Attached files

file filename
EX-32 - EXHIBIT 32 - Federal Home Loan Bank of Cincinnatiex322017q210-q.htm
EX-31.2 - EXHIBIT 31.2 - Federal Home Loan Bank of Cincinnatiex3122017q210-q.htm
EX-31.1 - EXHIBIT 31.1 - Federal Home Loan Bank of Cincinnatiex3112017q210-q.htm

 UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
Form 10-Q
x
 
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2017
or
o
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from __________ to __________.
Commission File No. 000-51399
FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Federally chartered corporation 
 
31-6000228
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization) 
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
600 Atrium Two, P.O. Box 598,
 
 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
 
45201-0598
(Address of principal executive offices) 
 
(Zip Code)

(513) 852-7500
(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
x Yes   o No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
x Yes   o No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer o
Accelerated filer o
Non-accelerated filer x (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company o
Emerging growth company o

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
o Yes   x No

As of July 31, 2017, the registrant had 43,049,589 shares of capital stock outstanding, which included stock classified as mandatorily redeemable. The capital stock of the registrant is not listed on any securities exchange or quoted on any automated quotation system, only may be owned by members and former members and is transferable only at its par value of $100 per share.

Page 1 of


Table of Contents
 
PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
Financial Statements (Unaudited):
 
 
 
 
 
Statements of Condition - June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016
 
 
 
 
Statements of Income - Three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016
 
 
 
 
Statements of Comprehensive Income - Three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016
 
 
 
 
Statements of Capital - Six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016
 
 
 
 
Statements of Cash Flows - Six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016
 
 
 
 
Notes to Unaudited Financial Statements
 
 
 
Item 2.
Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
 
 
 
Item 3.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
 
 
 
Item 4.
Controls and Procedures
 
 
 
 
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION
 
 
 
 
Item 1A.
Risk Factors
 
 
 
Item 2.
Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
 
 
 
Item 5.
Other Information
 
 
 
Item 6.
Exhibits
 
 
 
Signatures
 

2



PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1.     Financial Statements.

FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI
STATEMENTS OF CONDITION
(In thousands, except par value)
(Unaudited)
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
ASSETS
 
 
 
Cash and due from banks
$
370,216

 
$
8,737

Interest-bearing deposits
190

 
129

Securities purchased under agreements to resell
5,865,699

 
5,229,487

Federal funds sold
7,030,000

 
4,257,000

Investment securities:
 
 
 
Trading securities
882

 
970

Available-for-sale securities
350,004

 
1,300,023

Held-to-maturity securities (includes $0 and $0 pledged as collateral at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively, that may be repledged) (a)
14,687,378

 
14,546,979

Total investment securities
15,038,264

 
15,847,972

Advances (includes $15,063 and $15,093 at fair value under fair value option at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively)
71,088,071

 
69,882,074

Mortgage loans held for portfolio:
 
 
 
Mortgage loans held for portfolio
9,448,190

 
9,149,860

Less: allowance for credit losses on mortgage loans
970

 
1,142

Mortgage loans held for portfolio, net
9,447,220

 
9,148,718

Accrued interest receivable
118,472

 
109,886

Premises, software, and equipment, net
8,672

 
9,187

Derivative assets
78,149

 
104,753

Other assets
7,852

 
37,338

TOTAL ASSETS
$
109,052,805

 
$
104,635,281

LIABILITIES
 
 
 
Deposits
$
713,124

 
$
765,879

Consolidated Obligations:
 
 
 
Discount Notes
49,359,582

 
44,689,662

Bonds (includes $5,605,291 and $7,895,510 at fair value under fair value option at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively)
53,359,309

 
53,190,866

Total Consolidated Obligations
102,718,891

 
97,880,528

Mandatorily redeemable capital stock
35,969

 
34,782

Accrued interest payable
127,328

 
119,322

Affordable Housing Program payable
107,321

 
104,883

Derivative liabilities
5,942

 
17,874

Other liabilities
246,347

 
733,918

Total liabilities
103,954,922

 
99,657,186

Commitments and contingencies (Note 19)

 

CAPITAL
 
 
 
Capital stock Class B putable ($100 par value); issued and outstanding shares: 42,197 shares at June 30, 2017 and 41,569 shares at December 31, 2016
4,219,735

 
4,156,944

Retained earnings:
 
 
 
Unrestricted
599,926

 
574,122

Restricted
290,644

 
260,285

Total retained earnings
890,570

 
834,407

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(12,422
)
 
(13,256
)
Total capital
5,097,883

 
4,978,095

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL
$
109,052,805

 
$
104,635,281

(a)
Fair values: $14,634,113 and $14,413,231 at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

3


FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI
STATEMENTS OF INCOME
(In thousands)
(Unaudited)
 
Three Months Ended June 30,
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
INTEREST INCOME:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Advances
$
215,191

 
$
138,488

 
$
396,444

 
$
272,008

Prepayment fees on Advances, net
98

 
1,831

 
445

 
4,075

Interest-bearing deposits
25

 
77

 
41

 
156

Securities purchased under agreements to resell
6,633

 
1,835

 
11,359

 
3,757

Federal funds sold
11,315

 
7,690

 
21,765

 
18,860

Investment securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Trading securities
6

 
6

 
10

 
11

Available-for-sale securities
967

 
1,278

 
2,749

 
2,289

Held-to-maturity securities
76,149

 
82,657

 
148,904

 
167,214

Total investment securities
77,122

 
83,941

 
151,663

 
169,514

Mortgage loans held for portfolio
74,279

 
64,008

 
146,716

 
131,892

Total interest income
384,663

 
297,870

 
728,433

 
600,262

INTEREST EXPENSE:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Consolidated Obligations:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Discount Notes
79,687

 
44,419

 
136,336

 
99,299

Bonds
197,573

 
169,512

 
380,186

 
326,836

Total Consolidated Obligations
277,260

 
213,931

 
516,522

 
426,135

Deposits
1,021

 
300

 
1,785

 
580

Loans from other FHLBanks
6

 

 
6

 

Mandatorily redeemable capital stock
608

 
1,029

 
1,079

 
2,092

Total interest expense
278,895

 
215,260

 
519,392

 
428,807

NET INTEREST INCOME
105,768

 
82,610

 
209,041

 
171,455

NON-INTEREST INCOME (LOSS):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net (losses) gains on trading securities
(1
)
 
1

 
(4
)
 
1

Net losses on financial instruments held under fair value option
(6,397
)
 
(19,290
)
 
(12,458
)
 
(32,947
)
Net gains on derivatives and hedging activities
13,260

 
22,385

 
5,144

 
28,030

Standby Letters of Credit fees
2,816

 
3,086

 
5,679

 
6,230

Other, net
378

 
433

 
982

 
1,113

Total non-interest income (loss)
10,056

 
6,615

 
(657
)
 
