Attached files

file filename
EX-32.0 - EX-32.0 - Meridian Bancorp, Inc.d455643dex320.htm
EX-31.2 - EX-31.2 - Meridian Bancorp, Inc.d455643dex312.htm
EX-31.1 - EX-31.1 - Meridian Bancorp, Inc.d455643dex311.htm
EX-23 - EX-23 - Meridian Bancorp, Inc.d455643dex23.htm
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-K

 

Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2017

OR

Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the transition period from                  to                 

Commission file number 001-36573

 

 

Meridian Bancorp, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Maryland   46-5396964

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

67 Prospect Street,

Peabody, Massachusetts

 

01960

Zip Code

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)  

(617) 567-1500

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of Each Class

 

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

Common Stock, $0.01 par value   The NASDAQ Stock Market, LLC

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ☑    No  ☐

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ☐    No  ☑

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ☑    No  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  ☑    No  ☐

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this form 10-K.  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large Accelerated Filer

 

          Accelerated Filer                       

 

                Non-Accelerated Filer

 

Smaller Reporting Company

 

        Emerging Growth Company  

   

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial reporting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes  ☐    No  ☑

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the Registrant, computed by reference to price at which the common equity was last sold on June 30, 2017 was $906,684,087. As of February 22, 2018, there were 54,059,992 outstanding shares of the Registrant’s common stock.

 

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the Proxy Statement for the 2018 Annual Meeting of Stockholders of the Registrant are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

MERIDIAN BANCORP, INC.

2017 FORM 10-K ANNUAL REPORT

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

         Page  
  PART I   
  Forward Looking Statements      3  

Item 1.

  Business      4  

Item 1A.

  Risk Factors      27  

Item 1B.

  Unresolved Staff Comments      39  

Item 2.

  Properties      39  

Item 3.

  Legal Proceedings      39  

Item 4.

  Mine Safety Disclosures      39  
  PART II   

Item 5.

  Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities      40  

Item 6.

  Selected Financial Data      42  

Item 7.

  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations      43  

Item 7A.

  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk      66  

Item 8.

  Financial Statements and Supplementary Data      67  

Item 9.

  Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure      119  

Item 9A.

  Controls and Procedures      119  

Item 9B.

  Other Information      119  
  PART III   
Item 10.   Directors, Executive Officers, and Corporate Governance      120  
Item 11.   Executive Compensation      120  
Item 12.   Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters      120  
Item 13.   Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence      120  
Item 14.   Principal Accounting Fees and Services      121  
  PART IV   

Item 15.

  Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules      122  

Item 16.

  Form 10-K Summary      124  

Signatures

     125  

 

2


Table of Contents

PART I

Forward Looking Statements

This report contains forward-looking statements, which can be identified by the use of words such as “estimate,” “project,” “believe,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “plan,” “seek,” “expect” and words of similar meaning. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to:

 

   

statements of our goals, intentions and expectations;

 

   

statements regarding our business plans, prospects, growth and operating strategies;

 

   

statements regarding the quality of our loan and investment portfolios; and

 

   

estimates of our risks and future costs and benefits.

These forward-looking statements are based on current beliefs and expectations of our management and are inherently subject to significant business, economic and competitive uncertainties and contingencies, many of which are beyond our control. In addition, these forward-looking statements are subject to assumptions with respect to future business strategies and decisions that are subject to change.

The following factors, among others, could cause actual results to differ materially from the anticipated results or other expectations expressed in the forward-looking statements:

 

   

general economic conditions, either nationally or in our market areas, that are worse than expected;

 

   

inflation and changes in the interest rate environment that reduce our margins and yields, our mortgage banking revenues, the fair value of financial instruments or the origination levels in our lending business, or increase the level of defaults, losses and prepayments on loans we have made and make whether held in portfolio or sold in the secondary markets;

 

   

competition among depository and other financial institutions;

 

   

changes in consumer spending, borrowing and savings habits;

 

   

our ability to enter new markets successfully and capitalize on growth opportunities;

 

   

changes in laws or government regulations or policies affecting financial institutions, including changes in regulatory fees and capital requirements;

 

   

changes in monetary or fiscal policies of the U.S. Government, including policies of the U.S. Treasury and the Federal Reserve Board;

 

   

changes in the financial condition, results of operations or future prospects of issuers of securities that we own;

 

   

changes in accounting policies and practices, as may be adopted by the bank regulatory agencies, the Financial Accounting Standards Board or the SEC;

 

   

changes in the level and trends of loan delinquencies and charge-offs and changes in estimates of the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses;

 

   

our ability to access cost-effective funding;

 

   

fluctuations in real estate values and both residential and commercial real estate market conditions;

 

   

demand for loans and deposits in our market area;

 

   

our ability to implement changes in our business strategies;

 

   

adverse changes in the securities or secondary mortgage markets;

 

   

our ability to manage market risk, credit risk and operational risk in the current economic conditions;

 

   

failure or breaches of our IT security systems;

 

3


Table of Contents
   

our ability to successfully integrate any assets, liabilities, customers, systems and management personnel we have acquired or may acquire into our operations and our ability to realize related revenue synergies and cost savings within expected time frames and any goodwill charges related thereto;

 

   

technological changes that may be more difficult or expensive than expected;

 

   

the ability of third-party providers to perform their obligations to us;

 

   

the ability of the U.S. Government to manage federal debt limits;

 

   

our ability to successfully introduce new products and services;

 

   

our ability to retain key employees; and

 

   

significant increases in our loan losses.

Because of these and other uncertainties, our actual future results may be materially different from the results indicated by these forward-looking statements. Please see “Risk Factors” beginning on page 27.

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

Meridian Bancorp, Inc.

Meridian Bancorp, Inc. (the “Company”) is a Maryland corporation that was incorporated in 2014. The Company owns all of East Boston Savings Bank’s stock and directs, plans and coordinates East Boston Savings Bank’s business activities. The Company is the successor to East Boston Savings Bank’s previous holding company, Meridian Interstate Bancorp, Inc. (“Old Meridian”), and was formed as a result of a second-step mutual-to-stock conversion (the “Conversion”) of Meridian Financial Services, Incorporated, (the “MHC”), the top tier mutual holding company of Old Meridian. The Conversion was completed in 2014 at which point, the MHC and Meridian Interstate Funding Corporation were merged into Old Meridian (and ceased to exist), and Old Meridian merged into the Company. The Company sold 32,500,000 shares of common stock at $10.00 per share in the second-step stock offering. The Company utilized $16.3 million of the proceeds to fund an additional loan to its Employee Stock Ownership Plan (“ESOP”) for the acquisition of 1,625,000 shares at $10.00 per share, representing 5% of the shares sold in the second-step offering, and incurred expenses in connection with the offer and sale of the common stock totaling $6.5 million, resulting in net cash proceeds to the Company of $302.3 million. The Company invested $159.3 million of the net proceeds it received from the sale into East Boston Savings Bank and has retained the remaining amount for general corporate purposes. Concurrent with the completion of the stock offering, each share of Old Meridian common stock owned by public stockholders (stockholders other than the MHC) was exchanged for 2.4484 shares of Company common stock. A total of 22,200,316 shares of Company common stock were issued in the exchange.

On December 29, 2017, the Company completed its acquisition of Meetinghouse Bancorp, Inc. (“Meetinghouse”), the holding company for Meetinghouse Bank, a Massachusetts stock co-operative bank, with two full-service branches that were then merged into East Boston Savings Bank. The Meetinghouse acquisition added $120.4 million in total assets at fair value, including $75.7 million in loans and $93.8 million in deposits. The Company paid total cash consideration of $17.8 million, or $26.00 for each outstanding share of Meetinghouse common stock. Refer to Note 14, Acquisition, in Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 Financial Statements and Supplementary Data within this report for further information regarding the Meetinghouse acquisition.

East Boston Savings Bank

East Boston Savings Bank (the “Bank”) is a Massachusetts-chartered stock savings bank, founded in 1848, that conducts its business from 33 full-service locations, one mobile branch and three loan centers in the greater Boston metropolitan area. We offer a variety of deposit and loan products to individuals and businesses located in our primary market, which consists of Suffolk, Norfolk, Middlesex and Essex Counties, Massachusetts. We attract deposits from the general public and use those funds to originate one- to four-family real estate, multi-family and commercial real estate, construction, commercial and industrial, and consumer loans, which we primarily hold for investment. Our lending business also involves the purchase and sale of loan participation interests.

 

4


Table of Contents

Available Information

The Company is a public company and files interim, quarterly and annual reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission. These respective reports are on file and a matter of public record with the Securities and Exchange Commission and may be read and copied at the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549 during the hours of 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on official business days. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the Securities and Exchange Commission at 1-800-SEC-0330. The Securities and Exchange Commission maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC (http://www.sec.gov).

The Company’s executive offices are located at 67 Prospect Street, Peabody, Massachusetts 01960, and our telephone number is (617) 567-1500. The Company’s website address is www.ebsb.com. Our public reports are available, free of charge, on our website as soon or reasonably practical after they are with or furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission. Information on this website is not and should not be considered to be a part of this report.

Market Area

We consider the greater Boston metropolitan area to be our primary market area. While our primary deposit-gathering area is concentrated in the greater Boston metropolitan area, our lending area encompasses a broader market that includes most of eastern Massachusetts, including Cape Cod, and portions of southeastern New Hampshire, Maine and Rhode Island. We conduct our operations through our 33 full-service offices, one mobile branch and three loan centers located in the following counties, all of which are located in the greater Boston metropolitan area: Essex (five offices and two loan centers), Middlesex (seven offices), Suffolk (19 offices and one loan center) and Norfolk (two offices). The greater Boston metropolitan area is the 10th largest metropolitan area in the United States. Located adjacent to major transportation corridors, the Boston metropolitan area provides a highly diversified economic base, with major employment sectors ranging from services, manufacturing and wholesale retail trade, to finance, technology and medical care. The largest employment sector, however, is health care and social services, accounting for 16.8% of businesses in Massachusetts. Based on data from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, the unemployment rate for Massachusetts increased to 3.1% in December 2017 as compared to 2.8% in December 2016. Home prices in Massachusetts rose at an annual rate of 5.8% in the third quarter of 2017 as compared to 5.9% for the third quarter of 2016.

Competition

We face significant competition for the attraction of deposits and origination of loans. Our most direct competition for deposits has historically come from the many financial institutions operating in our market area and, to a lesser extent, from other financial service companies such as brokerage firms and insurance companies. Several large holding companies operate banks in our market area. These institutions are significantly larger than us and, therefore, have greater resources. We also face competition for investors’ funds from money market funds, mutual funds and other corporate and government securities. Based on data from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) as of June 30, 2017 (the latest date for which information is available), the Bank had 1.22% of the deposit market share within the Boston-Cambridge-Quincey, Massachusetts — New Hampshire metropolitan statistical area, giving us the 11th largest market share in our metropolitan statistical area out of 131 financial institutions in our metropolitan statistical area as of that date.

Our competition for loans comes from financial institutions in our market area and from other financial service providers, such as mortgage companies and mortgage brokers. Competition for loans also comes from the increasing number of non-depository financial service companies entering the mortgage market, such as insurance companies, securities companies and specialty finance companies. Some of our competitors offer products and services that we do not offer, such as insurance services, trust services, wealth management and asset-based financing.

 

5


Table of Contents

Lending Activities

Commercial Real Estate Loans. At December 31, 2017, commercial real estate loans were $2.064 billion, or 44.2%, of our total loan portfolio, including $14.1 million of commercial real estate loans acquired in the Meetinghouse acquisition. The commercial real estate loan portfolio consisted of $649.2 million of fixed-rate loans and $1.415 billion of adjustable-rate loans at December 31, 2017. Our commercial real estate loans are generally secured by properties used for business purposes such as office buildings, industrial facilities and retail facilities. At December 31, 2017, $331.8 million of our commercial real estate portfolio was owner occupied commercial real estate, and the remaining $1.732 billion was secured by income producing, or non-owner occupied commercial real estate. We intend to continue to grow our commercial real estate loan portfolio while maintaining prudent underwriting standards. In addition to originating these loans, we also participate in loans with other financial institutions.

We originate a variety of fixed- and adjustable-rate commercial real estate loans for terms and amortization periods up to 30 years, which may include balloon loans. Interest rates and payments on our adjustable-rate loans adjust every three, five, seven or ten years and generally are adjusted to a rate equal to a percentage above the corresponding U.S. Treasury rate or Federal Home Loan Bank borrowing rate. Most of our adjustable-rate commercial real estate loans adjust every five years and amortize over terms of 20 to 25 years. We also include prepayment penalties on loans we originate. Loan amounts generally do not exceed 75% to 80% of the property’s appraised value at the time the loan is originated. In addition, borrowers are generally required by policy to have a minimum income to debt service ratio of 1.20x. We require independent appraisals or evaluations on all loans secured by commercial real estate from an approved appraisers list. We require most of our commercial real estate loan borrowers to submit annual financial statements and/or rent rolls on the subject property. These properties may also be subject to annual inspections to support that appropriate maintenance is being performed by the owner/borrower. Our policy is to review all commercial real estate loans over $1 million at least annually along with each commercial real estate borrower and, as applicable, each guarantor. The loan and its borrowers and/or guarantors are subject to an annual risk review verifying that the loan is properly risk rated based upon covenant compliance and other terms as provided for in the loan agreements. While this process does not prevent loans from becoming delinquent, it provides us with the opportunity to better identify problem loans in a timely manner and to work with the borrower prior to the loan becoming delinquent.

The following table provides information with respect to our commercial real estate loans by type at December 31, 2017:

 

                                                 
       Amount        Percent  
       (Dollars in thousands)  

Accommodations

     $ 153,069          7.4

Industrial/Warehouse

       460,286          22.3  

Mixed use

       147,187          7.1  

Office building

       532,075          25.8  

Office condominium

       20,129          1.0  

Restaurant

       6,324          0.3  

Retail

       466,998          22.6  

Other

       277,713          13.5  
    

 

 

      

 

 

 
     $ 2,063,781          100.0
    

 

 

      

 

 

 

If we foreclose on a commercial real estate loan, the marketing and liquidation period to convert the real estate asset to cash can be lengthy with substantial holding costs. In addition, vacancies, deferred maintenance, repairs and market stigma can result in prospective buyers expecting sale price concessions to offset their real or perceived economic losses for the time it takes them to return the property to profitability. Depending on the individual circumstances, initial charge-offs and subsequent losses on commercial real estate loans can be unpredictable and substantial.

 

6


Table of Contents

The average outstanding loan size in our commercial real estate portfolio was $2.9 million as of December 31, 2017. We currently target new individual commercial real estate loan originations to owners and investors in our market area and generally originate loans to one borrower up to $75.0 million. We generally do not make commercial real estate loans outside our primary market areas. Our largest single commercial real estate relationship at December 31, 2017 totaled $95.9 million. These loans are secured by office buildings. Our next largest borrowing relationship at December 31, 2017 was for $86.9 million and is secured by office buildings. The third largest relationship was for $76.8 million at December 31, 2017 and is secured by industrial/warehouse properties. At December 31, 2017, all of these loans were performing in accordance with their repayment terms.

One- to Four-Family Residential Loans. Our one- to four-family residential loan portfolio consists of mortgage loans that enable borrowers to purchase or refinance existing homes, most of which serve as the primary residence of the owner. At December 31, 2017, one- to four-family residential loans were $603.7 million, or 12.9% of our total loan portfolio, including $46.0 million of one- to four-family residential loans acquired in the Meetinghouse acquisition. The one- to four-family residential portfolio consists of $86.3 million and $517.4 million of fixed-rate and adjustable-rate loans, respectively, at December 31, 2017. We generally offer fixed-rate loans and adjustable-rate loans with terms up to 30 years. Generally, our fixed-rate loans conform to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac underwriting guidelines and those with longer terms (more than 10 years) are originated with the intention to sell. Our adjustable-rate mortgage loans generally adjust annually or every three years after an initial fixed period that ranges from three to ten years. Management has the intent and ability to hold the remaining fixed-rate loans in our loan portfolio for the foreseeable future or until maturity or pay-off. Interest rates and payments on our adjustable-rate loans generally are adjusted to a rate equal to a percentage above the one or three year U.S. Treasury index. Depending on the loan type, the maximum amount by which the interest rate may be increased or decreased is generally 2% per adjustment period and the lifetime interest rate caps range from 2% to 6% over the initial interest rate of the loan. Our residential loans generally do not have prepayment penalties.

Borrower demand for adjustable-rate compared to fixed-rate loans is a function of the level of interest rates, the expectations of changes in the level of interest rates, and the difference between the interest rates and loan fees offered for fixed-rate mortgage loans as compared to the interest rates and loan fees for adjustable-rate loans. The relative amount of fixed-rate and adjustable-rate mortgage loans that can be originated at any time is largely determined by the demand for each in a competitive environment. The loan fees, interest rates and other provisions of mortgage loans are determined by us on the basis of our own pricing criteria and competitive market conditions.

While one- to four-family residential real estate loans are normally originated with up to 30-year terms, such loans typically remain outstanding for substantially shorter periods because borrowers often prepay their loans in full either upon sale of the property pledged as security or upon refinancing the original loan. Therefore, average loan maturity is a function of, among other factors, the level of purchase and sale activity in the real estate market, prevailing interest rates and the interest rates payable on outstanding loans. We do not offer loans with negative amortization and generally do not offer interest-only, one- to four-family residential real estate loans. Additionally, our current practice is generally (1) to sell to the secondary market newly originated longer-term (terms of 10 years or greater) fixed-rate, one- to four-family residential real estate loans, and (2) to hold in our portfolio shorter-term, fixed-rate loans and adjustable-rate loans. We sell residential real estate loans in the secondary market primarily with servicing released. We also sell loans to Fannie Mae, the Federal Home Loan Bank Mortgage Partnership Finance Program and other investors with servicing retained.

We will make loans with loan-to-value ratios up to 95% (100% for first time home buyers) with such value measured at origination; however, we generally require private mortgage insurance for loans with a loan-to-value ratio over 80%. We require all properties securing mortgage loans to be appraised by a licensed real estate appraiser. We generally require title insurance on all first mortgage loans. Borrowers must obtain hazard insurance, and flood insurance is required for loans on properties located in a flood zone.

In an effort to provide financing for first-time buyers, we offer fixed-rate 30-year residential real estate loans through the Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency First Time Home Buyer Program. We offer mortgage

 

7


Table of Contents

loans through this program to qualified individuals and originate the loans using modified underwriting guidelines and loan conditions.

We also offer adjustable-rate loans secured by one- to four-family properties that are not owner-occupied. Non-owner-occupied one- to four-family residential loans generally can be made with a loan-to-value ratio of up to 75% with such value measured at origination. At December 31, 2017, these loans totaled $190.6 million. Non-owner-occupied residential loans can have higher risk of loss than owner-occupied residential loans, as payment on such loans often depends on successful operation and management of the properties. In addition, non-owner-occupied residential borrowers may be more willing to default on a loan than an owner-occupied residential borrower as the non-owner-occupied residential borrower would not be losing his or her residence.

Multi-Family Real Estate Loans. At December 31, 2017, multi-family real estate loans were $779.6 million, or 16.7% of our total loan portfolio, including $2.5 million of multi-family real estate loans acquired in the Meetinghouse acquisition. The multi-family loan portfolio consisted of $36.0 million of fixed-rate loans and $743.6 million of adjustable-rate loans at December 31, 2017. Our multi-family real estate loans are generally secured by apartment buildings. We intend to continue to grow our multi-family loan portfolio, while maintaining prudent underwriting standards. In addition to originating these loans, we also participate in loans with other financial institutions.

We originate a variety of adjustable-rate, multi-family real estate loans for terms up to 30 years. Interest rates and payments on our adjustable-rate loans adjust every three, five, seven or ten years and generally are adjusted to a rate equal to a percentage above the corresponding U.S. Treasury rate or Federal Home Loan Bank borrowing rate. Most of our adjustable-rate multi-family real estate loans adjust every five years and amortize over terms of 20 to 25 years. We also include prepayment penalties on loans we originate. Loan amounts generally do not exceed 75% to 80% of the property’s appraised value at the time the loan is originated. Borrowers are generally required by policy to have a minimum income to debt service ratio of 1.20x. We require most of our multi-family real estate loan borrowers to submit annual financial statements and/or rent rolls on the subject property. These properties may also be subject to annual inspections to support that appropriate maintenance is being performed by the owner/borrower.

If we foreclose on a multi-family real estate loan, the marketing and liquidation period to convert the real estate asset to cash can be lengthy with substantial holding costs. In addition, vacancies, deferred maintenance, repairs and market stigma can result in prospective buyers expecting sale price concessions to offset their real or perceived economic losses for the time it takes them to return the property to profitability. Depending on the individual circumstances, initial charge-offs and subsequent losses on multi-family real estate loans can be unpredictable and substantial.

The average outstanding loan size in our multi-family real estate portfolio was $1.8 million as of December 31, 2017. We currently target new individual multi-family real estate loan originations to owners and investors in our market area and generally originate loans to one borrower up to $75.0 million.

We generally do not make multi-family real estate loans outside our primary market areas.

Our largest multi-family real estate relationship at December 31, 2017 totaled $50.2 million and originated in 2016. Our next largest multi-family borrowing relationship at December 31, 2017 was for $47.7 million and the third largest multi-family borrowing relationship was for $37.1 million. Each relationship is secured by apartment buildings. At December 31, 2017, all of these loans were performing in accordance with their terms.

Construction Loans. Historically, we have invested a significant portion of our loan portfolio in construction loans for commercial real estate, multi-family properties and one- to four-family residential developments. Although well diversified with respect to price ranges and borrowers, our construction loans are significantly concentrated in the greater Boston metropolitan area. At December 31, 2017, construction loans were $641.3 million, or 13.7% of our total loan portfolio, including $2.0 million of construction loans acquired in the Meetinghouse acquisition.

We primarily make construction loans for commercial development projects, including apartment buildings, condominiums, small industrial buildings and retail and office buildings. Most of our construction loans provide

 

8


Table of Contents

for the payment of only interest during the construction phase, which is usually up to 12 to 36 months, although some construction loans are renewed, generally for one or two additional years. At the end of the construction phase, the loan may convert to a permanent mortgage loan or the loan may be paid in full. Loans generally can be made with a maximum loan-to-value ratio of 80% of the discounted appraised market value upon completion of the project. As appropriate to the underwriting, a “discounted cash flow analysis” is utilized. Before making a commitment to fund a construction loan, we require an appraisal of the property by an independent licensed appraiser. We also will generally require an inspection of the property before disbursement of funds during the term of the construction loan.

