce the cash available for distribution to stockholders.

Our policies do not limit us from incurring debt. For purposes of calculating our leverage, we assume full consolidation of all of our real estate investments, whether or not they would be consolidated under GAAP, include assets we have classified as held for sale, and include any joint venture level indebtedness in our total indebtedness.

These high debt levels cause us to incur higher interest charges, resulting in higher debt service payments, and may be accompanied by restrictive covenants. Interest we pay reduces cash available for distribution to stockholders. Additionally, with respect to our variable rate debt, increases in interest rates increase our interest costs, which reduces our cash flow and our ability to make distributions to you. In addition, if we need to repay existing debt during periods of rising interest rates, we could be required to liquidate one or more of our investments in properties at times which may not permit realization of the maximum return on such investments and could result in a loss. In addition, if we are unable to service our debt payments, our lenders may foreclose on our interests in the real property that secures the loans we have entered into.

High mortgage rates may make it difficult for us to finance or refinance properties, which could reduce the number of properties we can acquire, our cash flow from operations and the amount of cash distributions we can make.

To qualify as a REIT, we will be required to distribute at least 90% of our annual taxable income (excluding net capital gains) to our stockholders in each taxable year, and thus our ability to retain internally generated cash is limited. Accordingly, our ability to acquire properties or to make capital improvements to or remodel properties will depend on our ability to obtain debt or equity financing from third parties or the sellers of properties. If mortgage debt is unavailable at reasonable rates, we may not be able to finance the purchase of properties. If we place mortgage debt on properties, we run the risk of being unable to refinance the properties when the debt becomes due or of being unable to refinance on favorable terms. If interest rates are higher when we refinance the properties, our income could be reduced. We may be unable to refinance properties. If any of these events occurs, our cash flow would be reduced. This, in turn, would reduce cash available for distribution to you and may hinder our ability to raise capital by issuing more stock or borrowing more money.

Lenders may require us to enter into restrictive covenants relating to our operations, which could limit our ability to make distributions to you.

When providing financing, a lender may impose restrictions on us that affect our distribution and operating policies and our ability to incur additional debt. Loan documents we enter into may contain covenants that limit our ability to further mortgage the property, discontinue insurance coverage, or impose other limitations. These or other limitations may limit our flexibility and prevent us from achieving our operating plans.

If mortgage debt is unavailable at reasonable rates, it may make it difficult for us to finance or refinance properties, which could reduce the number of properties we can acquire, our cash flows from operations and the amount of cash distributions we can make.

If we are unable to borrow monies on terms and conditions that we find acceptable, we likely will have to reduce the number of properties we can purchase, and the return on the properties we do purchase may be lower. If we place mortgage debt on properties, we run the risk of being unable to refinance the properties when the debt becomes due or of being unable to refinance on favorable terms. If interest rates are higher when we refinance the properties, our income could be reduced. As such, we may find it difficult, costly or impossible to refinance indebtedness which is maturing. If any of these events occur, our interest cost would increase as a result, which would reduce our cash flow. This, in turn, could reduce cash available for distribution to our stockholders and may hinder our ability to raise capital by issuing more stock or borrowing more money. If we are unable to refinance maturing indebtedness with respect to a particular property and are unable to pay the same, then the lender may foreclose on such property.

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Financial and real estate market disruptions could adversely affect the multifamily property sector’s ability to obtain financing from Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, which could adversely impact us.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are major sources of financing for the multifamily sector and both have historically experienced losses due to credit-related expenses, securities impairments and fair value losses. If new U.S. government regulations (i) heighten Fannie Mae’s and Freddie Mac’s underwriting standards, (ii) adversely affect interest rates, or (iii) reduce the amount of capital they can make available to the multifamily sector, it could reduce or remove entirely a vital resource for multifamily financing. Any potential reduction in loans, guarantees and credit-enhancement arrangements from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac could jeopardize the effectiveness of the multifamily sector’s available financing and decrease the amount of available liquidity and credit that could be used to acquire and diversify our portfolio of multifamily assets.

Volatility in and regulation of the commercial mortgage-backed securities market has limited and may continue to impact the pricing of secured debt.

As a result of the past crisis in the residential mortgage-backed securities markets, the most recent global recession and some concerns over the ability to refinance or repay existing commercial mortgage-backed securities as they come due, liquidity previously provided by the commercial mortgage-backed securities and collateralized debt obligations markets has significantly decreased. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act imposes significant new regulations related to the mortgage backed securities industry and market participants, which has contributed to uncertainty in the market. The volatility in the commercial mortgage-backed securities market could result in the following adverse effects on our incurrence of secured debt, which could have a materially negative impact on our financial condition, results of operations, cash flow and cash available for distribution:

higher loan spreads;
tighter loan covenants;
reduced loan to value ratios and resulting borrower proceeds; and
higher amortization and reserve requirements.

Some of our mortgage loans may have “due on sale” provisions, which may impact the manner in which we acquire, sell and/or finance our properties.

In purchasing properties subject to financing, we may obtain financing with “due-on-sale” and/or “due-on-encumbrance” clauses. Due-on-sale clauses in mortgages allow a mortgage lender to demand full repayment of the mortgage loan if the borrower sells the mortgaged property. Similarly, due-on-encumbrance clauses allow a mortgage lender to demand full repayment if the borrower uses the real estate securing the mortgage loan as security for another loan. In such event, we may be required to sell our properties on an all-cash basis, which may make it more difficult to sell the property or reduce the selling price.

Lenders may be able to recover against our other properties under our mortgage loans.

In financing our property acquisitions, we will seek to obtain secured nonrecourse loans. However, only recourse financing may be available, in which event, in addition to the property securing the loan, the lender would have the ability to look to our other assets for satisfaction of the debt if the proceeds from the sale or other disposition of the property securing the loan are insufficient to fully repay it. Also, in order to facilitate the sale of a property, we may allow the buyer to purchase the property subject to an existing loan whereby we remain responsible for the debt.

If we are required to make payments under any “bad boy” carve-out guaranties that we may provide in connection with certain mortgages and related loans, our business and financial results could be materially adversely affected.

In obtaining certain nonrecourse loans, we may provide standard carve-out guaranties. These guaranties are only applicable if and when the borrower directly, or indirectly through agreement with an affiliate, joint venture partner or other third party, voluntarily files a bankruptcy or similar liquidation or reorganization

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action or takes other actions that are fraudulent or improper (commonly referred to as “bad boy” guaranties). Although we believe that “bad boy” carve-out guaranties are not guaranties of payment in the event of foreclosure or other actions of the foreclosing lender that are beyond the borrower’s control, some lenders in the real estate industry have recently sought to make claims for payment under such guaranties. In the event such a claim were made against us under a “bad boy” carve-out guaranty following foreclosure on mortgages or related loan, and such claim were successful, our business and financial results could be materially adversely affected.

Interest-only indebtedness may increase our risk of default and ultimately may reduce our funds available for distribution to our stockholders.

We may finance our property acquisitions using interest-only mortgage indebtedness. During the interest-only period, the amount of each scheduled payment will be less than that of a traditional amortizing mortgage loan. The principal balance of the mortgage loan will not be reduced (except in the case of prepayments) because there are no scheduled monthly payments of principal during this period. After the interest-only period, we will be required either to make scheduled payments of amortized principal and interest or to make a lump-sum or “balloon” payment at maturity. These required principal or balloon payments will increase the amount of our scheduled payments and may increase our risk of default under the related mortgage loan. If the mortgage loan has an adjustable interest rate, the amount of our scheduled payments also may increase at a time of rising interest rates. Increased payments and substantial principal or balloon maturity payments will reduce the funds available for distribution to our stockholders because cash otherwise available for distribution will be required to pay principal and interest associated with these mortgage loans.

To hedge against interest rate fluctuations, we may use derivative financial instruments that may be costly and ineffective, may reduce the overall returns on your investment, and may expose us to the credit risk of counterparties.

To the extent consistent with maintaining our qualification as a REIT, we may use derivative financial instruments to hedge exposures to interest rate fluctuations on loans secured by our assets and investments in collateralized mortgage-backed securities. Derivative instruments may include interest rate swap contracts, interest rate cap or floor contracts, futures or forward contracts, options or repurchase agreements. Our actual hedging decisions will be determined in light of the facts and circumstances existing at the time of the hedge and may differ from time to time.

To the extent that we use derivative financial instruments to hedge against interest rate fluctuations, we will be exposed to financing, basis risk and legal enforceability risks. In this context, credit risk is the failure of the counterparty to perform under the terms of the derivative contract. If the fair value of a derivative contract is positive, the counterparty owes us, which creates credit risk for us. Basis risk occurs when the index upon which the contract is based is more or less variable than the index upon which the hedged asset or liability is based, thereby making the hedge less effective. Finally, legal enforceability risks encompass general contractual risks, including the risk that the counterparty will breach the terms of, or fail to perform its obligations under, the derivative contract. If we are unable to manage these risks effectively, our results of operations, financial condition and ability to make distributions to you will be adversely affected.

Complying with REIT requirements may limit our ability to hedge risk effectively.

We must satisfy two gross income tests annually to maintain our qualification as a REIT. First, at least 75% of our gross income for each taxable year must consist of defined types of income that we derive, directly or indirectly, from investments relating to real property or mortgages on real property or qualified temporary investment income (the “75% Gross Income Test”). Second, in general, at least 95% of our gross income for each taxable year must consist of income that is qualifying income for purposes of the 75% Gross Income Test, other types of interest and dividends, gain from the sale or disposition of shares or securities, or any combination of these (the “95% Gross Income Test”).

These and other REIT provisions of the Code may limit our ability to hedge the risks inherent to our operations. From time to time, we may enter into hedging transactions with respect to one or more of our

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assets or liabilities. Our hedging transactions may include entering into interest rate swaps, caps and floors, options to purchase these items, and futures and forward contracts. Any income or gain derived by us from transactions that hedge certain risks, such as the risk of changes in interest rates, will not be treated as gross income for purposes of either the 75% Gross Income Test or the 95% Gross Income Test, unless specific requirements are met. Such requirements include that the hedging transaction be properly identified within prescribed time periods and that the transaction either (1) hedges risks associated with indebtedness issued by us that is incurred to acquire or carry real estate assets or (2) manages the risks of currency fluctuations with respect to income or gain that qualifies under the 75% Gross Income Test or 95% Gross Income Test (or assets that generate such income). To the extent that we do not properly identify such transactions as hedges, hedge with other types of financial instruments, or hedge other types of indebtedness, the income from those transactions is not likely to be treated as qualifying income for purposes of the 75% Gross Income Test and the 95% Gross Income Test. As a result of these rules, we may have to limit the use of hedging techniques that might otherwise be advantageous, which could result in greater risks associated with interest rate or other changes than we would otherwise incur.

You may not receive any profits resulting from the sale of one of our properties, or receive such profits in a timely manner, because we may provide financing for the purchaser of such property.

If we liquidate our Company, you may experience a delay before receiving your share of the proceeds of such liquidation. In a forced or voluntary liquidation, we may sell our properties either subject to or upon the assumption of any then outstanding mortgage debt or, alternatively, may provide financing to purchasers. We may take a purchase money obligation secured by a mortgage as partial payment. We do not have any limitations or restrictions on our taking such purchase money obligations. To the extent we receive promissory notes or other property instead of cash from sales, such proceeds, other than any interest payable on those proceeds, will not be included in net sale proceeds until and to the extent the promissory notes or other property are actually paid, sold, refinanced or otherwise disposed of. In certain cases, we may receive initial down payments in the year of sale in an amount less than the selling price and subsequent payments may be spread over a number of years. In such cases, you may experience a delay in the distribution of the proceeds of a sale until such time.

Risks Related to Offerings of our Class A Common Stock

The market price and trading volume of our Class A common stock has been volatile at times following the IPO, and these trends may continue following an offering, which may adversely impact the market for shares of our Class A common stock and make it difficult for purchasers to sell their shares.

Prior to the IPO, there was no active market for our common stock. Although our Class A common stock is listed on the NYSE American, the stock markets, including the NYSE American on which our Class A common stock is listed, have from time to time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations. Our Class A common stock has frequently traded below the IPO price since the completion of the IPO. As a result, the market price of shares of our Class A common stock may be similarly volatile, and holders of shares of our Class A common stock may from time to time experience a decrease in the value of their shares, including decreases unrelated to our operating performance or prospects. The offering price for shares of our Class A common stock is expected to be determined by negotiation between us and the underwriters. Purchasers may not be able to sell their shares of Class A common stock at or above the offering price.