2,427

NON-INTEREST EXPENSE:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Compensation and benefits
10,479

 
10,210

 
22,244

 
20,778

Other operating expenses
4,412

 
5,943

 
9,574

 
11,852

Finance Agency
1,641

 
1,534

 
3,281

 
3,069

Office of Finance
1,018

 
1,023

 
2,120

 
2,218

Other
1,990

 
2,186

 
2,387

 
4,730

Total non-interest expense
19,540

 
20,896

 
39,606

 
42,647

INCOME BEFORE ASSESSMENTS
96,284

 
68,329

 
168,778

 
131,235

Affordable Housing Program assessments
9,690

 
6,936

 
16,986

 
13,333

NET INCOME
$
86,594

 
$
61,393

 
$
151,792

 
$
117,902

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

4


FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI
STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(In thousands)
(Unaudited)
 
Three Months Ended June 30,
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Net income
$
86,594

 
$
61,393

 
$
151,792

 
$
117,902

Other comprehensive income adjustments:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net unrealized gains (losses) on available-for-sale securities
7

 
(158
)
 
(19
)
 
(14
)
Pension and postretirement benefits
511

 
709

 
853

 
1,181

Total other comprehensive income adjustments
518

 
551

 
834

 
1,167

Comprehensive income
$
87,112

 
$
61,944

 
$
152,626

 
$
119,069


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.


5


FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI
STATEMENTS OF CAPITAL
(In thousands)
(Unaudited)
 
Capital Stock
Class B - Putable
 
Retained Earnings
 
Accumulated Other Comprehensive
 
Total
 
Shares
 
Par Value
 
Unrestricted
 
Restricted
 
Total
 
Loss
 
Capital
BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 2015
44,288

 
$
4,428,756

 
$
530,998

 
$
206,648

 
$
737,646

 
$
(13,277
)
 
$
5,153,125

Proceeds from sale of capital stock
356

 
35,663

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
35,663

Net shares reclassified to mandatorily
   redeemable capital stock
(2,379
)
 
(237,883
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(237,883
)
Comprehensive income
 
 
 
 
94,322

 
23,580

 
117,902

 
1,167

 
119,069

Cash dividends on capital stock
 
 
 
 
(86,969
)
 
 
 
(86,969
)
 
 
 
(86,969
)
BALANCE, JUNE 30, 2016
42,265

 
$
4,226,536

 
$
538,351

 
$
230,228

 
$
768,579

 
$
(12,110
)
 
$
4,983,005

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 2016
41,569

 
$
4,156,944

 
$
574,122

 
$
260,285

 
$
834,407

 
$
(13,256
)
 
$
4,978,095

Proceeds from sale of capital stock
2,502

 
250,196

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
250,196

Net shares reclassified to mandatorily
   redeemable capital stock
(1,874
)
 
(187,405
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(187,405
)
Comprehensive income
 
 
 
 
121,433

 
30,359

 
151,792

 
834

 
152,626

Cash dividends on capital stock
 
 
 
 
(95,629
)
 
 
 
(95,629
)
 
 
 
(95,629
)
BALANCE, JUNE 30, 2017
42,197

 
$
4,219,735

 
$
599,926

 
$
290,644

 
$
890,570

 
$
(12,422
)
 
$
5,097,883


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.


6


FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI
STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(In thousands)
(Unaudited)
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
 
 
 
Net income
$
151,792

 
$
117,902

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
24,521

 
28,583

Net change in derivative and hedging activities
7,937

 
(36,990
)
Net change in fair value adjustments on trading securities
4

 
(1
)
Net change in fair value adjustments on financial instruments held under fair value option
12,458

 
32,947

Net change in:
 
 
 
Accrued interest receivable
(8,593
)
 
(9,752
)
Other assets
29,486

 
4,875

Accrued interest payable
2,723

 
17,189

Other liabilities
2,234

 
3,940

Total adjustments
70,770

 
40,791

Net cash provided by operating activities
222,562

 
158,693

 
 
 
 
INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
 
 
 
Net change in:
 
 
 
Interest-bearing deposits
31,358

 
(96,178
)
Securities purchased under agreements to resell
(636,212
)
 
5,613,722

Federal funds sold
(2,773,000
)
 
9,520,000

Premises, software, and equipment
(954
)
 
(1,009
)
Trading securities:
 
 
 
Proceeds from maturities of long-term
84

 
83

Available-for-sale securities:
 
 
 
Net decrease (increase) in short-term
950,000

 
(500,000
)
Held-to-maturity securities:
 
 
 
Net (increase) decrease in short-term
(1,510
)
 
1,672

Proceeds from maturities of long-term
1,067,947

 
1,297,615

Purchases of long-term
(1,695,542
)
 
(1,091,090
)
Advances:
 
 
 
Proceeds
1,061,870,216

 
591,327,098

Made
(1,063,075,660
)
 
(592,545,989
)
Mortgage loans held for portfolio:
 
 
 
Principal collected
605,081

 
679,892

Purchases
(925,134
)
 
(1,232,995
)
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities
(4,583,326
)
 
12,972,821

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

7


(continued from previous page)
 
 
 
FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI
STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(In thousands)
(Unaudited)
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
 
 
 
Net (decrease) increase in deposits and pass-through reserves
$
(71,905
)
 
$
100,600

Net payments on derivative contracts with financing elements
(2,898
)
 
(7,640
)
Net proceeds from issuance of Consolidated Obligations:
 
 
 
Discount Notes
293,476,586

 
173,693,969

Bonds
13,680,336

 
28,842,319

Payments for maturing and retiring Consolidated Obligations:
 
 
 
Discount Notes
(288,823,225
)
 
(202,005,522
)
Bonds
(13,505,000
)
 
(13,522,053
)
Proceeds from issuance of capital stock
250,196

 
35,663

Payments for repurchase/redemption of mandatorily redeemable capital stock
(186,218
)
 
(179,929
)
Cash dividends paid
(95,629
)
 
(86,969
)
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
4,722,243

 
(13,129,562
)
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
361,479

 
1,952

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the period
8,737

 
10,136

Cash and cash equivalents at end of the period
$
370,216

 
$
12,088

Supplemental Disclosures:
 
 
 
Interest paid
$
510,622

 
$
420,646

Affordable Housing Program payments, net
$
14,548

 
$
19,620




The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.


8


FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI

NOTES TO UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


Background Information    

The Federal Home Loan Bank of Cincinnati (the FHLB), a federally chartered corporation, is one of 11 District Federal Home Loan Banks (FHLBanks). The FHLBanks serve the public by enhancing the availability of credit for residential mortgages and targeted community development. The FHLB is regulated by the Federal Housing Finance Agency (Finance Agency).

