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EX-32.2 - EX-32.2 - GTJ REIT, Inc.ck0001368757-ex322_13.htm
EX-32.1 - EX-32.1 - GTJ REIT, Inc.ck0001368757-ex321_9.htm
EX-31.2 - EX-31.2 - GTJ REIT, Inc.ck0001368757-ex312_10.htm
EX-31.1 - EX-31.1 - GTJ REIT, Inc.ck0001368757-ex311_7.htm
EX-23.1 - EX-23.1 - GTJ REIT, Inc.ck0001368757-ex231_180.htm
EX-21.1 - EX-21.1 - GTJ REIT, Inc.ck0001368757-ex211_6.htm
EX-10.138 - EX-10.138 - GTJ REIT, Inc.ck0001368757-ex10138_181.htm
EX-10.137 - EX-10.137 - GTJ REIT, Inc.ck0001368757-ex10137_182.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016

or

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission file number: 333-136110

 

GTJ REIT, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

MARYLAND

 

20-5188065

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

 

60 Hempstead Avenue,
West Hempstead, New York

 

11552

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

(516) 693-5500

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: NONE

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “small reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer

 

 

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

  (do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

Smaller reporting company

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes      No  

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked priced of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter: N/A

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the last practicable date: As of March 23, 2017, there were 13,618,884 shares of common stock issued and outstanding.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

GTJ REIT, INC.

ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

 

PAGE

PART I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 1.

 

BUSINESS

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 1A.

 

RISK FACTORS

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 1B.

 

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

19

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 2.

 

PROPERTIES

 

20

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 3.

 

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

22

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 4.

 

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

22

 

 

 

 

 

PART II

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 5.

 

MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

23

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 7.

 

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

25

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 7A.

 

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

32

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 8.

 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

33

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 9.

 

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

55

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 9A.

 

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

56

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 9B.

 

OTHER INFORMATION

 

56

 

 

 

 

 

PART III

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 10.

 

DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS, AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

57

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 11.

 

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

61

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 12.

 

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

65

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 13.

 

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS, RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

66

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 14.

 

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

 

67

 

 

 

 

 

PART IV

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 15.

 

EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULE

 

69

 

ITEM 16.

 

10-K SUMMARY

 

81

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Certain information included in this Annual Report contains or may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Historical results and trends should not be taken as indicative of future operations. Forward-looking statements, which are based on certain assumptions and describe future plans, strategies, and expectations, are generally identifiable by use of the words “believe,” “expect,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “project,” “prospects,” or similar expressions. Our ability to predict results or the actual effect of future plans or strategies is inherently uncertain. Factors which could have a material adverse effect on our operations and future prospects on a consolidated basis include, but are not limited to:

 

changes in economic conditions generally and the real estate market specifically;

 

legislative or regulatory changes, including changes to laws governing the taxation of real estate investment trusts (“REITs”);

 

availability of capital; interest rates;

 

our ability to service our debt;

 

competition;

 

supply and demand for operating properties in our current and proposed market areas;

 

changes to generally accepted accounting principles;

 

policies and guidelines applicable to REITs; and

 

litigation.

These risks and uncertainties should be considered in evaluating forward-looking statements and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements. Although we believe the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements, and the forward-looking statements themselves, are reasonable, any of the assumptions could be inaccurate and, therefore, there can be no assurance that these forward-looking statements will prove to be accurate. In light of the significant uncertainties inherent in these forward-looking statements, the inclusion of this information should not be regarded as a representation by us or any other person that our objectives and plans, which we consider to be reasonable, will be achieved. The forward-looking statements are made as of the date of this Annual Report, and we assume no obligation to update the forward-looking statements or to update the reasons actual results could differ from those projected in such forward-looking statements.

PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

Overview

GTJ REIT, Inc. (the “Company” or “GTJ REIT”) is a self-administered and self-managed real estate investment trust (“REIT”) which, as of the date of this report, owns and operates a total of 47 commercial properties in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Delaware. We focus primarily on the acquisition, ownership, management and operation of commercial real estate. We previously provided, through our taxable REIT subsidiaries, outdoor maintenance and shelter cleaning services, as well as electrical construction services. These operations have all been disposed.

We were incorporated on June 23, 2006 in Maryland. On March 29, 2007, the Company completed a merger transaction with Triboro Coach Corp., Jamaica Central Railways, Inc., and Green Bus Lines, Inc., (together collectively referred to as the “Bus Companies”). The effect of the merger transaction was to complete a reorganization (the “Reorganization”) of the ownership of the Bus Companies into GTJ REIT, with the former stockholders of the Bus Companies becoming stockholders in GTJ REIT. The Company then commenced operations as a fully integrated real estate company, and elected to be treated as a real estate investment trust, or REIT, under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, (the “Code”) effective July 1, 2007.

On January 17, 2013, the Company closed on a transaction with Wu/Lighthouse Portfolio, LLC, in which a limited partnership (the “Operating Partnership”) owned and controlled by the Company, acquired all outstanding ownership interests of a portfolio consisting of 25 commercial properties (the “Acquired Properties”) located in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, in exchange for 33.29% of the outstanding limited partnership interest in the Operating Partnership; the owner of all 47 properties. The outstanding limited partnership interest in the Operating Partnership was increased to 33.78% due to post-closing adjustments, and to 34.21% due to the redemption of certain outstanding shares of GTJ REIT, Inc. stock. The acquisition was recorded as a business

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combination and accordingly the purchase price was allocated to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed at fair value. As a result of this acquisition and the acquisition of six properties in 2014, seven in 2015 and two properties in 2016, the Company currently beneficially owns a 65.79% interest in a total of 47 properties consisting of approximately 5.6 million square feet of primarily industrial properties on approximately 349 acres of land in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Delaware.

 

Our 2017 contractual rental income (as described below) is approximately $42.6 million;

 

The occupancy rate of our properties owned as of December 31, 2016, is approximately 96% based on square footage, plus land available;

 

The weighted average remaining term of the leases generating our 2017 contractual rental income is 6.7 years.

Our 2017 contractual rental income includes, after giving effect to any abatements, concessions or adjustments, rental income that is payable in 2017 under leases existing at December 31, 2016. Contractual rental income excludes straight-line rent and amortization of intangibles.

2016 Highlights

 

Total revenues were $49.7 million in 2016, an increase of $2.0 million, or 4%, from 2015.

 

Operating Income increased $1.0 million, or 5%, to $20.0 million in 2016 from $19.0 million in 2015.

 

Completed approximately 475,000 square feet of new leasing and renewals of existing leases during 2016.

 

Increased our Adjusted Funds From Operations, or AFFO, attributable to our stockholders from $11.1 million in 2015 to $11.3 million in 2016.

 

Increased our EBITDA attributable to our stockholders from $10.7 million in 2015 to $20.9 million in 2016.

 

On May 10, 2016, the Company acquired a 57,786 square foot warehouse/garage facility in East New York, Brooklyn, New York for $10.0 million.  The property is leased to The City of New York (DCAS) for the benefit of the Department of Sanitation for a term that expires December 31, 2025. The purchase was financed from the Company’s secured revolving credit facility.  

 

On June 1, 2016, the Company acquired a 208,656 square foot warehouse/distribution facility in Newark, Delaware for $17.0 million. The property is leased to Valassis Communications, Inc. for a term that expires April 30, 2025. The purchase was financed from the Company’s secured revolving credit facility.

Description of Business

We intend to further expand our real estate portfolio beyond our current portfolio of 47 properties. We seek to acquire commercial real estate at favorable prices; focusing on the industrial product sector. We believe that quality tenants seek well-managed properties that offer superior and dependable services, particularly in competitive markets. We believe that a critical success factor in property acquisition lies in possessing the ability and flexibility to move quickly when an opportunity presents itself.

We intend to acquire fee ownership interests, but may also enter into joint venture arrangements. We seek to maximize current cash flows and seek long-term increases in the value of our assets. Our policy is to acquire assets where we believe opportunities exist for appropriate risk adjusted investment returns. We seek to accomplish this by investing in quality properties in geographic markets that we believe to be attractive and offer the potential of current and future demand, renovating acquired properties as appropriate, maintaining and efficiently operating our properties, and establishing good relationships with our tenants and the local communities.