The price of shares of our Class A common stock could be subject to wide fluctuations in response to a number of factors, including those listed in this “Risk Factors” section and others such as:

our operating performance and the performance of other similar companies;
actual or anticipated differences in our quarterly operating results;
changes in our revenues or earnings estimates or recommendations by securities analysts;
publication of research reports about us, the apartment real estate sector, apartment tenants or the real estate industry;
increases in market interest rates, which may lead investors to demand a higher distribution yield for shares of our Class A common stock, and would result in increased interest expenses on our debt;

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the current state of the credit and capital markets, and our ability and the ability of our tenants to obtain financing;
additions and departures of key personnel;
increased competition in the multifamily real estate business in our target markets;
the passage of legislation or other regulatory developments that adversely affect us or our industry;
speculation in the press or investment community;
equity issuances by us (including the issuances of Operating Partnership units), or common stock resales by our stockholders, or the perception that such issuances or resales may occur;
actual, potential or perceived accounting problems;
changes in accounting principles;
failure to qualify as a REIT;
terrorist acts, natural or man-made disasters or threatened or actual armed conflicts; and
general market and local, regional and national economic conditions, particularly in our target markets, including factors unrelated to our performance.

No assurance can be given that the market price of shares of our Class A common stock will not fluctuate or decline significantly in the future or that holders of shares of our Class A common stock will be able to sell their shares when desired on favorable terms, or at all. From time to time in the past, securities class action litigation has been instituted against companies following periods of extreme volatility in their stock price. This type of litigation could result in substantial costs and divert our management’s attention and resources.

In addition, our charter contains restrictions on the ownership and transfer of our stock, and these restrictions may inhibit your ability to sell your stock. Our charter contains a restriction on ownership of our shares that generally prevents any one person from owning more than 9.8% in value of our outstanding shares of stock or more than 9.8% in value or in number of shares, whichever is more restrictive, of our outstanding shares of common stock, unless otherwise excepted (prospectively or retroactively) by our board of directors.

Sales of shares of our Class A common stock, or the perception that such sales will occur, may have adverse effects on our share price.

We cannot predict the effect, if any, of future sales of Class A common stock, or the availability of shares for future sales, on the market price of our Class A common stock. Sales of substantial amounts of Class A common stock, including shares of Class A common stock issued in an offering, issuable upon the exchange of OP Units, the sale of shares of Class A common stock held by our current stockholders, and the sale of any shares we may issue under our incentive plans, or the perception that these sales could occur, may adversely affect prevailing market prices for our Class A common stock. We may be required to conduct additional offerings to raise more funds. These offerings or the perception of a need for offerings may affect the market prices for our Class A common stock.

An increase in market interest rates may have an adverse effect on the market price of our Class A common stock.

One of the factors that investors may consider in deciding whether to buy or sell our Class A common stock is our distribution yield, which is our distribution rate as a percentage of our share price, relative to market interest rates. If market interest rates increase, prospective investors may desire a higher distribution yield on our Class A common stock or may seek securities paying higher dividends or interest. The market price of our Class A common stock likely will be based primarily on the earnings that we derive from rental income with respect to our investments and our related distributions to stockholders, and not from the underlying appraised value of the properties themselves. As a result, interest rate fluctuations and capital market conditions are likely to affect the market price of our Class A common stock, and such effects could be significant. For example, if interest rates rise without an increase in our distribution rate, the market price of

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our Class A common stock could decrease because potential investors may require a higher distribution yield on our Class A common stock as market rates on interest-bearing securities, such as bonds, rise.

We have paid and may continue to pay distributions from offering proceeds, borrowings or the sale of assets to the extent our cash flow from operations or earnings are not sufficient to fund declared distributions. Rates of distribution to you will not necessarily be indicative of our operating results. If we make distributions from sources other than our cash flows from operations or earnings, we will have fewer funds available for the acquisition of properties and your overall return may be reduced.

Our organizational documents permit us to make distributions from any source, including the net proceeds from an offering. There is no limit on the amount of offering proceeds we may use to pay distributions. We have funded and may continue to fund distributions from the net proceeds of our offerings, borrowings and the sale of assets to the extent distributions exceed our earnings or cash flows from operations. While our policy is generally to pay distributions from cash flow from operations, our distributions through December 31, 2017 have been paid from proceeds from our underwritten and continuous offerings and at the market (“ATM”) offerings, and sales of assets, and may in the future be paid from additional sources, such as from borrowings. To the extent we fund distributions from sources other than cash flow from operations, such distributions may constitute a return of capital and we will have fewer funds available for the acquisition of properties and your overall return may be reduced. Further, to the extent distributions exceed our earnings and profits, a stockholder’s basis in our stock will be reduced and, to the extent distributions exceed a stockholder’s basis, the stockholder will be required to recognize capital gain.

We have issued Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock, and intend to issue additional Series B Preferred Stock under our continuous offering, which, along with future issuances of debt securities and preferred equity, rank senior to our Class A common stock in priority of dividend payment and upon liquidation, dissolution and winding up, and may adversely affect the trading price of our Class A common stock.

As of December 31, 2017, we have issued and outstanding 5,721,460 shares of Series A Preferred Stock, 184,130 shares of Series B Preferred Stock, 2,323,750 shares of Series C Preferred Stock and 2,850,602 shares of Series D Preferred Stock, and are offering up to an additional 250,870 shares of Series B Preferred Stock in our continuous offering, all of which are senior to our common stock with respect to priority of dividend payments and rights upon liquidation, dissolution or winding up. The Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock may limit our ability to make distributions to holders of our Class A common stock. In the future, we may issue debt or additional preferred equity securities or incur other borrowings. Upon our liquidation, holders of our debt securities, other loans and Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock and additional preferred stock, if any, will receive a distribution of our available assets before common stockholders. Any additional preferred stock, if issued, likely will also have a preference on periodic distribution payments, which could eliminate or otherwise limit our ability to make distributions to holders of our Class A common stock. Holders of shares of our Class A common stock bear the risk that our future issuances of debt or equity securities, including Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock or our incurrence of other borrowings may negatively affect the trading price of our Class A common stock.

We operate as a holding company dependent upon the assets and operations of our subsidiaries, and because of our structure, we may not be able to generate the funds necessary to make dividend payments on our common stock.

We generally operate as a holding company that conducts its businesses primarily through our Operating Partnership, which in turn is a holding company conducting its business through its subsidiaries. These subsidiaries conduct all of our operations and are our only source of income. Accordingly, we are dependent on cash flows and payments of funds to us by our subsidiaries as dividends, distributions, loans, advances, leases or other payments from our subsidiaries to generate the funds necessary to make dividend payments on our common stock. Our subsidiaries’ ability to pay such dividends and/or make such loans, advances, leases or other payments may be restricted by, among other things, applicable laws and regulations, current and

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future debt agreements and management agreements into which our subsidiaries may enter, which may impair our ability to make cash payments on our common stock. In addition, such agreements may prohibit or limit the ability of our subsidiaries to transfer any of their property or assets to us, any of our other subsidiaries or to third parties. Our future indebtedness or our subsidiaries’ future indebtedness may also include restrictions with similar effects.

In addition, because we are a holding company, stockholders’ claims will be structurally subordinated to all existing and future liabilities and obligations (whether or not for borrowed money) of our Operating Partnership and its subsidiaries. Therefore, in the event of our bankruptcy, liquidation or reorganization, claims of our stockholders will be satisfied only after all of our and our Operating Partnership’s and its subsidiaries’ liabilities and obligations have been paid in full.

Your percentage of ownership may be diluted if we issue new shares of stock.

Stockholders have no rights to buy additional shares of our stock in the event we issue new shares of stock. We may issue common stock, convertible debt or preferred stock pursuant to a subsequent public offering or a private placement, to sellers of properties we directly or indirectly acquire instead of, or in addition to, cash consideration, or to our former Manager in payment of some or all of the base management fee or incentive fee or operating expense reimbursements that may be earned by our former Manager. Because our decision to issue securities in any future offering will depend on market conditions and other factors beyond our control, we cannot predict or estimate the amount, timing or nature of our future offerings. Investors purchasing shares of our Class A common stock in an offering who do not participate in any future stock issuances will experience dilution in the percentage of the issued and outstanding shares of Class A common stock they own.

Redemption of our Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock or Series C Preferred Stock for shares of our Class A common stock will dilute the ownership interest of existing holders of our Class A common stock, including stockholders whose shares of Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock or Series C Preferred Stock were previously redeemed for shares of our Class A common stock, and stockholders whose shares of Series B Preferred Stock were previously converted into shares of our Class A common stock or whose Warrants were previously exercised for shares of our Class A common stock.

Commencing on October 21, 2022, the holders of shares of our Series A Preferred Stock have the option to cause us to redeem their shares at a redemption price of $25.00 per share, plus an amount equal to all accrued but unpaid dividends. In addition, commencing on the date of original issuance of the shares of Series B Preferred Stock to be redeemed, the holders of shares of Series B Preferred Stock may require us to redeem such shares at a redemption price equal to their stated value (initially $1,000 per share), less a declining redemption fee (if applicable), plus an amount equal to any accrued but unpaid dividends. Further, commencing on July 19, 2023, the holders of shares of our Series C Preferred Stock have the option to cause us to redeem their shares at a redemption price of $25.00 per share, plus an amount equal to all accrued but unpaid dividends. The redemption price for any such redemptions of shares of Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, or Series C Preferred Stock is payable, in our sole discretion, in cash or in equal value of shares of our Class A common stock, at our option. The redemption of our Series A Preferred Stock, our Series B Preferred Stock, or our Series C Preferred Stock for shares of our Class A common stock may result in the dilution of some or all of the ownership interests of existing stockholders, including stockholders whose shares of Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock or Series C Preferred Stock were previously redeemed for shares of our Class A common stock, and stockholders whose shares of Series B Preferred Stock were previously converted into shares of our Class A common stock or whose Warrants were previously exercised for shares of our Class A common stock. Any sales in the public market of our Class A common stock issuable upon any such redemption could adversely affect prevailing market prices of our Class A common stock. In addition, any redemption of our Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock or Series C Preferred Stock for shares of our Class A common stock could depress the price of our Class A common stock.

Our authorized but unissued shares of common and preferred stock may prevent a change in our control.

Our charter authorizes us to issue additional authorized but unissued shares of common or preferred stock. In addition, our board of directors may, without stockholder approval, amend our charter from time to

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time to increase or decrease the aggregate number of shares of our stock or the number of shares of stock of any class or series that we have authority to issue and classify or reclassify any unissued shares of common or preferred stock into other classes or series of stock and set the preferences, rights and other terms of the classified or reclassified shares. As a result, our board of directors may establish a series of common or preferred stock that could delay or prevent a transaction or a change in control that might involve a premium price for our common stock or otherwise be in the best interest of our stockholders.

Risks Related to Offerings of our Series A Preferred Stock, our Series B Preferred Stock, our Series C Preferred Stock and/or our Series D Preferred Stock

Because we conduct substantially all of our operations through our Operating Partnership, our ability to pay dividends on any of our Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock depends almost entirely on the distributions we receive from our Operating Partnership. We may not be able to pay dividends regularly on our Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock or Series D Preferred Stock.

We may not be able to pay dividends on a regular quarterly basis in the future on any of our Series A Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock or Series D Preferred Stock, or on a monthly basis in the future on our Series B Preferred Stock. We intend to contribute the entire net proceeds from the offerings of all such series of preferred stock to our Operating Partnership in exchange for Series A Preferred Units, Series B Preferred Units, Series C Preferred Units and Series D Preferred Units (as applicable) that have substantially the same economic terms as the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock (respectively). Because we conduct substantially all of our operations through our Operating Partnership, our ability to pay dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock will depend almost entirely on payments and distributions we receive on our interests in our Operating Partnership. If our Operating Partnership fails to operate profitably and to generate sufficient cash from operations (and the operations of its subsidiaries), we may not be able to pay dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock or Series D Preferred Stock. Furthermore, any new shares of preferred stock on parity with any such series of preferred stock will substantially increase the cash required to continue to pay cash dividends at stated levels. Any common stock or preferred stock that may be issued in the future to finance acquisitions, upon exercise of stock options or otherwise, would have a similar effect.

Your interests in our Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and/or Series D Preferred Stock could be diluted by the incurrence of additional debt, the issuance of additional shares of preferred stock, including additional shares of any or all of the foregoing series of preferred stock, and by other transactions.