We also originate construction and site development loans to contractors and builders to finance the construction of single-family homes and subdivisions. While we may originate these loans whether or not the collateral property underlying the loan is under contract for sale, we consider each project carefully in light of current residential real estate market conditions. We actively monitor the number of unsold homes in our construction loan portfolio and local housing markets to attempt to maintain an appropriate balance between home sales and new loan originations. The maximum number of speculative loans (loans that are not pre-sold) approved for each builder is based on a combination of factors, including the financial capacity of the builder, the market demand for the finished product and the ratio of sold to unsold inventory the builder maintains. We have attempted to diversify the risk associated with speculative construction lending by doing business with a large number of experienced small and mid-sized builders within our market area.

We regularly monitor the construction loan portfolio and the economic conditions and housing inventory in each of our markets and increase or decrease this type of lending as we observe market conditions change. We believe that the underwriting policies and internal monitoring systems we have in place have helped to mitigate some of the risks inherent in construction and land lending.

The composition of our construction portfolio at December 31, 2017 is as follows.

 

                                                 
       Amount        Percent  
       (Dollars in thousands)  

Condominium

     $ 166,834          26.0

One- to four-family residential real estate

       44,757          7.0  

Apartment

       96,166          15.0  

Commercial real estate

       33,702          5.2  

Mixed use

       33,405          5.2  

Accommodations

       62,280          9.7  

Retail

       63,016          9.8  

Office building

       110,733          17.3  

Land

       22,873          3.6  

Other

       7,540          1.2  
    

 

 

      

 

 

 
     $ 641,306          100.0
    

 

 

      

 

 

 

Our largest construction loan relationship at December 31, 2017 totaled $55.4 million. This relationship is secured by hotel properties. The next largest construction borrowing relationship at December 31, 2017 was for $51.6 million and is secured by office buildings. The third largest construction loan relationship was for $40.5 million. This relationship is secured by apartment buildings. At December 31, 2017, all of these loans were performing in accordance with their terms.

Commercial and Industrial Loans. At December 31, 2017, commercial and industrial loans were $525.6 million, or 11.3% of our total loan portfolio, including $2.1 million of commercial and industrial loans acquired in the Meetinghouse acquisition, and we intend to increase the amount of commercial and industrial loans that we originate. A significant portion of our commercial and industrial loans consists of our direct purchase of tax-exempt bonds issued by non-profit organizations (primarily educational and health organizations) and manufacturers through programs sponsored by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the states of Maine and New Hampshire. We underwrite these bonds in substantially the same manner as our other commercial and

 

9


Table of Contents

industrial loans. At December 31, 2017, tax exempt bonds included in our commercial and industrial loan portfolio were $284.8 million, or 54.2% of our total commercial and industrial loans at that date. A portion of our commercial and industrial loans is secured by owner-occupied commercial real estate. We make commercial and industrial loans primarily in our market area to a variety of professionals, sole proprietorships, nonprofit organizations and small businesses. However, the primary source of repayment for all of our commercial and industrial loans is income from the underlying business. As part of our relationship driven focus, we require many of our commercial and industrial borrowers to maintain their primary deposit accounts with us, which enhances our interest rate spread and overall profitability.

Commercial lending products include term loans and revolving lines of credit. Commercial loans and lines of credit are made with either variable or fixed rates of interest. Variable rates are based on the Prime Rate as published in The Wall Street Journal, plus a margin. Initial rates on fixed-rate business loans are generally based on a corresponding U.S. Treasury or Federal Home Loan Bank rate, plus a margin. Commercial and industrial loans typically have shorter maturity terms and higher interest rates than commercial real estate loans, but may involve more credit risk because of the type and nature of the collateral. We are focusing our efforts on small- to medium-sized, privately-held companies with local or regional businesses and non-profit entities that operate in our market area and generally originate loans to one borrower up to $65.0 million.

When making commercial loans, we consider the financial statements of the borrower, our lending history with the borrower, the debt service capabilities of the borrower, the projected cash flows of the business and the value of the collateral, primarily real estate, accounts receivable, inventory and equipment. Depending on the collateral used to secure the loans, commercial loans are made in amounts of up to 80% of the value of the collateral securing the loan. All of these loans are secured by assets of the respective borrowers.

Our largest single commercial and industrial loan relationship at December 31, 2017 totaled $63.3 million. This loan is secured by gross receipts. Our next largest borrowing relationship at December 31, 2017 was for $36.3 million and is secured by an assisted living facility. The third largest relationship was for $24.4 million at December 31, 2017 and is secured by academic facilities. At December 31, 2017, all of these loans were performing in accordance with their repayment terms.

Home Equity Lines of Credit. We offer home equity lines of credit, which are secured by one- to four-family residences. At December 31, 2017, the outstanding balance owed on home equity lines of credit amounted to $48.4 million, or 1.0% of our total loan portfolio, including $6.5 million of home equity lines of credit acquired in the Meetinghouse acquisition. Home equity lines of credit have adjustable rates of interest with five to ten-year draws and 15 to 20 year terms that are indexed to the Prime Rate as published by The Wall Street Journal on the last business day of the month. Our home equity lines either have a monthly variable interest rate or an interest rate that is fixed for five years and that adjusts in years six and 11. We offer home equity lines of credit with cumulative loan-to-value ratios generally up to 80%, when taking into account both the balance of the home equity loans and first mortgage loan.

The procedures for underwriting home equity lines of credit include an assessment of the applicant’s payment history on other debts and ability to meet existing obligations and payments on the proposed loan. Although the applicant’s creditworthiness is a primary consideration, the underwriting process also includes a comparison of the value of the collateral to the proposed loan amount. The procedures for underwriting one- to four-family residential real estate loans apply equally to home equity loans.

Consumer Loans. We offer automobile loans, loans secured by savings or certificate accounts, credit builder, annuity and overdraft loans. At December 31, 2017, consumer loans were $10.8 million, or 0.2% of total loans. The procedures for underwriting consumer loans include an assessment of the applicant’s payment history on other debts and ability to meet existing obligations and payments on the proposed loan. Although the applicant’s creditworthiness is a primary consideration, the underwriting process also includes a comparison of the value of the collateral, if any, to the proposed loan amount.

Loan Underwriting Risks

Adjustable-Rate Loans. While we anticipate that adjustable-rate loans will better offset the adverse effects of an increase in interest rates as compared to fixed-rate mortgage loans, an increased monthly mortgage

 

10


Table of Contents

payment required of adjustable-rate loan borrowers in a rising interest rate environment could cause an increase in delinquencies and defaults. The marketability of the underlying property also may be adversely affected in a high interest rate environment. In addition, although adjustable-rate mortgage loans make our asset base more responsive to changes in interest rates, the extent of this interest sensitivity is limited by the annual and lifetime interest rate adjustment limits on residential loans.

Commercial and Multi-Family Real Estate Loans. Loans secured by commercial and multi-family real estate generally have larger balances and involve a greater degree of risk than one- to four-family residential mortgage loans. Of primary concern in commercial and multi-family real estate lending is the borrower’s creditworthiness and the feasibility and cash flow potential of the project. Payments on loans secured by income properties often depend on successful operation and management of the properties. As a result, repayment of such loans may be subject to a greater extent than residential real estate loans, to adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy. To monitor cash flows on income properties, we require borrowers and loan guarantors, if any, to provide annual financial statements on commercial and multi-family real estate loans. In reaching a decision on whether to make a commercial or multi-family real estate loan, we consider and review a global cash flow analysis of the borrower and consider the net operating income of the property, the borrower’s expertise, credit history and profitability and the value of the underlying property. We have generally required that the properties securing these real estate loans have debt service coverage ratios (the ratio of earnings before debt service to debt service) of at least 1.20x. An environmental phase one report is obtained when the possibility exists that hazardous materials may have existed on the site, or the site may have been impacted by adjoining properties that handled hazardous materials. If the estimate of value proves to be inaccurate, in the event of default and foreclosure, we may be confronted with a property the value of which is insufficient to assure full payment.

Construction Loans. Our construction loans are based upon estimates of costs and values associated with the completed project. Underwriting is focused on the borrowers’ financial strength, credit history and demonstrated ability to produce a quality product and effectively market and manage their operations. All speculative construction loans must be approved by senior loan officers.

Construction lending involves additional risks when compared with permanent residential lending because funds are advanced upon the security of the project, which is of uncertain value prior to its completion. Because of the uncertainties inherent in estimating construction costs, as well as the market value of the completed project and the effects of governmental regulation of real property, it is relatively difficult to evaluate accurately the total funds required to complete a project and the related loan-to-value ratio. This type of lending also typically involves higher loan principal amounts and is often concentrated with a small number of builders. In addition, during the term of a construction loan, interest is funded by the borrower or disbursed from an interest reserve set aside from the construction loan budget. These loans often involve the disbursement of substantial funds with repayment substantially dependent on the success of the ultimate project and the ability of the borrower to sell or lease the property or obtain permanent take-out financing, rather than the ability of the borrower or guarantor to repay principal and interest. If our appraisal of the value of a completed project proves to be overstated, we may have inadequate security for the repayment of the loan upon completion of construction of the project and may incur a loss. A discounted cash flow analysis is utilized for determining the value of any construction project of five or more units. Our ability to continue to originate a significant amount of construction loans is dependent on the strength of the housing market in our market areas.

Commercial and Industrial Loans. Unlike residential mortgage loans, which generally are made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayment from his or her employment or other income, and which are secured by real property whose value tends to be more easily ascertainable, commercial and industrial loans are of higher risk and typically are made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayment from the cash flows of the borrower’s business and the collateral securing these loans may fluctuate in value. Our commercial and industrial loans are originated primarily based on the identified cash flows of the borrower and secondarily on the underlying collateral provided by the borrower. Most often, this collateral consists of real estate, accounts receivable, inventory or equipment. Credit support provided by the borrower for most of these loans and the probability of repayment is based on the liquidation of the pledged collateral and enforcement of a personal guarantee, if any. As a result, the availability of funds for the repayment of commercial and industrial loans may

 

11


Table of Contents

depend substantially on the success of the business itself. Further, any collateral securing such loans may depreciate over time, may be difficult to appraise and may fluctuate in value.

Consumer Loans. Consumer loans may entail greater risk than residential mortgage loans, particularly in the case of consumer loans that are unsecured or secured by assets that depreciate rapidly, such as motor vehicles. Repossessed collateral for a defaulted consumer loan may not provide an adequate source of repayment for the outstanding loan and a small remaining deficiency often does not warrant further substantial collection efforts against the borrower. Consumer loan collections depend on the borrower’s continuing financial stability, and therefore are likely to be adversely affected by various factors, including job loss, divorce, illness or personal bankruptcy. Furthermore, the application of various federal and state laws, including federal and state bankruptcy and insolvency laws, may limit the amount that can be recovered on such loans.

Loan Originations, Purchase and Sales

Loan originations come from a variety of sources. The primary sources of loan originations are current customers, business development by our relationship managers, walk-in traffic, our website, advertising and referrals from customers as well as our directors, business owners, investors, entrepreneurs, builders, realtors, existing customers and other professional third parties, including brokers. Loan originations are further supported by lending services offered through our internet website, direct mail, cross-selling, and employees’ community service. We also advertise in newspapers that are widely circulated throughout our market area and on local radio and television. We also participate in loans with others to supplement our origination efforts. We generally do not purchase whole loans.

We generally originate loans for our portfolio; however, we generally agree to sell to the secondary market newly originated conforming fixed-rate, 10- to 30-year one- to four-family residential real estate loans. Our decision to sell loans is based on prevailing market interest rate conditions and interest rate risk management. We sell residential real estate loans in the secondary market primarily with servicing released. We also sell loans to Fannie Mae, the Federal Home Loan Bank Mortgage Partnership Finance Program and other investors with servicing retained. For the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, we originated $42.7 million and $70.5 million of residential real estate loans for sale, respectively, and sold $45.0 million and $71.3 million of residential real estate loans, respectively. At December 31, 2017, we were servicing $133.9 million of residential real estate loans for other financial institutions. In addition, we sell participation interests in commercial real estate loans to local financial institutions, primarily on the portion of loans exceeding our borrowing limits, or as is prudent in concert with recognition of credit risk.

Loan Approval Procedures and Authority

Our lending activities follow written, non-discriminatory, underwriting standards and loan origination procedures established by the Bank’s Board of Directors and management. The Bank’s Board of Directors has granted loan approval authority to certain officers up to prescribed limits, depending on the officer’s experience, the type of loan and whether the loan is secured or unsecured. Residential loans below $2.0 million require approval by members of senior management. Residential loans in excess of $2.0 million must be authorized by the Bank’s Executive Committee of the Board of Directors. Commercial loans below $2.5 million require approval by members of senior management. Commercial loans from $2.5 million up to $3.5 million require approval by management’s loan committee. Commercial loans in excess of $3.5 million must be authorized by the Bank’s Executive Committee of the Board of Directors. Exceptions are fully disclosed to the approving authority, either an individual officer or the appropriate management or Board committee prior to commitment. All exceptions are reported to the Board of Directors monthly.

Loans-to-One Borrower Limit and Loan Category Concentration

The maximum amount that we may lend to one borrower and the borrower’s related entities is generally limited, by statute, to 20% of our capital, which is defined under Massachusetts law as the sum of our capital stock, surplus account and undivided profits. At December 31, 2017, our regulatory limit on loans-to-one borrower was $110.2 million. At that date, our largest lending relationship consisted of four loans for

 

12


Table of Contents

$95.9 million and was secured by office buildings. This loan was performing in accordance with its original repayment terms at December 31, 2017.

Loan Commitments

We issue commitments for fixed- and adjustable-rate loans conditioned upon the occurrence of certain events. Commitments to originate loans are legally binding agreements to lend to our customers provided there are no violations of any contractually established conditions. Generally, our commitments to originate loans expire after 60 days. Unfunded commitments under lines of credit are commitments for possible future extensions of credit to existing customers. Our lines of credit usually do not contain a specified maturity date and may not be drawn upon to the total extent to which we are committed. Our letters of credit are conditional commitments issued to guarantee the performance of a customer to a third party, primarily to support borrowing arrangements.

Investment Activities

We have legal authority to invest in various types of liquid assets, including U.S. Treasury obligations, securities of various government-sponsored enterprises, residential mortgage-backed securities and municipal governments, deposits at the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston (“FHLB”), certificates of deposit of federally insured institutions, investment grade corporate bonds and investment grade marketable equity securities, including common stock and money market mutual funds. Our equity securities generally pay dividends. We also are required to maintain an investment in Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston stock, which investment is based on the level of our FHLB borrowings. While we have the authority under applicable law to invest in derivative securities, we had no investments in derivative securities at December 31, 2017.

At December 31, 2017, our investment portfolio consisted primarily of municipal bonds, investment-grade marketable equity securities and mortgage-backed securities.

Our investment objectives are to provide and maintain liquidity, to establish and maintain an acceptable level of interest rate and credit risk, to provide a use of funds when demand for loans is weak and to generate a favorable return. Our Board of Directors has the overall responsibility for the investment portfolio, including approval of our investment policy. The Executive Committee of the Board of Directors and management are responsible for implementation of the investment policy and monitoring our investment performance. Our Executive Committee reviews the status of our investment portfolio monthly.

Each reporting period, we evaluate all securities with a decline in fair value below the amortized cost of the investment to determine whether other-than-temporary impairment (“OTTI”) exists. OTTI is required to be recognized if (1) we intend to sell the security; (2) it is more likely than not that we will be required to sell the security before recovery of its amortized cost basis; or (3) for debt securities, the present value of expected cash flows is not sufficient to recover the entire amortized cost basis. Marketable equity securities are evaluated for OTTI based on the severity and duration of the impairment and, if deemed to be other than temporary, the declines in fair value are reflected in earnings as realized losses. For impaired debt securities that we intend to sell, or more likely than not will be required to sell, the full amount of the depreciation is recognized as OTTI through earnings. For all other impaired debt securities, credit-related OTTI is recognized through earnings and non-credit-related OTTI is recognized in other comprehensive income/loss, net of applicable taxes.

Deposit Activities and Other Sources of Funds

General. Deposits, borrowings and loan repayments are the major sources of our funds for lending and other investment purposes. Scheduled loan repayments are a relatively stable source of funds, while deposit inflows and outflows and loan prepayments are significantly influenced by general interest rates and market conditions.

Deposit Accounts. The substantial majority of our depositors reside in our market area. Deposits are attracted by advertising and through our website, primarily from within our market area through the offering of a broad selection of deposit instruments, including non-interest-bearing demand deposits (such as checking accounts), interest-bearing demand accounts (such as NOW and money market accounts), savings accounts and

 

13


Table of Contents

certificates of deposit. In addition to accounts for individuals, we also offer several commercial checking accounts designed for the businesses operating in our market area and accept brokered deposits when it’s deemed cost effective.

Deposit account terms vary according to the minimum balance required, the time period that funds must remain on deposit, and the interest rate, among other factors. In determining the terms of our deposit accounts, we consider the rates offered by our competition, our liquidity needs, profitability, and customer preferences and concerns. We generally review our deposit mix and pricing on a weekly basis. Our deposit pricing strategy has generally been to offer competitive rates and to periodically offer special rates in order to attract deposits of a specific type or term.

Borrowings. We may utilize advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston to supplement our supply of investable funds. The Federal Home Loan Bank functions as a central reserve bank providing credit for its member financial institutions. As a member, we are required to own capital stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank and are authorized to apply for advances on the security of such stock and certain of our whole first mortgage loans and other assets (principally securities which are obligations of, or guaranteed by, the United States), provided certain standards related to creditworthiness have been met. Advances are made under several different programs, each having its own interest rate and range of maturities. Depending on the program, limitations on the amount of advances are based either on a fixed percentage of an institution’s net worth or on the Federal Home Loan Bank’s assessment of the institution’s creditworthiness. As of December 31, 2017, we had $299.4 million of available borrowing capacity with the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston, including an available line of credit of $9.4 million at an interest rate that adjusts daily. All of our borrowings from the Federal Home Loan Bank are secured by investment securities and qualified collateral, including one- to four-family loans and multi-family and commercial real estate loans held in the Bank’s portfolio.

Financial Services

We exited the financial services industry effective December 31, 2017. Prior to that time, we offered customers a range of non-deposit financial products, including mutual funds, annuities, stocks and bonds which are offered and cleared by a third-party broker-dealer. We received a portion of the commissions generated by sales to our customers. We also offered customers long-term care insurance through a third-party insurance company, which generated commissions for us. Our non-deposit financial products generated $212,000, $255,000 and $373,000 of non-interest income during the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015, respectively.

Personnel

As of December 31, 2017, we had 447 full-time and 91 part-time employees, none of whom is represented by a collective bargaining unit. We believe our working relationship with our employees is good.

Subsidiaries and Affiliates

The Bank’s subsidiaries include Prospect, Inc., which engages in securities transactions on its own behalf; and EBOSCO, LLC which holds foreclosed real estate; and East Boston Investment Services, Inc., which is authorized for third-party investment sales and is currently inactive.

Supervision and Regulation

General

The Bank is a Massachusetts-charted stock savings bank. The Bank’s deposits are insured up to applicable limits by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and by the Depositors Insurance Fund for amounts in excess of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation insurance limits. The Bank is subject to extensive regulation by the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks, as its chartering agency, and by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as its deposit insurer. The Bank is required to file reports with, and is periodically examined by, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks concerning its activities

 

14


Table of Contents

and financial condition and must obtain regulatory approvals prior to entering into certain transactions, including, but not limited to, mergers with or acquisitions of other financial institutions. The Bank is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston.

The regulation and supervision of the Bank establish a comprehensive framework of activities in which an institution can engage and is intended primarily for the protection of depositors and borrowers and, for purposes of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the protection of the insurance fund. The regulatory structure also gives the regulatory authorities extensive discretion in connection with their supervisory and enforcement activities and examination policies, including policies with respect to the classification of assets and the establishment of adequate loan loss reserves for regulatory purposes.

As a bank holding company, the Company is required to comply with the rules and regulations of the Federal Reserve Board. It is required to file certain reports with the Federal Reserve Board and is subject to examination by and the enforcement authority of the Federal Reserve Board. The Company is also subject to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission under the federal securities laws.

Any change in applicable laws or regulations, whether by the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Federal Reserve Board, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or Congress, could have a material adverse impact on the operations and financial performance of the Company and the Bank. In addition, the Company and the Bank will be affected by the monetary and fiscal policies of various agencies of the United States Government, including the Federal Reserve Board. In view of changing conditions in the national economy and in the money markets, it is impossible for management to accurately predict future changes in monetary policy or the effect of such changes on the business or financial condition of the Company and the Bank.

Set forth below is a brief description of material regulatory requirements that are or will be applicable to the Bank and the Company. The description is limited to certain material aspects of the statutes and regulations addressed, and is not intended to be a complete description of such statutes and regulations and their effects on the Bank and the Company.

Massachusetts Banking Laws and Supervision

The Bank, as a Massachusetts savings bank, is regulated and supervised by the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks. The Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks is required to regularly examine each state-chartered bank. The approval of the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks is required to establish or close branches, to merge with another bank, to issue stock or to undertake many other activities. Any Massachusetts bank that does not operate in accordance with the regulations, policies and directives of the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks may be sanctioned. The Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks may suspend or remove directors or officers of a bank who have violated the law, conducted a bank’s business in a manner that is unsafe, unsound or contrary to the depositors’ interests, or been negligent in the performance of their duties. In addition, the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks has the authority to appoint a receiver or conservator if it is determined that the bank is conducting its business in an unsafe or unauthorized manner, and under certain other circumstances.

In 2015, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts adopted a law modernizing the Massachusetts banking law, which affords Massachusetts chartered banks with greater flexibility.

The powers that Massachusetts-chartered savings banks can exercise under these laws include, but are not limited to, the following:

Lending Activities. A Massachusetts-chartered savings bank may make a wide variety of mortgage loans including fixed-rate loans, adjustable-rate loans, variable-rate loans, participation loans, graduated payment loans, construction and development loans, condominium and co-operative loans, second mortgage loans and other types of loans that may be made in accordance with applicable regulations. Commercial loans may be made to corporations and other commercial enterprises with or without security. Consumer and personal loans may also be made with or without security.

 

15


Table of Contents

Insurance Sales. Massachusetts banks may engage in insurance sales activities if the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks has approved a plan of operation for insurance activities and the bank obtains a license from the Massachusetts Division of Insurance. A bank may be licensed directly or indirectly through an affiliate or a subsidiary corporation established for this purpose. Customers of the Bank are offered certain insurance products through a third party.