Note 1 - Basis of Presentation

The accompanying interim financial statements of the FHLB have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (GAAP). The preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP requires management to make assumptions and estimates. These assumptions and estimates affect the reported amount of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities, and the reported amounts of income and expenses. Actual results could differ from these estimates. The interim financial statements presented are unaudited, but they include all adjustments (consisting of only normal recurring adjustments) which are, in the opinion of management, necessary for a fair statement of the financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows for such periods. These financial statements do not include all disclosures associated with annual financial statements and accordingly should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements and notes included in the FHLB's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Results for the six months ended June 30, 2017 are not necessarily indicative of operating results for the full year.

The FHLB presents certain financial instruments, including derivative instruments and securities purchased under agreements to resell, on a net basis when it has a legal right of offset and all other requirements for netting are met (collectively referred to as the netting requirements). For these instruments, the FHLB has elected to offset its asset and liability positions, as well as cash collateral received or pledged, when it has met the netting requirements. The FHLB did not have any offsetting liabilities related to its securities purchased under agreements to resell for the periods presented.

The net exposure for these financial instruments can change on a daily basis; therefore, there may be a delay between the time this exposure change is identified and additional collateral is requested, and the time this collateral is received or pledged. Likewise, there may be a delay for excess collateral to be returned. For derivative instruments that meet the requirements for netting, any excess cash collateral received or pledged is recognized as a derivative liability or derivative asset. Additional information regarding these agreements is provided in Note 10. Based on the fair value of the related collateral held, the securities purchased under agreements to resell were fully collateralized for the periods presented. For more information about the FHLB's investments in securities purchased under agreements to resell, see “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data - Note 1 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” in the FHLB's 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

The FHLB has evaluated subsequent events for potential recognition or disclosure through the issuance of these financial statements and believes there have been no material subsequent events requiring additional disclosure or recognition in these financial statements.

Change in Accounting Principle. Effective October 1, 2016, the FHLB changed its method of accounting for the amortization and accretion of premiums and discounts and hedging basis adjustments on mortgage loans held for portfolio to the contractual interest method (contractual method). Historically, the FHLB deferred and amortized premiums and accreted discounts into interest income using the retrospective interest method (retrospective method), which used both actual prepayment experience and estimates of future principal repayments in calculating the estimated lives of the loans. While both the retrospective and contractual methods are acceptable under GAAP, the contractual method has become preferable for recognizing net unamortized premiums on mortgage loans held for portfolio because (i) it reduces the FHLB's reliance on subjective assumptions and estimates that affected the reported amounts of assets, capital and income in the financial statements and (ii) it represents the base accounting model articulated in GAAP applicable to accounting for the amortization of premiums and the accretion of discounts, whereas the retrospective method is only permitted by the guidance in narrowly defined circumstances.
The change to the contractual method for amortizing premiums and accreting discounts and hedging basis adjustments on mortgage loans has been reported through retroactive application of the change in accounting principle to all periods presented.

9


For the three and six months ended June 30, 2016, the effect of this change was an increase to net income (in thousands) of $5,017 and $13,179, respectively.
The following tables illustrate the effect of the change in amortization and accretion method on the FHLB's financial statements as of and for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016.

 
As of and for the Three Months Ended June 30, 2016
(In thousands)
Previous Method
 
New Method
 
Effect of Change
Statements of Income:
 
 
 
 
 
Interest income - mortgage loans held for portfolio
$
58,433

 
$
64,008

 
$
5,575

Net interest income
77,035

 
82,610

 
5,575

Income before assessments
62,754

 
68,329

 
5,575

Affordable Housing Program assessments
6,378

 
6,936

 
558

Net income
56,376

 
61,393

 
5,017

Statements of Comprehensive Income:
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
56,376

 
$
61,393

 
$
5,017

Comprehensive income
56,927

 
61,944

 
5,017



10


 
As of and for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2016
(In thousands)
Previous Method
 
New Method
 
Effect of Change
Statements of Condition:
 
 
 
 
 
Mortgage loans held for portfolio, net
$
8,509,933

 
$
8,496,646

 
$
(13,287
)
Total assets
106,141,555

 
106,128,268

 
(13,287
)
Affordable Housing Program payable
99,600

 
101,065

 
1,465

Total liabilities
101,143,798

 
101,145,263

 
1,465

Retained earnings:
 
 
 
 
 
Unrestricted
552,949

 
538,351

 
(14,598
)
Restricted
230,382

 
230,228

 
(154
)
Total retained earnings
783,331

 
768,579

 
(14,752
)
Total capital
4,997,757

 
4,983,005

 
(14,752
)
Total liabilities and capital
106,141,555

 
106,128,268

 
(13,287
)
Statements of Income:
 
 
 
 
 
Interest income - mortgage loans held for portfolio
$
117,248

 
$
131,892

 
$
14,644

Net interest income
156,811

 
171,455

 
14,644

Income before assessments
116,591

 
131,235

 
14,644

Affordable Housing Program assessments
11,868

 
13,333

 
1,465

Net income
104,723

 
117,902

 
13,179

Statements of Comprehensive Income:
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
104,723

 
$
117,902

 
$
13,179

Comprehensive income
105,890

 
119,069

 
13,179

Statements of Capital:
 
 
 
 
 
Total retained earnings, as of December 31, 2015
$
765,577

 
$
737,646

 
$
(27,931
)
Total comprehensive income
105,890

 
119,069

 
13,179

Total retained earnings, as of June 30, 2016
783,331

 
768,579

 
(14,752
)
Total capital
4,997,757

 
4,983,005

 
(14,752
)
Statements of Cash Flows:
 
 
 
 
 
Operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
104,723

 
$
117,902

 
$
13,179

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
43,227

 
28,583

 
(14,644
)
Changes in:
 
 
 
 
 
Other liabilities
2,475

 
3,940

 
1,465

Total adjustments
53,970

 
40,791

 
(13,179
)
Net cash provided by operating activities
158,693

 
158,693

 




Note 2 - Recently Issued Accounting Standards and Interpretations
 
Premium Amortization on Purchased Callable Debt Securities. On March 30, 2017, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued amended guidance to shorten the amortization period for certain purchased callable debt securities held at a premium. Specifically, the amendments require the premium to be amortized to the earliest call date. The amendments do not require an accounting change for securities held at a discount; the discount continues to be amortized to maturity. This guidance is effective for the FHLB for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and early adoption is permitted. This guidance should be applied using a modified retrospective method through a cumulative-effect adjustment directly to