As of December 31, 2017, our total long-term mortgage indebtedness was approximately $939.5 million and our credit facility was approximately $67.7 million, and we may incur significant additional debt in the future. Each of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock is subordinate to all of our existing and future debt and liabilities and those of our subsidiaries. Our future debt may include restrictions on our ability to pay dividends to preferred stockholders in the event of a default under the debt facilities or under other circumstances. Our charter currently authorizes the issuance of up to 250,000,000 shares of preferred stock in one or more classes or series, and as of December 31, 2017, we have issued and outstanding 5,721,460 shares of Series A Preferred Stock, 184,130 shares of Series B Preferred Stock, 2,323,750 shares of Series C Preferred Stock and 2,850,602 shares of Series D Preferred Stock. The issuance of additional preferred stock on parity with or senior to any or all of the foregoing series of preferred stock would dilute the interests of the holders of shares of preferred stock of the applicable series, and any issuance of preferred stock senior to the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock or Series D Preferred Stock or any issuance of additional indebtedness, could affect our ability to pay dividends on, redeem or pay the liquidation preference on any or all of the foregoing series of preferred stock. We may issue preferred stock on parity with any or all of the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and/or Series D Preferred Stock without the consent of the holders of shares of preferred stock of the applicable series. Other than the Asset Coverage Ratio (as defined below) with respect to the Series A Preferred Stock

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and Series C Preferred Stock and the right of holders to cause us to redeem the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, or Series C Preferred Stock or to convert the Series D Preferred Stock, upon a Change of Control/Delisting (as defined below), none of the provisions relating to any of the foregoing series of preferred stock relate to or limit our indebtedness or afford the holders of shares thereof protection in the event of a highly leveraged or other transaction, including a merger or the sale, lease or conveyance of all or substantially all our assets or business, that might adversely affect the holders of such shares.

In the event a holder of our Series A Preferred Stock exercises a Redemption at Option of Holder on or after October 21, 2022, a holder of our Series B Preferred Stock exercises their redemption option, or a holder of our Series C Preferred Stock exercise a Redemption at Option of Holder on or after July 19, 2023, we may redeem such shares of Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock or Series C Preferred Stock, as applicable, either for cash, or for shares of our Class A common stock, or any combination thereof, in our sole discretion.

If we choose to so redeem for Class A common stock, the holder will receive shares of our Class A common stock and therefore be subject to the risks of ownership thereof. See “— Risks Related to an Offering of our Class A Common Stock.” Ownership of shares of our Series A Preferred Stock, shares of our Series B Preferred Stock, or shares of our Series C Preferred Stock will not give you the rights of holders of our common stock. Until and unless you receive shares of our Class A common stock upon redemption, you will have only those rights applicable to holders of our Series A Preferred Stock, our Series B Preferred Stock or Series C Preferred Stock (as applicable).

The Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock have not been rated.

We have not sought to obtain a rating for the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock or the Series D Preferred Stock. No assurance can be given, however, that one or more rating agencies might not independently determine to issue such ratings or that such a rating, if issued, would not adversely affect the market price of the applicable series of preferred stock. In addition, we may elect in the future to obtain a rating of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and/or the Series D Preferred Stock, which could adversely impact the market price of the applicable series. Ratings only reflect the views of the rating agency or agencies issuing the ratings and such ratings could be revised downward, placed on negative outlook or withdrawn entirely at the discretion of the issuing rating agency if in its judgment circumstances so warrant. While ratings do not reflect market prices or the suitability of a security for a particular investor, such downward revision or withdrawal of a rating could have an adverse effect on the market price of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock or the Series D Preferred Stock. It is also possible that the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and/or the Series D Preferred Stock will never be rated.

Dividend payments on the Series A Preferred Stock, on the Series B Preferred Stock, on the Series C Preferred Stock and on the Series D Preferred Stock are not guaranteed.

Although dividends on each of the Series A Preferred Stock, on the Series B Preferred Stock, on the Series C Preferred Stock and on the Series D Preferred Stock are cumulative, our board of directors must approve the actual payment of such distributions. Our board of directors can elect at any time or from time to time, and for an indefinite duration, not to pay any or all accrued distributions. Our board of directors could do so for any reason, and may be prohibited from doing so in the following instances:

poor historical or projected cash flows;
the need to make payments on our indebtedness;
concluding that payment of distributions on any or all such series of preferred stock would cause us to breach the terms of any indebtedness or other instrument or agreement; or
determining that the payment of distributions would violate applicable law regarding unlawful distributions to stockholders.

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We intend to use the net proceeds from any offerings of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and/or the Series D Preferred Stock to fund future investments and for other general corporate and working capital purposes, but any such offerings will not be conditioned upon the closing of pending property investments and we will have broad discretion to determine alternative uses of proceeds.

We intend to use a portion of the net proceeds from any offerings of our Series A Preferred Stock, our Series B Preferred Stock, our Series C Preferred Stock and/or our Series D Preferred Stock to fund future investments and for other general corporate and working capital purposes. However, the offerings will not be conditioned upon the closing of definitive agreements to acquire or invest in any properties. We will have broad discretion in the application of the net proceeds from any such offerings, and holders of our Series A Preferred Stock, our Series B Preferred Stock, our Series C Preferred Stock and our Series D Preferred Stock will not have the opportunity as part of their investment decision to assess whether the net proceeds are being used appropriately. Because of the number and variability of factors that will determine our use of the net proceeds from any such offerings, their ultimate use may vary substantially from their currently intended use, and result in investments that are not accretive to our results from operations.

If we are required to make payments under any “bad boy” carve-out guaranties, recourse guaranties, and completion guaranties that we may provide in connection with certain mortgages and related loans in connection with an event that constitutes a Change of Control or Change of Control/Delisting, our business and financial results could be materially adversely affected.

In causing our subsidiaries to obtain certain nonrecourse loans, we may provide standard carve-out guaranties. These guaranties are generally only applicable if and when the borrower directly, or indirectly through agreement with an affiliate, joint venture partner or other third party, voluntarily files a bankruptcy or similar liquidation or reorganization action or takes other actions that are fraudulent or improper (commonly referred to as “bad boy” guaranties). We also may enter into recourse guaranties with respect to future mortgages, or provide credit support to development projects through completion guaranties, which also could increase risk of repayment. In some circumstances, pursuant to guarantees to which we are a party or that we may enter into in the future, our obligations pursuant to such “bad boy” carve-out guaranties and other guaranties may be triggered by a Change of Control or Change of Control/Delisting, because, among other things, such an event may result indirectly in a change of control of the applicable borrower. Because a Change of Control while any Series B Preferred Stock is outstanding, or a Change of Control/Delisting while any Series A Preferred Stock or Series C Preferred Stock is outstanding, also triggers a right of redemption for cash by the holders thereof, the effect of a Change of Control or Change of Control/Delisting could negatively impact our liquidity and overall financial condition, and could negatively impact the ability of holders of shares of our Series B Preferred Stock, Series A Preferred Stock or Series C Preferred Stock to receive dividends or other amounts on their shares of such Series B Preferred Stock, Series A Preferred Stock or Series C Preferred Stock.

There is a risk of delay in our redemption of the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock or Series C Preferred Stock and we may fail to redeem such securities as required by their terms.

Substantially all of the investments we presently hold and the investments we expect to acquire in the future are, and will be, illiquid. The illiquidity of our investments may make it difficult for us to obtain cash quickly if a need arises. If we are unable to obtain sufficient liquidity prior to a redemption date, we may be forced to engage in a partial redemption or to delay a required redemption. If such a partial redemption or delay were to occur, the market price of shares of the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock or Series C Preferred Stock might be adversely affected, and stockholders entitled to a redemption payment may not receive payment.

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The Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock will bear a risk of early redemption by us.

We may voluntarily redeem some or all of the Series A Preferred Stock solely for cash, on or after October 21, 2020. We may also voluntarily redeem some or all of the Series B Preferred Stock, for cash or equal value of shares of our Class A common stock, two years after the issuance date. In addition, we may voluntarily redeem some or all of the Series C Preferred Stock, solely for cash, on or after July 19, 2021. Finally, we may voluntarily redeem some or all of the Series D Preferred Stock solely for cash, on or after October 13, 2021. Any such redemptions may occur at a time that is unfavorable to holders of such preferred stock. We may have an incentive to redeem the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock or Series D Preferred Stock voluntarily if market conditions allow us to issue other preferred stock or debt securities at an interest or distribution rate that is lower than the distribution rate on the applicable series of preferred stock. Given the potential for early redemption of the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock, holders of such shares may face an increased reinvestment risk, which is the risk that the return on an investment purchased with proceeds from the sale or redemption of the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock or Series D Preferred Stock may be lower than the return previously obtained from the investment in such shares.

Holders of Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and/or Series D Preferred Stock should not expect us to redeem all or any such shares on the date they first become redeemable or on any particular date after they become redeemable.

Except in limited circumstances related to our ability to qualify as a REIT, our compliance with our Asset Coverage Ratio, or a special optional redemption in connection with a Change of Control/Delisting, the Series A Preferred Stock may be redeemed by us at our option, either in whole or in part, only on or after October 21, 2020, and the Series C Preferred Stock may be redeemed by us at our option, either in whole or in part, only on or after July 19, 2021. Except in limited circumstances related to our ability to qualify as a REIT or a special optional redemption in connection with a Change of Control/Delisting, the Series B Preferred Stock may be redeemed by us at our option, either in whole or in part, only on or after two years from the issuance date, and the Series D Preferred Stock may be redeemed by us at our option, either in whole or in part, only on or after October 13, 2021. Any decision we make at any time to propose a redemption of any such series of preferred stock will depend upon, among other things, our evaluation of our capital position and general market conditions at the time. It is likely that we would choose to exercise our optional redemption right only when prevailing interest rates have declined, which would adversely affect the ability of holders of shares of the applicable series of preferred stock to reinvest proceeds from the redemption in a comparable investment with an equal or greater yield to the yield on such series of preferred stock had their shares not been redeemed. In addition, there is no penalty or premium payable on redemption, and the market price of the shares of such series of preferred stock may not exceed the liquidation preference at the time the shares become redeemable for any reason.

Compliance with the Asset Coverage Ratio may result in our early redemption of your Series A Preferred Stock and/or Series C Preferred Stock.

The terms of our Series A Preferred Stock and Series C Preferred Stock require us to maintain asset coverage of at least 200% calculated by determining the percentage value of (1) our total assets plus accumulated depreciation minus our total liabilities and indebtedness as reported in our financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP (exclusive of the book value of any Redeemable and Term Preferred Stock (as defined below)), over (2) the aggregate liquidation preference, plus an amount equal to all accrued and unpaid dividends, of our outstanding Series A Preferred Stock and Series C Preferred Stock and any outstanding shares of term preferred stock or preferred stock providing for a fixed mandatory redemption date or maturity date (collectively referred to as “Redeemable and Term Preferred Stock”) on the last business day of any calendar quarter (the “Asset Coverage Ratio”).

If we are not in compliance with the Asset Coverage Ratio, we may redeem shares of Redeemable and Term Preferred Stock, which may include Series A Preferred Stock and/or Series C Preferred Stock, including shares that will result in compliance with the Asset Coverage Ratio up to and including 285%. This could

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result in our ability to redeem a significant amount of the Series A Preferred Stock prior to October 21, 2020 and/or Series C Preferred Stock prior to July 19, 2021.

We may not have sufficient funds to redeem the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, and/or Series C Preferred Stock upon a Change of Control/Delisting.

A “Change of Control/Delisting” is when, after the original issuance of the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock, or Series D Preferred Stock any of the following has occurred and is continuing:

a “person” or “group” within the meaning of Section 13(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the Exchange Act”), other than our Company, its subsidiaries, and its and their employee benefit plans, has become the direct or indirect “beneficial owner,” as defined in Rule 13d-3 under the Exchange Act, of our common equity representing more than 50% of the total voting power of all outstanding shares of our common equity that are entitled to vote generally in the election of directors, with the exception of the formation of a holding company;
consummation of any share exchange, consolidation or merger of our Company or any other transaction or series of transactions pursuant to which our common stock will be converted into cash, securities or other property, other than any such transaction where the shares of our common stock outstanding immediately prior to such transaction constitute, or are converted into or exchanged for, a majority of the common stock of the surviving person or any direct or indirect parent company of the surviving person immediately after giving effect to such transaction;
any sale, lease or other transfer in one transaction or a series of transactions of all or substantially all of the consolidated assets of our Company and its subsidiaries, taken as a whole, to any person other than one of the Company’s subsidiaries;
our stockholders approve any plan or proposal for the liquidation or dissolution of our Company;
our Class A common stock ceases to be listed or quoted on a national securities exchange in the United States; or
at least a majority of our board of directors ceases to be constituted of directors who were either a member of our board of directors on October 21, 2015, (February 24, 2016 for Series B Preferred Stock), or who became a member of our board of directors subsequent to that date and whose appointment, election or nomination for election by our stockholders was duly approved by a majority of the continuing directors on our board of directors at the time of such approval, either by a specific vote or by approval of the proxy statement issued by our Company on behalf of our board of directors in which such individual is named as nominee for director (each, a “Continuing Director”).