Investment Activities. In general, Massachusetts-chartered savings banks may invest in preferred and common stock of any corporation organized under the laws of the United States or any state provided such investments do not involve control of any corporation and do not, in the aggregate, exceed 4.0% of the bank’s deposits. Massachusetts-chartered savings banks may in addition invest an amount equal to 1.0% of their deposits in stocks of Massachusetts corporations or companies with substantial employment in the Commonwealth which have pledged to the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks that such monies will be used for further development within the Commonwealth. At the present time, the Bank’s authority under Massachusetts law to invest in equity securities is constrained by federal law. See “—Federal Bank Regulation—Investment Activities” for such federal restrictions.

Dividends. A Massachusetts stock bank may declare from net profits cash dividends not more frequently than quarterly and non-cash dividends at any time. No dividends may be declared, credited or paid if the bank’s capital stock is impaired. A Massachusetts savings bank with outstanding preferred stock may not, without the prior approval of the Commissioner of Banks, declare dividends to the common stock without also declaring dividends to the preferred stock. The approval of the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks is required if the total of all dividends declared in any calendar year exceeds the total of its net profits for that year combined with its retained net profits of the preceding two years, less any required transfer to surplus or a fund for the retirement of any preferred stock. Net profits for this purpose means the remainder of all earnings from current operations plus actual recoveries on loans and investments and other assets after deducting current operating expenses, actual losses, accrued dividends on preferred stock, if any, and all federal and state taxes.

Protection of Personal Information. Massachusetts has adopted regulatory requirements intended to protect personal information. The requirements, which are similar to existing federal laws such as the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, discussed below under “—Federal Bank Regulation—Privacy Regulations,” that require organizations to establish written information security programs to prevent identity theft. The Massachusetts regulation also contains technology system requirements, especially for the encryption of personal information sent over wireless or public networks or stored on portable devices.

Parity Regulation. A Massachusetts bank may, in accordance with Massachusetts law and regulations issued by the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks, exercise any power and engage in any activity that has been authorized for national banks, federal thrifts or state banks in a state other than Massachusetts, provided that the activity is permissible under applicable federal law and not specifically prohibited by Massachusetts law. Such powers and activities must be subject to the same limitations and restrictions imposed on the national bank, federal thrift or out-of-state bank that exercised the power or activity. In some cases, a Massachusetts bank is required to submit advanced written notice to the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks prior to engaging in certain activities authorized for national banks, federal thrifts or out-of-state banks.

Loans to One Borrower Limitations. Massachusetts banking law grants broad lending authority. However, with certain limited exceptions, total obligations of one borrower to a bank may not exceed 20.0% of the total of the bank’s capital, which is defined under Massachusetts law as the sum of the bank’s capital stock, surplus account and undivided profits.

Regulatory Enforcement Authority. Any Massachusetts bank that does not operate in accordance with the regulations, policies and directives of the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks may be subject to sanctions for non-compliance, including seizure of the property and business of the Bank and suspension or revocation of its charter. The Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks may, under certain circumstances, suspend or remove officers or directors who have violated the law, conducted the Bank’s business in a manner which is unsafe, unsound or contrary to the depositors interests or been negligent in the performance of their duties. In addition, upon finding that a bank has engaged in an unfair or deceptive act or practice, the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks may issue an order to cease and desist and impose a fine on the bank concerned. Massachusetts

 

16


Table of Contents

consumer protection and civil rights statutes applicable to the Bank permit private individual and class action law suits and provide for the rescission of consumer transactions, including loans, and the recovery of statutory and punitive damage and attorney’s fees in the case of certain violations of those statutes.

Depositors Insurance Fund. All Massachusetts-chartered savings banks are required to be members of the Depositors Insurance Fund, a corporation that insures savings bank deposits in excess of federal deposit insurance coverage. The Depositors Insurance Fund is authorized to charge savings banks a risk-based assessment on deposits balances in excess of the amounts insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.

Massachusetts has other statutes and regulations that are similar to the federal provisions discussed below.

Federal Bank Regulation

Capital Requirements. Under applicable federal regulations, federally insured depository institutions, including state-chartered banks that are not members of the Federal Reserve System (“state non-member banks”), such as the Bank, are required to comply with minimum capital requirements. The regulations require insured depository institutions to meet several minimum capital standards: a common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-based assets ratio of 4.5%, a Tier 1 capital to risk-based assets ratio of 6.0%, a total capital to risk-based assets of 8.0%, and a 4.0% Tier 1 capital to total assets leverage ratio. The existing capital requirements were effective January 1, 2015 and are the result of a final rule implementing regulatory amendments based on recommendations of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision and certain requirements of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (the “Dodd-Frank Act”).

Common equity Tier 1 capital is generally defined as common stockholders’ equity and retained earnings. Tier 1 capital is generally defined as common equity Tier 1 and additional Tier 1 capital. Additional Tier 1 capital includes certain noncumulative perpetual preferred stock and related surplus and minority interests in equity accounts of consolidated subsidiaries. Total capital includes Tier 1 capital (common equity Tier 1 capital plus additional Tier 1 capital) and Tier 2 capital. Tier 2 capital is comprised of capital instruments and related surplus, meeting specified requirements, and may include cumulative preferred stock and long-term perpetual preferred stock, mandatory convertible securities, intermediate preferred stock and subordinated debt. Also included in Tier 2 capital is the allowance for loan and lease losses limited to a maximum of 1.25% of risk-weighted assets and, for institutions that have exercised a permanent opt-out election regarding the treatment of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (“AOCI”), up to 45% of net unrealized gains on available-for-sale equity securities with readily determinable fair market values. Institutions that have not exercised the AOCI opt-out have AOCI incorporated into common equity Tier 1 capital (including unrealized gains and losses on available-for-sale-securities). The Bank elected to exercise its option to opt-out. Calculation of all types of regulatory capital is subject to deductions and adjustments specified in the regulations.

In determining the amount of risk-weighted assets for purposes of calculating risk-based capital ratios, all assets, including certain off-balance sheet assets (recourse obligations, direct credit substitutes, residual interests) are multiplied by a risk weight factor assigned by the regulations based on the risks believed inherent in the type of asset. Higher levels of capital are required for asset categories believed to present greater risk. For example, a risk weight of 0% is assigned to cash and U.S. government securities, a risk weight of 50% is generally assigned to prudently underwritten first lien one- to four-family residential mortgages, a risk weight of 100% is assigned to commercial and consumer loans, a risk weight of 150% is assigned to certain past due loans and a risk weight of between 0% to 600% is assigned to permissible equity interests, depending on certain specified factors.

In addition to establishing the minimum regulatory capital requirements, the regulations limit capital distributions and certain discretionary bonus payments to management if the institution does not hold a “capital conservation buffer” consisting of 2.5% of common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets above the amount necessary to meet its minimum risk-based capital requirements. The capital conservation buffer requirement is being phased in beginning January 1, 2016 at 0.625% of risk-weighted assets and increasing each year until fully implemented at 2.5% on January 1, 2019. For the 2017 calendar year, the capital conservation buffer was 1.25%. It increased to 1.875% on January 1, 2018.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act required each federal banking agency to revise its risk-based capital standards for insured institutions to ensure that those standards take adequate account

 

17


Table of Contents

of interest-rate risk, concentration of credit risk and the risk of nontraditional activities, as well as to reflect the actual performance and expected risk of loss on multi-family residential loans. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, along with the other federal banking agencies, has adopted a regulation providing that the agencies will take into account the exposure of a bank’s capital and economic value to changes in interest rate risk in assessing a bank’s capital adequacy. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation also has authority to establish individual minimum capital requirements in appropriate cases upon determination that an institution’s capital level is, or is likely to become, inadequate in light of the particular circumstances.

Standards for Safety and Soundness. As required by statute, the federal banking agencies adopted final regulations and Interagency Guidelines Establishing Standards for Safety and Soundness to implement safety and soundness standards. The guidelines set forth the safety and soundness standards that the federal banking agencies use to identify and address problems at insured depository institutions before capital becomes impaired. The guidelines address internal controls and information systems, internal audit system, credit underwriting, loan documentation, interest rate exposure, asset growth, asset quality, earnings and compensation, fees and benefits. Most recently, the agencies have established standards for safeguarding customer information. If the appropriate federal banking agency determines that an institution fails to meet any standard prescribed by the guidelines, the agency may require the institution to submit to the agency an acceptable plan to achieve compliance with the standard.

Investment Activities. All state-chartered Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation insured banks, including savings banks, are generally limited in their investment activities to principal and equity investments of the type and in the amount authorized for national banks, notwithstanding state law, subject to certain exceptions. For example, state chartered banks may, with Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation approval, continue to exercise state authority to invest in common or preferred stocks listed on a national securities exchange or the NASDAQ Global Market and in the shares of an investment company registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended. The maximum permissible investment is 100.0% of Tier 1 Capital, as specified by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s regulations, or the maximum amount permitted by Massachusetts law, whichever is less. The Bank received approval from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation to retain and acquire such equity instruments equal to the lesser of 100% of the Bank’s Tier 1 capital or the maximum permissible amount specified by Massachusetts law. Such grandfathered authority may be terminated under certain circumstances including a determination by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation that such investments pose a safety and soundness risk.

In addition, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation is authorized to permit such a state bank to engage in state-authorized activities or investments not permissible for national banks (other than non-subsidiary equity investments) if it meets all applicable capital requirements and it is determined that such activities or investments do not pose a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation has adopted procedures for institutions seeking approval to engage in such activities or investments. In addition, a nonmember bank may control a subsidiary that engages in activities as principal that would only be permitted for a national bank to conduct in a “financial subsidiary” if a bank meets specified conditions and deducts its investment in the subsidiary for regulatory capital purposes.

Interstate Banking and Branching. Federal law permits well capitalized and well managed bank holding companies to acquire banks in any state, subject to Federal Reserve Board approval, certain concentration limits and other specified conditions. Interstate mergers of banks are also authorized, subject to regulatory approval and other specified conditions. In addition, banks are permitted to establish de novo branches on an interstate basis to the extent that branching is authorized by the law of the host state for the banks chartered by that state.

Prompt Corrective Regulatory Action. Federal law requires, among other things, that federal bank regulatory authorities take “prompt corrective action” with respect to banks that do not meet minimum capital requirements. For these purpose, the law establishes five capital categories: well capitalized, adequately capitalized, undercapitalized, significantly undercapitalized and critically undercapitalized.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation has adopted regulations to implement the prompt corrective action legislation. Effective January 1, 2015, an institution is deemed to be “well capitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of 10.0% or greater, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 8.0% or greater, a leverage ratio of

 

18


Table of Contents

5.0% or greater and a common equity Tier 1 ratio of 6.5% or greater. An institution is “adequately capitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of 8.0% or greater, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 6.0% or greater, a leverage ratio of 4.0% or greater, and a common equity Tier 1 ratio of 4.5% or greater. An institution is “undercapitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of less than 8.0%, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of less than 6.0%, a leverage ratio of less than 4.0%, or a common equity Tier 1 ratio of less than 4.5%. An institution is deemed to be “significantly undercapitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of less than 6.0%, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of less than 4.0%, a leverage ratio of less than 3.0% or a common equity Tier 1 ratio of less than 3%. An institution is considered to be “critically undercapitalized” if it has a ratio of tangible equity (as defined in the regulations) to total assets that is equal to or less than 2.0%. As of December 31, 2017, the Bank was classified as a “well capitalized” institution.

“Undercapitalized” banks must adhere to growth, capital distribution (including dividend) and other limitations and are required to submit a capital restoration plan. A bank’s compliance with such a plan is required to be guaranteed by any company that controls the undercapitalized institution in an amount equal to the lesser of 5.0% of the institution’s total assets when deemed undercapitalized or the amount necessary to achieve the status of adequately capitalized. If an “undercapitalized” bank fails to submit an acceptable plan, it is treated as if it is “significantly undercapitalized.” “Significantly undercapitalized” banks must comply with one or more of a number of additional restrictions, including but not limited to an order by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation to sell sufficient voting stock to become adequately capitalized, requirements to reduce total assets, cease receipt of deposits from correspondent banks or dismiss directors or officers, and restrictions on interest rates paid on deposits, compensation of executive officers and capital distributions by the parent holding company. “Critically undercapitalized” institutions are subject to additional measures including, subject to a narrow exception, the appointment of a receiver or conservator within 270 days after it obtains such status.

Transactions with Affiliates and Regulation W of the Federal Reserve Regulations. Transactions between banks and their affiliates are governed by federal law. An affiliate of a bank is any company or entity that controls, is controlled by or is under common control with the bank. In a holding company context, the parent bank holding company and any companies which are controlled by such parent holding company are affiliates of the bank (although subsidiaries of the bank itself, except financial subsidiaries, are generally not considered affiliates). Generally, Section 23A of the Federal Reserve Act and the Federal Reserve Board’s Regulation W limits the extent to which the bank or its subsidiaries may engage in “covered transactions” with any one affiliate to an amount equal to 10.0% of such institution’s capital stock and surplus, and with all such transactions with all affiliates to an amount equal to 20.0% of such institution’s capital stock and surplus. Section 23B applies to “covered transactions” as well as to certain other transactions and requires that all such transactions be on terms substantially the same, or at least as favorable, to the institution or subsidiary as those provided to a non-affiliate. The term “covered transaction” includes the making of loans, purchase of assets from, and issuance of a guarantee to an affiliate, and other similar transactions. Section 23B transactions also include the provision of services and the sale of assets by a bank to an affiliate. In addition, loans or other extensions of credit by the financial institution to the affiliate are required to be collateralized in accordance with the requirements set forth in Section 23A of the Federal Reserve Act.

Sections 22(h) and (g) of the Federal Reserve Act and the Federal Reserve Bank’s Regulation O place restrictions on loans to a bank’s insiders, i.e., executive officers, directors and principal stockholders. Under Regulation O, loans to a director, executive officer and to a greater than 10.0% stockholder of a financial institution, and certain of their affiliated interests, together with all other outstanding loans to such person and affiliated interests, may not exceed specified limits. Regulation O also requires that, subject to an exception for certain bank-wide employee programs, loans to directors, executive officers and principal stockholders be made on terms and conditions substantially the same as offered in comparable transactions to persons who are not insiders. Regulation O also requires prior board approval for certain loans. In addition, the aggregate amount of extensions of credit by a financial institution to insiders cannot exceed the institution’s unimpaired capital and surplus. Additional restrictions apply to loans to executive officers.

Enforcement. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation has extensive enforcement authority over insured state savings banks, including the Bank. The enforcement authority includes, among other things, the ability to assess civil money penalties, issue cease and desist orders and remove directors and officers. In general, these

 

19


Table of Contents

enforcement actions may be initiated in response to violations of laws and regulations, breaches of fiduciary duty and unsafe or unsound practices. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation is required, with certain exceptions, to appoint a receiver or conservator for an insured state non-member bank if that bank was “critically undercapitalized” on average during the calendar quarter beginning 270 days after the date on which the institution became “critically undercapitalized.” The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation may also appoint itself as conservator or receiver for an insured state non-member bank under specified circumstances, including: (1) insolvency; (2) substantial dissipation of assets or earnings through violations of law or unsafe or unsound practices; (3) existence of an unsafe or unsound condition to transact business; (4) insufficient capital; or (5) the incurrence of losses that will deplete substantially all of the institution’s capital with no reasonable prospect of replenishment without federal assistance.

Federal Insurance of Deposit Accounts. The Bank is a member of the Deposit Insurance Fund, which is administered by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Deposit accounts in the Bank are insured up to a maximum of $250,000 for each separately insured depositor.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation imposes deposit insurance assessments. Under the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s risk-based assessment system, insured institutions were initially assigned to risk categories based on supervisory evaluations, regulatory capital levels and certain other factors. An institution’s assessment rate depended upon the category to which it is assigned and certain adjustments specified by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation regulations, with less risky institutions paying lower rates. Assessment rates (inclusive of possible adjustments) ranged from 2 1/2 to 45 basis points of each institution’s total assets less tangible capital. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s current system represents a change, required by the Dodd-Frank Act, from its prior practice of basing the assessment on an institution’s volume of deposits.

Effective July 1, 2016, the FDIC adopted changes that eliminated the risk categories. Assessments for most institutions are now based on financial measures and supervisory ratings derived from statistical modeling estimating the probability of failure within three years. In conjunction with the Deposit Insurance Fund reserve ratio achieving 1.15%, the assessment range (inclusive of possible adjustments) was reduced for institutions of less than $10 billion in total assets to 1.5 basis points to 30 basis points, also effective July 1, 2016. The Dodd-Frank Act specifies that banks of greater than $10 billion in assets be required to bear the burden of raising the reserve ratio from 1.15% to 1.35%. Such institutions are subject to an annual surcharge of 4.5 basis points of total assets exceeding $10 billion. This surcharge will remain in place until the earlier of the Deposit Insurance Fund reaching the 1.35% ratio or December 31, 2018, at which point a shortfall assessment would be applied. The FDIC, exercising discretion provided to it by the Dodd-Frank Act, has established a long-term goal of achieving a 2% reverse ratio for the Deposit Insurance Fund.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation has authority to increase insurance assessments. A significant increase in insurance premiums would likely have an adverse effect on the operating expenses and results of operations of the Bank. Future insurance assessment rates cannot be predicted.

Insurance of deposits may be terminated by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation upon a finding that the institution has engaged in unsafe or unsound practices, is in an unsafe or unsound condition to continue operations or has violated any applicable law, regulation, rule order or regulatory condition imposed in writing. We do not know of any practice, condition or violation that might lead to termination of deposit insurance.

In addition to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation assessments, the Financing Corporation (“FICO”) is authorized to impose and collect, with the approval of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, assessments for anticipated payments, issuance costs and custodial fees on bonds issued by the FICO in the 1980s to recapitalize the former Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation. The bonds issued by the FICO are due to mature in 2017 through 2019. For the quarter ended December 31, 2017, the annualized FICO assessment was equal to 0.54 basis points of total assets less tangible capital.

Privacy Regulations. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation regulations generally require that the Bank disclose its privacy policy, including identifying with whom it shares a customer’s “non-public personal information,” to customers at the time of establishing the customer relationship and annually thereafter. In addition, the Bank is required to provide its customers with the ability to “opt-out” of having their personal

 

20


Table of Contents

information shared with unaffiliated third parties and not to disclose account numbers or access codes to non-affiliated third parties for marketing purposes. The Bank currently has a privacy protection policy in place and believes that such policy is in compliance with the regulations.

Community Reinvestment Act. Under the Community Reinvestment Act, or CRA, as implemented by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation regulations, a non-member bank has a continuing and affirmative obligation, consistent with its safe and sound operation, to help meet the credit needs of its entire community, including low and moderate income neighborhoods. The CRA does not establish specific lending requirements or programs for financial institutions nor does it limit an institution’s discretion to develop the types of products and services that it believes are best suited to its particular community, consistent with the CRA. The CRA does require the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, in connection with its examination of a non-member bank, to assess the institution’s record of meeting the credit needs of its community and to take such record into account in its evaluation of certain applications by such institution, including applications to acquire branches and other financial institutions. The CRA requires the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation to provide a written evaluation of an institution’s CRA performance utilizing a four-tiered descriptive rating system. The Bank’s latest Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation CRA rating was “Satisfactory.”

Massachusetts has its own statutory counterpart to the CRA which is also applicable to the Bank. The Massachusetts version is generally similar to the CRA but utilizes a five-tiered descriptive rating system. Massachusetts law requires the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks to consider, but not be limited to, a bank’s record of performance under Massachusetts law in considering any application by the bank to establish a branch or other deposit-taking facility, to relocate an office or to merge or consolidate with or acquire the assets and assume the liabilities of any other banking institution. The Bank’s most recent rating under Massachusetts law was “Satisfactory.”

Consumer Protection and Fair Lending Regulations. Massachusetts savings banks are subject to a variety of federal and Massachusetts statutes and regulations that are intended to protect consumers and prohibit discrimination in the granting of credit. These statutes and regulations provide for a range of sanctions for non-compliance with their terms, including imposition of administrative fines and remedial orders, and referral to the Attorney General for prosecution of a civil action for actual and punitive damages and injunctive relief. Certain of these statutes authorize private individual and class action lawsuits and the award of actual, statutory and punitive damages and attorneys’ fees for certain types of violations.

USA Patriot Act. The Bank is subject to the USA PATRIOT Act, which gave federal agencies additional powers to address terrorist threats through enhanced domestic security measures, expanded surveillance powers, increased information sharing, and broadened anti-money laundering requirements. By way of amendments to the Bank Secrecy Act, Title III of the USA PATRIOT Act provided measures intended to encourage information sharing among bank regulatory agencies and law enforcement bodies. Further, certain provisions of Title III impose affirmative obligations on a broad range of financial institutions, including banks, thrifts, brokers, dealers, credit unions, money transfer agents, and parties registered under the Commodity Exchange Act.

Other Regulations

Interest and other charges collected or contracted for by the Bank are subject to state usury laws and federal laws concerning interest rates. Loan operations are also subject to state and federal laws applicable to credit transactions, such as the:

 

   

Home Mortgage Disclosure Act of 1975, requiring financial institutions to provide information to enable the public and public officials to determine whether a financial institution is fulfilling its obligation to help meet the housing needs of the community it serves;

 

   

Equal Credit Opportunity Act, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, creed or other prohibited factors in extending credit;

 

   

Fair Credit Reporting Act of 1978, governing the use and provision of information to credit reporting agencies;

 

21


Table of Contents
   

Massachusetts Debt Collection Regulations, establishing standards, by defining unfair or deceptive acts or practices, for the collection of debts from persons within the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 167E, which governs the Bank’s lending powers; and

 

   

Rules and regulations of the various federal and state agencies charged with the responsibility of implementing such federal and state laws.

The deposit operations of the Bank also are subject to, among others, the:

 

   

Right to Financial Privacy Act, which imposes a duty to maintain confidentiality of consumer financial records and prescribes procedures for complying with administrative subpoenas of financial records;

 

   

Check Clearing for the 21st Century Act (also known as “Check 21”), which gives “substitute checks,” such as digital check images and copies made from that image, the same legal standing as the original paper check;

 

   

Electronic Funds Transfer Act and Regulation E promulgated thereunder, and, as to East Boston Savings Bank Chapter 167B of the General Laws of Massachusetts, which govern automatic deposits to and withdrawals from deposit accounts and customers’ rights and liabilities arising from the use of automated teller machines and other electronic banking services; and

 

   

General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 167D, which governs the Bank’s deposit powers.