11


retained earnings as of the beginning of the period of adoption. The FHLB is in the process of evaluating this guidance, and its effect on the FHLB’s financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows has not yet been determined.
Improving the Presentation of Net Periodic Pension and Postretirement Benefit Cost. On March 10, 2017, the FASB issued amended guidance that requires an employer to disaggregate the service cost component from the other components of net periodic pension and postretirement benefit costs (net benefit costs). The amendments also provide explicit guidance on how to present the service cost component and the other components of net benefit costs in the income statement and allow only the service cost component of net benefit cost to be eligible for capitalization. This guidance is effective for the FHLB for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and early adoption is permitted. This guidance should be applied retrospectively for the presentation of the service cost component and the other components of net benefit costs in the income statement. For the capitalization of the service cost component of net benefit costs, this guidance should be applied prospectively on and after the effective date. While the FHLB is still in the process of evaluating this guidance, the FHLB does not expect the new guidance to have a material impact on its financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.
Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments. On August 26, 2016, the FASB issued amendments to clarify guidance on the classification of certain cash receipts and payments in the Statement of Cash Flows. This guidance is intended to reduce existing diversity in practice in how certain cash receipts and cash payments are presented and classified on the Statement of Cash Flows. This guidance is effective for the FHLB for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and early adoption is permitted. This guidance should be applied using a retrospective transition method to each period presented. The FHLB does not intend to adopt the new guidance early. At this time, the FHLB does not expect the new guidance to have any impact on the FHLB’s cash flows.
Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments. On June 16, 2016, the FASB issued amended guidance for the accounting of credit losses on financial instruments. The amendments require entities to immediately record the full amount of expected credit losses in their loan portfolios. The measurement of expected credit losses is based on relevant information about past events, including historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts that affect the collectability of the reported amount. The guidance also requires, among other things, credit losses relating to available-for-sale debt securities to be recorded through an allowance for credit losses and expanded disclosure requirements. The guidance is effective for the FHLB for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Early application is permitted as of the interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018. The guidance should be applied using a modified-retrospective approach, through a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings as of the beginning of the first reporting period in which the guidance is effective. In addition, entities are required to use a prospective transition approach for debt securities for which an other-than-temporary impairment had been recognized before the effective date. The FHLB does not intend to adopt the new guidance early. While the FHLB is still in the process of evaluating this guidance, the FHLB expects the guidance will result in an increase in the allowance for credit losses given the requirement to estimate losses for the entire estimated life of the financial asset. The extent of the impact on the FHLB’s financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows will depend upon the composition of the FHLB’s financial assets at the adoption date and the economic conditions and forecasts at that time.
Contingent Put and Call Options in Debt Instruments. On March 14, 2016, the FASB issued amendments to clarify the requirements for assessing whether contingent call (put) options that can accelerate the payment of principal on debt instruments are clearly and closely related to their debt hosts. The guidance requires entities to apply only the four-step decision sequence when assessing whether the economic characteristics and risks of call (put) options are clearly and closely related to the economic characteristics and risks of their debt hosts. Consequently, when a call (put) option is contingently exercisable, an entity does not have to assess whether the event that triggers the ability to exercise a call (put) option is related to interest rates or credit risks. This guidance became effective for the FHLB for the interim and annual periods beginning on January 1, 2017. The adoption of this guidance had no effect on the FHLB's financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.

12


Leases. On February 25, 2016, the FASB issued guidance which requires recognition of lease assets and lease liabilities on the Statement of Condition and disclosure of key information about leasing arrangements. In particular, this guidance requires a lessee, of operating or finance leases, to recognize on the Statement of Condition a liability to make lease payments and a right-of-use asset representing its right to use the underlying asset for the lease term. However, for leases with a term of 12 months or less, a lessee is permitted to make an accounting policy election not to recognize lease assets and lease liabilities. The guidance becomes effective for the FHLB for the interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and early application is permitted. The guidance requires lessors and lessees to recognize and measure leases at the beginning of the earliest period presented in the financial statements using a modified retrospective approach. The FHLB does not intend to adopt the new guidance early. Upon adoption, the FHLB expects to report higher assets and liabilities as a result of including right-of-use assets and lease liabilities on its Statement of Condition. While the FHLB is still in the process of evaluating this guidance, the FHLB does not expect the new guidance to have a material impact on its financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.

Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities. On January 5, 2016, the FASB issued amended guidance on certain aspects of recognition, measurement, presentation, and disclosure of financial instruments. This guidance includes, but is not limited to, the following:

Requires an entity to present separately in other comprehensive income the portion of the total change in the fair value of a liability resulting from a change in the instrument-specific credit risk when the entity has elected the fair value option.
Requires separate presentation of financial assets and financial liabilities by measurement category and form of financial asset on the Statement of Condition or the accompanying notes to the financial statements.
Eliminates the requirement for public entities to disclose the method(s) and significant assumptions used to estimate the fair value for financial instruments measured at amortized cost on the Statement of Condition.
The guidance becomes effective for the FHLB for the interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and early adoption is only permitted for certain provisions. The amendments, in general, should be applied by means of a cumulative-effect adjustment to the Statement of Condition as of the beginning of the period of adoption. The FHLB does not intend to adopt the new guidance early. While this guidance will affect the FHLB's disclosures, the FHLB does not expect the requirement to present the instrument-specific credit risk in other comprehensive income to have a material effect on the FHLB's financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.


Note 3 - Trading Securities

Table 3.1 - Trading Securities by Major Security Types (in thousands)        
Fair Value
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Mortgage-backed securities:
 
 
 
Other U.S. obligation single-family mortgage-backed securities
$
882

 
$
970

Total
$
882

 
$
970


Table 3.2 - Net (Losses) Gains on Trading Securities (in thousands)
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
Net (losses) gains on trading securities held at period end
$
(4
)
 
$
1

Net (losses) gains on trading securities
$
(4
)
 
$
1



13


Note 4 - Available-for-Sale Securities

Table 4.1 - Available-for-Sale Securities by Major Security Types (in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
Amortized
Cost
 
Gross
Unrealized
Gains
 
Gross
Unrealized
Losses
 
Fair
Value
Certificates of deposit
$
350,000

 
$
10

 
$
(6
)
 
$
350,004

Total
$
350,000

 
$
10

 
$
(6
)
 
$
350,004

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
December 31, 2016
 
Amortized
Cost
 
Gross
Unrealized
Gains
 
Gross
Unrealized
Losses
 
Fair
Value
Certificates of deposit
$
1,300,000

 
$
38

 
$
(15
)
 
$
1,300,023

Total
$
1,300,000

 
$
38

 
$
(15
)
 
$
1,300,023


All securities outstanding with gross unrealized losses at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 were in a continuous unrealized loss position for less than 12 months.