Upon the occurrence of a Change of Control/Delisting, unless we have exercised our right to redeem the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock, or Series D Preferred Stock, each holder of Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, or Series C Preferred Stock will have the right to require us to redeem all or any part of such stockholder’s Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, or Series C Preferred Stock at a price equal to the liquidation preference per share, plus an amount equal to any accumulated and unpaid dividends up to and including the date of payment (and each holder of Series D Preferred Stock will have the right to require us to convert all or some of their Series D Preferred Stock into shares of our Class A common stock (or equivalent value of alternative consideration)). If we experience a Change of Control/Delisting, there can be no assurance that we would have sufficient financial resources available to satisfy our obligations to redeem the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, or Series C Preferred Stock, and any guarantees or indebtedness that may be required to be repaid or repurchased as a result of such event. Our failure to redeem the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, or Series C Preferred Stock, could have material adverse consequences for us and the holders of the applicable series of preferred stock. In addition, the special optional redemption in connection with a Change of Control/Delisting feature of the Series A Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock or Series D Preferred Stock may have the effect of inhibiting a third party from making an acquisition proposal for the Company, or of delaying, deferring or preventing a change of control of the Company under circumstances that otherwise

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could provide the holders of our Class A common stock, Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock, and Series D Preferred Stock with the opportunity for liquidity or the opportunity to realize a premium over the then-current market price or that stockholders may otherwise believe is in their best interests.

Holders of our Series D Preferred Stock may not be permitted to exercise conversion rights upon a Change of Control/Delisting. If exercisable, the Change of Control/Delisting conversion feature of our Series D Preferred Stock may not adequately compensate such holders and may make it more difficult for a third party to take over our Company or discourage a third party from taking over our Company.

Upon the occurrence of a Change of Control/Delisting, holders of our Series D Preferred Stock will have the right to convert some or all of their Series D Preferred Stock into shares of our Class A common stock (or equivalent value of alternative consideration). Notwithstanding that we generally may not redeem the Series D Preferred Stock prior to October 13, 2021, we have a special optional redemption right in the event of a Change of Control/Delisting, and if we provide notice of our election to redeem the Series D Preferred Stock (whether pursuant to our optional redemption right or our special optional redemption right), the holders of the Series D Preferred Stock will not be permitted to exercise the Change of Control/Delisting Conversion Right with respect to the shares of Series D Preferred Stock subject to such notice. Upon such a conversion, such holders will be limited to a maximum number of shares of our Class A common stock per share of Series D Preferred Stock equal to the lesser of (i) the conversion value (equal to the liquidation preference and unpaid and accrued dividends) divided by the closing price on the date of the event triggering the Change of Control/Delisting and (ii) the share cap of 4.15973, subject to adjustments.

The Change of Control/Delisting conversion feature of our Series D Preferred Stock may have the effect of discouraging a third party from making an acquisition proposal for our Company or of delaying, deferring or preventing certain change of control transactions of our Company under circumstances that stockholders may otherwise believe is in their best interests.

The market price of shares of our Class A common stock received in a conversion of our Series D Preferred Stock may decrease between the date received and the date the shares of Class A common stock are sold.

The market price of shares of our Class A common stock received in a conversion may decrease between the date received and the date the shares of Class A common stock are sold. The stock markets, including the NYSE American, have experienced significant price and volume fluctuations. As a result, the market price of our Class A common stock is likely to be similarly volatile, and recipients of our Class A common stock may experience a decrease in the value of their shares, including decreases unrelated to our operating performance or prospects. The price of our Class A common stock could be subject to wide fluctuations in response to a number of factors, including sales of Class A common stock by other stockholders who received shares of our Class A common stock upon conversion of their Series D Preferred Stock, our financial performance, government regulatory action or inaction, tax laws, interest rates and general market conditions and other factors.

Market interest rates may have an effect on the value of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock or the Series D Preferred Stock.

One of the factors that will influence the price of the Series A Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock or the Series D Preferred Stock will be the dividend yield on the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock or the Series D Preferred Stock (as a percentage of the price of the Preferred Stock, as applicable) relative to market interest rates. An increase in market interest rates, which are currently at low levels relative to historical rates, may lead prospective purchasers of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock or the Series D Preferred Stock to expect a higher dividend yield and higher interest rates would likely increase our borrowing costs and potentially decrease funds available for distribution. Thus, higher market interest rates could cause the market price of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock or the Series D Preferred Stock to decrease.

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Holders of the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock will be subject to inflation risk.

Inflation is the reduction in the purchasing power of money resulting from the increase in the price of goods and services. Inflation risk is the risk that the inflation-adjusted, or “real,” value of an investment in preferred stock or the income from that investment will be worth less in the future. As inflation occurs, the real value of the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock and dividends payable on such shares declines.

Holders of Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock have extremely limited voting rights.

The voting rights of holders of shares of Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock will be extremely limited. Our common stock is the only class or series of our stock carrying full voting rights. Voting rights for holders of shares of Series A Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock exist primarily with respect to the ability to elect two additional directors in the event that dividends for each of six quarterly dividend periods payable on the applicable series of such preferred stock are in arrears, and with respect to voting on amendments to our charter that materially and adversely affect the rights of the applicable series of such preferred stock or, with holders of Series B Preferred Stock, the creation of additional classes or series of preferred stock that are senior to the applicable series of such preferred stock with respect to a liquidation, dissolution or winding up of our affairs. Other than in these limited circumstances, holders of Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock will not have voting rights.

The amount of the liquidation preference is fixed and holders of Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock will have no right to receive any greater payment.

The payment due upon liquidation is fixed at the liquidation preference of $25.00 per share of Series A Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock, and $1,000.00 per share of Series B Preferred Stock, plus an amount equal to all accrued and unpaid dividends thereon, to, but not including, the date of liquidation, whether or not authorized or declared. If, in the case of our liquidation, there are remaining assets to be distributed after payment of this amount, you will have no right to receive or to participate in these amounts. Further, if the market price of a holder’s shares of Series A Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock or Series D Preferred Stock is greater than the liquidation preference, the holder will have no right to receive the market price from us upon our liquidation.

Our charter and the articles supplementary establishing the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock each contain restrictions upon ownership and transfer of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock which may impair the ability of holders to acquire the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock and the shares of our common stock into which shares of Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock may be converted, at the Company’s option, pursuant to the redemption at the option of the holder under certain circumstances.

Our charter and the articles supplementary establishing the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock each contain restrictions on ownership and transfer of each such series of preferred stock intended to assist us in maintaining our qualification as a REIT for federal income tax purposes. For example, to assist us in qualifying as a REIT, the articles supplementary establishing the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock (respectively) prohibit anyone from owning, or being deemed to own by virtue of the applicable constructive ownership provisions of the Code, more than 9.8% in value or number of shares, whichever is more restrictive, of the outstanding Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock (as applicable). You should consider these ownership limitations prior to a purchase of shares of any such series of preferred stock. The restrictions could also have anti-takeover effects and could reduce the possibility that a third party will

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attempt to acquire control of us, which could adversely affect the market price of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock.

Our ability to pay dividends or redeem shares is limited by the requirements of Maryland law.

Our ability to pay dividends on or redeem shares of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock is limited by the laws of Maryland. Under applicable Maryland law, a Maryland corporation generally may not make a distribution (including a dividend or redemption) if, after giving effect to the distribution, the corporation would not be able to pay its debts as the debts become due in the usual course of business, or the corporation’s total assets would be less than the sum of its total liabilities plus, unless the corporation’s charter provides otherwise, the amount that would be needed, if the corporation were dissolved at the time of the distribution, to satisfy the preferential rights upon dissolution of stockholders whose preferential rights are superior to those receiving the distribution. Accordingly, we generally may not make a distribution on the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock if, after giving effect to the distribution, we would not be able to pay our debts as they become due in the usual course of business or our total assets would be less than the sum of our total liabilities plus, unless the terms of such class or series provide otherwise, the amount that would be needed to satisfy the preferential rights upon dissolution of the holders of shares of any class or series of preferred stock then outstanding, if any, with preferences senior to those of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock. Any dividends or redemption payments may be delayed or prohibited.

If our common stock is no longer listed on the NYSE American or another national securities exchange, the ability to transfer or sell shares of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock may be limited and the market value of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock will be materially adversely affected.

If our Class A common stock is no longer listed on the NYSE American or another national securities exchange, it is likely that the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock will be delisted as well. Accordingly, if our Class A common stock is delisted, the ability of holders to transfer or sell their shares of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock may be limited and the market value of the Series A Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock may be materially adversely affected.

If our Class A common stock is no longer listed on the NYSE American or another national securities exchange, we will be required to terminate the continuous offering of Series B Preferred Stock.

The Series B Preferred Stock is a “covered security” and therefore is not subject to registration under the state securities, or “Blue Sky,” regulations in the various states in which it may be sold due to its seniority to our Class A common stock, which is listed on the NYSE American. If our Class A common stock is no longer listed on the NYSE American or another appropriate exchange, we will be required to register the offering or Series B Preferred Stock in any state in which we subsequently offer the Series B Units. This would require the termination of the continuous offering and could result in our raising an amount of gross proceeds that is substantially less than the amount of the gross proceeds we expect to raise if the maximum offering is sold. This would reduce our ability to make additional investments and limit the diversification of our portfolio.

Although the Warrants are not “covered securities,” most states include an exemption from securities registration for warrants that are exercisable into a listed security. Therefore, the Warrants are subject to state securities registration in any state that does not provide such an exemption and the offering of Series B Preferred Stock must be registered in order to sell the Warrants in these states.

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To the extent that our distributions represent a return of capital for tax purposes, stockholders may recognize an increased gain or a reduced loss upon subsequent sales (including cash redemptions) of their shares of Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock or Series D Preferred Stock.

The dividends payable by us on the Series A Preferred Stock, the Series B Preferred Stock, the Series C Preferred Stock and the Series D Preferred Stock may exceed our current and accumulated earnings and profits as determined for U.S. federal income tax purposes. If that were to occur, it would result in the amount of distributions that exceed our earnings and profits being treated first as a return of capital to the extent of the stockholder’s adjusted tax basis in the stockholder’s Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock and then, to the extent of any excess over the stockholder’s adjusted tax basis in the stockholder’s Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock, as capital gain. Any distribution that is treated as a return of capital will reduce the stockholder’s adjusted tax basis in the stockholder’s Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock, and subsequent sales (including cash redemptions) of such stockholder’s Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock will result in recognition of an increased taxable gain or reduced taxable loss due to the reduction in such adjusted tax basis.

There is no public market for our Series B Preferred Stock or Warrants and we do not expect one to develop.

There is no public market for our Series B Preferred Stock or Warrants offered in the Series B Preferred Offering, and we currently have no plan to list the Series B Preferred Stock or Warrants on a securities exchange or to include such shares for quotation on any national securities market. Additionally, our charter contains restrictions on the ownership and transfer of our securities, including our Series B Preferred Stock, and these restrictions may inhibit the ability to sell shares of our Series B Preferred Stock or Warrants promptly or at all. Furthermore, the Warrants will expire four years from the date of issuance. If holders are able to sell the Series B Preferred Stock or Warrants, they may only be able to be sold at a substantial discount from the price originally paid. Therefore, Series B Units should be purchased only as a long-term investment. After one year from the date of issuance, the Warrants will be exercisable at the option of the holder for shares of our Class A common stock, which currently are publicly traded on the NYSE American. Beginning two years from the date of original issuance, we may redeem, and upon original issuance the holder of shares of Series B Preferred Stock may require us to redeem, such shares, with the redemption price payable, in our sole discretion, in cash or in equal value of shares of our Class A common stock, based on the volume weighted average price per share of our Class A common stock for the 20 trading days prior to the redemption. If we opt to pay the redemption price in shares of our Class A common stock, holders of shares of Series B Preferred Stock may receive publicly traded shares as we currently expect to continue listing our Class A common stock on the NYSE American.

There may not be a broad market for our Class A common stock, which may cause our Class A common stock to trade at a discount and make it difficult for holders of Warrants to sell the Class A common stock for which the Warrants are exercisable and for which shares of our Series B Preferred Stock may be redeemable at our option.