We intend to invest primarily in quality commercial real estate, specifically targeting industrial properties since they:

 

generally require less capital expenditures than other commercial property types;

 

typically feature longer term leases, thereby reducing our vacancy and leasing costs;

 

feature net leases under which the tenant is generally responsible for real estate taxes, insurance and ordinary operating expenses. Since our target tenants tend to manage the properties directly, this enables us to grow our portfolio without substantially increasing the size of our property management infrastructure; and

 

provide a platform for our goals of both predictable and stable cash flow and the opportunity for long term real estate appreciation.

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To the extent it is in the interest of our stockholders, we will seek to invest in a diversified portfolio of properties that will satisfy our primary investment objectives of providing our stockholders with stable cash flow, preservation of capital, and growth of income and principal, without taking undue risk. We anticipate that the majority of properties we acquire will have both the potential for growth in value and the ability to provide current cash distributions to stockholders.

We intend to acquire properties with financing from mortgage or other debt or may acquire properties subject to existing indebtedness. We may also acquire properties, including a portfolio of properties, in exchange for an interest in our Operating Partnership (GTJ Realty, LP). We do not intend to incur aggregate indebtedness in excess of 75% of the gross fair value of our properties. Fair value, defined as the amount at which an investment could be exchanged in a current transaction with market participants, will be determined by management, using analytical data and other available information, including independent appraisals.

Decisions relating to the purchase or sale of properties are approved by our Board of Directors (the “Board”). Our Board is responsible for monitoring the administrative procedures, investment operations, and performance of our Company to ensure our policies are carried out. Our Board oversees our investment policies to determine that our policies are in the best interests of our stockholders.

Our Business Objective

Our business objective is to maintain and increase, over time, the cash available for distribution to our stockholders and enhance stockholder value by:

 

identifying opportunistic and strategic property acquisitions consistent with our portfolio and our acquisition strategies;

 

obtaining mortgage indebtedness on favorable terms and maintaining access to capital to finance property acquisitions and our growth plans; and

 

monitoring our portfolio, including leasing, tenant relations, operational and property management performance and property enhancements.

Typical Property Attributes

The properties in our portfolio typically have the following attributes:

 

Net or ground leases. Substantially all of the leases are net or ground leases under which the tenant is typically responsible for real estate taxes, insurance and ordinary maintenance and repairs. We believe that investments in net or ground leased properties offer more predictable returns than investments in properties that are not net or ground leased;

 

Long-term leases. Substantially all of our leases are long-term leases. Leases representing approximately 87% of our 2017 contractual rental income expire after 2018, approximately 33% of our 2017 contractual rental income expire after 2026; and

 

Scheduled rent increases. Leases representing approximately 78% of our 2017 contractual rental income provide for either periodic contractual rent increases or a rent increase based on the consumer price index.

Considerations Related to Potential Acquisitions

The following are some of the material considerations which we evaluate in relation to potential acquisitions:

 

general credit quality of current or prospective tenants, including their ability to meet operational needs and lease obligations;

 

the estimated return on equity to us;

 

the terms of tenant leases, including the relationship between current rents and market rents;

 

the projected residual value of the property;

 

the potential to finance the property;

 

prospects for liquidity through sale or refinancing of the property;

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current and projected long term cash flow and potential for capital appreciation;

 

alternate uses or tenants for the property;

 

property quality and condition and expectation of future capital needs;

 

potential for economic growth in the community in which the property is located;

 

potential for expanding the physical layout of the property;

 

occupancy and demand by tenants for properties of a similar type in the same geographic vicinity; and

 

competition from existing properties and the potential for the construction of new properties in the market.

We will not acquire any property until we obtain an environmental assessment for each property and are satisfied with the environmental status of the property.

We anticipate that the purchase price of properties we acquire will vary depending on the general interest rate environment and availability of credit in addition to tenant profile, value of leases in place, property condition, size and location. We are not specifically limited in the number or size of properties we may acquire. The number and mix of properties we may acquire will depend upon existing real estate and market conditions and other relevant circumstances. Our operating costs will vary based on the amount of debt we incur in connection with financing the acquisition. It is difficult to predict the actual number or timing of properties that we will acquire because the purchase prices of properties vary widely and our investment in each will vary based on the amount and cost of debt financing we use.

Acquisition Strategies

We seek to acquire properties that have locations, demographics and other investment attributes that we believe to be attractive. We believe that long-term leases provide a predictable income stream over the term of the lease, making fluctuations in market rental rates and in real estate values less significant to achieving our overall investment objectives. Our preference is to acquire single-tenant properties that are subject to long-term net or ground leases that include periodic contractual rental increases or rent increases based on increases in the consumer price index. Periodic contractual rental increases provide reliable increases in future rent payments and rent increases based on the consumer price index provide protection against inflation. Historically, long-term leases have made it easier for us to obtain longer-term, fixed-rate mortgage financing, thereby moderating the interest rate risk. We may, however, acquire a property that is subject to a short-term lease when we believe the property represents a good opportunity for recurring income, potential repositioning and residual value. Although the acquisition of single-tenant properties subject to net and ground leases is the focus of our investment strategy, we will also consider investments in, among other things, properties that can be repositioned or redeveloped and multi-tenant properties.

Generally, we hold the properties we acquire for an extended period of time. Our investment criteria are intended to identify properties from which increased asset value and overall return can be realized from an extended period of ownership. Although our investment criteria favor an extended period of ownership, we will dispose of a property if we regard the disposition of the property as an opportunity to realize the overall value of the property sooner or to avoid future risks by achieving a determinable return from the property.

Our charter documents do not limit the number of properties in which we may invest, or the amount or percentage of our assets that may be invested in any specific property or property type. We will continue to form entities to acquire interests in real properties, either alone or with other investors, and we may acquire interests in joint ventures or other entities that own real property.

Competitive Strengths

We believe that our investment strategy and operating model distinguish us from other owners, operators and acquirers of industrial real estate in a number of ways, including:

 

Established Intermediary Relationships: We believe we have developed a reputation as a credible buyer of single-tenant industrial real estate, which provides us access to significant acquisition opportunities that may not be available to our competitors.

 

Scalable Platform: Our focus on net lease properties ensures that our current staff (with incremental additions of employees) and infrastructure are sufficient to support our continued growth.

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Expertise in Underwriting Single-Tenant Properties: We believe that our industry and market relationships, market penetration and knowledge, combined with an expertise in assessing tenant retention and vacancy costs are advantages in identifying, underwriting and closing on attractive real estate acquisition opportunities.

 

Experienced Management Team: The three senior members of our management team have significant real estate industry experience, each averaging in excess of 20 years.

Our Policies With Respect to Borrowing

We presently anticipate that we will borrow funds, secured by the acquired property, as we purchase new properties. We may later refinance or increase mortgage indebtedness by obtaining additional loans secured by selected properties. Our Board reviews our aggregate borrowings to ensure that such borrowings are reasonable in relation to our assets.

We may also seek an acquisition facility to finance the purchase of additional properties, finance capital and/or tenant improvements or major repairs and maintenance and, if necessary, for working capital needs, or to meet our distribution requirements. We anticipate that aggregate borrowings, both secured and unsecured, will not exceed 75% of the gross fair value of our properties.

When incurring secured debt, we will seek to incur nonrecourse indebtedness, which means that the lenders’ rights in the event of our default generally will be limited to foreclosure on the property(ies) that secured the obligation. However, we may have to accept limited recourse financing, where we remain liable for any shortfall between the debt and the proceeds of sale of the mortgaged property. If we incur mortgage indebtedness, we will endeavor to obtain level payment financing, meaning that the amount of debt service payable would be substantially the same each year. However, we acknowledge that some mortgages are likely to provide for one large payment, and therefore, we may incur floating or adjustable rate financing depending on market conditions.

Sale or Other Disposition of Our Properties

Management, with approval from our Board, determines whether a particular property should be sold or otherwise disposed of after consideration of the relevant factors, including performance or projected performance of the property and market conditions, with a view toward achieving our principal investment objectives including maximizing capital appreciation and the effect on our obligations under existing agreements.