Federal Reserve System

The Federal Reserve Board regulations require depository institutions to maintain reserves against their transaction accounts (primarily NOW and regular checking accounts). The Federal Reserve Board regulations generally require for 2018 that reserves be maintained against aggregate transaction accounts as follows: for that portion of transaction accounts aggregating $122.3 million or less (which may be adjusted by the Federal Reserve Board) the reserve requirement is 3.0% and the amounts greater than $122.3 million require a 10.0% reserve (which may be adjusted annually by the Federal Reserve Board between 8.0% and 14.0%). The first $16.0 million of otherwise reservable balances (which may be adjusted by the Federal Reserve Board) are exempted from the reserve requirements. These amounts are increased from the 2017 threshold of $115.1 million and the exception of $15.5 million. The Bank is in compliance with these requirements.

Federal Home Loan Bank System

The Bank is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank System, which consists of 11 regional Federal Home Loan Banks. The Federal Home Loan Bank provides a central credit facility primarily for member institutions. Members of the Federal Home Loan Bank are required to acquire and hold shares of capital stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank. The Bank was in compliance with this requirement at December 31, 2017. Based on redemption provisions of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston, the stock has no quoted market value and is carried at cost. The Bank reviews for impairment based on the ultimate recoverability of the cost basis of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston stock. As of December 31, 2017, no impairment has been recognized.

At its discretion, the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston may declare dividends on the stock. The Federal Home Loan Banks are required to provide funds for certain purposes including the resolution of insolvent thrifts in the late 1980s and to contributing funds for affordable housing programs. These requirements could reduce the amount of dividends that the Federal Home Loan Banks pay to their members and result in the Federal Home Loan Banks imposing a higher rate of interest on advances to their members. As a result of losses incurred, the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston suspended and did not pay dividends in 2009 and 2010. However, the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston resumed payment of quarterly dividends in 2011 and, for 2017, paid dividends with an annual yield of 4.14%. There can be no assurance that such dividends will continue in the future. Further, there can be no assurance that the impact of recent or future legislation on the Federal Home Loan Banks also will not cause a decrease in the value of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston stock held by the Bank.

 

22


Table of Contents

Holding Company

The Company is subject to examination, regulation, and periodic reporting under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended, as administered by the Federal Reserve Board. The Company is required to obtain the prior approval of the Federal Reserve Board to acquire all, or substantially all, of the assets of any bank or bank holding company. Prior Federal Reserve Board approval is required for the Company to acquire direct or indirect ownership or control of any voting securities of any bank or bank holding company if, after such acquisition, it would, directly or indirectly, own or control more than 5% of any class of voting shares of the bank or bank holding company. In addition to the approval of the Federal Reserve Board, prior approval may also be necessary from other agencies having supervisory jurisdiction over the bank to be acquired before any bank acquisition can be completed.

A bank holding company is generally prohibited from engaging in non-banking activities, or acquiring direct or indirect control of more than 5% of the voting securities of any company engaged in non-banking activities. One of the principal exceptions to this prohibition is for activities found by the Federal Reserve Board to be so closely related to banking or managing or controlling banks as to be a proper incident thereto. Some of the principal activities that the Federal Reserve Board has determined by regulation to be so closely related to banking are: (i) making or servicing loans; (ii) performing certain data processing services; (iii) providing discount brokerage services; (iv) acting as fiduciary, investment or financial advisor; (v) leasing personal or real property; (vi) making investments in corporations or projects designed primarily to promote community welfare; and (vii) acquiring a savings and loan association whose direct and indirect activities are limited to those permitted for bank holding companies.

The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of 1999 authorized a bank holding company that meets specified conditions, including being “well capitalized” and “well managed,” to opt to become a “financial holding company” and thereby engage in a broader array of financial activities than previously permitted. Such activities can include insurance underwriting and investment banking.

The Company is subject to the Federal Reserve Board’s capital adequacy requirements for bank holding companies. The Dodd-Frank Act required the Federal Reserve Board to promulgate consolidated capital requirements for depository institution holding companies that are no less stringent, both quantitatively and in terms of components of capital, than those applicable to institutions themselves. The previously discussed final rule regarding regulatory capital requirements implemented the Dodd-Frank Act as to bank holding company capital standards. Consolidated regulatory capital requirements identical to those applicable to the subsidiary banks applied to bank holding companies (with greater than $1 billion of assets) as of January 1, 2015. As is the case with institutions themselves, the capital conservation buffer is being phased in between 2016 and 2019. The Company was in compliance with the consolidated capital requirements as of December 31, 2017.

A bank holding company is generally required to give the Federal Reserve Board prior written notice of any purchase or redemption of then outstanding equity securities if the gross consideration for the purchase or redemption, when combined with the net consideration paid for all such purchases or redemptions during the preceding 12 months, is equal to 10% or more of the company’s consolidated net worth. The Federal Reserve Board may disapprove such a purchase or redemption if it determines that the proposal would constitute an unsafe and unsound practice, or would violate any law, regulation, Federal Reserve Board order or directive, or any condition imposed by, or written agreement with, the Federal Reserve Board. There is an exception to this approval requirement for well-capitalized bank holding companies that meet certain other conditions.

The Federal Reserve Board has issued a policy statement regarding capital distributions, including dividends, by bank holding companies. In general, the Federal Reserve Board’s policies provide that dividends should be paid only out of current earnings and only if the prospective rate of earnings retention by the bank holding company appears consistent with the organization’s capital needs, asset quality and overall financial condition. The Federal Reserve Board’s policies also require that a bank holding company serve as a source of financial strength to its subsidiary banks by standing ready to use available resources to provide adequate capital funds to those banks during periods of financial stress or adversity and by maintaining the financial flexibility and capital-raising capacity to obtain additional resources for assisting its subsidiary banks where necessary. The Dodd-Frank Act codified the source of strength doctrine. Under the prompt corrective action laws, the ability of a

 

23


Table of Contents

bank holding company to pay dividends may be restricted if a subsidiary bank becomes undercapitalized. In addition, the Federal Reserve Board has issued guidance which requires consultation with the agency prior to a bank holding company’s payment of dividends or repurchase of its stock under certain circumstances. These regulatory policies could affect the ability of the Company to pay dividends, repurchase its stock or otherwise engage in capital distributions.

Under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, depository institutions are liable to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation for losses suffered or anticipated by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in connection with the default of a commonly controlled depository institution or any assistance provided by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation to such an institution in danger of default.

The status of the Company as a registered bank holding company under the Bank Holding Company Act does not exempt it from certain federal and state laws and regulations applicable to corporations generally, including, without limitation, certain provisions of the federal securities laws.

Massachusetts Holding Company Regulation. Under the Massachusetts banking laws, a company owning or controlling two or more banking institutions, including a savings bank, is regulated as a bank holding company. The term “company” is defined by the Massachusetts banking laws similarly to the definition of “company” under the Bank Holding Company Act. Each Massachusetts bank holding company: (i) must obtain the approval of the Massachusetts Board of Bank Incorporation before engaging in certain transactions, such as the acquisition of more than 5% of the voting stock of another banking institution; (ii) must register, and file reports, with the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks; and (iii) is subject to examination by the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks.

Federal Securities Laws

The Company’s common stock is registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission under Section 12(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”). We are subject to the information, proxy solicitation, insider trading restrictions and other requirements under the Exchange Act.

Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 is intended to improve corporate responsibility, to provide for enhanced penalties for accounting and auditing improprieties at publicly traded companies and to protect investors by improving the accuracy and reliability of corporate disclosures pursuant to the securities laws. We have policies, procedures and systems designed to comply with these regulations, and we review and document such policies, procedures and systems to ensure continued compliance with these regulations.

Change in Control Regulations

Under the Change in Bank Control Act, no person, or group of persons acting in concert, may acquire control of a bank holding company such as the Company unless the Federal Reserve Board has been given 60 days’ prior written notice and not disapproved the proposed acquisition. The Federal Reserve Board considers several factors in evaluating a notice, including the financial and managerial resources of the acquirer and competitive effects. Control, as defined under the applicable regulations, means the power, directly or indirectly, to direct the management or policies of the company or to vote 25% or more of any class of voting securities of the company. Acquisition of more than 10% of any class of a bank holding company’s voting securities constitutes a rebuttable presumption of control under certain circumstances, including where the issuer has registered securities under Section 12 of the Exchange Act.

In addition, federal regulations provide that no company may acquire control (as defined in the Bank Holding Company Act) of a bank holding company without the prior approval of the Federal Reserve Board. Any company that acquires such control becomes a “bank holding company” subject to registration, examination and regulation by the Federal Reserve Board.

 

24


Table of Contents

Taxation

The Company and the Bank are subject to federal and state income taxation in the same general manner as other corporations, with some exceptions discussed below. The following discussion of federal and state taxation is intended only to summarize certain pertinent tax matters and is not a comprehensive description of the tax rules applicable to the Company and the Bank.

Federal Taxation

General. The Company reports its income on a calendar year basis using the accrual method of accounting. The federal income tax laws apply to the Company in the same manner as to other corporations with some exceptions, including the reserve for bad debts discussed below. The Company’s federal income tax returns have been either audited or closed under the statute of limitations through December 31, 2013. For its 2017 tax year, the Bank’s maximum federal income tax rate was 35%. With the enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”) on December 22, 2017, the Company’s federal income tax rate will be reduced to 21% beginning January 1, 2018. As a result of the Tax Act, the Company incurred a $7.1 million charge in 2017 related to the revaluation of its net deferred tax asset.

Bad Debt Reserves. For taxable years beginning before January 1, 1996, thrift institutions that qualified under certain definitional tests and other conditions of the Internal Revenue Code were permitted to use certain favorable provisions to calculate their deductions from taxable income for annual additions to their bad debt reserve. A reserve could be established for bad debts on qualifying real property loans, generally secured by interests in real property improved or to be improved, under the percentage of taxable income method or the experience method. The reserve for non-qualifying loans was computed using the experience method. Federal legislation enacted in 1996 repealed the reserve method of accounting for bad debts and the percentage of taxable income method for tax years beginning after 1995 and required savings institutions to recapture or take into income certain portions of their accumulated bad debt reserves. However, those bad debt reserves accumulated prior to 1988 (“Base Year Reserves”) were not required to be recaptured unless the savings institution failed certain tests. At December 31, 2017, $9.8 million of the Bank’s accumulated bad debt reserves would not be recaptured into taxable income unless the Bank makes a “non-dividend distribution” to the Company as described below.

Distributions. If the Bank makes “non-dividend distributions” to the Company, the distributions will be considered to have been made from the Bank’s un-recaptured tax bad debt reserves, including the balance of its Base Year Reserves as of December 31, 1987, to the extent of the “non-dividend distributions,” and then from the Bank’s supplemental reserve for losses on loans, to the extent of those reserves, and an amount based on the amount distributed, but not more than the amount of those reserves, will be included in the Bank’s taxable income. Non-dividend distributions include distributions in excess of the Bank’s current and accumulated earnings and profits, as calculated for federal income tax purposes, distributions in redemption of stock and distributions in partial or complete liquidation. Dividends paid out of the Bank’s current or accumulated earnings and profits will not be so included in the Company’s taxable income.

The amount of additional taxable income triggered by a non-dividend is an amount that, when reduced by the tax attributable to the income, is equal to the amount of the distribution. Therefore, if the Bank makes a non-dividend distribution to the Company, approximately one and one-half times the amount of the distribution not in excess of the amount of the reserves would be includable in income for federal income tax purposes, assuming a 35% federal corporate income tax rate. With a 21% federal corporate income tax rate for years after 2017, approximately one and one-third times the amount of the distribution would be includable in income for federal tax purposes. The Bank does not intend to pay dividends that would result in a recapture of any portion of its bad debt reserves.

State Taxation. Financial institutions in Massachusetts are generally required to file combined income tax returns. The Massachusetts excise tax rate for savings banks is 9.0% of federal taxable income, adjusted for certain items. Taxable income includes gross income as defined under the Internal Revenue Code, plus interest from bonds, notes and evidences of indebtedness of any state, including Massachusetts, less deductions, but not the credits, allowable under the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, except for those deductions relating to

 

25


Table of Contents

dividends received and income or franchise taxes imposed by a state or political subdivision. Carryforwards and carrybacks of net operating losses and capital losses are not allowed. The Company’s state tax returns, as well as those of its subsidiaries, are not currently under audit.

A financial institution or business corporation is generally entitled to special tax treatment as a “security corporation” under Massachusetts law provided that: (a) its activities are limited to buying, selling, dealing in or holding securities on its own behalf and not as a broker; and (b) it has applied for, and received, classification as a “security corporation” by the Commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Revenue. A security corporation that is also a bank holding company under the Internal Revenue Code must pay a tax equal to 0.33% of its gross income. A security corporation that is not a bank holding company under the Internal Revenue Code must pay a tax equal to 1.32% of its gross income. Prospect, Inc. is qualified as a security corporation. As such, it has received security corporation classification by the Massachusetts Department of Revenue; and does not conduct any activities deemed impermissible under the governing statutes and the various regulations, directives, letter rulings and administrative pronouncements issued by the Massachusetts Department of Revenue.

 

26


Table of Contents
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

An investment in our securities is subject to risks inherent in our business and the industry in which we operate. Before making an investment decision, you should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties described below and all other information included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The risks described below may adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results. In addition to these risks and the other risks and uncertainties described in Forward Looking Statements and Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” there may be additional risks and uncertainties that are not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial that could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition or operating results. The value or market price of our securities could decline due to any of these identified or other risks. Past financial performance may not be a reliable indicator of future performance, and historical trends should not be used to anticipate results or trends in future periods.

A worsening of economic conditions could result in increases in our level of non-performing loans and/or reduce demand for our products and services, which could have adverse effect on our results of operations.

Unlike larger financial institutions that are more geographically diversified, our profitability depends on the general economic conditions in the Boston metropolitan area. Local economic conditions have a significant impact on our commercial real estate and construction and consumer loans, the ability of the borrowers to repay these loans and the value of the collateral securing these loans. Almost all of our loans are to borrowers located in the greater Boston metropolitan area or secured by collateral located in the greater Boston metropolitan area.

A deterioration in economic conditions or a prolonged delay in economic recovery in the market areas we serve, in particular the greater Boston metropolitan area, could result in the following consequences, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations:

 

   

demand for our products and services may decline;

 

   

loan delinquencies, problem assets and foreclosures may increase;

 

   

collateral for loans, especially real estate, may decline further in value, in turn reducing customers’ borrowing power, reducing the value of assets and collateral associated with existing loans;

 

   

rental rates may decline reducing the borrower’s cash flow, which may impact their ability to honor their commitments to us;

 

   

the value of our securities portfolio may decline;

 

   

the net worth and liquidity of loan guarantors may decline, impairing their ability to honor commitments to us; and/or

 

   

the amount of our low-cost or non-interest-bearing deposits may decrease.

Moreover, a significant decline in general economic conditions, caused by inflation, recession, acts of terrorism, an outbreak of hostilities or other international or domestic calamities, unemployment or other factors beyond our control could further impact these local economic conditions and could further negatively affect the financial results of our banking operations. In addition, deflationary pressures, while possibly lowering our operating costs, could have a significant negative effect on our borrowers, especially our business borrowers, and the values of underlying collateral securing loans, which could negatively affect our financial performance.

Changes in interest rates could hurt our profits.

Our profitability, like most financial institutions, depends to a large extent upon our net interest income, which is the difference between our interest income on interest-earning assets, such as loans and securities, and our interest expense on interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowed funds. Accordingly, our results of operations depend largely on movements in market interest rates and our ability to manage our interest-rate-sensitive assets and liabilities in response to these movements. Factors such as inflation, recession and instability in financial markets, among other factors beyond our control, may affect interest rates.

 

27


Table of Contents

If interest rates rise, and if rates on our deposits reprice upwards faster than the rates on our long-term loans and investments, we would experience compression of our interest rate spread, which would have a negative effect on our profitability. Conversely, decreases in interest rates can result in increased prepayments of loans and mortgage-related securities, as borrowers refinance to reduce their borrowing costs. Under these circumstances, we are subject to reinvestment risk as we may have to redeploy such loan or securities proceeds into lower-yielding assets, which might also negatively impact our income.

Any substantial, unexpected, prolonged change in market interest rates could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, liquidity and results of operations. Further, a prolonged period of exceptionally low market interest rates, such as we are currently experiencing, limits our ability to lower our interest expense, while the average yield on our interest-earning assets may continue to decrease as our loans reprice or are originated at these low market rates. Accordingly, our net interest income may continue to decrease, which would have an adverse effect on our profitability. Also, our interest rate risk modeling techniques and assumptions likely may not fully predict or capture the impact of actual interest rate changes on our balance sheet or projected operating results.

While we pursue an asset/liability strategy designed to mitigate our risk from changes in interest rates, changes in interest rates can still have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Changes in the level of interest rates also may negatively affect our ability to originate real estate loans, the value of our assets and our ability to realize gains from the sale of our assets, all of which ultimately affect our earnings. For further discussion of how changes in interest rates could impact us, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Results of Operations and Financial Condition — Risk Management — Interest Rate Risk Management.”

We may be adversely affected by recent changes in U.S. tax laws.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which was enacted in December 2017, is likely to have both positive and negative effects on our financial performance. For example, the new legislation will result in a reduction in our federal corporate tax rate from 35% to 21% beginning in 2018, which will have a favorable impact on our earnings and capital generation abilities. However, the new legislation also enacted limitations on certain deductions that will have an impact on the banking industry, borrowers and the market for single-family residential real estate. These limitations include (i) a lower limit on the deductibility of mortgage interest on single-family residential mortgage loans, (ii) the elimination of interest deductions for home equity loans, (iii) a limitation on the deductibility of business interest expense and (iv) a limitation on the deductibility of property taxes and state and local income taxes. In addition, as a result of the lower corporate tax rate, we were required under U.S. generally accepted accounting principles to record a charge to tax expense due to remeasurement in the fourth quarter of 2017 with respect to our net deferred tax asset amounting to $7.1 million. The recent changes in the tax laws may have an adverse effect on the market for, and valuation of, residential properties, and on the demand for such loans in the future, and could make it harder for borrowers to make their loan payments. In addition, these recent changes may also have a disproportionate effect on taxpayers in states with high residential home prices and high state and local taxes, such as Massachusetts. If home ownership becomes less attractive, demand for mortgage loans could decrease. The value of the properties securing loans in our loan portfolio may be adversely impacted as a result of the changing economics of home ownership, which could require an increase in our provision for loan losses, which would reduce our profitability and could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our commercial real estate, multi-family, commercial and industrial, and construction lending involves risks that could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

In recent years, we have focused on shifting our asset mix from increases in the one- to four-family residential loan portfolio to increases in commercial real estate, multi-family, commercial and industrial, and construction loans. As of December 31, 2017, our commercial real estate, multi-family, commercial and industrial, and construction loans totaled $4.010 billion or 85.8% of our loan portfolio. As a result, our credit risk profile is higher than traditional savings institutions that have higher concentrations of one- to four-family residential loans. Also, these types of commercial lending activities, while potentially more profitable than one-to

 

28


Table of Contents

four-family residential lending, are generally more sensitive to regional and local economic conditions, making loss levels more difficult to predict. Collateral evaluation and financial statement analysis in these types of loans requires a more detailed analysis at the time of loan underwriting and on an ongoing basis. A decline in real estate values would reduce the value of the real estate collateral securing our loans and increase the risk that we would incur losses if borrowers defaulted on their loans. In addition, the repayment of commercial real estate and multi-family loans generally is dependent, in large part, on the successful operation of the property securing the loan or the business conducted on the property securing the loan. In addition, loan balances for commercial real estate, multi-family and construction loans are typically larger than those for single-family and consumer loans. Accordingly, when there are defaults and losses on these types of loans, they are often larger on a per loan basis than those for one- to four-family residential and consumer loans. Commercial and industrial loans expose us to additional risks since they typically are made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayments from the cash flow of the borrower’s business and are secured by non-real estate collateral that may depreciate over time, may be illiquid and may fluctuate in value based on the success of the business. A secondary market for most types of commercial real estate, multi-family, commercial and industrial, and construction loans is not readily liquid, so we have less opportunity to mitigate credit risk by selling part or all of our interest in these loans.

Our construction loans are based upon estimates of costs and values associated with the completed project. These estimates may be inaccurate. Construction lending involves additional risks when compared with permanent residential lending because funds are advanced upon the security of the project, which is of uncertain value prior to its completion. Because of the uncertainties inherent in estimating construction costs, as well as the market value of the completed project and the effects of governmental regulation of real property, it is relatively difficult to evaluate accurately the total funds required to complete a project and the related loan-to-value ratio. This type of lending also typically involves higher loan principal amounts and is often concentrated with a small number of builders. In addition, during the term of a construction loan, interest is funded by the borrower or disbursed from an interest reserve set aside from the construction loan budget. These loans often involve the disbursement of substantial funds with repayment substantially dependent on the success of the ultimate project and the ability of the borrower to sell or lease the property or obtain permanent take-out financing, rather than the ability of the borrower or guarantor to repay principal and interest. If our appraisal of the value of a completed project proves to be overstated, we may have inadequate security for the repayment of the loan upon completion of construction of the project and may incur a loss. In addition, speculative construction loans to a builder are often associated with homes that are not pre-sold, and thus pose a greater potential risk to us than construction loans to individuals on their personal residences. These risks can be significantly affected by supply and demand conditions.

The credit risk related to commercial real estate and multi-family loans is considered to be greater than the risk related to one- to four-family residential or consumer loans because the repayment of commercial real estate loans and multi-family typically is dependent on the income stream of the real estate securing the loan as collateral and the successful operation of the borrower’s business, which can be significantly affected by conditions in the real estate markets or in the economy. For example, if the cash flows from the borrower’s project are reduced as a result of leases not being obtained or renewed, the borrower’s ability to repay the loan may be impaired. In addition, some of our commercial real estate loans are not fully amortizing and contain large balloon payments upon maturity. These balloon payments may require the borrower to either sell or refinance the underlying property in order to make the balloon payment, which may increase the risk of default or non-payment. This risk was exacerbated in the recent recession and could remain an elevated risk in the current slow recovery economic environment.