Our Class A common stock for which the Warrants are exercisable trades on the NYSE American under the symbol “BRG.” Listing on the NYSE American or another national securities exchange does not ensure an actual or active market for our Class A common stock. Historically, our Class A common stock has had a low trading volume. Accordingly, an actual or active market for our Class A common stock may not be maintained, the market for our Class A common stock may not be liquid, the holders of our Class A common stock may be unable to sell their shares of our Class A common stock, and the prices that may be obtained following the sale of our Class A common stock upon the exercise of Warrants or the redemption of shares of Series B Preferred Stock may not reflect the underlying value of our assets and business.

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Shares of Series B Preferred Stock may be redeemed for shares of our Class A common stock, which rank junior to the Series B Preferred Stock with respect to dividends and upon liquidation.

The holders of shares of Series B Preferred Stock may require us to redeem such shares, with the redemption price payable, in our sole discretion, in cash or in equal value of shares of our Class A common stock, based on the volume weighted average price per share of our Class A common stock for the 20 trading days prior to the redemption. We may opt to pay the redemption price in shares of our Class A common stock. The rights of the holders of shares of Series B Preferred Stock, Series A Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock rank senior to the rights of the holders of shares of our common stock as to dividends and payments upon liquidation. Unless full cumulative dividends on our shares of Series B Preferred Stock, Series A Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock for all past dividend periods have been declared and paid (or set apart for payment), we will not declare or pay dividends with respect to any shares of our Class A common stock for any period. Upon liquidation, dissolution or winding up of our Company, the holders of shares of our Series B Preferred Stock are entitled to receive a liquidation preference of stated value, $1,000 per share, plus an amount equal to all accrued but unpaid dividends and holders of shares of our Series A Preferred Stock, our Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock are entitled to receive a liquidation preference of $25.00 per share, plus an amount equal to all accrued and unpaid dividends, prior and in preference to any distribution to the holders of shares of our Class A common stock or any other class of our equity securities.

We will be able to call shares of Series B Preferred Stock for redemption under certain circumstances without the consent of the holder.

We will have the ability to call the outstanding shares of Series B Preferred Stock after two years from the date of original issuance of such shares of Series B Preferred Stock. At that time, we will have the right to redeem, at our option, the outstanding shares of Series B Preferred Stock, in whole or in part, at 100% of the Stated Value per share, plus an amount equal to any accrued and unpaid dividends.

Our requirement to redeem the Series B Preferred Stock in the event of a Series B Change of Control may deter a change of control transaction otherwise in the best interests of our stockholders.

Upon the occurrence of a Series B Change of Control (as defined below), we will be required to redeem all outstanding shares of the Series B Preferred Stock in whole within 60 days after the first date on which such Series B Change of Control occurred, in cash at a redemption price of $1,000 per share, plus an amount equal to all accrued and unpaid dividends, if any, to and including the redemption date. The mandatory redemption in connection with a Series B Change of Control feature of the Series B Preferred Stock may have the effect of inhibiting a third party from making an acquisition proposal for the Company, or of delaying, deferring or preventing a change of control of the Company under circumstances that otherwise could provide the holders of our Class A common stock and Series B Preferred Stock with the opportunity for liquidity or the opportunity to realize a premium over the then-current market price or that stockholders may otherwise believe is in their best interests.

A “Series B Change of Control” is when, after the initial issuance of the Series B Preferred Stock, any of the following has occurred and is continuing:

a “person” or “group” within the meaning of Section 13(d) of the Exchange Act, other than our Company, its subsidiaries, and its and their employee benefit plans, has become the direct or indirect “beneficial owner,” as defined in Rule 13d-3 under the Exchange Act, of our common equity representing more than 50% of the total voting power of all outstanding shares of our common equity that are entitled to vote generally in the election of directors, with the exception of the formation of a holding company;
consummation of any share exchange, consolidation or merger of our Company or any other transaction or series of transactions pursuant to which our Class A common stock will be converted into cash, securities or other property, (1) other than any such transaction where the shares of our Class A common stock outstanding immediately prior to such transaction constitute, or are converted into or exchanged for, a majority of the common stock of the surviving person or any direct or indirect parent company of the surviving person immediately after giving effect to such transaction,

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and (2) expressly excluding any such transaction preceded by our Company’s acquisition of the capital stock of another company for cash, securities or other property, whether directly or indirectly through one of our subsidiaries, as a precursor to such transactions; or
at least a majority of our board of directors ceases to be constituted of directors who were either a member of our board of directors on February 24, 2016 or who becomes a member of our board of directors subsequent to that date and whose appointment, election or nomination for election by our stockholders was duly approved by a majority of the continuing directors on our board of directors at the time of such approval, either by a specific vote or by approval of the proxy statement issued by our Company on behalf of our board of directors in which such individual is named as nominee for director (each, a “Series B Continuing Director”).

Subject to the Cetera Side Letter, upon the sale of any individual property, holders of Series B Preferred Stock do not have a priority over holders of our common stock regarding return of capital.

Subject to the Cetera Side Letter, holders of our Series B Preferred Stock do not have a right to receive a return of capital prior to holders of our common stock upon the individual sale of a property. To provide protection to the holders of the Series B Preferred Stock, our Cetera Side Letter restricts us from selling an asset if the sale would cause us to fail to meet a dividend coverage ratio of no less than 1.1:1 based on the ratio of our adjusted funds from operations to dividends required to be paid to holders of our Series A, Series B, Series C and Series D Preferred Stock for the two most recent quarters, subject to our ability to maintain status as a REIT for federal income tax purposes. Depending on the price at which such property is sold, it is possible that holders of our common stock will receive a return of capital prior to the holders of our Series B Preferred Stock, provided that any accrued but unpaid dividends have been paid in full to holders of Series B Preferred Stock. It is also possible that holders of common stock will receive additional distributions from the sale of a property (in excess of their capital attributable to the asset sold) before the holders of Series B Preferred Stock receive a return of their capital.

We established the offering price for the Series B Units pursuant to negotiations among us and our affiliated dealer manager; as a result, the actual value of an investment in Series B Units may be substantially less than the amount paid.

The selling price of the Series B Units was determined pursuant to negotiations among us and the dealer manager, which is an affiliate of Bluerock, based upon the following primary factors: the economic conditions in and future prospects for the industry in which we compete; our prospects for future earnings; an assessment of our management; the present state of our development; the prevailing conditions of the equity securities markets at the time of the Series B Preferred Offering; the present state of the market for non-traded REIT securities; and current market valuations of public companies considered comparable to our Company. Because the offering price is not based upon any independent valuation, the offering price is not indicative of the proceeds that an investor in the Series B Units would receive upon liquidation.

Your percentage of ownership may become diluted if we issue new shares of stock or other securities, and issuances of additional preferred stock or other securities by us may further subordinate the rights of the holders of our Class A common stock (which you may become upon receipt of redemption payments in shares of our Class A common stock, conversion of any of your shares of Series B Preferred Stock or exercise of any of your Warrants).

We may make redemption payments under the terms of the Series B Preferred Stock in shares of our Class A common stock. Although the dollar amounts of such payments are unknown, the number of shares to be issued in connection with such payments may fluctuate based on the price of our Class A common stock. Any sales or perceived sales in the public market of shares of our Class A common stock issuable upon such redemption payments could adversely affect prevailing market prices of shares of our Class A common stock. The issuance of shares of our Class A common stock upon such redemption payments also may have the effect of reducing our net income per share (or increasing our net loss per share). In addition, the existence of Series B Preferred Stock may encourage short selling by market participants because the existence of redemption payments could depress the market price of shares of our Class A common stock.

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Our board of directors is authorized, without stockholder approval, to cause us to issue additional shares of our Class A common stock or to raise capital through the issuance of additional preferred stock (including equity or debt securities convertible into preferred stock), options, warrants and other rights, on such terms and for such consideration as our board of directors in its sole discretion may determine. Any such issuance could result in dilution of the equity of our stockholders. Our board of directors may, in its sole discretion, authorize us to issue common stock or other equity or debt securities to persons from whom we purchase apartment communities, as part or all of the purchase price of the community. Our board of directors, in its sole discretion, may determine the value of any common stock or other equity or debt securities issued in consideration of apartment communities or services provided, or to be provided, to us.

Our charter also authorizes our board of directors, without stockholder approval, to designate and issue one or more classes or series of preferred stock in addition to the Series B Preferred Stock (including equity or debt securities convertible into preferred stock) and to set or change the voting, conversion or other rights, preferences, restrictions, limitations as to dividends or other distributions and qualifications or terms or conditions of redemption of each class or series of shares so issued. If any additional preferred stock is publicly offered, the terms and conditions of such preferred stock (including any equity or debt securities convertible into preferred stock) will be set forth in a registration statement registering the issuance of such preferred stock or equity or debt securities convertible into preferred stock. Because our board of directors has the power to establish the preferences and rights of each class or series of preferred stock, it may afford the holders of any series or class of preferred stock preferences, powers, and rights senior to the rights of holders of common stock or the Series B Preferred Stock. If we ever create and issue additional preferred stock or equity or debt securities convertible into preferred stock with a distribution preference over common stock or the Series B Preferred Stock, payment of any distribution preferences of such new outstanding preferred stock would reduce the amount of funds available for the payment of distributions on our common stock and our Series B Preferred Stock. Further, holders of preferred stock are normally entitled to receive a preference payment if we liquidate, dissolve, or wind up before any payment is made to the common stockholders, likely reducing the amount common stockholders would otherwise receive upon such an occurrence. In addition, under certain circumstances, the issuance of additional preferred stock may delay, prevent, render more difficult or tend to discourage a merger, tender offer, or proxy contest, the assumption of control by a holder of a large block of our securities, or the removal of incumbent management.

Stockholders have no rights to buy additional shares of stock or other securities if we issue new shares of stock or other securities. We may issue common stock, convertible debt or preferred stock pursuant to a subsequent public offering or a private placement, or to sellers of properties we directly or indirectly acquire instead of, or in addition to, cash consideration. Investors purchasing Series B Units in the offering of our Series B Preferred Stock who do not participate in any future stock issuances will experience dilution in the percentage of the issued and outstanding stock they own. In addition, depending on the terms and pricing of any additional offerings and the value of our investments, you also may experience dilution in the book value and fair market value of, and the amount of distributions paid on, your shares of Series B Preferred Stock and common stock, if any.

Our charter, the articles supplementary establishing the Series B Preferred Stock, and the Warrant Agreement each contain restrictions upon ownership and transfer of the Series B Preferred Stock and the Warrants, which may impair the ability of holders to acquire the Series B Preferred Stock, the Warrants and the shares of our Class A common stock upon exercise of the Warrants and into which shares of Series B Preferred Stock may be converted, at the Company’s option.

Our charter, the articles supplementary establishing the Series B Preferred Stock, and the Warrant Agreement each contain restrictions on ownership and transfer of the Series B Preferred Stock and the Warrants intended to assist us in maintaining our qualification as a REIT for federal income tax purposes. For example, to assist us in qualifying as a REIT, the articles supplementary establishing the Series B Preferred Stock prohibits anyone from owning, or being deemed to own by virtue of the applicable constructive ownership provisions of the Code, more than 9.8% in value or number of shares, whichever is more restrictive, of the outstanding Series B Preferred Stock. Additionally, the Warrant Agreement prohibits any person from beneficially or constructively owning more than 9.8% of our Warrants, and provides that Warrants may not be exercised to the extent such exercise would result in the holder’s beneficial or constructive

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ownership of more than 9.8%, in number or value, whichever is more restrictive, of our outstanding shares of common stock, or more than 9.8% in value of our outstanding capital stock. You should consider these ownership limitations prior to a purchase of the Series B Units. The restrictions could also have anti-takeover effects and could reduce the possibility that a third party will attempt to acquire control of us, which could adversely affect the market price of the Series B Preferred Stock.

Holders of the Series B Preferred Stock have no control over changes in our policies and operations.

Our board of directors determines our major policies, including with regard to investment objectives, financing, growth, debt capitalization, REIT qualification and distributions. Our board of directors may amend or revise these and other policies without a vote of the stockholders.

In addition, holders of shares of our Series B Preferred Stock have no voting rights under our charter, and otherwise have no voting rights except as set forth in the Cetera Side Letter. Pursuant to the Cetera Side Letter, holders of shares of Series B Preferred Stock have voting rights only in certain limited circumstances, voting together as a single class with the holders of preferred stock (i) ranking on parity with the Series B Preferred Stock with respect to dividend rights and rights upon our liquidation, dissolution or winding up, and (ii) upon which voting rights have been conferred (such holders, together with holders of shares of Series B Preferred Stock, the Parity Holders). The Parity Holders currently include the holders of Series A Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock and Series D Preferred Stock. The affirmative vote of a majority of the votes cast by the Parity Holders, voting together as a single class, is required to approve (a) the authorization, creation or issuance, or an increase in the number of authorized or issued shares of, any class or series of our capital stock ranking senior to the Series A Preferred Stock, Series B Preferred Stock, Series C Preferred Stock, or Series D Preferred Stock with respect to dividend rights and rights upon our liquidation, dissolution or winding up (any such senior stock, the “Senior Stock”), (b) the reclassification of any of our authorized capital stock into Senior Stock, or (c) the creation, authorization or issuance of any obligation or security convertible into, or evidencing the right to purchase, Senior Stock. Other than in these limited circumstances, holders of Series B Preferred Stock have no voting rights.