The determination of whether a particular property should be sold or otherwise disposed of will be made after consideration of the relevant factors, including prevailing economic, market, property and tenant conditions, with a view to achieving maximum capital appreciation. We cannot assure you that this objective will always be realized.

Presently, we do not intend to sell any of the real estate we acquired from the Bus Companies for a period of ten years after we made our REIT election, which ends, July 2017. Under the Code, if real estate acquired from the Bus Companies is sold within such ten-year period, we may be taxed on the gain from the sale, and a subsequent distribution of any of the profits would be taxed to the stockholder as a dividend. This may result in the proceeds of such sale being subject to double taxation meaning taxation both at the corporate and stockholder level. In addition, if we sell any of the 25 properties we acquired in the January 2013 transaction described above prior to January 2020, we may be required to pay the former Wu/Lighthouse partners certain monies as set forth in the Tax Protection Agreement.

Changes in Our Investment Objectives

Subject to the limitations in our charter, our bylaws, and the Maryland General Corporation Law, our business and policies will be controlled by our Board. Our Board has the right to establish policies concerning investments and the right, power, and obligation to monitor our procedures, investment operations, and performance of our company. Thus, stockholders must be aware that the Board, acting consistently with our organizational documents, applicable law, and their fiduciary obligations, may elect to modify our objectives and policies from time to time.

Discontinued Outdoor Maintenance Operations

We, through our wholly owned subsidiary, Shelter Express Corp., operated a group of outdoor maintenance, shelter cleaning, and electrical contracting businesses, as well as a parking garage facility. During 2011, our Board voted to divest these operations.

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Employees

As of December 31, 2016, we had 14 employees who were employed at GTJ REIT, Inc. We consider our relations with our employees to be good.

Our Compliance with Governmental Regulations

Many laws and government regulations are applicable to our Company and changes in these laws and regulations, or their interpretation by agencies and the courts, occur frequently.

Costs of Compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or ADA, all public accommodations must meet federal requirements for access and use by disabled persons. Although we believe that we are in substantial compliance with present requirements of the ADA, none of our properties have been audited, nor have investigations of our properties been conducted to determine compliance. Therefore, we may incur additional costs in connection with the ADA. There are also federal, state, and local laws which also may require modifications to our properties or restrict our ability to renovate our properties. We cannot predict the cost of compliance with the ADA or other legislation. If we incur substantial costs to comply with the ADA or any other legislation, our financial condition, results of operations, cash flow, and ability to satisfy our debt service obligations and pay dividends and distributions could be adversely affected.

Costs of Government Environmental Regulation and Private Litigation

Environmental laws and regulations hold us liable for the costs of removal or remediation of certain hazardous or toxic substances which may be on our properties. These laws could impose liability without regard to whether we are responsible for the presence or release of the hazardous materials. Government investigations and remediation actions may have substantial costs and the presence of hazardous substances on a property could result in personal injury or similar claims by private plaintiffs. Various laws also impose liability on persons who arrange for the disposal or treatment of hazardous or toxic substances for the cost of removal or remediation of hazardous substances at the disposal or treatment facility. These laws often impose liability whether or not the person arranging for the disposal ever owned or operated the disposal facility. If we incur substantial costs to comply with any governmental environmental laws and regulations or the results of private litigation, our financial condition, results of operations, cash flow, and ability to satisfy our debt obligations and pay dividends and distributions could be adversely affected.

Use of Hazardous Substances by Some of Our Tenants

Some of our tenants may handle hazardous or toxic substances and wastes on our properties as part of their routine operations. Environmental laws and regulations subject these tenants, and potentially us, to liability resulting from such activities. We require the tenants, in their respective leases, to comply with these environmental laws and regulations and to indemnify us for any related liabilities. We are unaware of any material noncompliance, liability, or claim relating to hazardous or toxic substances or petroleum products in connection with any of our properties. If we incur substantial costs in order to comply with any environmental laws and regulations, our financial condition, results of operations, cash flow, and ability to satisfy our debt obligations and pay dividends and distributions could be adversely affected.  

Other Federal, State, and Local Regulations

Our properties are subject to various federal, state, and local regulatory requirements, such as state and local fire and life safety requirements. If we fail to comply with these various requirements, we may incur governmental fines or private damage awards. Although we believe that our properties are currently in material compliance with all of these regulatory requirements, we do not know whether existing requirements will change or whether future requirements will require us to make significant unanticipated expenditures that will adversely affect our ability to make liquidating distributions to our stockholders. We believe, based in part on engineering reports which we generally obtain at the time we acquire the properties, that all of our properties comply in all material respects with current regulations. However, if we were required to make significant expenditures under applicable regulations, our financial condition, results of operations, cash flow, and ability to satisfy our debt service obligations and pay dividends and distributions could be adversely affected.

Our Corporate Information

Our principal executive offices are located at 60 Hempstead Avenue, Suite 718, West Hempstead, New York 11552. Our telephone number is (516) 693-5500. Our website is www.gtjreit.com. The information found on, or otherwise accessible through, our

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website is not incorporated into, and does not form a part of this report or any other report or document we file with or furnish to the SEC.

How to Obtain Our SEC Filings

All reports we file with the SEC are available free of charge via EDGAR through the SEC website at www.sec.gov. In addition, the public may read and copy materials we file with the SEC at the SEC’s public reference room located at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. Information on the operation of the public reference room can be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. Our Annual Report on Form 10-K, our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, our Current Reports on Form 8-K and any amendments to any of those reports that we file with the SEC are available free of charge as soon as reasonably practicable through our website at www.gtjreit.com. The information found on, or otherwise accessible through, our website is not incorporated into, and does not form a part of, this report or any other report or document we file with or furnish to the SEC.

 

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

You should carefully consider the specific factors listed below, together with the cautionary statement under the caption “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward Looking Statements” and the other information included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. If any of the following significant risk factors set forth below actually occur, our business, financial condition, or results of operation could be materially adversely affected and the value of our common stock could decline and potentially affect our ability to pay dividends and distributions.

Risks Related to our Organization and Structure

Our failure to qualify as a REIT would subject us to corporate level income tax, which would materially impact funds available for distribution.

We intend to continue to operate in a manner so as to qualify as a REIT. Qualifying as a REIT requires us to meet several tests regarding the nature of our assets and income on an ongoing basis. A number of the tests established to qualify as a REIT for tax purposes are fact specific. Therefore, while we intend to qualify as a REIT, it may not be possible at this time to assess our ability to satisfy these various tests on a continuing basis. Additionally, we cannot guarantee that we will in fact qualify as a REIT or remain qualified as a REIT in the future.

If we fail to qualify as a REIT in any year, we would be required to pay federal income tax on our net income. Our payment of income tax would substantially decrease the amount of cash available to be distributed to our stockholders. In addition, we would no longer be required to distribute substantially all of our taxable income to our stockholders. Unless our failure to qualify as a REIT is excused under relief provisions of the federal income tax laws, we could not re-elect REIT status until the fifth calendar year following the year in which we failed to qualify.

We depend on key personnel and the loss of their full service could adversely affect us.

Our success depends to a significant degree upon the continued contributions of certain key personnel including, but not limited to, our management team, whose continued service is not guaranteed, and each of whom would be difficult to replace. If any of our key personnel were to cease employment with us, our operating results could suffer. Our ability to retain our management group or to attract suitable replacements should any members of the management group leave is dependent on the competitive nature of the employment market. The loss of services from key members of the management group or a limitation in their availability could adversely impact our financial condition and cash flows. Further, such a loss could be negatively perceived in the marketplace.

Our growth depends on external sources of capital which are outside of our control, which may affect our ability to seize strategic opportunities, satisfy debt obligations and make distributions to our stockholders.