Table 4.2 - Available-for-Sale Securities by Contractual Maturity (in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Year of Maturity
Amortized
Cost
 
Fair
Value
 
Amortized
Cost
 
Fair
Value
Due in one year or less
$
350,000

 
$
350,004

 
$
1,300,000

 
$
1,300,023


Table 4.3 - Interest Rate Payment Terms of Available-for-Sale Securities (in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Amortized cost of available-for-sale securities:
 
 
 
Fixed-rate
$
350,000

 
$
1,300,000


Realized Gains and Losses. The FHLB had no sales of securities out of its available-for-sale portfolio for the six months ended June 30, 2017 or 2016.


14



Note 5 - Held-to-Maturity Securities

Table 5.1 - Held-to-Maturity Securities by Major Security Types (in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
Amortized Cost (1)
 
Gross Unrecognized Holding
Gains
 
Gross Unrecognized Holding Losses
 
Fair Value
Non-mortgage-backed securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Government-sponsored enterprises (GSE)
$
32,789

 
$

 
$
(3
)
 
$
32,786

Total non-mortgage-backed securities
32,789

 

 
(3
)
 
32,786

Mortgage-backed securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other U.S. obligation single-family
   mortgage-backed securities
2,881,992

 
4,998

 
(15,951
)
 
2,871,039

GSE single-family mortgage-backed securities
7,457,569

 
44,301

 
(94,278
)
 
7,407,592

GSE multi-family mortgage-backed securities
4,315,028

 
7,903

 
(235
)
 
4,322,696

Total mortgage-backed securities
14,654,589

 
57,202

 
(110,464
)
 
14,601,327

Total
$
14,687,378

 
$
57,202

 
$
(110,467
)
 
$
14,634,113

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
December 31, 2016
 
Amortized Cost (1)
 
Gross Unrecognized Holding
Gains
 
Gross Unrecognized Holding Losses
 
Fair Value
Non-mortgage-backed securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
GSE
$
31,279

 
$
1

 
$

 
$
31,280

Total non-mortgage-backed securities
31,279

 
1

 

 
31,280

Mortgage-backed securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other U.S. obligation single-family
   mortgage-backed securities
3,183,219

 
3,653

 
(23,151
)
 
3,163,721

GSE single-family mortgage-backed securities
8,186,733

 
36,161

 
(147,494
)
 
8,075,400

GSE multi-family mortgage-backed securities
3,145,748

 
988

 
(3,906
)
 
3,142,830

Total mortgage-backed securities
14,515,700

 
40,802

 
(174,551
)
 
14,381,951

Total
$
14,546,979

 
$
40,803

 
$
(174,551
)
 
$
14,413,231

 
(1)
Carrying value equals amortized cost.

Table 5.2 - Net Purchased Premiums Included in the Amortized Cost of Mortgage-backed Securities Classified as Held-to-Maturity (in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Premiums
$
54,391

 
$
60,519

Discounts
(27,190
)
 
(31,474
)
Net purchased premiums
$
27,201

 
$
29,045



15


Table 5.3 summarizes the held-to-maturity securities with unrealized losses, which are aggregated by major security type and length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position.

Table 5.3 - Held-to-Maturity Securities in a Continuous Unrealized Loss Position (in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
Less than 12 Months
 
12 Months or more
 
Total
 
Fair Value
 
Gross Unrealized Losses
 
Fair Value
 
Gross Unrealized Losses
 
Fair Value
 
Gross Unrealized Losses
Non-mortgage-backed securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
GSE
$
32,786

 
$
(3
)
 
$

 
$

 
$
32,786

 
$
(3
)
Total non-mortgage-backed securities
32,786

 
(3
)
 

 

 
32,786

 
(3
)
Mortgage-backed securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other U.S. obligation single-family
   mortgage-backed securities
1,538,654

 
(15,951
)
 

 

 
1,538,654

 
(15,951
)
GSE single-family mortgage-backed securities
3,912,027

 
(53,875
)
 
1,122,601

 
(40,403
)
 
5,034,628

 
(94,278
)
GSE multi-family mortgage-backed securities
282,733

 
(235
)
 

 

 
282,733

 
(235
)
Total mortgage-backed securities
5,733,414

 
(70,061
)
 
1,122,601

 
(40,403
)
 
6,856,015

 
(110,464
)
Total
$
5,766,200

 
$
(70,064
)
 
$
1,122,601

 
$
(40,403
)
 
$
6,888,801

 
$
(110,467
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
December 31, 2016
 
Less than 12 Months
 
12 Months or more
 
Total
 
Fair Value
 
Gross Unrealized Losses
 
Fair Value
 
Gross Unrealized Losses
 
Fair Value
 
Gross Unrealized Losses
Mortgage-backed securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other U.S. obligation single-family
   mortgage-backed securities
$
2,151,584

 
$
(23,151
)
 
$

 
$

 
$
2,151,584

 
$
(23,151
)
GSE single-family mortgage-backed securities
4,548,897

 
(90,119
)
 
1,193,241

 
(57,375
)
 
5,742,138

 
(147,494
)
GSE multi-family mortgage-backed securities
1,897,043

 
(3,906
)
 

 

 
1,897,043

 
(3,906
)
Total
$
8,597,524

 
$
(117,176
)
 
$
1,193,241

 
$
(57,375
)
 
$
9,790,765

 
$
(174,551
)

Table 5.4 - Held-to-Maturity Securities by Contractual Maturity (in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Year of Maturity
Amortized Cost (1)
 
Fair Value
 
Amortized Cost (1)
 
Fair Value
Non-mortgage-backed securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Due in 1 year or less
$
32,789

 
$
32,786

 
$
31,279

 
$
31,280

Due after 1 year through 5 years

 

 

 

Due after 5 years through 10 years

 

 

 

Due after 10 years

 

 

 

Total non-mortgage-backed securities
32,789

 
32,786

 
31,279

 
31,280

Mortgage-backed securities (2)
14,654,589

 
14,601,327

 
14,515,700

 
14,381,951

Total
$
14,687,378

 
$
14,634,113

 
$
14,546,979

 
$
14,413,231

(1)
Carrying value equals amortized cost.
(2)
Mortgage-backed securities are not presented by contractual maturity because their expected maturities will likely differ from contractual maturities because borrowers may have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without call or prepayment fees.