Further, if we foreclose on a commercial real estate, multi-family or construction loan, our holding period for the collateral may be longer than for one- to four-family residential mortgage loans because there are fewer potential purchasers of the collateral.

The unseasoned nature of our commercial loan portfolio may result in errors in judging its collectability, which may lead to additional provisions for loan losses or charge-offs, which would hurt our profits.

Our commercial loan portfolio, which includes commercial real estate, multi-family, commercial and industrial, and construction loans, has increased to $4.010 billion, or 85.8% of total loans at December 31, 2017

 

29


Table of Contents

from $1.776 billion, or 77.5% of total loans, at December 31, 2013. A portion of our commercial loan portfolio is unseasoned, meaning they were originated recently. Our limited experience with these borrowers does not provide us with a significant payment history pattern with which to judge future collectability. Further, these loans have not been subjected to unfavorable economic conditions. As a result, it is difficult to predict the future performance of this part of our loan portfolio. These loans may have delinquency or charge-off levels above our historical experience, which could adversely affect our future performance.

Our business strategy includes the continuation of significant growth plans, and our financial condition and results of operations could be negatively affected if we fail to grow or fail to manage our growth effectively.

We expect to continue to experience growth in the amount of our assets, the level of our deposits and the scale of our operations. Achieving our growth targets requires us to attract customers that currently bank at other financial institutions in our market, thereby increasing our share of the market. Our ability to successfully grow will depend on a variety of factors, including our ability to attract and retain experienced bankers, the continued availability of desirable business opportunities, the competitive responses from other financial institutions in our market areas and our ability to manage our growth. Growth opportunities may not be available or we may not be able to manage our growth successfully. If we do not manage our growth effectively, we may not be able to achieve our business plan, and our business could be harmed

Acquisitions may disrupt our business and dilute stockholder value.

We completed the acquisition of Meetinghouse Bancorp, Inc. and Meetinghouse Bank in December 2017. We regularly evaluate merger and acquisition opportunities with other financial institutions and financial services companies. As a result, negotiations may take place and future mergers or acquisitions involving cash, debt, or equity securities may occur at any time. We would seek acquisition partners that offer us either significant market presence or the potential to expand our market footprint and improve profitability through economies of scale or expanded services.

Acquiring other banks, businesses, or branches may have an adverse effect on our financial results and may involve various other risks commonly associated with acquisitions, including, among other things:

 

   

difficulty in estimating the value of the target company;

 

   

payment of a premium over book and market values that may dilute our tangible book value and earnings per share in the short and long term;

 

   

potential exposure to unknown or contingent liabilities of the target company;

 

   

exposure to potential asset quality problems of the target company;

 

   

potential volatility in reported income associated with goodwill impairment losses;

 

   

difficulty and expense of integrating the operations and personnel of the target company;

 

   

inability to realize the expected revenue increases, cost savings, increases in geographic or product presence, and/or other projected benefits of the acquisition;

 

   

potential disruption to our business;

 

   

potential diversion of our management’s time and attention;

 

   

the possible loss of key employees and customers of the target company; and

 

   

potential changes in banking or tax laws or regulations that may affect the target company.

Declines in property values can increase the loan-to-value ratios on our residential mortgage loan portfolio, which could expose us to greater risk of loss.

Some of our residential mortgage loans are secured by liens on mortgage properties in which the borrowers have little or no equity because either we originated the loan with a relatively high combined loan-to-value ratio,

 

30


Table of Contents

including second mortgage loans issued by us or other institutions, or because of the decline in home values in our market areas. Residential loans with high combined loan-to-value ratios may experience a higher incidence of default and severity of losses. In addition, if the borrowers sell their homes, such borrowers may be unable to repay their loans in full from the sale proceeds. As a result, these loans may experience higher rates of delinquencies, defaults and losses.

If our allowance for loan losses is not sufficient to cover actual loan losses, our earnings could decrease.

We maintain an allowance for loan losses, which is established through a provision for loan losses that represents management’s best estimate of probable losses within the existing portfolio of loans. We make various assumptions and judgments about the collectability of our loan portfolio, including the creditworthiness of borrowers and the value of the real estate and other assets serving as collateral for the repayment of loans. In determining the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses, we rely on our experience and our evaluation of economic conditions. If our assumptions prove to be incorrect, our current allowance for loan losses may not be sufficient to cover losses inherent in our loan portfolio and adjustment may be necessary to allow for different economic conditions or adverse developments in our loan portfolio. Consequently, a problem with one or more loans could require us to significantly increase the level of our provision for loan losses. In addition, federal and state regulators periodically review our allowance for loan losses and may require us to increase our provision for loan losses or recognize further loan charge-offs. Material additions to the allowance would materially decrease our net income.

The Financial Accounting Standards Board has adopted a new accounting standard that will be effective for us beginning January 1, 2020. This standard, which requires a Current Expected Credit Loss (‘CECL”) model, will require financial institutions to determine periodic estimates of lifetime expected credit losses on loans, and recognize the expected credit losses as allowances for loan losses. This will change from the current method of providing allowances for loan losses that have already been incurred, which may require us to increase our allowance for loan losses, and to greatly increase the types of data we would need to collect and review to determine the appropriate level of the allowance for loan losses. Any increase in our allowance for loan losses or expenses incurred to determine the appropriate level of the allowance for loan losses may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Our allowance for loan losses increased in 2017, primarily due to growth in the multi-family, commercial real estate, construction, and commercial and industrial loan categories; as such loans have higher inherent credit risk than loans in our residential real estate loan categories. Refer to “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Results of Operations and Financial Condition — Asset Quality.”

Changes in the valuation of our securities portfolio could hurt our profits.

Our securities portfolio may be impacted by fluctuations in market value, potentially reducing accumulated other comprehensive income and/or earnings. Fluctuations in market value may be caused by changes in market interest rates, lower market prices for securities and limited investor demand. Management evaluates securities for other-than-temporary impairment on a monthly basis, with more frequent evaluation for selected issues. In analyzing a debt issuer’s financial condition, management considers whether the securities are issued by the federal government or its agencies, whether downgrades by bond rating agencies have occurred, industry analysts’ reports and, to a lesser extent given the relatively insignificant levels of depreciation in our debt portfolio, spread differentials between the effective rates on instruments in the portfolio compared to risk-free rates. In analyzing an equity issuer’s financial condition, management considers industry analysts’ reports, financial performance and projected target prices of investment analysts within a one-year time frame. If this evaluation shows impairment to the actual or projected cash flows associated with one or more securities, a potential loss to earnings may occur. Changes in interest rates can also have an adverse effect on our financial condition, as our available-for-sale securities are reported at their estimated fair value, and therefore are impacted by fluctuations in interest rates. We increase or decrease our stockholders’ equity by the amount of change in the estimated fair value of the available-for-sale securities, net of taxes. The declines in market value could result in other-than-temporary impairments of these assets, which would lead to accounting charges that could have a material adverse effect on our net income and capital levels. Refer to “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Results of Operations and Financial Condition — Securities Portfolio.”

 

31


Table of Contents

Effective December 10, 2013, pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act, federal banking and securities regulators issued final rules to implement Section 619 of the Dodd-Frank Act (the “Volcker Rule”). Generally, subject to a transition period and certain exceptions, the Volcker Rule restricts insured depository institutions and their affiliated companies from engaging in short-term proprietary trading of certain securities, investing in funds with collateral comprised of less than 100% loans that are not registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission and from engaging in hedging activities that do not hedge a specific identified risk. After the transition period, the Volcker Rule prohibitions and restrictions will apply to banking entities unless an exception applies.

In January 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2016-01, Financial Instruments — Overall, (Subtopic 825-10). The amendments in this update address certain aspects of recognition, measurement, presentation, and disclosure of financial instruments. Targeted changes to generally accepted accounting principles include the requirement for equity investments (except those accounted for under the equity method of accounting or those that result in consolidation of the investee) to be measured at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in net income and the elimination of the requirement for public business entities to disclose the methods and significant assumptions used to estimate the fair value for financial instruments measured at amortized cost. The amendments in this update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company has a portfolio of equity investments and if such guidance were effective for the year ended December 31, 2017, a net unrealized loss of approximately $2.6 million and related deferred tax benefit of $900,000 would have been recognized in net income, instead of in other comprehensive income. The impact of this guidance on future periods is dependent on future market conditions and investment activity.

Impairment of goodwill could require charges to earnings, which could result in a negative impact on our results of operations.

Goodwill arises when a business is purchased for an amount greater than the net fair value of its assets. We recognized goodwill as an asset on our balance sheet in connection with our acquisitions of Mt. Washington Co-operative Bank and Meetinghouse. We evaluate goodwill for impairment at least annually. Although we determined that goodwill was not impaired during 2017, a significant and sustained decline in our stock price, a significant decline in our expected future cash flows, a significant adverse change in the business climate, slower growth rates or other factors could result in impairment of goodwill. If we were to conclude that a future write-down of the goodwill was necessary, then we would record the appropriate charge to earnings, which could be materially adverse to the results of operations and financial position. For further discussion of our methodology of evaluating and impairing goodwill, refer to “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Results of Operations and Financial Condition — Critical Accounting Policies — Evaluation of Goodwill and Core Deposit Intangible and Analysis for Impairment.”

The building of market share through de novo branching and expansion of our residential, commercial real estate, and commercial and industrial lending capacity could cause our expenses to increase faster than revenues.

We intend to continue to build market share in the greater Boston metropolitan area through de novo branching and expansion of our residential, commercial real estate, and commercial and industrial lending capacity. Since 2007, we have opened 14 de novo branches including the most recent two branches opened in March and December 2016. There are considerable costs involved in opening branches and expanding lending capacity that generally require a period of time to generate the necessary revenues to offset their costs, especially in areas in which we do not have an established presence. Accordingly, any such business expansion may negatively impact our earnings for some period of time until certain economies of scale are reached. Our expenses could be further increased if we encounter delays in the opening of any of our new branches. Finally, our business expansion may not be successful after establishment.

Our funding sources may prove insufficient to replace deposits at maturity and support our future growth.

We must maintain sufficient funds to respond to the needs of depositors and borrowers. As a part of our liquidity management, we use a number of funding sources in addition to core deposit growth and repayments

 

32


Table of Contents

and maturities of loans and investments. As we continue to grow, we are likely to become more dependent on these sources, which include Federal Home Loan Bank advances, proceeds from the sale of loans, federal funds purchased and brokered certificates of deposit. Adverse operating results or changes in industry conditions could lead to difficulty or an inability to access these additional funding sources. Our financial flexibility will be severely constrained if we are unable to maintain our access to funding or if adequate financing is not available to accommodate future growth at acceptable interest rates. If we are required to rely more heavily on more expensive funding sources to support future growth, our revenues may not increase proportionately to cover our costs. In this case, our operating margins and profitability would be adversely affected.

We are subject to certain capital requirements, which may adversely impact our return on equity, require us to raise additional capital, or constrain us from paying dividends or repurchasing shares.

Effective January 1, 2015, we became subject to more stringent capital requirements as a result of the implementation of Basel III regulatory capital reforms and changes required by the Dodd-Frank Act. The application of more stringent capital requirements could, among other things, result in lower returns on equity, require the raising of additional capital, and result in regulatory actions if we were to be unable to comply with such requirements. The imposition of liquidity requirements in connection with the implementation of Basel III could result in our having to lengthen the term of our funding, restructure our business models, and/or increase our holdings of liquid assets. Furthermore, a financial institution is subject to limitations on paying dividends, engaging in share repurchases, any paying discretionary bonuses if its capital level falls below the capital conversation buffer amount. These limitations establish a maximum percentage of eligible retained income that can be utilized for such actions. See “Supervision and Regulation — Federal Banking Regulation — Capital Requirements.”

The level of our commercial real estate loan portfolio may subject us to additional regulatory scrutiny.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the other federal bank regulatory agencies have promulgated joint guidance on sound risk management practices for financial institutions with concentrations in commercial real estate lending. Under the guidance, a financial institution that, like us, is actively involved in commercial real estate lending should perform a risk assessment to identify concentrations. A financial institution may have a concentration in commercial real estate lending if, among other factors, (i) total reported loans for construction, land acquisition and development, and other land represent 100% or more of total capital, or (ii) total reported loans secured by multi-family and non-farm residential properties, loans for construction, land acquisition and development and other land, and loans otherwise sensitive to the general commercial real estate market, including loans to commercial real estate related entities, represent 300% or more of total capital. Based on these factors, we have a concentration in multi-family and commercial real estate lending, as such loans represent 470% of total bank capital as of December 31, 2017. The particular focus of the guidance is on exposure to commercial real estate loans that are dependent on the cash flow from the real estate held as collateral and that are likely to be at greater risk to conditions in the commercial real estate market (as opposed to real estate collateral held as a secondary source of repayment or as an abundance of caution). The purpose of the guidance is to guide banks in developing risk management practices and capital levels commensurate with the level and nature of real estate concentrations. The guidance states that management should employ heightened risk management practices including board and management oversight and strategic planning, development of underwriting standards, risk assessment and monitoring through market analysis and stress testing. While we believe we have implemented policies and procedures with respect to our commercial real estate loan portfolio consistent with this guidance, bank regulators could require us to implement additional policies and procedures consistent with their interpretation of the guidance that may result in additional costs to us or that may result in a curtailment of our multi-family and commercial real estate lending that would adversely affect our loan originations and profitability.

Changes in laws and regulations and the cost of regulatory compliance with new laws and regulations may adversely affect our operations, increase our costs of operations and decrease our efficiency.

The Company and the Bank are subject to extensive regulation, supervision and examination by the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the Federal Reserve

 

33


Table of Contents

Board. Such regulation and supervision governs the activities in which we may engage and are intended primarily for the protection of the insurance fund and the depositors and borrowers of the Bank rather than for holders of our common stock. Regulatory authorities have extensive discretion in their supervisory and enforcement activities, including the imposition of restrictions on our operations, the classification of our assets and the determination of the level of our allowance for loan losses. These regulations, along with the currently existing tax, accounting, securities, insurance, monetary laws, rules, standards, policies, and interpretations control the methods by which financial institutions conduct business, implement strategic initiatives and tax compliance, and govern financial reporting and disclosures. Any change in such regulation and oversight, whether in the form of regulatory policy, regulations, legislation or supervisory action, may have a material impact on our operations. Further, changes in accounting standards can be both difficult to predict and involve judgment and discretion in their interpretation by us and our independent accounting firms. These changes could materially impact, potentially even retroactively, how we report our financial condition and results of our operations as could our interpretation of those changes.

Monetary policies and regulations of the Federal Reserve Board could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition to being affected by general economic conditions, our earnings and growth are affected by the policies of the Federal Reserve Board. An important function of the Federal Reserve Board is to regulate the money supply and credit conditions. Among the instruments used by the Federal Reserve Board to implement these objectives are open market purchases and sales of U.S. government securities, adjustments of the discount rate and changes in banks’ reserve requirements against bank deposits. These instruments are used in varying combinations to influence overall economic growth and the distribution of credit, bank loans, investments and deposits. Their use also affects interest rates charged on loans or paid on deposits.

The monetary policies and regulations of the Federal Reserve Board have had a significant effect on the operating results of financial institutions in the past and are expected to continue to do so in the future. The effects of such policies upon our business, financial condition and results of operations cannot be predicted.

We are subject to the Community Reinvestment Act and fair lending laws, and failure to comply with these laws could lead to material penalties.

The Community Reinvestment Act (“CRA”), the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Fair Housing Act and other fair lending laws and regulations impose nondiscriminatory lending requirements on financial institutions. A successful regulatory challenge to an institution’s performance under the CRA or fair lending laws and regulations could result in a wide variety of sanctions, including the required payment of damages and civil money penalties, injunctive relief, imposition of restrictions on mergers and acquisitions activity and restrictions on expansion. Private parties may also have the ability to challenge an institution’s performance under fair lending laws in private class action litigation. Such actions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Certain regulations could restrict our ability to originate and sell loans.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has issued a rule designed to clarify for lenders how they can avoid legal liability under the Dodd-Frank Act, which would hold lenders accountable for ensuring a borrower’s ability to repay a mortgage. Loans that meet this “qualified mortgage” definition will be presumed to have complied with the new ability-to-repay standard. Under the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s rule, a “qualified mortgage” loan must not contain certain specified features, including:

 

   

excessive upfront points and fees (those exceeding 3% of the total loan amount, less “bona fide discount points” for prime loans);

 

   

interest-only payments;

 

   

negative-amortization; and

 

   

terms longer than 30 years.

 

34


Table of Contents

Also, to qualify as a “qualified mortgage,” a borrower’s total monthly debt-to-income ratio may not exceed 43%. Lenders must also verify and document the income and financial resources relied upon to qualify the borrower for the loan and underwrite the loan based on a fully amortizing payment schedule and maximum interest rate during the first five years, taking into account all applicable taxes, insurance and assessments. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act requires the regulatory agencies to issue regulations that require securitizers of loans to retain not less than 5% of the credit risk for any asset that is not a “qualified residential mortgage.” The regulatory agencies have issued a final rule to implement this requirement, which provides that the definition of “qualified residential mortgage” includes loans that meet the definition of “qualified mortgage” issued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for purposes of its regulations (as described above).

These final rules could have a significant effect on the secondary market for loans and the types of loans we originate, and restrict our ability to make loans, any of which could limit our growth or profitability.

Non-compliance with the USA PATRIOT Act, Bank Secrecy Act, or other laws and regulations could result in fines or sanctions.

The USA PATRIOT and Bank Secrecy Acts require financial institutions to develop programs to prevent financial institutions from being used for money laundering and terrorist activities. If such activities are detected, financial institutions are obligated to file suspicious activity reports with the U.S. Treasury’s Office of Financial Crimes Enforcement Network. These rules require financial institutions to establish procedures for identifying and verifying the identity of customers seeking to open new financial accounts. Failure to comply with these regulations could result in fines or sanctions. During the last year, several banking institutions have received large fines for non-compliance with these laws and regulations. While we have developed policies and procedures designed to assist in compliance with these laws and regulations, these policies and procedures may not be effective in preventing violations of these laws and regulations.

Legal and regulatory proceedings and related matters could adversely affect us or the financial services industry in general.

We, and other participants in the financial services industry upon whom we rely to operate, have been and may in the future become involved in legal and regulatory proceedings. Most of the proceedings we consider to be in the normal course of our business or typical for the industry; however, it is inherently difficult to assess the outcome of these matters and, other participants in the financial services industry or we may not prevail in any proceeding or litigation. There could be substantial cost and management diversion in such litigation and proceedings, and any adverse determination could have a materially adverse effect on our business, brand or image, or our financial condition and results of our operations.

The Federal Reserve Board may require us to commit capital resources to support the Bank.

Federal law requires that a holding company act as a source of financial and managerial strength to its subsidiary bank and to commit resources to support such subsidiary bank. Under the “source of strength” doctrine, the Federal Reserve Board may require a holding company to make capital injections into a troubled subsidiary bank and may charge the holding company with engaging in unsafe and unsound practices for failure to commit resources to a subsidiary bank. A capital injection may be required at times when the holding company may not have the resources to provide it and therefore may be required to borrow the funds or raise capital. Any loans by a holding company to its subsidiary bank are subordinate in right of payment to deposits and to certain other indebtedness of such subsidiary bank. In the event of a holding company’s bankruptcy, the bankruptcy trustee will assume any commitment by the holding company to a federal bank regulatory agency to maintain the capital of a subsidiary bank. Moreover, bankruptcy law provides that claims based on any such commitment will be entitled to a priority of payment over the claims of the institution’s general unsecured creditors, including the holders of its note obligations. Thus, any borrowing that must be done by the Company to make a required capital injection becomes more difficult and expensive and could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

35


Table of Contents

Strong competition within our market area could hurt our profits and slow growth.

We face intense competition in making loans and attracting deposits. Price competition for loans and deposits sometimes results in us charging lower interest rates on our loans and paying higher interest rates on our deposits and may reduce our net interest income. Competition also makes it more difficult and costly to attract and retain qualified employees. Many of the institutions with which we compete have substantially greater resources and lending limits than we have and may offer services that we do not provide. We expect competition to increase in the future as a result of legislative, regulatory and technological changes and the continuing trend of consolidation in the financial services industry. If we are not able to effectively compete in our market area, our profitability may be negatively affected, potentially limiting our ability to pay dividends. The greater resources and broader offering of deposit and loan products of some of our competitors may also limit our ability to increase our interest-earning assets. For more information about our market area and the competition we face, see “Item 1 — Business — Market Area” and “Item 1 — Competition.”

Our success depends on hiring and retaining certain key personnel.

Our performance largely depends on the talents and efforts of highly skilled individuals. We rely on key personnel to manage and operate our business, including major revenue generating functions such as loan and deposit generation. The loss of key staff may adversely affect our ability to maintain and manage these functions effectively, which could negatively affect our revenues. In addition, loss of key personnel could result in increased recruiting and hiring expenses, which could cause a decrease in our net income. Our continued ability to compete effectively depends on our ability to attract new employees and to retain and motivate our existing employees.

Our business may be adversely affected by an increasing prevalence of fraud and other financial crimes.

Our loans to businesses and individuals and our deposit relationships and related transactions are subject to exposure to the risk of loss due to fraud and other financial crimes. Nationally, reported incidents of fraud and other financial crimes have increased. We have also experienced losses due to apparent fraud and other financial crimes. While we have policies and procedures designed to prevent such losses, losses may still occur.

Managing reputational risk is important to attracting and maintaining customers, investors and employees.

Threats to our reputation can come from many sources, including adverse sentiment about financial institutions generally, unethical practices, employee misconduct, failure to deliver minimum standards of service or quality, compliance deficiencies, and questionable or fraudulent activities of our customers. We have policies and procedures in place to protect our reputation and promote ethical conduct, but these policies and procedures may not be fully effective. Negative publicity regarding our business, employees, or customers, with or without merit, may result in the loss of customers, investors and employees, costly litigation, a decline in revenues and increased governmental regulation.

System failure or breaches of our network security could subject us to increased operating costs as well as litigation and other liabilities.