In order to maintain our qualification as a REIT, we are generally required under the Code to distribute annually at least 90% of our net taxable income, determined without regard to the dividends paid deduction and excluding any net capital gain. In addition, we will be subject to income tax at regular corporate rates to the extent that we distribute less than 100% of our net taxable income, including any net capital gains. Because of these distribution requirements, we may not be able to fund future capital needs, including any necessary acquisition financing, from operating cash flow. Consequently, we may rely on thirdparty sources to fund our capital needs. We may not be able to obtain financing on favorable terms or at all. Any additional debt we incur will increase our leverage. Our access to thirdparty sources of capital depends, in part, on general market conditions, the market’s perception of our growth potential, our current debt levels, our current and expected future earnings, our cash flow and cash dividends, among other

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factors. If we cannot obtain capital from thirdparty sources, we may not be able to acquire properties when strategic opportunities exist, meet the capital and operating needs of our existing properties or satisfy our debt service obligations. Further, in order to meet the REIT distribution requirements and maintain our REIT status and to avoid the payment of income and excise taxes, we may need to borrow funds on a shortterm basis even if the then prevailing market conditions are not favorable for these borrowings. These shortterm borrowing needs could result from differences in timing between the actual receipt of cash and inclusion of income for federal income tax purposes or the effect of nondeductible capital expenditures, the creation of reserves, certain restrictions on distributions under loan documents or required debt or amortization payments. To the extent that capital is not available to acquire properties, profits may not be realized or their realization may be delayed, which could result in an earnings stream that is less predictable than some of our competitors and result in us not meeting our projected earnings and distributable cash flow levels in a particular reporting period. Failure to meet our projected earnings and distributable cash flow levels in a particular reporting period could have an adverse effect on our financial condition.

To maintain our REIT status, we may be forced to forego otherwise attractive opportunities, which may delay or hinder our ability to meet our investment objectives and reduce our stockholders’ overall return.

To qualify as a REIT, we must satisfy certain tests on an ongoing basis concerning, among other things, the sources of our income, nature of our assets and the amounts we distribute to our stockholders. We may be required to make distributions to stockholders at times when it would be more advantageous to reinvest cash in our business or when we do not have funds readily available for distribution. Compliance with the REIT requirements may hinder our ability to operate solely on the basis of maximizing profits and the value of our stockholders’ investment.

We may be subject to adverse legislative or regulatory tax changes affecting REITs that could have a negative effect on us.

The rules dealing with federal income taxation are constantly under review by persons involved in the legislative process and by the IRS and the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Changes to the tax laws, with or without retroactive application, could adversely affect our stockholders or us. We cannot predict how changes in the tax laws might affect our stockholders or us. New legislation, Treasury Regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions could significantly and negatively affect our ability to qualify as a REIT or the federal income tax consequences of such qualification.

Risks Related to Our Business and Properties

We depend upon our tenants to pay rent in a timely manner, and their inability or unwillingness to pay rent could impact our ability to pay our indebtedness, leading to possible defaults, and reduce cash available for distribution to our stockholders.

Our real property, particularly those we may purchase in the future, will be subject to varying degrees of risk that generally arise from such ownership. The underlying value of our properties and the ability to make distributions to you depend upon the ability of the tenants of our properties to generate enough income to pay their rents in a timely manner. Their inability or unwillingness to do so may be impacted by the profitability of our tenants’ businesses or other constraints on their finances. Changes beyond our control may adversely affect our tenants’ ability to make lease payments and consequently would substantially reduce our income from operations and our ability to meet our debt service requirements and make distributions to our stockholders.

A default by a tenant, the failure of a tenant’s guarantor to fulfill its obligations, or other premature termination of a lease could, depending upon the size of the leased premises and our ability to successfully find a substitute tenant, have a materially adverse effect on our revenues, the value of our common stock or our cash available for distribution to our stockholders.

If we are unable to find tenants for our properties, particularly those we may purchase in the future, or find replacement tenants when leases expire and are not renewed by the tenants, our revenues, cash available for distribution to our stockholders and our ability to serve our debt obligations will be reduced.

Approximately 34% of our 2016 rental income and 35% of our 2017 contractual rental income is derived from leases with the City of New York for five locations, two leases with Federal Express, and one lease with Avis Rent-A-Car Systems, Inc. A tenant default or financial distress could significantly reduce our revenues.

Virtually all of our leases with the City of New York, Federal Express and Avis Rent-A-Car Systems, Inc. are triple net leases and provide for escalations. Any disruption or delay in these tenants’ ability to perform under the leases could cause interruptions in the receipt of, or loss of, a significant amount of rental revenues and could result in requiring us to pay operating expenses currently paid by the tenants which could substantially reduce our income from operations and our ability to meet our debt service requirements and make distributions to our stockholders.

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We may not be able to diversify our real property portfolio due to the number and size of our competitors.

Competition may adversely affect acquisition of properties and leasing operations. We compete for the purchase of commercial property with a variety of investors, including domestic and foreign entities, other REITs, insurance companies and pension funds, as well as corporate and individual developers and owners of real estate, some of which are publicly traded. Many of our competitors have substantially greater financial resources than ours. In addition, our competitors may be willing to accept lower returns on their investments. If our competitors prevent us from buying the properties that we have targeted for acquisition, we may not be able to meet our property acquisition goals. We may also incur costs on unsuccessful acquisitions that we will not be able to recover.

All of our properties are located in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Delaware making us vulnerable to changes in economic, regulatory or other conditions in the Northeast that could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

All of our properties are located in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Delaware. This geographic concentration exposes us to greater risks than if we owned properties in multiple geographic regions. General economic conditions in the Northeast may significantly affect the occupancy and rental rates of our properties. Further, the economic condition of the region may also depend on a few industries and, therefore, an economic downturn in one of these industry sectors may adversely affect our performance. In addition to economic conditions, we may also be subject to changes in the region’s regulatory environment (such as increases in real estate and other taxes, costs of complying with government regulations or increased regulation and other factors) or other adverse conditions or events (such as natural disasters). Thus, adverse developments and/or conditions in the Northeast region could reduce demand for space, impact the credit-worthiness of our tenants or force our tenants to curtail operations, which could impair their ability to meet their rent obligations to us and, accordingly, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, and our ability to meet our debt service requirements and make distributions to our stockholders.

Lack of liquidity of real estate could make it difficult for us to sell properties within our desired time frame.

Our business is subject to risks normally associated with investment primarily in real estate. Real estate investments are relatively illiquid. Our ability to vary our portfolio in response to changes in economic and other conditions will be limited. We cannot assure you that we will be able to dispose of a property when we want or need to. Consequently, the sale price for any property we may purchase in the future may not recoup or exceed the amount of our investment.

Our revenues and the value of our portfolio are affected by a number of factors that affect investments in leased real estate generally.

We are subject to the general risks of investing in leased real estate. These include the non-performance of lease obligations by tenants, leasehold improvements that will be costly or difficult to remove or certain upgrades that may be needed should it become necessary to re-rent the leased space for other uses, rights of termination of leases due to events of casualty or condemnation affecting the leased space or the property or due to interruption of the tenant’s quiet enjoyment of the leased premises, and obligations of a landlord to restore the leased premises or the property following events of casualty or condemnation. The occurrence of any of these events could adversely impact our results of operations, liquidity and financial condition.

In addition, if our competitors offer space at rental rates below our current rates or the market rates, we may lose current or potential tenants to other properties in our markets. Additionally, we may need to reduce rental rates below our current rates in order to retain tenants upon expiration of their leases or to attract new tenants. As a result, our results of operations, cash flow and distributions to our stockholders may be adversely affected.

A number of risks to which our properties may be exposed may not be covered by insurance, which could result in losses which are uninsured.

We could suffer a loss due to the cost to repair any damage to properties that are not insured or are underinsured. There are types of losses, generally of a catastrophic nature, such as losses due to terrorism, wars, earthquakes, or acts of God that are either uninsurable or not economically insurable. Generally, we will not obtain insurance for hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, or other acts of God unless required by a lender or we determine that such insurance is necessary and may be obtained on a cost-effective basis. If such a catastrophic event were to occur, or cause the destruction of one or more of our properties, we could lose both our invested capital and anticipated profits from such property.

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We may be unable to renew our current leases, lease vacant space, including vacant space resulting from tenant defaults, or re-lease space as our current leases expire.

We cannot assure you that leases at our properties will be renewed or that such properties will be re-leased at favorable rental rates. If the rental rates for our properties decrease, our tenants do not renew their leases or we do not re-lease a significant portion of our available space, including vacant space resulting from tenant defaults, and space for which leases are scheduled to expire, our financial condition, results of operations, cash flows, cash available for distribution to stockholders and our ability to satisfy our debt service obligations could be materially adversely affected. In addition, if we are unable to renew leases or re-lease a property, the resale value of that property could be diminished because the market value of a particular property will depend in part upon the value of the leases of such property.