General Risks Related Ownership of our Securities

The cash distributions you receive may be less frequent or lower in amount than you expect.

Our directors determine the amount and timing of distributions in their sole discretion. Our directors consider all relevant factors, including the amount of cash available for distribution, capital expenditure and reserve requirements, general operational requirements and the requirements necessary to maintain our REIT qualification. We cannot assure you that we will consistently be able to generate sufficient available cash flow to make distributions, nor can we assure you that sufficient cash will be available to make distributions to you. We may borrow funds, return capital, make taxable distributions of our stock or debt securities, or sell assets to make distributions. We cannot predict the amount of distributions you may receive and we may be unable to pay or maintain cash distributions or increase distributions over time. Our inability to acquire additional properties or make real estate-related investments or operate profitably may have a negative effect on our ability to generate sufficient cash flow from operations to pay distributions.

Also, because we may receive income from rents at various times during our fiscal year, distributions paid may not reflect our income earned in that particular distribution period. The amount of cash available for distributions will be affected by many factors, such as our ability to acquire properties as offering proceeds become available, the income from those investments and yields on securities of other real estate companies that we invest in, as well as our operating expense levels and many other variables. In addition, to the extent we make distributions to stockholders with sources other than cash flow from operations, the amount of cash that is available for investment in real estate assets will be reduced, which will in turn negatively impact our ability to achieve our investment objectives and limit our ability to make future distributions.

If the properties we acquire or invest in do not produce the cash flow that we expect in order to meet our REIT minimum distribution requirement, we may decide to borrow funds to meet the REIT minimum distribution requirements, which could adversely affect our overall financial performance.

We may decide to borrow funds in order to meet the REIT minimum distribution requirements even if our management believes that the then prevailing market conditions generally are not favorable for such

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borrowings or that such borrowings would not be advisable in the absence of such tax considerations. If we borrow money to meet the REIT minimum distribution requirement or for other working capital needs, our expenses will increase, our net income will be reduced by the amount of interest we pay on the money we borrow and we will be obligated to repay the money we borrow from future earnings or by selling assets, which may decrease future distributions to stockholders.

We intend to use the net proceeds from any offering of our securities to fund future acquisitions and for other general corporate and working capital purposes, but no offering will be conditioned upon the closing of properties in our then-current pipeline and we will have broad discretion to determine alternative uses of proceeds.

As described under “Use of Proceeds” in any applicable prospectus or prospectus supplement, we intend to use a portion of the net proceeds from any offering of our securities to fund future acquisitions and for other general corporate and working capital purposes. However, no offering will be conditioned upon the closing of any properties. We will have broad discretion in the application of the net proceeds from an offering, and holders of our securities will not have the opportunity as part of their investment decision to assess whether the net proceeds are being used appropriately. Because of the number and variability of factors that will determine our use of the net proceeds from an offering, their ultimate use may vary substantially from their currently intended use.

Material Federal Income Tax Risks

Failure to remain qualified as a REIT would cause us to be taxed as a regular corporation, which would substantially reduce funds available for distributions to our stockholders.

We elected to be taxed as a REIT under the federal income tax laws commencing with our taxable year ended December 31, 2010. We believe that we have been organized and have operated in a manner qualifying us as a REIT commencing with our taxable year ended December 31, 2010 and intend to continue to so operate. However, we cannot assure you that we will remain qualified as a REIT.

If we fail to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year, we will face serious tax consequences that will substantially reduce the funds available for distributions to our stockholders because:

we would not be able to deduct dividends paid to stockholders in computing our taxable income and would be subject to U.S. federal income tax at regular corporate rates;
we could be subject to possibly increased state and local taxes; and
unless we are entitled to relief under certain U.S. federal income tax laws, we could not re-elect REIT status until the fifth calendar year after the year in which we failed to qualify as a REIT.

In addition, if we fail to qualify as a REIT, we will no longer be required to make distributions. As a result of all these factors, our failure to qualify as a REIT could impair our ability to expand our business and raise capital, and it would adversely affect the value of our securities.

Complying with REIT requirements may cause us to forego otherwise attractive opportunities or liquidate otherwise attractive investments.

To maintain our qualification as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, we must continually satisfy tests concerning, among other things, the sources of our income, the nature and diversification of our assets, the amounts we distribute to our stockholders and the ownership of our capital stock. In order to meet these tests, we may be required to forego investments we might otherwise make. Thus, compliance with the REIT requirements may hinder our performance.

In particular, we must ensure that at the end of each calendar quarter, at least 75% of the value of our assets consists of cash, cash items, government securities and qualified real estate assets. The remainder of our investment in securities (other than government securities, securities of TRSs and qualified real estate assets) generally cannot include more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of any one issuer or more than 10% of the total value of the outstanding securities of any one issuer. In addition, in general, no more than

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5% of the value of our assets (other than government securities, securities of TRSs and qualified real estate assets) can consist of the securities of any one issuer, and no more than 20% (25% for 2017 and prior years) of the value of our total assets can be represented by the securities of one or more TRSs. If we fail to comply with these requirements at the end of any calendar quarter, we must correct the failure within 30 days after the end of the calendar quarter or qualify for certain statutory relief provisions to avoid losing our REIT qualification and suffering adverse tax consequences. As a result, we may be required to liquidate otherwise attractive investments. These actions could have the effect of reducing our income and amounts available for distribution to our stockholders.

Even if we remain qualified as a REIT, we may face other tax liabilities that reduce our cash flows.

Even if we remain qualified as a REIT, we may be subject to certain federal, state and local taxes on our income and assets, including taxes on any undistributed income, tax on income from some activities conducted as a result of a foreclosure, and state or local income, property and transfer taxes. In addition, any TRS in which we own an interest will be subject to regular corporate federal, state and local taxes. Any of these taxes would decrease cash available for distributions to stockholders.

Failure to make required distributions would subject us to U.S. federal corporate income tax.

We intend to continue to operate in a manner so as to qualify as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes. In order to remain qualified as a REIT, we generally are required to distribute at least 90% of our REIT taxable income, determined without regard to the dividends paid deduction and excluding any net capital gain, each year to our stockholders. To the extent that we satisfy this distribution requirement, but distribute less than 100% of our REIT taxable income, we will be subject to U.S. federal corporate income tax on our undistributed taxable income. In addition, we will be subject to a 4% nondeductible excise tax if the actual amount that we pay out to our stockholders in a calendar year is less than a minimum amount specified under the Code.

We may satisfy the 90% distribution test with taxable distributions of our stock or debt securities. On August 11, 2017, the IRS issued Revenue Procedure 2017-45 authorizing elective cash/stock dividends to be made by publicly offered REITs (e.g., REITs that are required to file annual and periodic reports with the SEC under the Exchange Act). Pursuant to Revenue Procedure 2017-45, effective for distributions declared on or after August 11, 2017, the IRS will treat the distribution of stock pursuant to an elective cash/stock dividend as a distribution of property under Section 301 of the Code (e.g., a dividend), as long as at least 20% of the total dividend is available in cash and certain other parameters detailed in the Revenue Procedure are satisfied. Although we have no current intention of paying dividends in our own stock, if in the future we choose to pay dividends in our own stock, our stockholders may be required to pay tax in excess of the cash that they receive.

The prohibited transactions tax may subject us to tax on our gain from sales of property and limit our ability to dispose of our properties.

A REIT’s net income from prohibited transactions is subject to a 100% tax. In general, prohibited transactions are sales or other dispositions of property other than foreclosure property, held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business. Although we intend to acquire and hold all of our assets as investments and not for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business, the IRS may assert that we are subject to the prohibited transaction tax equal to 100% of net gain upon a disposition of real property. Although a safe harbor to the characterization of the sale of real property by a REIT as a prohibited transaction is available, not all of our prior property dispositions qualified for the safe harbor and we cannot assure you that we can comply with the safe harbor in the future or that we have avoided, or will avoid, owning property that may be characterized as held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business. Consequently, we may choose not to engage in certain sales of our properties or may conduct such sales through a TRS, which would be subject to federal and state income taxation. Additionally, in the event that we engage in sales of our properties, any gains from the sales of properties classified as prohibited transactions would be taxed at the 100% prohibited transaction tax rate.

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The ability of our board of directors to revoke our REIT qualification without stockholder approval may cause adverse consequences to our stockholders.

Our charter provides that our board of directors may revoke or otherwise terminate our REIT election, without the approval of our stockholders, if it determines that it is no longer in our best interest to continue to qualify as a REIT. If we cease to qualify as a REIT, we would become subject to U.S. federal income tax on our taxable income and would no longer be required to distribute most of our taxable income to our stockholders, which may have adverse consequences on our total return to our stockholders.

Our ownership of any TRSs will be subject to limitations and our transactions with any TRSs will cause us to be subject to a 100% penalty tax on certain income or deductions if those transactions are not conducted on arm’s-length terms.

Overall, no more than 20% (25% for 2017 and prior years) of the value of a REIT’s assets may consist of stock or securities of one or more TRSs. In addition, the Code limits the deductibility of interest paid or accrued by a TRS to its parent REIT to assure that the TRS is subject to an appropriate level of corporate taxation. The Code also imposes a 100% excise tax on certain transactions between a TRS and its parent REIT that are not conducted on an arm’s-length basis. Furthermore, we will monitor the value of our respective investments in any TRSs for the purpose of ensuring compliance with TRS ownership limitations and will structure our transactions with any TRSs on terms that we believe are arm’s-length to avoid incurring the 100% excise tax described above. There can be no assurance, however, that we will be able to comply with the 20% REIT subsidiaries limitation or to avoid application of the 100% excise tax.

You may be restricted from acquiring or transferring certain amounts of our common stock.

The stock ownership restrictions of the Code for REITs and the 9.8% stock ownership limits in our charter may inhibit market activity in our capital stock and restrict our business combination opportunities.

In order to qualify as a REIT, five or fewer individuals, as defined in the Code to include specified private foundations, employee benefit plans and trusts, and charitable trusts, may not own, beneficially or constructively, more than 50% in value of our issued and outstanding stock at any time during the last half of a taxable year. Attribution rules in the Code determine if any individual or entity beneficially or constructively owns our capital stock under this requirement. Additionally, at least 100 persons must beneficially own our capital stock during at least 335 days of a taxable year. To help insure that we meet these tests, among other purposes, our charter restricts the acquisition and ownership of shares of our capital stock.

Our charter, with certain exceptions, authorizes our directors to take such actions as are necessary and desirable to preserve our qualification as a REIT. Unless exempted, prospectively or retroactively, by our board of directors, our charter prohibits any person from beneficially or constructively owning more than 9.8% in value of the aggregate of our outstanding shares of capital stock or 9.8% in value or number of shares, whichever is more restrictive, of the outstanding shares of our common stock. Our board of directors may not grant an exemption from these restrictions to any proposed transferee whose ownership in excess of such thresholds does not satisfy certain conditions designed to ensure that we will not fail to qualify as a REIT. These restrictions on transferability and ownership will not apply, however, if our board of directors determines that it is no longer in our best interest to continue to qualify as a REIT or that compliance is no longer required for REIT qualification.

We may be subject to adverse legislative or regulatory tax changes that could reduce the market price of our stock.

At any time, the U.S. federal income tax laws governing REITs or the administrative interpretations of those laws may be amended. We cannot predict when or if any new U.S. federal income tax law, regulation or administrative interpretation, or any amendment to any existing U.S. federal income tax law, regulation or administrative interpretation, will be adopted, promulgated or become effective and any such law, regulation, or interpretation may take effect retroactively. We and our stockholders could be adversely affected by any such change in the U.S. federal income tax laws, regulations or administrative interpretations.