The computer systems and network infrastructure we use could be vulnerable to unforeseen problems. Our operations are dependent upon our ability to protect our computer equipment against damage from physical theft, fire, power loss, telecommunications failure or a similar catastrophic event, as well as from security breaches, denial of service attacks, viruses, worms and other disruptive problems caused by hackers. Any damage or failure that causes an interruption in our operations could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Computer break-ins, phishing and other disruptions could also jeopardize the security of information stored in and transmitted through our computer systems and network infrastructure, which may result in significant liability to us and may cause existing and potential customers to refrain from doing business with us. Although we, with the help of third-party service providers, intend to continue to implement security technology and establish operational procedures to prevent such damage, our security measures may not be successful. In addition, advances in computer capabilities, new discoveries in the field of cryptography or other

 

36


Table of Contents

developments could result in a compromise or breach of the algorithms we and our third-party service providers use to encrypt and protect customer transaction data. A failure of such security measures could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

It is possible that a significant amount of time and money may be spent to rectify the harm caused by a breach or hack. While we have general liability insurance and cyber liability insurance, there are limitations on coverage as well as dollar amount. Furthermore, cyber incidents carry a greater risk of injury to our reputation. Finally, depending on the type of incident, banking regulators can impose restrictions on our business and consumer laws may require reimbursement of customer loss.

Our risk management framework may not be effective in mitigating risk and reducing the potential for significant losses.

Our risk management framework is designed to minimize risk and loss to us. We seek to identify, measure, monitor, report and control our exposure to risk, including strategic, market, liquidity, compliance and operational risks. While we use a broad and diversified set of risk monitoring and mitigation techniques, these techniques are inherently limited because they cannot anticipate the existence or future development of currently unanticipated or unknown risks. Recent economic conditions and heightened legislative and regulatory scrutiny of the financial services industry, among other developments, have increased our level of risk. Accordingly, we could suffer losses as a result of our failure to properly anticipate and manage these risks.

We face significant operational risks because the financial services business involves a high volume of transactions.

We operate in diverse markets and rely on the ability of our employees and systems to process a high number of transactions. Operational risk is the risk of loss resulting from our operations, including but not limited to, the risk of fraud by employees or persons outside our company, the execution of unauthorized transactions by employees, errors relating to transaction processing and technology, breaches of our internal control systems and compliance requirements, and business continuation and disaster recovery. Insurance coverage may not be available for such losses, or where available, such losses may exceed insurance limits. This risk of loss also includes the potential legal actions that could arise as a result of operational deficiencies or as a result of non-compliance with applicable regulatory standards or customer attrition due to potential negative publicity. In the event of a breakdown in our internal control systems, improper operation of systems or improper employee actions, we could suffer financial loss, face regulatory action, and/or suffer damage to our reputation.

We are subject to environmental liability risk associated with lending activities.

A significant portion of our loan portfolio is secured by real estate, and we could become subject to environmental liabilities with respect to one or more of these properties. During the ordinary course of business, we may foreclose on and take title to properties securing defaulted loans. In doing so, there is a risk that hazardous or toxic substances could be found on these properties. If hazardous conditions or toxic substances are found on these properties, we may be liable for remediation costs, as well as for personal injury and property damage, civil fines and criminal penalties regardless of when the hazardous conditions or toxic substances first affected any particular property. Environmental laws may require us to incur substantial expenses to address unknown liabilities and may materially reduce the affected property’s value or limit our ability to use or sell the affected property. In addition, future laws or more stringent interpretations or enforcement policies with respect to existing laws may increase our exposure to environmental liability. Although we have policies and procedures to perform an environmental review before initiating any foreclosure action on nonresidential real property, these reviews may not be sufficient to detect all potential environmental hazards. The remediation costs and any other financial liabilities associated with an environmental hazard could have a material adverse effect on us.

Various factors may make takeover attempts more difficult to achieve.

Certain provisions of our articles of incorporation and state and federal banking laws, including regulatory approval requirements, could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire control of the Company without

 

37


Table of Contents

our Board of Directors’ approval. Under federal law, subject to certain exemptions, a person, entity or group must notify the Federal Reserve Board before acquiring control of a bank holding company. Acquisition of 10% or more of any class of voting stock of a bank holding company, including shares of our common stock or shares of our preferred stock were those shares to become entitled to vote upon the election of two directors because of missed dividends, creates a rebuttable presumption that the acquirer “controls” the bank holding company. Also, a bank holding company must obtain the prior approval of the Federal Reserve Board before, among other things, acquiring direct or indirect ownership or control of more than 5% of any class of voting shares of any bank, including East Boston Savings Bank.

There also are provisions in our articles of incorporation that may be used to delay or block a takeover attempt, including a provision that prohibits any person from voting more than 10% of the shares of common stock outstanding. Furthermore, shares of restricted stock and stock options that we have granted or may grant to employees and directors, stock ownership by our management and directors, including through our ESOP, employment agreements that we have entered into with our executive officers and other factors may make it more difficult for companies or persons to acquire control of the Company without the consent of our Board of Directors. Taken as a whole, these statutory provisions and provisions in our articles of incorporation could result in our being less attractive to a potential acquirer and thus could adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

Our stock-based benefit plans have increased our expenses and reduced our income, and may dilute your ownership interest.

In 2015, we adopted new stock-based benefit plans. These plans may be funded either through open market purchases or from the issuance of authorized but unissued shares of common stock. Our ability to purchase shares of common stock to fund these plans will be subject to many factors, including applicable regulatory restrictions, the availability of stock in the market, the trading price of the stock, our capital levels, alternative uses for our capital and our financial performance. While our intention is to fund the new stock-based benefit plans through open market purchases, stockholders would experience dilution in ownership interest in the event newly issued shares of our common stock are used to fund stock options and shares of restricted common stock.

Changes in management’s estimates and assumptions may have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements and our financial condition or operating results.

In preparing this annual report as well as other periodic reports we are required to file under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including our consolidated financial statements, our management is and will be required under applicable rules and regulations to make estimates and assumptions as of a specified date. These estimates and assumptions are based on management’s best estimates and experience as of that date and are subject to substantial risk and uncertainty. Materially different results may occur as circumstances change and additional information becomes known. Areas requiring significant estimates and assumptions by management include our determination of the allowance for loan losses, the evaluation of goodwill for impairment and the evaluation of securities for other-than-temporary impairment.

Changes in card network fees could impact our operations.

From time to time, the card networks increase the fees (known as interchange fees) that they charge to acquirers and that we charge to our merchants. It is possible that competitive pressures will result in us absorbing a portion of such increases in the future, which would increase our costs, reduce our profit margin and adversely affect our business and financial condition. In addition, the card networks require certain capital requirements. An increase in the required capital level would further limit our use of capital for other purposes.

Changes in card network rules or standards could adversely affect our business.

In order to provide our debit card and cash management solutions, we are members of the Visa network. As such, we are subject to card network rules that could subject us to a variety of fines or penalties that may be assessed on us. The termination of our membership or any changes in card network rules or standards, including

 

38


Table of Contents

interpretation and implementation of existing rules or standards, could increase the cost of operating our merchant servicer business or limit our ability to provide debit card and cash management solutions to or through our customers, and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our business could suffer if there is a decline in the use of debit cards as a payment mechanism or if there are adverse developments with respect to the financial services industry in general.

As the financial services industry evolves, consumers may find debit financial services to be less attractive than traditional or other financial services. Consumers might not use debit card financial services for any number of reasons, including the general perception of our industry. If consumers do not continue or increase their usage of debit cards, including making changes in the way debit cards are loaded, our operating revenues and debit card deposits may remain at current levels or decline. Any projected growth for the industry may not occur or may occur more slowly than estimated. If consumer acceptance of debit financial services does not continue to develop or develops more slowly than expected or if there is a shift in the mix of payment forms, such as cash, credit cards, traditional debit cards and debit cards, away from our products and services, it could have a material adverse effect on our financial position and results of operations.

 

ITEM 1B.     UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

At December 31, 2017, we conducted business through our 33 full service offices, one mobile branch and three loan centers located in Allston, Belmont, Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, Danvers, East Boston, Revere, Somerville, South Boston, Dorchester, Jamaica Plain, West Roxbury, Everett, Medford, Melrose, Wakefield, Winthrop, Lynn, Peabody, Roslindale and Saugus, Massachusetts. We also operate in three administrative/support offices. We own 20 and lease 19 of our offices. At December 31, 2017, the total net book value of our land, buildings, furniture, fixtures and equipment was $41.0 million.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

Periodically, there have been various claims and lawsuits against us, such as claims to enforce liens, condemnation proceedings on properties in which we hold security interests, claims involving the making and servicing of real property loans and other issues incident to our business. We are not a party to any pending legal proceedings that we believe would have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not Applicable.

 

39


Table of Contents

PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANTS COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Information and Holders

The Company’s shares of common stock are traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “EBSB.” The approximate number of shareholders of record of the Company’s common stock as of February 22, 2018 was 1,840. Certain shares of the Company are held in “nominee” or “street” name and accordingly, the number of beneficial owners of such shares is not known or included in the foregoing number.

The following table sets forth for each quarter of 2017 and 2016 the intra-day high and low sales prices per share of common stock as reported by NASDAQ and the cash dividends declared per share.

 

                                                                          

2017

     High        Low        Dividends  

Fourth quarter

     $ 21.30        $ 17.96        $ 0.05  

Third quarter

       19.00          16.35          0.04  

Second quarter

       19.27          15.85          0.04  

First quarter

       19.70          17.55          0.04  

2016

     High        Low        Dividends  

Fourth quarter

     $ 20.55        $ 15.06        $ 0.03  

Third quarter

       15.77          14.62          0.03  

Second quarter

       15.34          13.41          0.03  

First quarter

       14.36          12.28          0.03  

Dividends

The Company is not permitted to pay dividends on its common stock if its stockholders’ equity would be reduced below the amount of the liquidation account established by the Company in connection with the conversion. The source of dividends will depend on the net proceeds retained by the Company and earnings thereon, and dividends from the Bank. In addition, the Company is subject to state law limitations and federal bank regulatory policy on the payment of dividends. Maryland law generally limits dividends if the corporation would not be able to pay its debts in the usual course of business after giving effect to the dividend or if the corporation’s total assets would be less than the corporation’s total liabilities plus the amount needed to satisfy the preferential rights upon dissolution of stockholders whose preferential rights on dissolution are superior to those receiving the distribution. In addition, the Company is subject to the Federal Reserve Board’s policy that dividends should be paid only out of current earnings and only if the prospective rate of earnings retention by the Company appears consistent with its capital needs, asset quality and overall financial condition. See “Supervision and Regulation — Holding Company Regulation.”

Dividends from the Company may depend, in part, upon receipt of dividends from the Bank because the Company has no source of income other than dividends from the Bank and earnings from investment of net proceeds from the offering retained by the Company. Massachusetts banking law and FDIC regulations limit distributions from the Bank to the Company. For example, the Bank could not pay dividends if it were not in compliance with applicable regulatory capital requirements. See “Supervision and Regulation — Massachusetts Banking Laws and Supervision — Dividends” and “Federal Bank Regulation — Prompt Corrective Regulatory Action.”

In determining whether to declare or pay any dividends, whether regular or special, the Board of Directors takes into account our financial condition and results of operations, tax considerations, statutory and regulatory limitations, and general economic conditions. The payment and amount of any dividend payments depends upon a number of factors. We cannot assure that dividends will not be reduced or eliminated in the future.

 

40


Table of Contents

Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchases

There were no share repurchases during the year ended December 31, 2017. On August 12, 2015, the Company’s Board of Directors voted to adopt a stock repurchase program of up to 5% of its outstanding common stock, or 2,737,334 shares of its common stock. The repurchase program has no expiration date. As of December 31, 2017, 677,723 shares remain available for repurchase under the repurchase program.

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

Stock-based compensation awards outstanding and available for future grants as of December 31, 2017 represent stock-based compensation plans approved by stockholders. Other than our Employee Stock Ownership Plan, there are no plans that have not been approved by stockholders. Additional information is presented in Note 10, Employee Benefit Plans, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data, within this report. Additional information regarding the Company’s equity compensation plans is included in Part III, Item 12 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Performance Graph

The stock performance graph below compares the Company’s cumulative shareholder return on its common stock from December 31, 2012 to December 31, 2017 with the cumulative total return of the NASDAQ Composite and the SNL Bank and Thrift Composite. Total shareholder return is measured by dividing total dividends (assuming dividend reinvestment) for the measurement period plus share price change for the period from the share price at the beginning of the measurement period. The return is based on an initial investment of $100.00.

Meridian Bancorp, Inc.

LOGO

 

     Period Ending  

Index

  12/31/12     12/31/13     12/31/14     12/31/15     12/31/16     12/31/17  

Meridian Bancorp, Inc.

    100.00       134.56       163.71       206.64       279.14       307.04  

NASDAQ Composite Index

    100.00       140.12       160.78       171.97       187.22       242.71  

SNL Bank and Thrift Index

    100.00       136.92       152.85       155.94       196.86       231.49  

Source: SNL Financial LC, Charlottesville, VA

 

41


Table of Contents
ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following tables set forth selected consolidated financial data for the Company. This information should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes, and the section titled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” that appear elsewhere in this Annual Report.

 

                                                                                                                            
     At or For the Years Ended December 31,  
     2017     2016     2015     2014     2013  
     (Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)  

Financial Condition Data

          

Total assets

   $ 5,299,455     $ 4,436,002     $ 3,524,509     $ 3,278,526     $ 2,682,101  

Securities available for sale

     38,364       67,663       141,646       203,521       201,137  

Loans, net

     4,622,798       3,898,668       3,045,242       2,648,907       2,265,400  

Deposits

     4,107,861       3,475,837       2,743,018       2,503,935       2,248,600  

Borrowings

     513,444       322,512       167,226       171,899       161,903  

Total stockholders’ equity

     646,399       607,297       588,126       577,710       249,205  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating Data

          

Interest and dividend income

   $ 185,104     $ 149,692     $ 123,342     $ 108,679     $ 95,204  

Interest expense

     38,912       27,137       20,451       20,513       20,135  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net interest income

     146,192       122,555       102,891       88,166       75,069  

Provision for loan losses

     4,859       7,180       6,667       3,313       6,470  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net interest income, after provision for loan losses

     141,333       115,375       96,224       84,853       68,599  

Non-interest income

     23,064       14,190       13,040       16,056       19,416  

Non-interest expenses

     87,965       77,494       72,691       67,434       64,515  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

     76,432       52,071       36,573       33,475       23,500  

Provision for income taxes

     33,487       17,881       11,966       11,148       8,071  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 42,945     $ 34,190     $ 24,607     $ 22,327     $ 15,429  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Key Performance Ratios

          

Return on average assets

     0.89     0.87     0.74     0.75     0.62

Return on average equity

     6.82       5.77       4.19       5.69       6.39  

Interest rate spread (1)

     2.90       2.99       2.97       2.88       3.00  

Net interest margin (2)

     3.12       3.20       3.19       3.08       3.15  

Non-interest expense to average assets

     1.83       1.97       2.17       2.26       2.58  

Efficiency ratio (3)

     53.71       57.95       64.05       68.84       76.04  

Dividend payout ratio

     20.26       17.91       12.77              

Average interest-earning assets to average

          

interest-bearing liabilities

     126.88       129.95       134.63       126.57       118.30  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Capital Ratios

          

Stockholders’ equity to total assets

     12.20     13.69     16.69     17.62     9.29

Total capital to risk weighted assets

     13.60       14.95       17.48       20.34       10.77  

Tier I capital to risk weighted assets

     12.67       13.95       16.52       19.30       9.60  

Common equity tier I capital to risk weighted assets

     12.67       13.95       16.52              

Tier I capital to average assets

     12.10       13.95       16.71       17.44       8.73  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Asset Quality Ratios

          

Allowance for loan losses/total loans

     0.97     1.02     1.08     1.06     1.11

Allowance for loan losses/non-accrual loans

     540.30       298.82       106.58       90.35       61.00  

Net charge-offs/average loans outstanding

     0.00       0.01       0.06       0.01       0.08  

Non-accrual loans/total loans

     0.18       0.34       1.02       1.18       1.81  

Non-performing assets/total assets

     0.16       0.30       0.89       0.99       1.60  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Per Share Data

          

Basic earnings per share

   $ 0.84     $ 0.67     $ 0.47     $ 0.43     $ 0.29  

Diluted earnings per share

     0.82       0.65       0.46       0.42       0.29  

Dividends per share

     0.17       0.12       0.06              

Book value per share

     11.96       11.33       10.72       10.56       4.58  

Tangible book value per share (4)

     11.54       11.08       10.47       10.31       4.33  

Market value per share

     20.60       18.90       14.10       11.22       9.22  

Number of shares outstanding at end of year

     54,039,316       53,596,105       54,875,237       54,708,066       54,406,335  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other data:

          

Number of offices

     33       31       29       27       27  

Number of full-time equivalent employees

     495       462       445       431       420  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(footnotes begin on following page)

 

42


Table of Contents

(footnotes from previous page)

 

(1)

Represents the difference between the weighted average yield on average interest-earning assets and the weighted average cost of interest-bearing liabilities.

(2)

Represents net interest income as a percent of average interest-earning assets.

(3)

The efficiency ratio is a non-GAAP measure representing non-interest expense, excluding merger and acquisition expenses, divided by the sum of net interest income and non-interest income excluding gains or losses on sales of securities. The efficiency ratio is a common measure used by banks to understand expenses related to the generation of revenue. We have removed gains or losses on sales of securities as management deems them to be discretionary and not representative of operating performance. We have removed merger and acquisition expenses as management deems them to be not representative of operating performance. Presented on a basis including merger and acquisition expenses and gains or losses on sales of securities, the efficiency ratio was 51.97%, 56.67%, 62.70%, 64.70% and 68.28% for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014 and 2013 respectively.

(4)

Tangible book value per share is calculated as follows.

 

                                                                                                                            
       At December 31,  
       2017        2016        2015        2014        2013  
       (Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)  

Total stockholders’ equity

     $ 646,399        $ 607,297        $ 588,126        $ 577,710        $ 249,205  

Less: goodwill

       19,638          13,687          13,687          13,687          13,687  

Less: core deposit intangible

       3,243                                      
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

Tangible book value

     $ 623,518        $ 593,610        $ 574,439        $ 564,023        $ 235,518  
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

Number of shares outstanding at end of year

       54,039,316          53,596,105          54,875,237          54,708,066          54,406,335  

Tangible book value per share

     $ 11.54        $ 11.08        $ 10.47        $ 10.31        $ 4.33  

 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENTS DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

This discussion and analysis reflects our consolidated financial statements and other relevant statistical data, and is intended to enhance your understanding of our financial condition and results of operations. You should read the information in this section in conjunction with our business and financial information and the Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes that appear elsewhere in this Annual Report.

Critical Accounting Policies

A summary of significant accounting policies is described in Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017. Critical accounting estimates are necessary in the application of certain accounting policies and procedures and are particularly susceptible to significant change. Critical accounting policies are defined as those involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that could have a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income under different assumptions or conditions. Management believes that the most critical accounting policies, which involve the most complex or subjective decisions or assessments, are as follows:

Allowance for Loan Losses. The determination of the allowance for loan losses is considered critical due to the high degree of judgment involved, the subjectivity of the underlying assumptions used, and the potential for changes in the economic environment that could result in material changes in the amount of the allowance for loan losses. The allowance for loan losses is utilized to absorb losses inherent in the loan portfolio. The allowance represents management’s estimate of losses as of the date of the financial statements. The allowance includes an allocated component for impaired loans and a general component for pools of non-impaired loans.

The adequacy of the allowance for loan losses is evaluated on a regular basis by management and is based upon management’s periodic review of the collectability of the loans in light of historical experience, the size and composition of the loan portfolio, adverse situations that may affect the borrower’s ability to repay, estimated value of any underlying collateral and prevailing economic conditions. This evaluation is inherently subjective as it requires estimates that are susceptible to significant revision as more information becomes available.

 

43


Table of Contents

While management believes that it uses the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future adjustments to the allowance may be necessary and results of operations could be adversely affected if circumstances differ substantially from the assumptions used in making its determinations. Because the estimation of inherent losses cannot be made with certainty, there can be no assurance that the existing allowance for loan losses is adequate or that increases will not be necessary should the quality of any loan deteriorate as a result of the factors noted above. Any material increase in the allowance for loan losses may adversely affect the financial condition and results of operations and will be recorded in the period in which the circumstances become known.

Other-than-temporary Impairment of Securities. In analyzing a debt issuer’s financial condition, management considers whether the securities are issued by the federal government or its agencies, whether downgrades by bond rating agencies have occurred, industry analysts’ reports and, to a lesser extent given the relatively insignificant levels of depreciation in our debt portfolio, spread differentials between the effective rates on instruments in the portfolio compared to risk-free rates. Management evaluates securities for other-than-temporary impairment at least on a quarterly basis, and more frequently when economic or market concerns warrant such evaluation.

From time to time, management’s intent to hold depreciated debt securities to recovery or maturity may change as a result of prudent portfolio management. If management’s intent changes, unrealized losses are recognized either as impairment charges to the consolidated income statement or as realized losses if a sale has been executed. In most instances, management sells the securities at the time their intent changes.

In analyzing an equity issuer’s financial condition, management considers industry analysts’ reports, financial performance and projected target prices of investment analysts within a one-year time frame. A decline of 10% or more in the value of an acquired equity security is generally the triggering event for management to review individual securities for liquidation and/or classification as other-than-temporarily impaired. Impairment losses are recognized when management concludes that declines in the value of equity securities are other than temporary, or when they can no longer assert that they have the intent and ability to hold depreciated equity securities for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in fair value. Unrealized losses on marketable equity securities that are in excess of 25% of cost and that have been sustained for more than twelve months are generally considered-other-than temporary and charged to earnings as impairment losses, or realized through sale of the security.

Business Strategy

We emphasize responsive and personalized service to our customers. Due to the consolidation of financial institutions in our market, we continue to believe there is a significant opportunity for a community-focused bank to provide a full range of financial services to small and middle-market commercial and retail customers. By offering quicker decision making in the delivery of banking products and services, offering customized products where appropriate, and providing customer access to our senior managers, we distinguish ourselves from larger, regional banks operating in our market areas, while our larger capital base and product mix enable us to compete effectively against smaller banks. As a result, we believe we have a substantial opportunity to attract experienced management, loan officers and banking customers. We believe this will provide us a competitive advantage as we continue to expand into attractive, high growth markets within the Boston metropolitan area through the establishment of de novo bank branch offices, the potential acquisition of community banks and bank branches, and organic expansion where possible by growing our existing branches in their respective communities.