Declining real estate valuations and impairment charges could adversely affect our earnings and financial condition.

We review the carrying value of our properties when circumstances, such as adverse market conditions indicate potential impairment may exist. We base our review on an estimate of the future cash flows (excluding interest charges) expected to result from the real estate investment’s use and eventual disposition. We consider factors such as future operating income, trends and prospects, as well as the effects of leasing demand, competition and other factors. If our evaluation indicates that we may be unable to recover the carrying value of a real estate investment, an impairment loss will be recorded to the extent that the carrying value exceeds the estimated fair value of the property. These losses would have a direct impact on our net income because recording an impairment loss results in an immediate negative adjustment to net income. The evaluation of anticipated cash flows is highly subjective and is based in part on assumptions regarding future occupancy, rental rates and capital requirements that could differ materially from actual results in future periods. A worsening real estate market may cause us to reevaluate the assumptions used in our impairment analysis. Impairment charges could adversely affect our financial condition.

Stockholders may not receive any distributions from the sale of one of our properties, or not receive such distributions in a timely manner, because we may have to provide financing to the purchaser of such property, resulting in an inability or delay of distributions to stockholders.

When appropriate, we may structure the sale of a real property as a “like-kind exchange” under the federal income tax laws so that we may acquire qualifying like-kind replacement property meeting our investment objectives without recognizing taxable gain on the sale. Furthermore, we may reinvest in additional properties proceeds from the sale, financing, refinancing, or other disposition or, secondarily, to use such proceeds for capital improvements or maintenance and repair of existing properties or to increase our reserves for such purposes. The objective of reinvesting such portion of the sale, financing, and refinancing proceeds is to increase the total value of real estate assets that we own, and the future cash flow derived from such assets to pay distributions to our stockholders.

Despite this policy, our Board of Directors may distribute to our stockholders all or a portion of the proceeds from the sale, financing, refinancing, or other disposition of a property. In determining whether any of such proceeds should be distributed to our stockholders, our Board of Directors considers, among other factors, the desirability of properties available for purchase, real estate market conditions, and compliance with the REIT distribution requirements.

In connection with a sale of a property, our preference will be to obtain an all-cash sale price. However, we may accept a purchase money obligation secured by a mortgage on the property as partial payment. The terms of payment upon sale will be affected by the salient economic and market conditions. To the extent we receive notes, securities, or other property instead of cash from sales, such proceeds, other than any interest payable on such proceeds, will not be included in net sale proceeds available for distribution until and to the extent the notes or other property are actually paid, sold, refinanced, or otherwise disposed of. Thus, the distribution of the proceeds of a sale to stockholders may need to be paid from other sources.  

 

Disruptions in the financial markets could affect our ability to obtain financing and may negatively impact our liquidity, financial condition and operating results.

 

From time to time, the capital and credit markets in the United States and other countries experience significant price volatility, dislocations and liquidity disruptions, which can cause the market prices of many securities and the spreads on prospective debt financings to fluctuate substantially. These circumstances can materially impact liquidity in the financial markets, making terms for certain financings less attractive, and in some cases, result in the unavailability of financing. A significant amount of our existing indebtedness was issued through capital markets transactions. We anticipate that the capital markets could be a source of refinancing of our existing indebtedness in the future. This source of refinancing may not be available if volatility in or disruption of the capital markets occurs. If our ability to issue additional debt or equity securities or to borrow money were to be impaired by volatility in or disruption of the capital markets, it could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity and financial condition.

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Many real estate costs are fixed, even if income from properties decreases.

 

Our financial results depend on leasing space to tenants on terms favorable to us. Our income and funds available for distribution to our stockholders will decrease if a significant number of our tenants cannot pay their rent or we are unable to lease properties on favorable terms. In addition, if a tenant does not pay its rent, we may not be able to enforce our rights as landlord without delays and we may incur substantial legal costs. Costs associated with real property, such as real estate taxes and maintenance costs, generally are not reduced when circumstances cause a reduction in income from the property.

 

We may be unable to acquire properties on advantageous terms or acquisitions may not perform as we expect.

 

The acquisition of properties entails various risks, including risks that our investments may not perform as expected and that our cost estimates for bringing an acquired property up to market standards may prove inaccurate. Further, we face significant competition for attractive investment opportunities from other well-capitalized real estate investors, including publicly-traded REITs and private investors. This competition increases as investments in real estate become attractive relative to other forms of investment. As a result of competition, we may be unable to acquire additional properties and purchase prices may increase. Any of the above risks could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, cash flow and ability to make distributions to our stockholders and the value of our securities.

 

We may be unable to complete development and re-development projects on advantageous terms.

 

As part of our business, we develop new properties and re-develop existing properties as conditions warrant. This part of our business involves significant risks, including the following:

 

 

we may not be able to obtain financing for these projects on favorable terms;

 

we may not complete construction on schedule or within budget;

 

we may not be able to obtain, or may experience delays in obtaining, all necessary zoning, land-use, building, occupancy and other governmental permits and authorizations;

 

contractor and subcontractor disputes, strikes, labor disputes or supply chain disruptions may occur; and

 

properties may perform below anticipated levels, producing cash flow below budgeted amounts, which may result in us paying too much for a property, cause the property to not be profitable and limit our ability to sell such properties to third parties.

 

To the extent these risks result in increased debt service expense, construction costs and delays in budgeted leasing, they could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, cash flow and ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

 

Debt financing, the degree of leverage and rising interest rates could reduce our cash flow.

 

We use debt to allow us to make more investments than we otherwise could. Our use of leverage presents an additional element of risk in the event that the cash flow from our properties is insufficient to meet both debt payment obligations and the distribution requirements of the REIT provisions of the Code. In addition, rising interest rates would reduce our cash flow by increasing the amount of interest due on our floating rate debt and on our fixed rate debt as it matures and is refinanced.

Our performance and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and the value of our securities are subject to general economic conditions and risks associated with our real estate assets.

The investment returns available from equity investments in real estate depend on the amount of income earned and capital appreciation generated by the properties, as well as the expenses incurred in connection with the properties. If our properties do not generate income sufficient to meet operating expenses, including debt service and capital expenditures, then our ability to pay distributions to our stockholders could be adversely affected. In addition, there are significant expenditures associated with an investment in real estate (such as mortgage payments, real estate taxes and maintenance costs) that generally do not decline when circumstances reduce the income from the property. Income from and the value of our properties may be adversely affected by:

 

changes in general or local economic climate;

 

the attractiveness of our properties to potential tenants;

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changes in supply of or demand for similar or competing properties in an area;

 

bankruptcies, financial difficulties or lease defaults by our tenants;

 

changes in interest rates and availability of permanent mortgage funds that may render the sale of a property difficult or unattractive or otherwise reduce returns to stockholders;

 

changes in operating costs and expenses and our ability to control rents;

 

changes in or increased costs of compliance with governmental rules, regulations and fiscal policies, including changes in tax, real estate, environmental and zoning laws, and our potential liability thereunder;

 

our ability to provide adequate maintenance and insurance;

 

changes in the cost or availability of insurance, including coverage for mold or asbestos;

 

unanticipated changes in costs associated with known adverse environmental conditions or retained liabilities for such conditions;

 

periods of high interest rates and tight money supply;

 

tenant turnover;

 

general overbuilding or excess supply in the market; and

 

disruptions in the global supply chain caused by political, regulatory or other factors including terrorism.

In addition, periods of economic slowdown or recession, rising interest rates or declining demand for real estate, or public perception that any of these events may occur, could result in a general decrease in rents or an increased occurrence of defaults under existing leases, which would adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. For these and other reasons, we cannot assure you that we will be profitable or that we will realize growth in the value of our real estate properties.

 

We may become subject to litigation, which could have a material and adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flow.

 

We may become subject to litigation, including claims relating to our operations, offerings, and otherwise in the ordinary course of business. Some of these claims may result in significant defense costs and potentially significant judgments against us, some of which are not, or cannot be, insured against. Resolution of these types of matters could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flow. Certain litigation or the resolution of certain litigation may affect the availability or cost of some of our insurance coverage, which could adversely impact our results of operations and cash flows, expose us to increased risks that would be uninsured, and/or adversely impact our ability to attract officers and directors.