The recently-enacted “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act” (the “TCJA”) makes significant changes to the U.S. federal income tax rules for taxation of individuals and corporations. In the case of individuals, the tax

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brackets have been adjusted, the top federal income rate has been reduced to 37%, special rules reduce taxation of certain income earned through pass-through entities and reduce the top effective rate applicable to ordinary dividends from REITs to 29.6% (through a 20% deduction for ordinary REIT dividends received) and various deductions have been eliminated or limited, including limiting the deduction for state and local taxes to $10,000 per year. Most of the changes applicable to individuals are temporary and apply only to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017 and before January 1, 2026. The top corporate income tax rate has been reduced to 21%. There are only minor changes to the REIT rules (other than the 20% deduction applicable to individuals for ordinary REIT dividends received). The TCJA makes numerous other large and small changes to the tax rules that do not affect REITs directly but may affect our stockholders and may indirectly affect us.

Stockholders are urged to consult with their tax advisors with respect to the status of the TCJA and any other regulatory or administrative developments and proposals and their potential effect on investment in our stock.

Dividends payable by REITs generally do not qualify for the reduced tax rates available for certain dividends.

The maximum tax rate applicable to “qualified dividend income” payable to U.S. stockholders taxed at individual rates is 20% plus the 3.8% surtax on net investment income, if applicable. Dividends payable by REITs, however, generally are not eligible for the reduced rates on qualified dividend income. Rather, under the recently-enacted TCJA, REIT dividends constitute “qualified business income” and thus a 20% deduction is available to individual taxpayers with respect to such dividends, resulting in a 29.6% maximum federal tax rate (plus the 3.8% surtax on net investment income, if applicable) for individual U.S. stockholders. Additionally, without further legislative action, the 20% deduction applicable to REIT dividends will expire on January 1, 2026. The more favorable rates applicable to regular corporate qualified dividends could cause investors who are taxed at individual rates to perceive investments in REITs to be relatively less attractive than investments in the stocks of non-REIT corporations that pay dividends, which could adversely affect the value of the shares of REITs, including our stock.

Distributions to tax-exempt investors may be classified as unrelated business taxable income and tax-exempt investors would be required to pay tax on the unrelated business taxable income and to file income tax returns.

Neither ordinary nor capital gain distributions with respect to our stock nor gain from the sale of stock should generally constitute unrelated business taxable income to a tax-exempt investor. However, there are certain exceptions to this rule. In particular:

under certain circumstances, part of the income and gain recognized by certain qualified employee pension trusts with respect to our stock may be treated as unrelated business taxable income if our stock is predominately held by qualified employee pension trusts, such that we are a “pension-held” REIT (which we do not expect to be the case);
part of the income and gain recognized by a tax exempt investor with respect to our stock would constitute unrelated business taxable income if such investor incurs debt in order to acquire the stock; and
part or all of the income or gain recognized with respect to our stock held by social clubs, voluntary employee benefit associations, supplemental unemployment benefit trusts and qualified group legal services plans which are exempt from federal income taxation under Sections 501(c)(7), (9), (17) or (20) of the Code may be treated as unrelated business taxable income.

We encourage you to consult your tax advisor to determine the tax consequences applicable to you if you are a tax-exempt investor.

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Benefit Plan Risks Under ERISA or the Code

If you fail to meet the fiduciary and other standards under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended or the Code as a result of an investment in our stock, you could be subject to criminal and civil liabilities and penalties.

Special considerations apply to the purchase of stock or holding of Warrants by employee benefit plans subject to the fiduciary rules of Title I of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (“ERISA”), including pension or profit sharing plans and entities that hold assets of such plans, which we refer to as ERISA Plans, and plans and accounts that are not subject to ERISA, but are subject to the prohibited transaction rules of Section 4975 of the Code, including IRAs, Keogh Plans, and medical savings accounts. (Collectively, we refer to ERISA Plans and plans subject to Section 4975 of the Code as “Benefit Plans” or “Benefit Plan Investors”). If you are investing the assets of any Benefit Plan, you should consider whether:

your investment will be consistent with your fiduciary obligations under ERISA and the Code;
your investment will be made in accordance with the documents and instruments governing the Benefit Plan, including the Benefit Plan’s investment policy;
your investment will satisfy the prudence and diversification requirements of Sections 404(a)(1)(B) and 404(a)(1)(C) of ERISA, if applicable, and other applicable provisions of ERISA and the Code;
your investment will impair the liquidity of the Benefit Plan;
your investment will produce “unrelated business taxable income” for the Benefit Plan;
you will be able to value the assets of the plan annually in accordance with ERISA requirements and applicable provisions of the Benefit Plan;
you will be able to satisfy plan liquidity requirements as there may be only a limited market to sell or otherwise dispose of our stock; and
your investment will constitute a non-exempt prohibited transaction under Section 406 of ERISA or Section 4975 of the Code.

Failure to satisfy the fiduciary standards of conduct and other applicable requirements of ERISA and the Code may result in the imposition of civil and criminal penalties, and can subject the fiduciary to personal liability for claims for damages or for equitable remedies. In addition, if an investment in our stock or holding of Warrants constitutes a prohibited transaction under ERISA or the Code, the fiduciary or IRA owner who authorized or directed the investment may be subject to the imposition of excise taxes with respect to the amount invested. In the case of a prohibited transaction involving an IRA owner, the IRA may be disqualified and all of the assets of the IRA may be deemed distributed and subjected to tax. Benefit Plan Investors should consult with counsel before making an investment in our securities.

Plans that are not subject to ERISA or the prohibited transactions of the Code, such as government plans or church plans, may be subject to similar requirements under state law. The fiduciaries of such plans should satisfy themselves that the investment satisfies applicable law.

For additional discussion of significant factors that make an investment in our shares risky, see the Liquidity and Capital Resources Section under Item 7. — Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Conditions and Results of Operations of this report.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

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Item 2. Properties

As of December31, 2017, we owned interests in thirty-nine real estate properties, twenty-eight consolidated operating properties and eleven through preferred equity and mezzanine loan investments. Of the property interests held through preferred equity and mezzanine loan investments, six are under development, four are in leaseup and one property is stabilized. The following tables provide summary information regarding our consolidated operating properties and preferred equity and mezzanine loan investments.

Consolidated Operating Properties

         
Multifamily Community, Name, Location   Number of Units   Year Built/Renovated(1)   Ownership Interest   Average Rent(2)   Occupancy
%(3)
ARIUM at Palmer Ranch, Sarasota, FL     320       2016       95.0 %    $ 1,251       97 % 
ARIUM Glenridge, formerly Nevadan, Atlanta, GA     480       1990       90.0 %      1,120       94 % 
ARIUM Grandewood, Orlando, FL     306       2005       100.0 %      1,298       97 % 
ARIUM Gulfshore, Naples, FL     368       2016       95.0 %      1,272       99 % 
ARIUM Hunter’s Creek, Orlando, FL     532       1999       100.0 %      1,310       98 % 
ARIUM Metrowest, Orlando, FL     510       2001       100.0 %      1,273       98 % 
ARIUM Palms, Orlando, FL     252       2008       95.0 %      1,306       97 % 
ARIUM Pine Lakes, Port St. Lucie, FL     320       2003       85.0 %      1,182       96 % 
ARIUM Westside, Atlanta, GA     336       2008       90.0 %      1,500       94 % 
Ashton Reserve, Charlotte, NC     473       2015       100.0 %      1,062       93 % 
Citrus Tower, Orlando, FL     336       2006       96.8 %      1,225       93 % 
Enders at Baldwin Park, Orlando, FL     220       2003       92.0 %      1,643       97 % 
James on South First, Austin, TX     250       2016       90.0 %      1,228       92 % 
Marquis at Crown Ridge, San Antonio, TX     352       2009       90.0 %      946       92 % 
Marquis at Stone Oak, San Antonio, TX     335       2007       90.0 %      1,352       94 % 
Marquis at the Cascades, Tyler, TX     582       2009       90.0 %      1,075       92 % 
Marquis at TPC, San Antonio, TX     139       2008       90.0 %      1,308       95 % 
Outlook at Greystone, Birmingham, AL     300       2007       100.0 %      936       90 % 
Park & Kingston, Charlotte, NC     168       2015       100.0 %      1,234       94 % 
Preston View, Morrisville, NC     382       2000       100.0 %      1,068       93 % 
Roswell City Walk, Roswell, GA     320       2015       98.0 %      1,482       95 % 
Sorrel, Frisco, TX     352       2015       95.0 %      1,175       95 % 
Sovereign, Fort Worth, TX     322       2015       95.0 %      1,308       93 % 
The Brodie, Austin, TX     324       2001       92.5 %      1,218       91 % 
The Mills, Greenville, SC     304       2013       100.0 %      1,085       89 % 
The Preserve at Henderson Beach, Destin, FL     340       2009       100.0 %      1,338       91 % 
Villages at Cypress Creek, Houston, TX     384       2001       80.0 %      1,056       95 % 
Wesley Village, Charlotte, NC     301       2010       100.0 %      1,285       90 % 
Total/Average     9,608                 $ 1,222       94 % 

(1) Represents date of last significant renovation or year built if no renovations.
(2) Represents the average effective monthly rent per occupied unit for all occupied units for the three months ended December 31, 2017. Total concessions for the three months ended December 31, 2017 amounted to approximately $0.9 million.
(3) Percent occupied is calculated as (i) the number of units occupied as of December 31, 2017, divided by (ii) total number of units, expressed as a percentage.

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Preferred Equity and Mezzanine Loan Investments

             
Multifamily Community Name, Location   Number of Units   Total
Estimated Construction Cost
(in millions)
  Cost to Date (in millions)   Estimated Construction Cost Per Unit   Actual/ Anticipated Initial Occupancy   Anticipated Construction Completion   Pro Forma Average Rent(1)
Whetstone, Durham,
NC
    204     $ 37.0     $ 37.0     $ 181,478       3Q14       3Q15     $ 1,260  
Alexan CityCentre, Houston, TX     340     $ 83.2     $ 80.8     $ 244,706       2Q17       4Q17     $ 2,144  
Helios, Atlanta, GA     282     $ 51.4     $ 50.1     $ 182,270       2Q17       4Q17     $ 1,486  
Alexan Southside Place, Houston, TX     270     $ 49.0     $ 44.8     $ 181,481       4Q17       2Q18     $ 2,012  
Lake Boone Trail, Raleigh, NC     245     $ 40.2     $ 30.5     $ 164,082       3Q17       4Q18     $ 1,271  
Vickers Village, Roswell, GA     79     $ 30.7     $ 20.9     $ 388,608       3Q18       4Q18     $ 3,176  
APOK Townhomes, Boca Raton, FL     90     $ 28.9     $ 15.6     $ 321,111       3Q18       1Q19     $ 2,549  
Crescent Perimeter, Atlanta, GA     320     $ 70.0     $ 35.0     $ 218,750       4Q18       2Q19     $ 1,749  
Domain, Garland, TX     299     $ 52.6     $ 22.3     $ 175,920       4Q18       2Q19     $ 1,469  
West Morehead, Charlotte, NC     286     $ 60.0     $ 30.5     $ 209,790       4Q18       2Q19     $ 1,507  
Flagler Village, Fort Lauderdale, FL     385     $ 140.4     $ 29.5     $ 364,675       3Q19       3Q20     $ 2,352  
Total     2,800                                                  $ 1,815  

(1) Represents the average pro forma effective monthly rent per occupied unit for all expected occupied units upon stabilization.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings

We are not party to, and none of our properties are subject to, any material pending legal proceeding.

Item 4. Mining Safety Disclosures

None.

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PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Market Information

Our shares of Class A common stock are traded on the NYSE American, formerly referred to as NYSE MKT, under the symbol “BRG.”

On February 6, 2018, the closing price of our Class A common stock, as reported on the NYSE American, was $7.46.

The following table sets forth the high and low intraday sale prices of our Class A common stock, as reported on the NYSE American, for each calendar quarter in the last two fiscal years, as reported on the NYSE American, and the distributions paid by us with respect to those periods.

     
Quarter Ended   High   Low   Distributions(1)
March 31, 2016   $ 12.14     $ 9.06     $ 0.290  
June 30, 2016   $ 13.03     $ 10.65     $ 0.290  
September 30, 2016   $ 13.90     $ 12.26     $ 0.290  
December 31, 2016   $ 14.77     $ 11.40     $ 0.290  
March 31, 2017   $ 14.14     $ 11.25     $ 0.290  
June 30, 2017   $ 13.26     $ 11.95     $ 0.290  
September 30, 2017   $ 13.77     $ 9.68     $ 0.290  
December 31, 2017   $ 11.81     $ 9.67     $ 0.290  

(1) Distribution information is for distributions declared with respect to that quarter.

On December 20, 2017, our board of directors authorized, and we declared dividends for the first quarter of 2018 equal to a quarterly rate of $0.1625 per share on our Class A common stock and Class C common stock, payable to the stockholders of record as of March 23, 2018, which will be payable in cash on April 5, 2018. Holders of OP and LTIP Units are entitled to receive “distribution equivalents” at the same time as dividends are paid to holders of our Class A common stock.