Our strategies center on the continued enhancement of our full-service, community-oriented Bank, including the expansion of our branch network to more adequately cover the large geography of the Boston metropolitan area. In order to realize these objectives, we are pursuing the following strategies:

Emphasizing growth in commercial lending. We have diversified our loan portfolio by increasing the percentage of our assets consisting of higher-yielding commercial and industrial loans and commercial real estate loans with higher risk-adjusted returns, shorter maturities and more sensitivity to interest rate fluctuations, while still providing high quality loan products for single-family residential borrowers. We have a highly competitive suite of cash management services, technology solutions, and internal support expertise specific to the needs of

 

44


Table of Contents

our commercial business customers. Our lending staff is experienced and knowledgeable about local commercial business in our markets, enabling us to build on the relationship-style banking that is our hallmark. We also continue to review the products we offer to provide diversification of revenue sources and to enhance our customer relationships.

Hiring experienced employees with a customer service focus. We have been successful in attracting and retaining banking professionals with strong community relationships and significant knowledge of our markets, which is central to our business strategy. Exceptional service, local involvement and timely decision making are integral parts of our business strategy, and we have attracted highly qualified and highly motivated individuals. We believe that by focusing on experienced bankers who are established in their communities, we enhance our market position and add profitable growth opportunities. Our compensation and incentive systems are aligned with our strategies to grow core deposits and commercial loans, while maintaining superior asset quality. We have a strong corporate culture based on personal accountability, high ethical standards and significant training opportunities, which is supported by our commitment to career development and promotion from within the organization.

Improving profitability through geographic expansion within our market area, disciplined pricing, expense control and balance sheet management. We have achieved many milestones over the last five years as we have grown total assets to $5.299 billion at December 31, 2017 from $2.682 billion at December 31, 2013. On December 29, 2017, the Company completed its acquisition of Meetinghouse, which added $120.4 million in total assets at fair value. Since 2007, we have opened 14 de novo branches and one mobile branch, and acquired six branch offices in our 2010 acquisition of Mt. Washington Co-operative Bank, and two branch offices in our acquisition of Meetinghouse Bank. We intend to continue our geographic expansion in the greater Boston metropolitan area by opening de novo branches in communities contiguous to those we currently serve, as opportunities present themselves in favorable locations. We have also focused significant efforts and invested heavily in our infrastructure to support future growth, creating brand awareness, competitive products and a strong and experienced workforce. We believe these initiatives have positioned us well to implement a strategy focused on improving operating efficiency and earnings growth. While we expect to continue to strive for an appropriate level of loan and deposit growth, we will keenly focus on enhancing our profitability by exercising a disciplined approach to product pricing, expense control and balance sheet mix.

Expanding our presence and market share in contiguous and nearby market areas and capturing business opportunities resulting from changes in the competitive environment. Over the last several years, our markets have been subject to large-scale consolidation of local community banks, primarily by larger, out-of-state financial institutions. We believe there is a large customer base in our market that prefers doing business with a local institution and may be dissatisfied with the service received from larger regional banks. We believe that opportunities currently exist in contiguous and nearby market areas to grow our franchise and to complement our primary market areas. In addition, by delivering high quality, customer-focused products and services, we expect to attract additional borrowers and depositors and thus increase our market share and revenue generation.

We believe the success of our strategy is evidenced by the growth of our deposits to $4.108 billion at December 31, 2017 from $2.249 billion at December 31, 2013, and net loans, which increased to $4.623 billion at December 31, 2017 from $2.265 billion at December 31, 2013. We also believe that community bank consolidation will continue to take place and further believe that, with our capital and liquidity positions, we will be positioned to take advantage of industry consolidation through de novo branching, potential acquisition of individual branches, and the potential for whole bank acquisitions. Our focus will be on the Massachusetts markets we know and understand, with a primary view toward continued growth in the Boston metropolitan area. We believe our management team’s unique understanding of the Massachusetts market facilitates our growth into locations that will provide the right complement to our existing franchise and geographic footprint.

It is our intention to achieve significant market penetration in a relatively short period of time when we enter a new market. In advance of any branch expansion we hire experienced local bankers and make a concerted effort to establish as many high profile contacts as possible in the new target area. We are focused on generating key loan relationships and capturing significant deposit market share in our markets. Upon commencement of

 

45


Table of Contents

operations in a new location, we monitor and aggressively pursue a core deposit strategy that enhances profitability and we believe provides quality market penetration in the most expedient manner.

Managing credit risk to maintain a low level of nonperforming assets, and interest rate risk to optimize our net interest margin. Managing risk is an essential part of successfully managing a financial institution. Credit risk and interest rate risk are two prominent risk exposures that we face. Credit risk is the risk of not collecting the interest and/or the principal balance of a loan or investment when it is due. Our strategy for credit risk management focuses on having well-defined credit policies and uniform underwriting criteria and providing prompt attention to potential problem loans. We believe that strong asset quality is a key to long-term financial success. We have sought to grow and diversify the loan portfolio, while maintaining strong asset quality and moderate credit risk, using conservative underwriting standards, as well as diligent monitoring of the portfolio and loans in non-accrual status and on-going collection efforts. Although we will continue to originate commercial real estate, multi-family, commercial and industrial, and construction loans, we intend to continue our philosophy of managing large loan exposures through our experienced, risk-based approach to lending. In addition, we intend to remain focused on lending within our immediate market area, with a specific focus on commercial customers disaffected by their relationships with larger banks as a result of turmoil in the industry.

Interest rate risk is the potential reduction of net interest income as a result of changes in interest rates. Our earnings and the market value of our assets and liabilities are subject to fluctuations caused by changes in the level of interest rates. We manage the interest rate sensitivity of our interest-bearing liabilities and interest-earning assets in an effort to minimize the adverse effects of changes in the interest rate environment. To reduce the potential volatility of our earnings, we have sought to improve the match between asset and liability maturities and rates, while maintaining an acceptable interest rate spread. Our strategy for managing interest rate risk emphasizes: originating loans with adjustable interest rates; selling the residential real estate fixed-rate loans with terms 10 years or greater that we originate; promoting core deposit products; and adjusting the interest rates and maturities of funding sources, as necessary.

Increasing core deposits through aggressive marketing and the offering of new deposit products. Deposits are our primary source of funds for investing and lending. Core deposits, which include all deposit account types except certificates of deposit, comprised 66.6% of our total deposits at December 31, 2017. We value our core deposits because they represent a lower cost of funding and are generally less sensitive to withdrawal when interest rates fluctuate as compared to certificate of deposit accounts. We market core deposits through the internet, in-branch and local mail, print and television advertising, as well as programs that link various accounts and services together, minimizing service fees. We will continue to customize existing deposit products and introduce new products to meet the needs of our customers.

Balance Sheet Analysis

Assets. Our total assets increased $863.5 million, or 19.5%, to $5.299 billion at December 31, 2017 from $4.436 billion at December 31, 2016. Net loans increased $724.1 million, or 18.6%, to $4.623 billion at December 31, 2017 from $3.899 billion at December 31, 2016. Cash and due from banks increased $166.3 million, or 70.3%, to $402.7 million at December 31, 2017 from $236.4 million at December 31, 2016. Certificates of deposit decreased $11.0 million, or 13.7%, to $69.3 million at December 31, 2017 from $80.3 million at December 31, 2016, primarily due to maturities of $35.1 million, partially offset by purchases of $22.7 million. Securities available for sale decreased $29.3 million, or 43.3%, to $38.4 million at December 31, 2017 from $67.7 million at December 31, 2016.

Loan Portfolio Analysis. At December 31, 2017, net loans were $4.623 billion, or 87.2% of total assets. During the year ended December 31, 2017, net loans increased $724.1 million, or 18.6%, including $73.6 million of loans acquired in the Meetinghouse acquisition. Loan originations totaled $1.763 billion during the year ended December 31, 2017. The increase in net loans consisted primarily of $287.2 million in commercial real estate loans, $216.7 million in multi-family loans, $138.6 million in construction loans, $10.2 million in commercial and industrial loans and $71.2 million in one- to four-family loans.

Our loan portfolio consists of one- to four-family residential real estate, multi-family, home equity lines of credit, commercial real estate, construction, commercial and industrial and consumer segments. There are no

 

46


Table of Contents

foreign loans outstanding. Interest rates charged on loans are affected principally by the demand for such loans, the supply of money available for lending purposes and the rates offered by our competitors. Loan detail by category was as follows:

 

    At December 31,  
    2017     2016     2015     2014     2013  
    Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent  
    (Dollars in thousands)  

Real estate loans:

                   

Residential real estate:

                   

One- to four-family

  $ 603,680       12.9   $ 532,450       13.5   $ 458,423       14.9   $ 468,560       17.5   $ 454,148       19.8

Multi-family

    779,637       16.7       562,948       14.3       417,388       13.5       409,675       15.3       288,172       12.6  

Home equity lines of credit

    48,393       1.0       42,913       1.1       46,660       1.5       50,091       1.9       54,499       2.4  

Commercial real estate

    2,063,781       44.2       1,776,601       45.1       1,328,344       43.1       1,145,820       42.8       1,032,408       45.0  

Construction

    641,306       13.7       502,753       12.8       421,531       13.7       265,980       9.9       208,799       9.1  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total real estate loans

    4,136,797       88.5       3,417,665       86.8       2,672,346       86.7       2,340,126       87.4       2,038,026       88.9  

Commercial and industrial

    525,604       11.3       515,430       13.0       400,051       13.0       330,813       12.3       247,005       10.8  

Consumer

    10,761       0.2       9,712       0.2       10,028       0.3       8,772       0.3       7,225       0.3  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total loans

    4,673,162       100.0     3,942,807       100.0     3,082,425       100.0     2,679,711       100.0     2,292,256       100.0
   

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

 

Allowance for loan losses

    (45,185       (40,149       (33,405       (28,469       (25,335  

Net deferred loan origination costs
(fees)

    (5,179       (3,990       (3,778       (2,335       (1,521  
 

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

   

Loans, net

  $ 4,622,798       $ 3,898,668       $ 3,045,242       $ 2,648,907       $ 2,265,400    
 

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

   

Loan Maturity. The following table sets forth certain information at December 31, 2017 regarding the dollar amount of loan principal repayments becoming due during the periods indicated. The table does not include any estimate of prepayments which significantly shorten the average life of all loans and may cause our actual repayment experience to differ from that shown below. Demand loans having no stated schedule of repayments and no stated maturity are reported as due in one year or less. The amounts shown below exclude net deferred loan origination fees. Our adjustable-rate mortgage loans generally do not provide for downward adjustments below the initial discounted contract rate, other than declines due to a decline in the index rate.

 

                                                                                                   
       December 31, 2017  
       Real estate        Commercial
and  industrial
       Consumer        Total  
       (In thousands)  

Amounts due in:

                   

One year or less

     $ 229,373        $ 48,608        $ 604        $ 278,585  

More than one to five years

       510,100          41,438          10,157          561,695  

More than five to ten years

       876,417          94,218                   970,635  

More than ten years

       2,520,907          341,340                   2,862,247  
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

Total

     $ 4,136,797        $ 525,604        $ 10,761        $ 4,673,162  
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

Interest rate terms on amounts due after one year:

                   

Fixed-rate loans

     $ 934,055        $ 108,978        $ 10,157        $ 1,053,190  

Adjustable-rate loans

       2,973,369          368,018                   3,341,387  
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

Total

     $ 3,907,424        $ 476,996        $ 10,157        $ 4,394,577  
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

47


Table of Contents

At December 31, 2017, our loan portfolio consisted of $1.188 billion of fixed-rate loans and $3.485 billion of adjustable-rate loans.

Asset Quality

Credit Risk Management. Our strategy for credit risk management focuses on having well-defined credit policies and uniform underwriting criteria and providing prompt attention to potential problem loans. Management of asset quality is accomplished by internal controls, monitoring and reporting of key risk indicators, and both internal and independent third-party loan reviews. The primary objective of our loan review process is to measure borrower performance and assess risk for the purpose of identifying loan weakness in order to minimize loan loss exposure. From the time of loan origination through final repayment, multi-family, commercial real estate, construction, and commercial and industrial loans are assigned a risk rating based on pre-determined criteria and levels of risk. The risk rating is monitored annually for most loans; however, it may change during the life of the loan as appropriate.

Internal and independent third-party loan reviews vary by loan type, as well as the size and complexity of the loan. Depending on the size and complexity of the loan, some loans may warrant detailed individual review, while other loans may have less risk based upon size, or be of a homogeneous nature reducing the need for detailed individual analysis. Assets with these characteristics, such as consumer loans and loans secured by residential real estate, may be reviewed on the basis of risk indicators such as delinquency or credit rating. In cases of significant concern, a total re-evaluation of the loan and associated risks are documented by completing a loan risk assessment and action plan. Some loans may be re-evaluated in terms of their fair market value or net realizable value in order to determine the likelihood of potential loss exposure and, consequently, the adequacy of specific and general loan loss reserves.

When a borrower fails to make a required loan payment, we take a number of steps to have the borrower cure the delinquency and restore the loan to current status, including contacting the borrower by letter and phone at regular intervals. When the borrower is in default, we may commence collection proceedings. If a foreclosure action is instituted and the loan is not brought current, paid in full, or refinanced before the foreclosure sale, the real property securing the loan generally is sold at foreclosure. Management informs the Executive Committee monthly of the amount of loans delinquent more than 30 days. Management provides detailed information to the Board of Directors on loans 60 or more days past due and all loans in foreclosure and property that we own.

Delinquencies. Total past due loans decreased $3.9 million, or 37.0%, to $6.6 million at December 31, 2017 from $10.4 million at December 31, 2016, reflecting decreases of $4.4 million in loans 90 days or greater past due, partially offset by an increase of $507,000 in loans 30 to 89 days past due. The decrease in loans 90 days or greater past due was primarily due to the foreclosure of a $2.0 million commercial real estate property and a general decrease in delinquent residential mortgages. Additional reductions were also across all categories of loans 90 days or greater past due. At December 31, 2017 and 2016, non-accrual loans exceeded loans 90 days or greater past due primarily due to loans which were placed on non-accrual status based on a determination that the ultimate collection of all principal and interest due was not expected and certain loans remain on non-accrual status until they attain a sustained payment history of six consecutive months.

Non-performing Assets. Non-performing assets include loans that are 90 or more days past due or on non-accrual status, including troubled debt restructurings (“TDRs”) on non-accrual status, and real estate and other loan collateral acquired through foreclosure. Loans 90 days or greater past due may remain on an accrual basis if adequately collateralized and in the process of collection. At December 31, 2017 and 2016, we did not have any accruing loans past due 90 days or greater. For non-accrual loans, interest previously accrued but not collected is reversed and charged against income at the time a loan is placed on non-accrual status. Loans are returned to accrual status when all the principal and interest amounts contractually due are brought current and future payments are reasonably assured.

Real estate that we acquire as a result of foreclosure or by deed-in-lieu of foreclosure is classified as foreclosed real estate until it is sold. When property is acquired, it is initially recorded at the fair value less estimated costs to sell at the date of foreclosure, establishing a new cost basis. Holding costs and declines in fair

 

48


Table of Contents

value after acquisition of the property result in charges against income. The recorded investment of consumer mortgage loans secured by residential real estate properties for which formal foreclosure proceedings are in process according to local requirements of the applicable jurisdiction totaled $1.5 million at December 31, 2017. The following table provides information with respect to our non-performing assets at the dates indicated.

 

                                                                                                                            
       At December 31,  
       2017      2016      2015      2014      2013  
       (Dollars in thousands)  

Loans accounted for on a non-accrual basis:

                

Real estate loans:

                

Residential real estate:

                

One- to four-family

     $ 6,890      $ 8,487      $ 9,264      $ 14,649      $ 17,622  

Home equity lines of credit

       562        674        1,763        2,277        2,689  

Commercial real estate

       388        2,807        3,663        5,311        8,972  

Construction

              815        15,849        8,417        11,298  
    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total real estate loans

       7,840        12,783        30,539        30,654        40,581  

Commercial and industrial

       523        653        805        855        949  
    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total non-accrual loans (1)

       8,363        13,436        31,344        31,509        41,530  

Foreclosed assets

                            1,046        1,390  
    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total non-performing assets

     $ 8,363      $ 13,436      $ 31,344      $ 32,555      $ 42,920  
    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Non-accrual loans to total loans

       0.18      0.34      1.02      1.18      1.81

Non-accrual loans to total assets

       0.16      0.30      0.89      0.96      1.55

Non-performing assets to total assets

       0.16      0.30      0.89      0.99      1.60

 

(1)

TDRs on accrual status not included above totaled $12.7 million at December 31, 2017, $13.3 million at December 31, 2016, $14.2 million at December 31, 2015, $14.5 million at December 31, 2014 and $4.1 million at December 31, 2013.

Non-performing assets were $8.4 million or 0.16% of total assets, at December 31, 2017, compared to $13.4 million, or 0.30% of total assets, at December 31, 2016. We recognized $400,000 of interest income on non-accrual loans for the year ended December 31, 2017. Additional interest income that would have been recorded for the year ended December 31, 2017 had non-accruing loans been current according to their original terms amounted to $32,000.

Non-accrual loans decreased $5.1 million, or 37.8%, to $8.4 million, or 0.18% of total loans outstanding at December 31, 2017, from $13.4 million, or 0.34% of total loans outstanding at December 31, 2016, primarily due to a $2.4 million decrease in non-accrual commercial real estate loans, a $1.6 million decrease in non-accrual one- to four-family loans and a $815,000 decrease in non-accrual construction loans.

Achieving and maintaining a moderate risk profile by aggressively managing troubled assets has been and will continue to be a primary focus for us. At December 31, 2017, our allowance for loan losses was $45.2 million, or 0.97% of total loans and 540.30% of non-accrual loans, compared to $40.1 million, or 1.02% of total loans and 298.82% of non-accrual loans at December 31, 2016. We increased our allowance primarily as a result of growth in the loan portfolio, and in particular commercial loans, and changes in the composition of the loan portfolio. Included in our allowance at December 31, 2017 was a general component of $45.0 million, which is based upon our evaluation of various factors relating to loans not deemed to be impaired. We continue to believe our level of non-performing loans and assets, which declined significantly during the past two years, is manageable and we believe that we have sufficient capital and human resources to manage the collection of our non-performing assets in an orderly fashion.

 

49


Table of Contents

The Company did not hold any foreclosed real estate at December 31, 2017 and 2016. We continue to be actively engaged with our borrowers in resolving remaining problem assets and with the effective management of real estate owned as a result of foreclosures.

Troubled Debt Restructurings. In the course of resolving loans of borrowers with financial difficulties, we may choose to restructure the contractual terms of certain loans, with terms modified to fit the ability of the borrower to repay in line with its current financial status. A loan is considered a TDR if, for reasons related to the debtor’s financial difficulties, a concession is granted to the debtor that would not otherwise be considered.

The following table summarizes our TDRs at the dates indicated.

 

     At December 31,  
     2017      2016      2015      2014      2013  
     (In thousands)  

TDRs on accrual status:

              

One- to four-family

   $ 2,125      $ 2,219      $ 2,621      $ 2,946      $ 2,588  

Multi-family

     1,315        1,359        1,402        1,443        109  

Home equity lines of credit

            18        18        20        21  

Commercial real estate

     9,200        9,460        9,968        9,950        1,368  

Construction

            174        174        121         

Commercial and industrial

     20        27        33                
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total TDRs on accrual status

     12,660        13,257        14,216        14,480        4,086  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

TDRs on non-accrual status:

              

One- to four-family

     1,046        1,123        1,261        1,469        1,500  

Commercial real estate

                   528        283        4,309  

Construction

                   1,136        6,496        9,489  

Commercial and industrial

                   186        186        192  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total TDRs on non-accrual status

     1,046        1,123        3,111        8,434        15,490  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total TDRs

   $ 13,706      $ 14,380      $ 17,327      $ 22,914      $ 19,576  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total TDRs decreased $674,000, or 4.7%, to $13.7 million at December 31, 2017 from $14.4 million at December 31, 2016, due to decreases of $597,000 in TDRs on accrual status and $77,000 in TDRs on non-accrual status, reflecting principal paydowns. Modifications of TDRs consist of rate reductions, loan term extensions or provisions for interest-only payments for specified periods up to 12 months. We have generally been successful with the concessions we have offered to borrowers to date. We generally return TDRs to accrual status when they have sustained payments for six consecutive months based on the restructured terms and future payments are reasonably assured. We recognized $603,000 of interest income on TDRs for the year ended December 31, 2017.

Potential Problem Loans. Certain loans are identified during our loan review process that are currently performing in accordance with their contractual terms and we ultimately expect to receive payment in full of principal and interest, but it is deemed probable that we will be unable to collect all the scheduled payments of principal or interest when due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. This may result from deteriorating conditions such as cash flows, collateral values or creditworthiness of the borrower. These loans are classified as impaired but are not accounted for on a non-accrual basis.

Other potential problem loans are those loans that are currently performing, but where known information about possible credit problems of the borrowers causes us to have concerns as to the ability of such borrowers to comply with contractual loan repayment terms. These other potential problem loans are generally loans classified as “substandard” or 8-rated loans in accordance with our ten-grade internal loan rating system that is consistent with guidelines established by banking regulators. At December 31, 2017, other potential problem loans totaled $49.0 million, including $43.4 million of commercial and industrial loans, $3.1 million of multi-family loans and

 

50


Table of Contents

$2.5 million of commercial real estate loans. The $43.4 million of commercial and industrial loan relationships classified as substandard are comprised of two loans to non-profit educational organizations in eastern Massachusetts with loan balances of $24.4 million and $19.0 million that were identified during our loan review process as having possible financial issues that, if not corrected, could result in some loss to the Company. It was determined that both of these loan relationships are performing in accordance with the terms of their loans with the current expectation that we will be repaid in full in accordance with those terms, but with continual credit monitoring of the relationships.

Allowance for Loan Losses. The allowance for loan losses is maintained at levels considered adequate by management to provide for probable loan losses inherent in the loan portfolio as of the consolidated balance sheet reporting dates. The allowance for loan losses is based on management’s assessment of various factors affecting the loan portfolio, including portfolio composition, delinquent and non-accrual loans, national and local business conditions and loss experience and an overall evaluation of the quality of the underlying collateral.