16



Table 5.5 - Interest Rate Payment Terms of Held-to-Maturity Securities (in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Amortized cost of non-mortgage-backed securities:
 
 
 
Fixed-rate
$
32,789

 
$
31,279

Total amortized cost of non-mortgage-backed securities
32,789

 
31,279

Amortized cost of mortgage-backed securities:
 
 
 
Fixed-rate
8,878,017

 
9,706,072

Variable-rate
5,776,572

 
4,809,628

Total amortized cost of mortgage-backed securities
14,654,589

 
14,515,700

Total
$
14,687,378

 
$
14,546,979


Realized Gains and Losses. From time to time the FHLB may sell securities out of its held-to-maturity portfolio. These securities, generally, have less than 15 percent of the acquired principal outstanding at the time of the sale. These sales are considered maturities for the purposes of security classification. For the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the FHLB did not sell any held-to-maturity securities.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Note 6 - Other-Than-Temporary Impairment Analysis

The FHLB evaluates any of its individual available-for-sale and held-to-maturity investment securities holdings in an unrealized loss position for other-than-temporary impairment on a quarterly basis.

For its Other U.S. obligations and GSE investments (mortgage-backed securities and non-mortgage-backed securities), the FHLB has determined that the strength of the issuers' guarantees through direct obligations or support from the U.S. government is sufficient to protect the FHLB from losses based on current expectations. As a result, the FHLB determined that, as of June 30, 2017, all of the gross unrealized losses on these investments were temporary as the declines in market value of these securities were not attributable to credit quality. Furthermore, the FHLB does not intend to sell the investments, and it is not more likely than not that the FHLB will be required to sell the investments before recovery of their amortized cost bases. As a result, the FHLB did not consider any of these investments to be other-than-temporarily impaired at June 30, 2017.

The FHLB also reviewed its available-for-sale securities that have experienced unrealized losses at June 30, 2017 and determined that the unrealized losses were temporary, based on the creditworthiness of the issuers and the related collateral characteristics, and that the FHLB will recover its entire amortized cost basis. Additionally, because the FHLB does not intend to sell these securities, nor is it more likely than not that the FHLB will be required to sell the securities before recovery, it did not consider the investments to be other-than-temporarily impaired at June 30, 2017.

The FHLB did not consider any of its investments to be other-than-temporarily impaired at December 31, 2016.


Note 7 - Advances

The FHLB offers a wide range of fixed- and variable-rate Advance products with different maturities, interest rates, payment characteristics and optionality. The following table presents Advance redemptions by contractual maturity, including index-amortizing Advances, which are presented according to their predetermined amortization schedules.


17


Table 7.1 - Advance Redemption Terms (dollars in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Redemption Term
Amount
 
Weighted Average Interest
Rate
 
Amount
 
Weighted Average Interest
Rate
Due in 1 year or less
$
36,268,570

 
1.27
%
 
$
23,129,060

 
0.85
%
Due after 1 year through 2 years
17,263,673

 
1.44

 
21,503,138

 
1.06

Due after 2 years through 3 years
10,306,830

 
1.49

 
14,292,353

 
1.12

Due after 3 years through 4 years
1,887,708

 
1.85

 
5,322,050

 
1.26

Due after 4 years through 5 years
727,943

 
2.11

 
963,105

 
1.78

Thereafter
4,657,756

 
1.95

 
4,697,315

 
1.75

Total par value
71,112,480

 
1.41

 
69,907,021

 
1.07

Commitment fees
(522
)
 
 
 
(534
)
 
 
Discount on Affordable Housing Program (AHP) Advances
(6,613
)
 
 
 
(7,435
)
 
 
Premiums
1,926

 
 
 
2,061

 
 
Discounts
(4,947
)
 
 
 
(5,994
)
 
 
Hedging adjustments
(14,316
)
 
 
 
(13,138
)
 
 
Fair value option valuation adjustments and accrued interest
63

 
 
 
93

 
 
Total
$
71,088,071

 
 
 
$
69,882,074

 
 

The FHLB offers certain fixed and variable-rate Advances to members that may be prepaid on specified dates (call dates) without incurring prepayment or termination fees (callable Advances). If the call option is exercised, replacement funding may be available to members. Other Advances may only be prepaid subject to a prepayment fee paid to the FHLB that makes the FHLB financially indifferent to the prepayment of the Advance.

Table 7.2 - Advances by Year of Contractual Maturity or Next Call Date (in thousands)
Year of Contractual Maturity or Next Call Date
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Due in 1 year or less
$
41,825,393

 
$
33,831,156

Due after 1 year through 2 years
16,949,195

 
15,901,805

Due after 2 years through 3 years
7,612,968

 
13,608,214

Due after 3 years through 4 years
2,831,913

 
2,982,425

Due after 4 years through 5 years
592,255

 
2,243,105

Thereafter
1,300,756

 
1,340,316

Total par value
$
71,112,480

 
$
69,907,021


The FHLB also offers putable Advances. With a putable Advance, the FHLB effectively purchases put options from the member that allows the FHLB to terminate the Advance at predetermined dates. The FHLB normally would exercise its put option when interest rates increase relative to contractual rates.


18


Table 7.3 - Advances by Year of Contractual Maturity or Next Put Date for Putable Advances (in thousands)
Year of Contractual Maturity or Next Put Date
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Due in 1 year or less
$
36,545,070

 
$
23,499,560

Due after 1 year through 2 years
17,097,173

 
21,248,138

Due after 2 years through 3 years
10,306,830

 
14,286,853

Due after 3 years through 4 years
1,887,708

 
5,322,050

Due after 4 years through 5 years
727,943

 
963,105

Thereafter
4,547,756

 
4,587,315

Total par value
$
71,112,480

 
$
69,907,021


Table 7.4 - Advances by Interest Rate Payment Terms (in thousands)                    
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Total fixed-rate (1)
$
32,407,774

 
$
24,700,450

Total variable-rate (1)
38,704,706

 
45,206,571

Total par value
$
71,112,480

 
$
69,907,021

(1)
Payment terms based on current interest rate terms, which reflect any option exercises or rate conversions that have occurred subsequent to the related Advance issuance.

Table 7.5 - Borrowers Holding Five Percent or more of Total Advances, Including Any Known Affiliates that are Members of the FHLB (dollars in millions)
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
 
Principal
 
% of Total Par Value of Advances
 
 
Principal
 
% of Total Par Value of Advances
JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A.
$
26,850

 
38
%
 
JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A.
$
32,300

 
46
%
U.S. Bank, N.A.
9,783

 
14

 
U.S. Bank, N.A.
8,563

 
12

Fifth Third Bank
4,367

 
6

 
Total
$
40,863

 
58
%
Total
$
41,000

 
58
%
 
 


 




Note 8 - Mortgage Loans Held for Portfolio

Table 8.1 - Mortgage Loans Held for Portfolio (in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Unpaid principal balance:
 
 
 
Fixed rate medium-term single-family mortgage loans (1)
$
1,225,024

 
$
1,320,585

Fixed rate long-term single-family mortgage loans
7,999,172

 
7,605,088

Total unpaid principal balance
9,224,196

 
8,925,673

Premiums
215,517

 
211,058

Discounts
(3,567
)
 
(3,740
)
Hedging basis adjustments (2)
12,044

 
16,869

Total mortgage loans held for portfolio
$
9,448,190

 
$
9,149,860


(1)
Medium-term is defined as a term of 15 years or less.
(2)
Represents the unamortized balance of the mortgage purchase commitments' market values at the time of settlement. The market value of the commitment is included in the basis of the mortgage loan and amortized accordingly.