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On January 12, 2018, our board of directors authorized, and we declared monthly dividends for the first quarter of 2018 equal to a monthly rate of $5.00 per share on our Series B Preferred Stock, payable monthly to the stockholders of record as of January 25, 2018, February 23, 2018 and March 23, 2018, which was paid in cash on February 5, 2018, and which will be paid in cash on March 5, 2018 and April 5, 2018, respectively.

[GRAPHIC MISSING]

                 
Period Ending
Index   04/02/14   06/30/14   12/31/14   06/30/15   12/31/15   06/30/16   12/31/16   06/30/17   12/31/17
Bluerock Residential Growth REIT, Inc     100.00       89.77       88.62       94.28       92.60       107.22       118.18       118.29       96.03  
Russell 3000 Index     100.00       103.72       109.17       111.29       109.69       113.66       123.66       135.64       149.79  
Russell 2000 Index     100.00       100.35       102.01       106.86       97.50       99.66       118.28       125.04       135.60  
SNL U.S. REIT Equity Index     100.00       106.27       116.89       110.65       120.11       136.71       130.79       138.56       141.37  
MSCI U.S. REIT Index     100.00       106.44       117.92       110.62       120.89       137.28       131.29       136.34       137.95  

Stockholder Information

As of February 6, 2018, we had approximately 24,257,551 shares of Class A common stock outstanding held by a total of 506 stockholders, one of which is the holder for all beneficial owners who hold in street name.

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Distributions

Future distributions paid by the Company will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon the actual cash flow of the Company, its financial condition, capital requirements, the annual distribution requirements under the REIT provisions of the Code and such other factors as our board of directors deems relevant.

Distributions paid on our Class A common shares, Class C common shares and our Class B-3 common shares (all of which were converted to Class A common stock on March 17, 2016), and OP Units and LTIP Units that are entitled to receive distribution equivalents when dividends are paid on the common stock, by quarter for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively, were as follows (amounts in thousands, except per share amounts):

   
  Distributions
     Declared Per
Share
  Total Paid
2016
                 
First Quarter   $ 0.290     $ 6,030  
Second Quarter     0.290       6,082  
Third Quarter     0.290       6,111  
Fourth Quarter     0.290       6,214  
Total   $ 1.160     $ 24,437  
2017
                 
First Quarter   $ 0.290     $ 7,130  
Second Quarter     0.290       7,628  
Third Quarter     0.290       7,721  
Fourth Quarter     0.290       8,219  
Total   $ 1.160     $ 30,698  
2018
 
First Quarter(1)   $ 0.1625     $  

(1) On December 20, 2017, our board of directors authorized, and we declared dividends for the first quarter of 2018 equal to a quarterly rate of $0.1625 per share on our Class A common stock and Class C common stock, payable to the stockholders of record as of March 23, 2018, which will be payable in cash on April 5, 2018. Holders of OP and LTIP Units are entitled to receive “distribution equivalents” at the same time as dividends are paid to holders of our Class A common stock. A portion of each dividend may constitute a return of capital for tax purposes. There is no assurance that we will continue to declare dividends or at this rate.

On January 12, 2018, our board of directors authorized, and we declared monthly dividends for the first quarter of 2018 equal to monthly rate of $5.00 per share on our Series B Preferred Stock, payable monthly to the stockholders of record as of January 25, 2018, February 23, 2018 and March 23, 2018, which was paid in cash on February 5, 2018, and which will be paid in cash on March 5, 2018 and April 5, 2018, respectively.

Distributions paid for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015, respectively, were funded from cash provided by operating activities except with respect to $4,824,000, $3,283,000, and $5,524,000, respectively, which was funded from sales of real estate, borrowings, and/or proceeds from our equity offerings.

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Although we may use alternative sources of cash to fund distributions in a given period, we expect that distribution requirements for an entire year will be met with cash flows from operating activities.

     
  Year Ended December 31,
     2017   2016   2015
     (In thousands)
Cash provided by operating activities   $ 54,247     $ 34,444     $ 16,708  
Cash distributions to preferred stockholders     (26,042 )      (9,664 )       
Cash distributions to common stockholders     (29,583 )      (24,437 )      (20,127 ) 
Cash distributions to noncontrolling interests, excluding $27.9 million from sale of real estate investments     (3,446 )      (3,626 )      (2,105 ) 
Total distributions   $ (59,071 )    $ (37,727 )    $ (22,232 ) 
Shortfall   $ (4,824 )    $ (3,283 )    $ (5,524 ) 
Proceeds from sale of joint venture interests   $ 17,603     $ 20,521     $  
Proceeds from sale of real estate assets   $     $ 36,675     $ 17,862  
Proceeds from sale of real estate assets, net of noncontrolling distributions of $27.9 million   $ 44,028     $     $  
Proceeds from sale of unconsolidated real estate joint venture interests   $     $     $ 15,590  

Equity Compensation Plans

Incentive Plans

The Company’s incentive plans were originally adopted by our board of directors on December 16, 2013, and approved by our stockholders on January 23, 2014, as the 2014 Equity Incentive Plan for Individuals (the “2014 Individuals Plan”) and the 2014 Equity Incentive Plan for Entities (the “2014 Entities Plan,” and together with the 2014 Individuals Plan, the “2014 Incentive Plans”). The 2014 Incentive Plans were subsequently amended and restated by the Amended and Restated 2014 Equity Incentive Plan for Individuals (the “Amended 2014 Individuals Plan”), and the Amended and Restated 2014 Equity Incentive Plan for Entities (the “Amended 2014 Entities Plan,” and together with the Amended 2014 Individuals Plan, the “Amended 2014 Incentive Plans”) as adopted by our board of directors on April 7, 2015 and approved by our stockholders on May 28, 2015.

On August 3, 2017 and October 18, 2017, our board of directors adopted, and on October 26, 2017 our stockholders approved, the second amendment and restatement of the 2014 Individuals Plan (the “Second Amended 2014 Individuals Plan”) and the 2014 Entities Plan (the “Second Amended 2014 Entities Plan,” and together with the Second Amended 2014 Individuals Plan, the “Second Amended 2014 Incentive Plans”), which superseded and replaced in their entirety the Amended 2014 Incentive Plans. Under the Second Amended 2014 Incentive Plans, we have reserved and authorized an aggregate number of 1,550,000 shares of our common stock for issuance. As of February 6, 2018, no shares were available for future issuance.

The purpose of the Second Amended 2014 Incentive Plans is to attract and retain independent directors, executive officers and other key employees, including officers and employees of our Operating Partnership and their affiliates, and other service providers, including, while we were externally managed, our former Manager and its affiliates. The Second Amended 2014 Incentive Plans provide for the grant of options to purchase shares of our common stock, stock awards, stock appreciation rights, performance units, incentive awards and other equity-based awards.

Administration of the Second Amended 2014 Incentive Plans

The Second Amended 2014 Incentive Plans are administered by the compensation committee of our board of directors, except that the Second Amended 2014 Incentive Plans will be administered by our board of directors with respect to awards made to directors who are not employees. This summary uses the term “administrator” to refer to the compensation committee or our board of directors, as applicable. The

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administrator will approve who will receive grants under the Second Amended 2014 Incentive Plans, determine the type of award that will be granted and will specify the number of shares of our Class A Common Stock subject to each grant.

Eligibility

Employees and officers of our Company and our affiliates (including employees of our Operating Partnership and, while we were externally managed, employees of our former Manager) and members of our board of directors are eligible to receive grants under the Second Amended 2014 Individuals Plan. In addition, individuals who provide significant services to us or an affiliate, including individuals who provide services to us or an affiliate by virtue of employment with, or providing services to, our Operating Partnership (or, while we were externally managed, the former Manager) may receive grants under the Second Amended 2014 Individuals Plan.

Entities that provide significant services to us or our affiliates, including our Operating Partnership (and, while we were externally managed, our former Manager) may receive grants under the Second Amended 2014 Entities Plan in the discretion of the administrator.

The following table provides information about our common stock that may be issued upon the exercise of options, warrants and rights under our Second Amended 2014 Incentive Plans, as of December 31, 2017.

     
Plan Category   Number of
Securities to Be
Issued Upon
Exercise of
Outstanding
Options,
Warrants, and
Rights
  Weighted-
Average
Exercise Price
of Outstanding
Options,
Warrants, and
Rights
  Number of
Securities
Remaining
Available for
Future
Issuance
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders                 1,075,000  
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders                  
Total                 1,075,000  

We have adopted a Code of Ethics for our directors, officers and employees intended to satisfy NYSE American (formerly the NYSE MKT) listing standards and the definition of a “code of ethics” set forth in Item 406 of Regulation S-K. Any information relating to amendments to our Code of Ethics or waivers of a provision of our Code of Ethics required to be disclosed pursuant to Item 5.05 of Form 8-K will be disclosed through our website.

Clawback Policy

Any award granted under the Second Amended 2014 Incentive Plans, and any payment made with respect to any such award, are subject to the condition that we may require such award to be returned, and any payment made with respect to such award to be repaid, if such action is required under the terms of any Company recoupment or “clawback” (forfeiture or repayment) policy as in effect on the date the award was granted or if recoupment is required by any law, rule, requirement or regulation.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities

We previously disclosed our issuances during the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015 of equity securities that were not registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, in our Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments thereto on Form 8-K/A, as applicable, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on February 17, 2015, February 18, 2015, May 13, 2015, May 15, 2015, July 9, 2015, August 12, 2015, August 17, 2015, September 11, 2015, September 14, 2015, November 17, 2015, November 19, 2015, December 16, 2015, February 26, 2016, March 1, 2016, May 9, 2016, May 11, 2016, August 3, 2016, August 9, 2016, November 14, 2016, February 22, 2017, May 15, 2017, August 4, 2017, August 10, 2017, November 6, 2017, and November 9, 2017 and in our Form 10-Q filed on August 8, 2016.

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Item 6. Selected Financial Data

The following table sets forth our selected consolidated financial data and should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes to the consolidated financial statements and Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”) included elsewhere in this report.

         
  Year Ended December 31,
     2017   2016   2015   2014   2013
     (In thousands, except share and per share amounts)
Operating Data:
                                            
Total revenue   $ 123,184     $ 81,041     $ 46,273     $ 31,714     $ 12,446  
Operating (loss) income     (44,647 )      (1,032 )      (1,623 )      (3,565 )      (1,125 ) 
Preferred returns and equity in income (loss) of unconsolidated real estate joint ventures     10,336       11,632       6,590       1,066       (103 ) 
Equity in gain on sale of unconsolidated real estate joint venture interests                 11,303       4,067       1,604  
Gain on sale of real estate assets     50,163       4,947       2,677              
Gain on revaluation of equity on business combination           3,761                    
Gain on sale of joint venture interests,
net
    10,262                          
(Loss) income from continuing
operations
    (7,028 )      (2,974 )      7,643       (6,674 )      (4,219 ) 
Net (loss) income     (7,028 )      (2,974 )      7,643       (6,558 )      (4,413 ) 
Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling partner interest     8,617       1,355       5,855       (1,386 )      (1,442 ) 
Preferred share dividends     (27,023 )      (13,763 )      (1,153 )             
Net (loss) income available to common stockholders     (45,679 )      (18,985 )      635       (5,172 )      (2,971 ) 
(Loss) earnings per common share, basic
                                            
Continuing operations   $ (1.79 )    $ (0.91 )    $ 0.04     $ (0.98 )    $ (2.70 ) 
Discontinued operations                       0.02       (0.19 ) 
Basic (Loss) earnings   $ (1.79 )    $ (0.91 )    $ 0.04     $ (0.96 )    $ (2.89 ) 
(Loss) earnings per common share, diluted
                                            
Continuing operations   $ (1.79 )    $ (0.91 )    $ 0.04     $ (0.98 )    $ (2.70 ) 
Discontinued operations                       0.02       (0.19 ) 
Diluted (loss) earnings   $ (1.79 )    $ (0.91 )    $ 0.04     $ (0.96 )    $ (2.89 ) 
Weighted average shares outstanding:
                                            
Basic     25,561,673       20,805,852       17,404,348       5,381,787       1,032,339  
Diluted     25,561,673       20,805,852       17,417,198       5,381,787       1,032,339  
Cash dividends declared per BRG common share   $ 1.16     $ 1.16     $ 1.16     $ 0.92     $ 0.31  
Balance Sheet Data (at December 31):
                                            
Investment in real estate (before accumulated depreciation)     1,452,759