 

Terrorist attacks and other acts of violence or war may affect the market for the Company's common stock, the industry in which we conduct our operations and our profitability.

 

Terrorist attacks may harm our results of operations and financial condition. We cannot assure you that there will not be terrorist attacks in the localities in which we conduct business. More generally, any of these events could cause consumer confidence and spending to decrease or result in increased volatility in the worldwide financial markets and economy. These attacks or armed conflicts may adversely impact our operations or financial condition. In addition, losses resulting from these types of events may be uninsurable.

 

We face risks relating to cybersecurity attacks that could cause loss of confidential information and other business disruptions.

 

We rely extensively on computer systems to manage our business, and our business is at risk from and may be impacted by cybersecurity attacks. These could include attempts to gain unauthorized access to our data and computer systems. Attacks can be prepared and conducted by individuals as well as by sophisticated groups/organizations. We employ a number of measures to prevent, detect and mitigate these threats, which include password protection, frequent password change events, firewall detection systems, frequent backups, a redundant data system for core applications and annual penetration testing; however, there is no guarantee such efforts will be successful in preventing a cybersecurity attack. A cybersecurity attack could compromise the confidential information of our employees, tenants and vendors. A successful attack could have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Actions by our competitors may decrease or prevent increases in the occupancy and rental rates of our properties.

We compete with other owners, operators and developers of real estate, some of which own properties similar to ours in the same markets and submarkets in which our properties are located. If our competitors offer space at rental rates below current market rates or below the rental rates we currently charge our tenants, we may lose potential tenants, and we may be pressured to reduce our rental rates below those we currently charge in order to retain tenants when our tenants’ leases expire. As a result, our financial condition, cash flows, cash available for distribution, trading price of our securities and ability to satisfy our debt service obligations could be materially adversely affected.

A property that incurs a vacancy could be difficult to sell or release, which could adversely affect our results of operations, cash flows, cash available for distribution, and the value of our securities.

A property may incur a vacancy either by the continued default of a tenant under its lease or the expiration of one of our leases. In addition, certain of the properties we acquire may have some level of vacancy at the time of closing. Certain of our properties may be specifically suited to the particular needs of a tenant. We may have difficulty obtaining a new tenant for any vacant space we have in our properties. If the vacancy continues for a long period of time, we may suffer reduced revenue resulting in less cash available to be distributed to stockholders. In addition, the resale value of a property could be diminished because the market value of a particular property will depend principally upon the value of the leases of such property.

We may not have funding for future tenant improvements, which could adversely affect our results of operations, cash flows, cash available for distribution, and the value of our securities.

When a tenant at one of our properties does not renew its lease or otherwise vacates its space in one of our buildings, it is likely that, in order to attract one or more new tenants, we will be required to expend funds to construct new tenant improvements in the vacated space. Except with respect to our current reserves for capital expenditures, tenant improvements and leasing commissions, we cannot assure you that we will have adequate sources of funding available to us for such purposes in the future.

Bankruptcy laws will limit our remedies if a tenant becomes bankrupt and rejects the lease and we may be unable to collect balances due on our leases.

If a tenant becomes bankrupt or insolvent, that could diminish the income we receive from that tenant’s leases. Our tenants may experience downturns in their operating results due to adverse changes to their business or economic conditions, and those tenants that are highly leveraged may have a higher possibility of filing for bankruptcy or insolvency. We may not be able to evict a tenant solely because of its bankruptcy. On the other hand, a bankruptcy court might authorize the tenant to terminate its leases with us. If that happens, our claim against the bankrupt tenant for unpaid future rent would be an unsecured prepetition claim subject to statutory limitations, and therefore such amounts received in bankruptcy are likely to be substantially less than the remaining rent we otherwise were owed under the leases. In addition, any claim we have for unpaid past rent could be substantially less than the amount owed. If the lease for such a property is rejected in bankruptcy, our revenue would be reduced and could adversely impact our ability to pay distributions to stockholders.

Environmentally hazardous conditions may adversely affect our operating results.

Under various federal, state and local environmental laws, a current or previous owner or operator of real property may be liable for the cost of removing or remediating hazardous or toxic substances on such property. Such laws often impose liability whether or not the owner or operator knew of, or was responsible for, the presence of such hazardous or toxic substances. Even if more than one person may have been responsible for the contamination, each person covered by the environmental laws may be held responsible for all of the cleanup costs incurred. In addition, third parties may sue the owner or operator of a site for damages based on personal injury, natural resources or property damage or other costs, including investigation and cleanup costs, resulting from the environmental contamination. The presence of hazardous or toxic substances on one of our properties, or the failure to properly remediate a contaminated property, could give rise to a lien in favor of the government for costs it may incur to address the contamination, or otherwise adversely affect our ability to sell or lease the property or borrow using the property as collateral. Environmental laws also may impose restrictions on the manner in which property may be used or businesses may be operated. A property owner who violates environmental laws may be subject to sanctions which may be enforced by governmental agencies or, in certain circumstances, private parties. In connection with the acquisition and ownership of our properties, we may be exposed to such costs. The cost of defending against environmental claims, of compliance with environmental regulatory requirements or of remediating any contaminated property could materially adversely affect our business, assets or results of operations and, consequently, amounts available for distribution to our stockholders.

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We may be unable to sell a property if or when we decide to do so, including as a result of uncertain market conditions, which could adversely affect the return on your investment.

We expect to hold the various real properties in which we invest until such time as we decide that a sale or other disposition is appropriate given our investment objectives. Our ability to dispose of properties on advantageous terms depends on factors beyond our control, including competition from other sellers and the availability of attractive financing for potential buyers of our properties. We cannot predict the various market conditions affecting real estate investments which will exist at any particular time in the future. Due to the uncertainty of market conditions which may affect the future disposition of our properties, we cannot assure you that we will be able to sell our properties at a profit in the future. Accordingly, the extent to which you will receive cash distributions and realize potential appreciation on our real estate investments will be dependent upon fluctuating market conditions. Furthermore, we may be required to expend funds to correct defects or to make improvements before a property can be sold. We cannot assure you that we will have funds available to correct such defects or to make such improvements.

Our officers and directors may have other interests which may conflict with their duties to us and our stockholders, and which may have adverse effects on the interests of us and our stockholders.

Our officers and directors may have other interests which could conflict with their duties to us and our stockholders, and which may have adverse effects on the interests of us and our stockholders. For example, certain of such persons may have interests in other real estate related ventures and may have to determine how to allocate an opportunity between us and such other ventures. Also, such persons may have to decide on whether we should purchase or dispose of real property from or to an entity with which they are related, or conduct other transactions, and if so, the terms thereof. Our officers and directors are expected to disclose, in a timely and fair manner, such instances, and we require that potential conflicts be brought to the attention of our Board of Directors and that determinations will be made by a majority of directors who have no interest in the transaction. As of this time, only two officers and directors conduct a real property business apart from his activities with us. These individuals are Paul Cooper, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and Louis Sheinker, our President, Chief Operating Officer, Secretary, and Director.

Risks Related to our Common Stock

The absence of a public market for our common stock will make it difficult for a stockholder to sell shares, which may have to be held for an indefinite period.

Current and prospective stockholders should understand that our common stock is illiquid, as there is currently no public market, and they must be prepared to hold their shares of common stock for an indefinite length of time. We have no current plans to cause our common stock to be listed on any securities exchange or quoted on any market system or in any established market either immediately or at any definite time in the future. While our Board of Directors may attempt to cause our common stock to be listed or quoted in the future, there can be no assurance that this event will occur. Accordingly, stockholders will find it difficult to resell their shares of common stock. Thus, our common stock should be considered a long-term investment. In addition, there are restrictions on the transfer of our common stock. In order to qualify as a REIT, our shares must be beneficially owned by 100 or more persons at all times and no more than 50% of the value of our issued and outstanding shares may be owned directly or indirectly by five or fewer individuals and certain entities at all times. Our charter provides that no person may own more than 9.9% of the issued and outstanding shares of our common stock. Any attempted ownership of our shares that would result in a violation of one or more of these limits will result in such shares being transferred to an “excess share trust” so that such shares will be disposed of in a manner consistent with the REIT ownership requirements. In addition, any attempted transfer of our shares that would cause us to be beneficially owned by less than 100 persons will be disallowed.