19


Table 8.2 - Mortgage Loans Held for Portfolio by Collateral/Guarantee Type (in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Unpaid principal balance:
 
 
 
Conventional mortgage loans
$
8,869,888

 
$
8,534,542

Federal Housing Administration (FHA) mortgage loans
354,308

 
391,131

Total unpaid principal balance
$
9,224,196

 
$
8,925,673


For information related to the FHLB's credit risk on mortgage loans and allowance for credit losses, see Note 9.

Table 8.3 - Members, Including Any Known Affiliates that are Members of the FHLB, and Former Members Selling Five Percent or more of Total Unpaid Principal (dollars in millions)
 
June 30, 2017
 
 
December 31, 2016
 
Principal
 
% of Total
 
 
Principal
 
% of Total
Union Savings Bank
$
3,118

 
34
%
 
Union Savings Bank
$
2,886

 
32
%
Guardian Savings Bank FSB
895

 
10

 
Guardian Savings Bank FSB
855

 
10

PNC Bank, N.A. (1)
583

 
6

 
PNC Bank, N.A. (1)
660

 
7

 
(1)
Former member.     


Note 9 - Allowance for Credit Losses

The FHLB has established an allowance methodology for each of the FHLB's portfolio segments: credit products (Advances, Letters of Credit and other extensions of credit to members); FHA mortgage loans held for portfolio; and conventional mortgage loans held for portfolio.

Credit Products

The FHLB manages its credit exposure to credit products through an integrated approach that includes establishing a credit limit for each borrower, ongoing review of each borrower's financial condition, coupled with collateral and lending policies to limit risk of loss while balancing borrowers' needs for a reliable source of funding. In addition, the FHLB lends to eligible borrowers in accordance with federal law, including the FHLBank Act and Finance Agency regulations, which require the FHLB to obtain sufficient collateral to fully secure credit products. The estimated value of the collateral required to secure each member's credit products is calculated by applying collateral discounts, or haircuts, to the value of the collateral. The FHLB accepts certain investment securities, residential mortgage loans, deposits and other real estate related assets as collateral. In addition, community financial institutions are eligible to utilize expanded statutory collateral provisions for small business, agriculture loans and community development loans. The FHLB's capital stock owned by its member borrowers is also pledged as collateral. Collateral arrangements and a member’s borrowing capacity vary based on the financial condition and performance of the institution, the types of collateral pledged and the overall quality of those assets. The FHLB can also require additional or substitute collateral to protect its security interest. Management of the FHLB believes that these policies effectively manage the FHLB's credit risk from credit products.

Members experiencing financial difficulties are subject to FHLB-performed “stress tests” of the impact of poorly performing assets on the member’s capital and loss reserve positions. Depending on the results of these tests and the level of overcollateralization, a member may be allowed to maintain pledged loan assets in its custody, may be required to deliver those loans into the custody of the FHLB or its agent, and/or may be required to provide details on these loans to facilitate an estimate of their fair value. The FHLB perfects its security interest in all pledged collateral. The FHLBank Act affords any security interest granted to the FHLB by a member priority over the claims or rights of any other party except for claims or rights of a third party that would be entitled to priority under otherwise applicable law and that are held by a bona fide purchaser for value or by a secured party holding a prior perfected security interest.

Using a risk-based approach, the FHLB considers the payment status, collateralization levels, and borrower's financial condition to be indicators of credit quality for its credit products. At June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the FHLB had rights to collateral on a member-by-member basis with an estimated value in excess of its outstanding extensions of credit.


20


The FHLB evaluates and makes changes to its collateral guidelines, as necessary, based on current market conditions. At June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the FHLB did not have any Advances that were past due, in non-accrual status or impaired. In addition, there were no troubled debt restructurings related to credit products of the FHLB during the six months ended June 30, 2017 or 2016.

The FHLB has not experienced any credit losses on Advances since it was founded in 1932. Based upon the collateral held as security, its credit extension and collateral policies and the repayment history on credit products, the FHLB did not record any credit losses on credit products as of June 30, 2017 or December 31, 2016. Accordingly, the FHLB did not record any allowance for credit losses on Advances.

At June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the FHLB did not record any liability to reflect an allowance for credit losses for off-balance sheet credit exposures. See Note 19 for additional information on the FHLB's off-balance sheet credit exposure.

Mortgage Loans Held for Portfolio - FHA

The FHLB invests in fixed-rate mortgage loans secured by one-to-four family residential properties insured by the FHA. The FHLB expects to recover any losses from such loans from the FHA. Any losses from these loans that are not recovered from the FHA would be due to a claim rejection by the FHA and, as such, would be recoverable from the selling participating financial institutions. Therefore, the FHLB only has credit risk for these loans if the seller or servicer fails to pay for losses not covered by the FHA insurance. As a result, the FHLB did not establish an allowance for credit losses on its FHA insured mortgage loans. Furthermore, due to the insurance, none of these mortgage loans have been placed on non-accrual status.

Mortgage Loans Held for Portfolio - Conventional Mortgage Purchase Program (MPP)

The FHLB determines the allowance for conventional loans through analyses that include consideration of various data observations such as past performance, current performance, loan portfolio characteristics, collateral-related characteristics, industry data, and prevailing economic conditions. The measurement of the allowance for credit losses consists of: (1) collectively evaluating homogeneous pools of residential mortgage loans; (2) reviewing specifically identified loans for impairment; and (3) considering other relevant qualitative factors.

Collectively Evaluated Mortgage Loans. The credit risk analysis of conventional loans evaluated collectively for impairment considers historical delinquency migration, applies estimated loss severities, and incorporates the associated credit enhancements in order to determine the FHLB's best estimate of probable incurred losses at the reporting date. The FHLB performs the credit risk analysis of all conventional mortgage loans at the individual Master Commitment Contract level to properly determine the credit enhancements available to recover losses on loans under each individual Master Commitment Contract. The Master Commitment Contract is an agreement with a member in which the member agrees to make a best efforts attempt to sell a specific dollar amount of loans to the FHLB generally over a one-year period. Migration analysis is a methodology for determining, through the FHLB's experience over a historical period, the rate of default on loans. The FHLB applies migration analysis to loans based on payment status categories such as current, 30, 60, and 90 days past due. The FHLB then estimates, based on historical experience, how many loans in these categories may migrate to a loss realization event and applies a current loss severity to estimate losses. The estimated losses are then reduced by the probable cash flows resulting from available credit enhancements. Any credit enhancement cash flows that are projected and assessed as not probable of receipt do not reduce estimated losses.