Changes in the allowance for loan losses during the years indicated were as follows:

 

     Years Ended December 31,  
     2017     2016     2015     2014     2013  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Beginning balance

   $ 40,149     $ 33,405     $ 28,469     $ 25,335     $ 20,504  

Provision for loan losses

     4,859       7,180       6,667       3,313       6,470  

Charge-offs:

          

One- to four-family

     98             165       54       531  

Multi-family

                             96  

Home equity lines of credit

                 60       5        

Commercial real estate

                       116        

Construction

     3       486       2,287       71       1,362  

Commercial and industrial

           49       36       72       288  

Consumer

     340       302       306       187       283  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total charge-offs

     441       837       2,854       505       2,560  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Recoveries:

          

One- to four-family

     104             116       67       232  

Multi-family

     1                          

Home equity lines of credit

     1                          

Commercial real estate

     310             18       30        

Construction

     51       230       881       137       555  

Commercial and industrial

     30       60       1       8       24  

Consumer

     121       111       107       84       110  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total recoveries

     618       401       1,123       326       921  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net (charge-offs) recoveries

     177       (436     (1,731     (179     (1,639
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 45,185     $ 40,149     $ 33,405     $ 28,469     $ 25,335  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Allowance to non-accrual loans

     540.30     298.82     106.58     90.35     61.00

Allowance to total loans outstanding

     0.97     1.02     1.08     1.06     1.11

Net (charge-offs) recoveries to average loans outstanding

     0.00     (0.01 )%      (0.06 )%      (0.01 )%      (0.08 )% 

Our provision for loan losses was $4.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2017 compared to $7.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 and $6.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. The allowance for loan losses was $45.2 million or 0.97% of total loans at December 31, 2017, compared to $40.1 million or 1.02% of total loans at December 31, 2016 and $33.4 million or 1.08% of total loans at

 

51


Table of Contents

December 31, 2015. The changes in the provision were based on management’s assessment of loan portfolio growth and composition changes, declines in historical charge-off trends, reduced levels of problem loans and other improving asset quality trends. The reduction in the provision for loan losses for the year ended December 31, 2017 reflects improvement in these asset quality factors during the year. The increases in the overall allowance for loan losses at December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015 were primarily due to increases in the multi-family, commercial real estate, construction, and commercial and industrial loan categories. We continue to assess the adequacy of our allowance for loan losses in accordance with established policies.

The following tables set forth the breakdown of the allowance for loan losses by loan category at the dates indicated:

 

     At December 31,  
     2017     2016     2015  
    

Amount

    Percent of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
    Percent
of

Loans in
Category
of Total
Loans
    Amount     Percent of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
    Percent
of

Loans in
Category
of Total
Loans
    Amount     Percent of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
    Percent
of

Loans in
Category
of Total
Loans
 
    (Dollars in thousands)  

Real estate loans:

                 

Residential real estate:

                 

One- to four-family

  $ 1,001       2.2     12.9   $ 1,367       3.4     13.5   $ 1,354       4.1     14.9

Multi-family

    6,263       13.9       16.7       4,514       11.2       14.3       3,385       10.1       13.5  

Home equity lines of credit

    62       0.1       1.0       73       0.2       1.1       144       0.4       1.5  

Commercial real estate

    21,513       47.6       44.2       18,725       46.7       45.1       14,497       43.4       43.1  

Construction

    10,166       22.5       13.7       8,931       22.2       12.8       8,313       24.9       13.7  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total real estate loans

    39,005       86.3       88.5       33,610       83.7       86.8       27,693       82.9       86.7  

Commercial and industrial

    6,084       13.5       11.3       6,452       16.1       13.0       5,620       16.8       13.0  

Consumer

    96       0.2       0.2       87       0.2       0.2       92       0.3       0.3  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total loans

  $ 45,185       100.0     100.0   $ 40,149       100.0     100.0   $ 33,405       100.0     100.0
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

     At December 31,  
      2014     2013  
      Amount      Percent of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
    Percent
of

Loans in
Category
of Total
Loans
    Amount      Percent of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
    Percent
of

Loans in
Category
of Total
Loans
 
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Real estate loans:

              

Residential real estate:

              

One- to four-family

   $ 1,849        6.5     17.5   $ 1,991        7.9     19.8

Multi-family

     3,635        12.8       15.3       2,419        9.5       12.6  

Home equity lines of credit

     100        0.4       1.9       155        0.6       2.4  

Commercial real estate

     13,000        45.6       42.8       12,831        50.6       45.0  

Construction

     5,155        18.1       9.9       4,374        17.3       9.1  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total real estate loans

     23,739        83.4       87.4       21,770        85.9       88.9  

Commercial and industrial

     4,633        16.3       12.3       3,433        13.6       10.8  

Consumer

     97        0.3       0.3       132        0.5       0.3  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total loans

   $ 28,469        100.0     100.0   $ 25,335        100.0     100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

52


Table of Contents

The allowance consists of general and allocated components. The general component relates to pools of non-impaired loans and is based on historical loss experience adjusted for qualitative factors. The allocated component relates to loans that are classified as impaired. A loan is considered impaired when, based on current information and events, it is probable that we will be unable to collect the scheduled payments of principal or interest when due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. Factors considered by management in determining impairment include payment status, collateral value and the probability of collecting scheduled principal and interest payments when due. Impairment is measured on a loan by loan basis by either the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, the loan’s obtainable market price, or the fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent.

We had impaired loans totaling $4.9 million and $8.4 million as of December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. At December 31, 2017, impaired loans totaling $1.8 million had a valuation allowance of $184,000. Impaired loans totaling $1.9 million had a valuation allowance of $186,000 at December 31, 2016. Our average recorded investment in impaired loans was $7.0 million and $19.2 million for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

Large groups of smaller balance homogeneous loans are collectively evaluated for impairment based on payment status. Accordingly, we do not separately identify individual one- to four-family residential real estate, home equity lines of credit and consumer loans for impairment disclosures, unless such loans are subject to a troubled debt restructuring. We periodically may agree to modify the contractual terms of loans. When a loan is modified and a concession is made to a borrower experiencing financial difficulty, the modification is considered a TDR. All TDRs are initially classified as impaired.

Management has reviewed the collateral value for all impaired and non-accrual loans that were collateral-dependent as of December 31, 2017 and considered any probable loss in determining the allowance for loan losses.

For residential loans measured for impairment based on the collateral value, we will do the following:

 

   

When a loan becomes seriously delinquent, generally 60 days past due, we obtain third-party appraisals that are generally the basis for charge-offs when a loss is indicated, prior to the foreclosure sale, but usually no later than when such loans are 180 days past due. We generally are able to complete the foreclosure process within six to nine months from receipt of the third-party appraisal.

 

   

We make adjustments to appraisals based on updated economic information, if necessary, prior to the foreclosure sale. We review current market factors to determine whether, in management’s opinion, downward adjustments to the most recent appraised values may be warranted. If so, we use our best estimate to apply an estimated discount rate to the appraised values to reflect current market factors.

 

   

Appraisals we receive are based on comparable property sales.

For commercial loans measured for impairment based on the collateral value, we will do the following:

 

   

We obtain a third party appraisal at the time a loan is deemed to be in a workout situation and there is no indication that the loan will return to performing status, generally when the loan is 90 days or more past due. One or more updated third party appraisals are obtained prior to foreclosure depending on the foreclosure timeline. In general we order new appraisals annually on loans in the process of foreclosure.

 

   

We make downward adjustments to appraisals when conditions warrant. Adjustments are made by applying a discount to the appraised value based on occupancy, recent changes in condition to the property and certain other factors. Adjustments are also made to appraisals for construction projects involving residential properties based on recent sales of units. Losses are recognized if the appraised value less estimated costs to sell is less than our carrying value of the loan.

 

   

Appraisals we receive are generally based on a reconciliation of comparable property sales and income capitalization approaches. For loans on construction projects involving residential properties, appraisals are generally based on a discounted cash flow analysis assuming a bulk sale to a single buyer.

 

53


Table of Contents

Loans that are partially charged off generally remain on non-accrual status until foreclosure or such time that they are performing in accordance with the terms of the loan and have a sustained payment history of at least six consecutive months. The accrual of interest is generally discontinued when the contractual payment of principal or interest has become 90 days past due or management has serious doubts about further collectability of principal or interest, even though the loan is currently performing. Loan losses are charged against the allowance when we believe the uncollectability of a loan balance is confirmed; for collateral-dependent loans, generally when appraised values (as adjusted values, if applicable) less estimated costs to sell, are less than our carrying values.

Although we believe that we use the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future adjustments to the allowance for loan losses may be necessary and our results of operations could be adversely affected if circumstances differ substantially from the assumptions used in making the determinations. Furthermore, while we believe we have established our allowance for loan losses in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America, there can be no assurance that regulators, in reviewing our loan portfolio, will not require us to increase our allowance for loan losses. In addition, because future events affecting borrowers and collateral cannot be predicted with certainty, there can be no assurance that the existing allowance for loan losses is adequate or that increases will not be necessary should the quality of any loans deteriorate as a result of the factors discussed above. Any material increase in the allowance for loan losses may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Securities Portfolio

At December 31, 2017, our securities portfolio was $38.4 million, or 0.7% of total assets. During the year ended December 31, 2017, the securities portfolio decreased $29.3 million, or 43.3%, primarily due to $16.8 million in maturities, calls and principal payments, and $32.5 million in sales, partially offset by $14.3 million of securities acquired through the purchase of Meetinghouse and $8.4 million in purchases. At December 31, 2017, the securities portfolio consisted of $20.6 million, or 53.7%, in debt securities and $17.8 million, or 46.3%, in marketable equity securities. The debt securities within the portfolio are corporate bonds, government-sponsored enterprises, municipal bonds and mortgage-backed securities issued by government-sponsored enterprises and private companies. Included in marketable equity securities are common stocks and money market mutual funds. We purchase marketable equity securities with the intent to generate long-term capital gains through purchasing investment grade dividend paying securities in companies with relatively low long-term debt and a history of sustained earnings and above-average growth. We typically initiate a securities position based on market opportunities and add to our position through dollar cost averaging on a monthly basis. Refer to Note 2, Securities Available for Sale, in Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 Financial Statements and Supplementary Data within this report for more detail regarding industry concentrations in our securities portfolio.

 

54


Table of Contents

The following table sets forth the amortized cost and fair value of our securities, all of which at the dates indicated were available for sale.

 

     At December 31,  
     2017      2016      2015  
     Amortized
Cost
     Fair
Value
     Amortized
Cost
     Fair
Value
     Amortized
Cost
     Fair
Value
 
     (In thousands)  

Debt securities:

                 

Corporate bonds

   $      $      $ 13,988      $ 14,005      $ 29,429      $ 29,499  

Government-sponsored enterprises

     1,942        1,942                      11,000        10,962  

Municipal bonds

     2,424        2,426        1,202        1,219        4,326        4,415  

Residential mortgage-backed securities:

                 

Government-sponsored enterprises

     15,916        16,145        5,284        5,606        6,948        7,381  

Private label

     70        76        779        801        878        904  

U.S. treasury securities

                                 24,996        24,934  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total debt securities

     20,352        20,589        21,253        21,631        77,577        78,095  

Marketable equity securities:

                 

Common stocks

     17,071        17,765        42,770        46,030        65,683        62,406  

Money market mutual funds

     10        10        2        2        1,193        1,145  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total marketable equity securities

     17,081        17,775        42,772        46,032        66,876        63,551  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 37,433      $ 38,364      $ 64,025      $ 67,663      $ 144,453      $ 141,646  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

At December 31, 2017, we had no investments in a single company or entity that had an aggregate book value in excess of 10% of our equity.

The following table sets forth the stated maturities and weighted average yields of the securities at December 31, 2017.

 

    One Year or Less     More than One Year
to Five Years
    More than Five Years
to Ten Years
    More than Ten Years     Total  
    Amortized
Cost
    Weighted
Average
Yield
    Amortized
Cost
    Weighted
Average
Yield
    Amortized
Cost
    Weighted
Average
Yield
    Amortized
Cost
    Weighted
Average
Yield
    Amortized
Cost
    Weighted
Average
Yield
 
    (Dollars in thousands)  

Debt securities:

                   

Government-sponsored enterprises

  $         $         $ 1,339       2.26   $ 603       2.45   $ 1,942       2.32

Municipal bonds

    325       3.71                   2,099       2.87                   2,424       2.99  

Residential mortgage-backed securities:

                   

Government-sponsored enterprises

                109       2.53       1,392       3.31       14,415       3.33       15,916       3.32  

Private label

                                        70       4.04       70       4.04  
 

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

   

Total debt securities

  $ 325       3.71   $ 109       2.53   $ 4,830       2.83   $ 15,088       3.30   $ 20,352       3.19
 

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

   

Each reporting period, we evaluate all securities with a decline in fair value below the amortized cost of the investment to determine whether or not the impairment is deemed to be other-than-temporary (“OTTI”). OTTI is required to be recognized if (1) we intend to sell the security; (2) it is more likely than not that we will be required to sell the security before recovery of its amortized cost basis; or (3) for debt securities, the present value of expected cash flows is not sufficient to recover the entire amortized cost basis. Marketable equity securities are evaluated for OTTI based on the severity and duration of the impairment and, if deemed to be other than temporary, the declines in fair value are reflected in earnings as realized losses. For impaired debt securities that we intend to sell, or more likely than not will be required to sell, the full amount of the depreciation is recognized as OTTI through earnings. For all other impaired debt securities, credit-related OTTI is recognized through earnings and non-credit related OTTI is recognized in other comprehensive income, net of applicable taxes.

 

55


Table of Contents

At December 31, 2017, 12 marketable equity securities with a fair value of $5.8 million had gross unrealized losses totaling $958,000, or an aggregate depreciation of 14.2% from the Company’s cost basis. These marketable equity securities consisted of six securities with a fair value of $3.5 million and a gross unrealized loss of $348,000 for less than 12 months and six securities with a fair value of $2.3 million and a gross unrealized loss of $610,000 for 12 months or longer. The marketable equity securities in a gross unrealized loss position for 12 months or longer were comprised of one security in the basic materials sector with a fair value of $641,000 and a gross unrealized loss of $163,000, three marketable equity securities in the consumer products and services sector with a fair value of $1.3 million and a gross unrealized loss of $391,000, and two securities in the technology sector with a fair value of $426,000 and a gross unrealized loss of $56,000.

In analyzing an equity issuer’s financial condition, management considers industry analysts’ reports, financial performance and projected target prices of investment analysts within a one-year time frame. A decline of 10% or more in the value of an acquired equity security is generally the triggering event for management to review individual securities for liquidation and/or write-down. Impairment losses are recognized when management concludes that declines in the value of equity securities are other than temporary, or when they can no longer assert that they have the intent and ability to hold depreciated equity securities for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in fair value. Unrealized losses on marketable equity securities that are in excess of 25% of cost and that have been sustained for more than twelve months are generally considered-other-than temporary and charged to earnings as impairment losses, or realized through sale of the security.

Although issuers within the marketable equity securities portfolio had price declines resulting in unrealized losses, management does not believe these declines in market value are other than temporary and the Company currently has the ability and intent to hold these investments until a recovery of fair value.

Deposits

Deposits are a major source of our funds for lending and other investment purposes. Deposit inflows and outflows are significantly influenced by general interest rates and money market conditions. Our deposit base is comprised of noninterest-bearing demand, interest-bearing demand, money market, regular savings and other deposits, and certificates of deposit, which include brokered certificates of deposit. We consider noninterest-bearing demand, interest-bearing demand, money market, and regular savings and other deposits to be core deposits. Total deposits increased $632.0 million, or 18.2%, to $4.108 billion at December 31, 2017 from $3.476 billion at December 31, 2016. Contributing to the growth was $93.8 million of deposits acquired in the Meetinghouse acquisition. Our continuing focus on the acquisition and expansion of core deposit relationships resulted in net growth in core deposits of $389.6 million, or 16.6%, to $2,737 billion, or 66.6% of total deposits at December 31, 2017.

The following table sets forth the average balances of deposits for the years indicated.

 

     Years Ended December 31,
     2017   2016   2015
     Average
Balance
   Average
Rate
  Percent
of Total
Deposits
  Average
Balance
   Average
Rate
  Percent
of Total
Deposits
  Average
Balance
   Average
Rate
  Percent
of Total
Deposits
     (Dollars in thousands)

Noninterest-bearing demand deposits

     $ 448,952        %       11.6 %     $ 382,644        %       13.5 %     $ 335,060        %       13.5 %

Interest-bearing demand deposits

       799,377        0.92       24.4       469,103        0.64       12.2       295,958        0.58       12.2

Money market deposits

       971,692        0.91       22.4       857,952        0.82       31.4       928,712        0.83       31.4

Regular savings and other deposits

       317,717        0.14       8.1       296,951        0.14       10.5       281,389        0.16       10.5

Certificates of deposit

       1,193,803        1.45       33.5       1,042,425        1.31       32.4       745,866        1.16       32.4
    

 

 

          

 

 

     

 

 

          

 

 

     

 

 

          

 

 

 

Total

     $ 3,731,541        0.91 %       100.0 %     $ 3,049,075        0.79 %       100.0 %     $ 2,586,985        0.71 %       100.0 %
    

 

 

          

 

 

     

 

 

          

 

 

     

 

 

          

 

 

 

 

56


Table of Contents

The following table indicates the amount of the certificates of deposits of $100,000 or more by time remaining until maturity as of December 31, 2017.

 

                        
        Certificates
of Deposit
 
       (In thousands)  

Maturity Period:

    

Three months or less

     $ 149,300  

Over three through six months

       95,633  

Over six through twelve months

       105,512  

Over twelve months

       410,501  
    

 

 

 

Total

     $ 760,946  
    

 

 

 

Borrowings

We use borrowings from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston to supplement our supply of funds for loans and investments. At December 31, 2017 and 2016, Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston advances totaled $513.4 million and $322.5 million, respectively, with a weighted average rate of 1.22% and 1.01%, respectively. Total borrowings increased $190.9 million, or 59.2%, during the year ended December 31, 2017, and includes $8.2 million assumed in the acquisition of Meetinghouse. The Bank entered into long-term advances with the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston totaling $320.6 million with original terms ranging from three to 15 years and initial interest rates ranging from 0.004% to 2.21% during the year ended December 31, 2017. The maturing long–term advances with the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston totaled $137.9 million and consisted of advances with original terms ranging from two to 15 years and fixed interest rates ranging from of 0.31% to 1.57% during the year ended December 31, 2017. At December 31, 2017, we also had an available line of credit of $9.4 million with the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston at an interest rate that adjusts daily, none of which was outstanding at that date.

Information relating to borrowings is detailed in the following table.

 

                                                 
       Years Ended December 31,  
       2017      2016  
       (Dollars in thousands)  

Balance outstanding at end of period

     $ 513,444      $ 322,512  

Average amount outstanding during the period

     $ 411,200      $ 277,586  

Weighted average interest rate during the period

       1.20      1.09

Maximum outstanding at any month end

     $ 513,429      $ 329,551  

Weighted average interest rate at end of period

       1.22      1.01

Stockholders’ Equity

Total stockholders’ equity increased $39.1 million, or 6.4%, to $646.4 million at December 31, 2017, from $607.3 million at December 31, 2016. The increase for the year ended December 31, 2017 was due primarily to $42.9 million in net income and $6.5 million related to stock-based compensation plans, partially offset by $1.7 million in accumulated other comprehensive losses, reflecting a decrease in the fair value of available-for-sale securities, and three quarterly dividends of $0.04 per share and one quarterly dividend of $0.05 per share totaling $8.7 million. Stockholders’ equity to assets was 12.20% at December 31, 2017, compared to 13.69% at December 31, 2016. Book value per share increased to $11.96 at December 31, 2017 from $11.33 at December 31, 2016. At December 31, 2017, the Company and the Bank continued to exceed all regulatory capital requirements.

Results of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015

Net Income. Our primary source of income is net interest income. Net interest income is the difference between interest income, which is the income that we earn on our loans and investments, and interest expense,

 

57


Table of Contents

which is the interest that we pay on our deposits and borrowings. Changes in levels of interest rates affect our net interest income. A secondary source of income is non-interest income, which includes revenue that we receive from providing products and services. The majority of our non-interest income generally comes from customer service fees, loan fees, bank-owned life insurance, mortgage banking gains and gains on sales of securities.

Net income information is as follows:

 

                                                                                                                                                                              
     Years Ended December 31,     Change 2017/2016     Change 2016/2015  
     2017     2016     2015     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Net interest income

   $ 146,192     $ 122,555     $ 102,891     $ 23,637       19.3   $ 19,664       19.1

Provision for loan losses

     4,859       7,180       6,667       (2,321     (32.3     513       7.7  

Non-interest income

     23,064       14,190       13,040       8,874       62.5       1,150       8.8  

Non-interest expenses

     87,965       77,494       72,691       10,471       13.5       4,803       6.6  

Net income

     42,945       34,190       24,607       8,755       25.6       9,583       38.9  

Basic earnings per share

     0.84       0.67       0.47       0.17       25.4       0.20       41.2  

Diluted earnings per share

     0.82       0.65       0.46       0.17       26.2       0.19       41.1  

Return on average assets

     0.89     0.87     0.74     0.02     2.3       0.13     17.6  

Return on average equity

     6.82     5.77     4.19     1.05     18.2       1.58     37.7  

Net income for the year ended December 31, 2017 reflects a charge to tax expense of approximately $7.1 million, or $0.13 per diluted share, related to enactment of the Tax Act on December 22, 2017 that required the Company to revalue its net deferred tax asset and merger and acquisition expenses totaling $2.1 million (pre-tax) related to the Meetinghouse acquisition.

Net Interest Income.

Average Balance Sheets and Related Yields and Rates

The following table presents information regarding average balances of assets and liabilities, the total dollar amounts of interest income and dividends from average interest-earning assets, the total dollar amounts of interest expense on average interest-bearing liabilities and the resulting annualized average yields and costs. The yields and costs for the periods indicated are derived by dividing income or expense by the average balances of assets or liabilities, respectively, for the periods presented. For purposes of this table, average balances have been calculated using daily average balances, and include non-accrual loans and purchase accounting related premium

 

58


Table of Contents

and discounts. The loan yields include the effect of amortization or accretion of deferred loan fees/costs and purchase accounting premiums/discounts to interest and fees on loans.

 

    Years Ended December 31,
    2017   2016   2015
    Average
Balance
  Interest
(1)
  Yield/
Cost
(1)
  Average
Balance
  Interest
(1)
  Yield/
Cost
(1)
  Average
Balance
  Interest
(1)
  Yield/
Cost
(1)
    (Dollars in thousands)

Assets:

                                   

Interest-earning assets:

                                   

Loans (2)

    $ 4,286,830     $ 184,337       4.30 %     $ 3,495,088     $ 150,182       4.30 %     $ 2,801,970     $ 121,859       4.35 %

Securities and certificates of deposits

      132,872       2,630       1.98       183,828       3,629       1.97       268,398       4,719       1.76

Other interest-earning assets (3)

      266,945       3,465       1.30       146,786       1,147       0.78       158,463       724       0.46