Our stockholders’ interests may be diluted by issuances under our 2007 Incentive Award Plan and other common stock or preferred stock issuances, which could result in lower returns to our stockholders.

We have adopted the 2007 Incentive Award Plan, under which 1,000,000 shares of common stock are reserved for issuance, and under which we may grant stock options, restricted stock, and other performance awards to our officers, employees, consultants, and directors. The effect of these grants, including the subsequent exercise of stock options, could be to dilute the value of the stockholders’ investments.

In addition, our Board of Directors is authorized, without stockholder approval, to cause us to issue additional shares of our common stock, or shares of preferred stock on which it can set the terms, and to raise capital through the issuance of options, warrants and other rights, on terms and for consideration as the Board of Directors in its sole discretion may determine, subject to certain restrictions in our charter in the instance of options and warrants. Any such issuance could result in dilution to stockholders. The Board of Directors may, in its sole discretion, authorize us to issue common stock or other interests or our securities to persons from whom we purchase real property or other assets, as part or all of the purchase price. The Board of Directors, in its sole discretion,

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may determine the value of any common stock or other equity or debt securities issued in consideration of property or services provided, or to be provided, to us.

Real estate investments are not as liquid as other types of assets, which may reduce the economic returns we are able to provide to our stockholders.

Real estate investments are not as liquid as other types of investments, and this lack of liquidity may limit our ability to react promptly to changes in economic, financial, investment or other conditions. In addition, significant expenditures associated with real estate investments, such as mortgage payments, real estate taxes and maintenance costs, are generally not reduced when circumstances cause a reduction in income from the investments. In addition, we intend to comply with the safe harbor rules relating to the number of properties that can be disposed of in a year, the tax basis and the costs of improvements made to these properties, and meet other tests which enable a REIT to avoid punitive taxation on the sale of assets. Thus, our ability at any time to sell assets may be restricted. This lack of liquidity may limit our ability to vary our portfolio promptly in response to changes in economic, financial, investment or other conditions and, as a result, could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and our ability to pay distributions on our common stock.

Tax Risks Related to our Business and Structure

The requirement to distribute at least 90% of our taxable REIT income may require us to incur debt, sell assets, or issue additional securities for cash, which would increase the risks associated with your investment.

In order to qualify as a REIT, we must distribute annually to our stockholders at least 90% of our taxable REIT income, other than any capital gains. To the extent that we distribute at least 90% but less than 100% of our taxable income in a calendar year, we will incur no federal corporate income tax on our distributed net income, but will incur a federal corporate income tax on any undistributed amounts. In addition, we will incur a 4% nondeductible excise tax if the actual amount we distribute to our stockholders in a calendar year is less than a minimum amount required. We intend to distribute at least 90% of our taxable income to our stockholders each year so that we will satisfy the distribution requirement and avoid the 4% excise tax. However, we could be required to include earnings in our taxable income before we actually receive the related cash. In the event that we don’t distribute 100% of our taxable income, we will be subject to taxation at the REIT level on the amount of undistributed taxable income and to the extent we distribute such amount, you will be subject to taxation on it at the stockholder level.

We cannot assure you that we will make distributions. Our policy is to make such distributions on a quarterly basis. We will seek to minimize, to the extent possible, the fluctuations in distributions that might result if distribution payments were based solely on actual cash received during the distribution period. To implement this policy, we may use cash received during prior periods or cash received subsequent to the distribution period and prior to the payment date for such distribution payment, to pay annualized distributions consistent with the distribution level established from time to time by our Board of Directors. Our ability to maintain this policy will depend upon, among other things, the availability of cash and applicable requirements for qualification as a REIT under the Code. Therefore, we cannot guarantee that there will be cash available to pay distributions or that distributions will not fluctuate. If cash available for distribution is insufficient to pay distributions to our stockholders, we may distribute payment in the form of shares of our common stock or obtain the necessary funds by borrowing, issuing new securities, or selling assets. These methods of obtaining funds could affect future distributions by increasing operating costs.

To the extent that distributions to our stockholders are made out of our current or accumulated earnings and profits, such distributions would be taxable as ordinary income. To the extent that our distributions exceed our current and accumulated earnings and profits, such amounts will constitute a return of capital to our stockholders for federal income tax purposes, to the extent of their basis in their stock, and any amount in excess of their stock basis would constitute capital gains.

If we fail to remain qualified as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, we will not be able to deduct our distributions, and our income will be subject to taxation, which would reduce the cash available for distribution to our stockholders.

The requirements for qualification as a REIT are complex and interpretations of the federal income tax laws governing REITs are limited. Our continued qualification as a REIT will depend on our ability to meet various requirements concerning, among other things, the ownership of our outstanding shares of beneficial interest, the nature of our assets, the sources of our income and the amount of our distributions to our stockholders. If we fail to meet these requirements and do not qualify for certain statutory relief provisions, our distributions to our stockholders will not be deductible by us and we will be subject to a corporate level tax (including any applicable alternative minimum tax) on our taxable income at regular corporate rates, substantially reducing our cash available to make distributions to our stockholders. In addition, if we failed to maintain our qualification as a REIT, we would no longer be required to make distributions for federal income tax purposes. Incurring corporate income tax liability might cause us to borrow funds, liquidate some of our investments or take other steps that could negatively affect our operating results. Moreover, if our REIT status is terminated

16


 

because of our failure to meet a REIT qualification requirement or if we voluntarily revoke our election, unless relief provisions applicable to certain REIT qualification failures apply, we would be disqualified from electing treatment as a REIT for the four taxable years following the year in which REIT status is lost. We may not qualify for relief provisions for REIT qualification failures and even if we can qualify for such relief, we may be required to make penalty payments, which could be significant in amount.

We are required to comply with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and furnish a report on our internal control over financial reporting.

We are required to comply with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 which requires us to assess and attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Since we are defined as a smaller reporting company pursuant to Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act, our independent registered public accounting firm is not required to opine as to the adequacy of our assessment and effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. If any deficiencies or material weaknesses exist as a result of our assessment of our internal controls over financial reporting, our financial statements may be materially adversely affected.

Acquisition Risks

Our inability to identify or find funding for acquisitions could prevent us from diversification or growth and could adversely impact the value of an investment in us.

We may not be able to identify or obtain financing to acquire additional real properties. We are required to distribute at least 90% of our taxable income, excluding net capital gains, to our stockholders each year, and thus our ability to retain internally generated cash is very limited. Accordingly, our ability to acquire properties or to make capital improvements or renovate properties will depend on our available cash flow and our ability to obtain financing from third parties or the sellers of properties.

Investing in properties through joint ventures creates a risk of loss to us as a result of the possible inaction or misconduct of a joint venture partner.

We may decide to acquire certain properties using a joint venture structure. Joint venture investments may involve risks not present in a direct acquisition, including, for example:

 

the risk that our co-venturer or partner in an investment might become unable to provide the required capital;

 

the risk that such co-venturer or partner may at any time have economic or business interests or goals which are inconsistent with our business interests or goals;

 

the risk that such co-venturer or partner may be in a position to take or request action contrary to our objectives, such as selling a property at a time which we believe to be suboptimal; or

 

the risk that we may not have sufficient financial resources to exercise any right of first refusal to purchase our partner’s interest.

Actions by such a co-venturer or partner might have the result of subjecting the applicable property to liabilities in excess of those otherwise contemplated and may have the effect of reducing our cash available for distribution. It also may be difficult for us to sell our interest in any such joint venture or partnership in such property.

Risks Related to Our Use of Borrowed Funds

We have incurred and plan to incur mortgage and other indebtedness, which could result in material risk to our business if there is a default, including the loss of the real property.

Borrowings by us may increase the risks of owning shares of our company. If there is a shortfall between the cash flow generated by our properties and the cash flow needed to service our indebtedness, then the amount available for distributions to our stockholders will be reduced. In addition, incurring mortgage debt increases the risk of loss since defaults on indebtedness secured by a property may result in lenders initiating foreclosure actions. In that case, we could lose the property securing the loan that is in default, thus reducing the value of your investment. If any mortgages or other indebtedness contain cross-collateralization or cross-default provisions, a default on a single loan could affect multiple properties.