Individually Evaluated Mortgage Loans. Conventional mortgage loans that are considered troubled debt restructurings are specifically identified for purposes of calculating the allowance for credit losses. The FHLB measures impairment of these specifically identified loans by either estimating the present value of expected cash flows, estimating the loan's observable market price, or estimating the fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent. The FHLB removes specifically identified loans evaluated for impairment from the collectively evaluated mortgage loan population.

Qualitative Factors. The FHLB also assesses other qualitative factors in its estimation of loan losses for the collectively evaluated population. This amount represents a subjective management judgment, based on facts and circumstances that exist as of the reporting date, that is intended to cover other incurred losses that may not otherwise be captured in the methodology described above.

Rollforward of Allowance for Credit Losses on Mortgage Loans. The following tables present a rollforward of the allowance for credit losses on conventional mortgage loans as well as the recorded investment in mortgage loans by impairment methodology. The recorded investment in a loan is the unpaid principal balance of the loan adjusted for accrued interest,

21


unamortized premiums or discounts, hedging basis adjustments and direct write-downs. The recorded investment is not net of any allowance.

Table 9.1 - Rollforward of Allowance for Credit Losses on Conventional Mortgage Loans (in thousands)
 
Three Months Ended June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
Balance, beginning of period
$
880

 
$
1,483

Net recoveries (charge offs)
90

 
(266
)
Balance, end of period
$
970

 
$
1,217

 
 
 
 
 
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
Balance, beginning of period
$
1,142

 
$
1,686

Net charge offs
(172
)
 
(469
)
Balance, end of period
$
970

 
$
1,217


Table 9.2 - Allowance for Credit Losses and Recorded Investment on Conventional Mortgage Loans by Impairment Methodology (in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Allowance for credit losses:
 
 
 
Collectively evaluated for impairment
$
970

 
$
1,142

Individually evaluated for impairment

 

Total allowance for credit losses
$
970

 
$
1,142

Recorded investment:
 
 
 
Collectively evaluated for impairment
$
9,109,542

 
$
8,772,681

Individually evaluated for impairment
9,648

 
9,889

Total recorded investment
$
9,119,190

 
$
8,782,570


Credit Enhancements. The conventional mortgage loans under the MPP are supported by some combination of credit enhancements (primary mortgage insurance (PMI), supplemental mortgage insurance (SMI) and the Lender Risk Account (LRA), including pooled LRA for those members participating in an aggregated MPP pool). The amount of credit enhancements needed to protect the FHLB against credit losses is determined through use of a third-party default model. These credit enhancements apply after a homeowner's equity is exhausted. Beginning in February 2011, the FHLB discontinued the use of SMI for all new loan purchases and replaced it with expanded use of the LRA. The LRA is funded by the FHLB as a portion of the purchase proceeds to cover expected losses. The LRA is recorded in other liabilities in the Statements of Condition. Excess funds over required balances are distributed to the member in accordance with a step-down schedule that is established upon execution of a Master Commitment Contract, subject to performance of the related loan pool. The LRA established for a pool of loans is limited to only covering losses of that specific pool of loans.

Table 9.3 - Changes in the LRA (in thousands)
 
Six Months Ended
 
June 30, 2017
LRA at beginning of year
$
187,684

Additions
10,556

Claims
(262
)
Scheduled distributions
(5,092
)
LRA at end of period
$
192,886



22


Credit Quality Indicators. Key credit quality indicators for mortgage loans include the migration of past due loans, loans in process of foreclosure, and non-accrual loans. The table below summarizes the FHLB's key credit quality indicators for mortgage loans.

Table 9.4 - Recorded Investment in Delinquent Mortgage Loans (dollars in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
Conventional MPP Loans
 
FHA Loans
 
Total
Past due 30-59 days delinquent
$
39,029

 
$
21,256

 
$
60,285

Past due 60-89 days delinquent
6,888

 
5,670

 
12,558

Past due 90 days or more delinquent
18,492

 
10,856

 
29,348

Total past due
64,409

 
37,782

 
102,191

Total current mortgage loans
9,054,781

 
321,606

 
9,376,387

Total mortgage loans
$
9,119,190

 
$
359,388

 
$
9,478,578

Other delinquency statistics:
 
 
 
 
 
In process of foreclosure, included above (1)
$
12,342

 
$
5,628

 
$
17,970

Serious delinquency rate (2)
0.21
%
 
3.06
%
 
0.32
%
Past due 90 days or more still accruing interest (3)
$
16,838

 
$
10,856

 
$
27,694

Loans on non-accrual status, included above
$
3,204

 
$

 
$
3,204

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
December 31, 2016
 
Conventional MPP Loans
 
FHA Loans
 
Total
Past due 30-59 days delinquent
$
39,409

 
$
23,206

 
$
62,615

Past due 60-89 days delinquent
9,350

 
8,275

 
17,625

Past due 90 days or more delinquent
21,773

 
14,054

 
35,827

Total past due
70,532

 
45,535

 
116,067

Total current mortgage loans
8,712,038

 
351,299

 
9,063,337

Total mortgage loans
$
8,782,570

 
$
396,834

 
$
9,179,404

Other delinquency statistics:
 
 
 
 
 
In process of foreclosure, included above (1)
$
15,412

 
$
5,841

 
$
21,253

Serious delinquency rate (2)
0.26
%
 
3.59
%
 
0.40
%
Past due 90 days or more still accruing interest (3)
$
19,408

 
$
14,054

 
$
33,462

Loans on non-accrual status, included above
$
3,908

 
$

 
$
3,908

(1)
Includes loans where the decision of foreclosure or a similar alternative such as pursuit of deed-in-lieu has been reported. Loans in process of foreclosure are included in past due or current loans dependent on their delinquency status.
(2)
Loans that are 90 days or more past due or in the process of foreclosure (including past due or current loans in the process of foreclosure) expressed as a percentage of the total loan portfolio class recorded investment amount.
(3)
Each conventional loan past due 90 days or more still accruing interest is on a schedule/scheduled monthly settlement basis and contains one or more credit enhancements. Loans that are well secured and in the process of collection as a result of remaining credit enhancements and schedule/scheduled settlement are not placed on non-accrual status.

The FHLB did not have any real estate owned at June 30, 2017 or December 31, 2016.