Additionally, when providing financing, a lender may impose restrictions on us that affect our distribution and operating policies and our ability to incur additional debt. Loan documents we enter into may also contain covenants that limit our ability to further leverage a property. These or other limitations may limit our flexibility and our ability to achieve our operating plans. Our

17


 

failure to meet such restrictions and covenants may result in an event of default under our line of credit and result in the foreclosure of some or all of our properties.

As we incur indebtedness which may be needed for operations, we increase expenses which could result in a decrease in cash available for distribution to our stockholders.

Debt service payments decreases cash available for distribution. In the event the fair market value of our properties was to increase, we could incur more debt without a commensurate increase in cash flow to service the debt.

Prolonged disruptions in the financial markets could affect our ability to obtain financing on reasonable terms and have other adverse effects on us and the market price of our common stock.

Global stock and credit markets experience price volatility, dislocations, and liquidity disruptions, which cause market prices of many stocks to fluctuate, availability of debt to be curtailed and the spreads on prospective debt financings to widen considerably. These circumstances materially impact liquidity in the financial markets, making terms for certain financings less attractive, and, in certain cases, result in the unavailability of certain types of financing. Our profitability will be adversely affected if we are unable to obtain cost-effective financing for our investments. A prolonged downturn in the stock or credit markets may cause us to seek alternative sources of potentially less attractive financing, and may require us to adjust our business plan accordingly. These events in the stock and credit markets may also make it more difficult for us to raise capital.

We have incurred and will incur indebtedness secured by our properties, which may subject our properties to foreclosure in the event of a default.

Incurring mortgage indebtedness increases the risk of possible loss. Most of our borrowings to acquire properties would be secured by mortgages on our properties. In February 2015, we refinanced a substantial portion of our real estate portfolio in the amount of approximately $233.1 million. If we default on our secured indebtedness, the lender may foreclose and we could lose our entire investment in the properties securing such loan, which would adversely affect distributions to stockholders. For federal tax purposes, any such foreclosure would be treated as a sale of the property for a purchase price equal to the outstanding balance of the debt secured by the mortgage and, if the outstanding balance of the debt secured by the mortgage exceeds the basis of the property to our company, there could be taxable income upon a foreclosure. To the extent lenders require our company to cross-collateralize our properties, or our loan agreements contain cross-default provisions, a default under a single loan agreement could subject multiple properties to foreclosure. In addition, the foreclosure of certain of our properties may trigger additional liabilities for us, such as payments which may be required pursuant to the Tax Protection Agreement.

Possible Adverse Consequences of Limits on Ownership and Transfer of our Shares

The limitation on ownership of our stock in our charter will prevent you from acquiring more than 9.9% of our common stock and may force you to sell common stock back to us.

Our charter limits the beneficial and constructive ownership of our capital stock by any single stockholder to 9.9% of the number of outstanding shares of each class or series of our stock including our common stock. We refer to these limitations as the ownership limits. Our charter also prohibits the beneficial or constructive ownership of our capital stock by any stockholder that would result in (1) our capital stock being beneficially owned by fewer than 100 persons, (2) five or fewer individuals, including natural persons, private foundations, specified employee benefit plans and trusts, and charitable trusts, owning more than 50% of our capital stock, applying broad attribution rules imposed by the federal tax laws, (3) our company otherwise failing to qualify as a REIT for federal tax purposes. In addition, any attempted transfer of our capital stock that would result in the Company being beneficially owned by less than 100 persons will be disallowed.

Anti-takeover Provisions Related to Us

Our Stockholder Rights Agreement is designed to discourage takeover attempts without approval of our Board of Directors, which could discourage a potential takeover bid and the related payment to our stockholders.

The Stockholder Rights Agreement provides that a right is deemed to be issued and outstanding in conjunction with each outstanding share of our common stock. If any person or group, as defined in the agreement, acquires more than 15% of our outstanding common stock without the approval of our Board of Directors, each holder of a right, other than such 15% or more holder(s), will be entitled to purchase 1000th of a share of our Series A preferred stock for $50.00 which is convertible into our common stock at one-half of the market value of our common stock, or to purchase, for each right, $50.00 of our common stock at one-half of the market value. The effect of this provision is to materially dilute the holdings of such 15% or more holders and

18


 

substantially increase the cost of acquiring a controlling interest in us. These types of provisions generally inhibit tender offers or other purchases of a controlling interest in a company such as ours.

Limitations on share ownership and transfer may deter a sale of our company in which you could profit.

The limits on ownership and transfer of our equity securities in our charter may have the effect of delaying, deferring, or preventing a transaction or a change in control of our company that might involve a premium price for your common stock. The ownership limits and restrictions on transferability will continue to apply until our Board of Directors determines that it is no longer in our best interest to continue to qualify as a REIT.

Our ability to issue preferred stock with terms fixed by the Board of Directors may include a preference in distributions superior to our common stock and also may deter or prevent a sale of our company in which a stockholder could otherwise profit.

Our ability to issue preferred stock and other securities without your approval also could deter or prevent someone from acquiring our company. Our Board of Directors may establish the preferences and rights, including a preference in distributions superior to our common stockholders, of any issued preferred stock designed to prevent, or with the effect of preventing, someone from acquiring control of our company.

Maryland anti-takeover statute restrictions may deter others from seeking to acquire our company in a transaction in which a stockholder could profit.

Maryland law contains many provisions, such as the business combination statute and the control share acquisition statute, that are designed to prevent, or have the effect of preventing, someone from acquiring control of our company without approval of our Board of Directors. Our bylaws exempt our company from the control share acquisition statute (which eliminates voting rights for certain levels of shares that could exercise control over us) and our Board of Directors has adopted a resolution opting out of the business combination statute (which prohibits a merger or consolidation of us and a 10% stockholder for a period of time) with respect to affiliates of our company. However, if the bylaw provisions exempting our company from the control share acquisition statute or the board resolution opting out of the business combination statute were repealed by the Board of Directors, in its sole discretion, these provisions of Maryland Law could delay or prevent offers to acquire our company and increase the difficulty of consummating any such offers.

Because of our staggered Board of Directors, opposition candidates would have to be elected in two separate years to constitute a majority of the Board of Directors, which may deter a change of control from which a stockholder could profit.

We presently have eight members of our Board of Directors. Each director has or will have a three-year term. Accordingly, in order to change a majority of our Board of Directors, a third party would have to wage a successful proxy contest in two successive years, which is a situation that may deter proxy contests.

Certain provisions of our charter make stockholder action more difficult, which could deter changes beneficial to our stockholders.

We have certain provisions in our charter and bylaws that require super-majority voting and regulate the opportunity to nominate directors and to bring proposals to a vote by the stockholders.

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

 

 

19


 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

The Company’s 47 properties as of December 31, 2016 are as follows:

 

 

 

Property Type

 

Square Feet

 

 

Land Acreage

 

New York

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

103 Fairview Park Drive, Elmsford, NY

 

Industrial

 

 

112,447

 

 

 

5.6

 

412 Fairview Park Drive, Elmsford, NY (1)

 

Industrial

 

 

439,956

 

 

 

10.1

 

401 Fieldcrest Drive, Elmsford, NY (1)

 

Industrial

 

 

313,632

 

 

 

7.2

 

404 Fieldcrest Drive, Elmsford, NY

 

Industrial

 

 

78,674

 

 

 

8.7

 

199 Ridgewood Drive, Elmsford, NY

 

Industrial

 

 

28,050

 

 

 

5.4

 

203 Ridgewood Drive, Elmsford, NY

 

Industrial

 

 

32,000

 

 

 

7.0

 

36 Midland Avenue, Port Chester, NY

 

Industrial

 

 

78,287

 

 

 

3.6

 

100-110 Midland Avenue, Port Chester, NY

 

Industrial

 

 

180,975

 

 

 

7.5

 

112 Midland Avenue, Port Chester, NY

 

Retail

 

 

3,200

 

 

 

1.1

 

8 Slater Street, Port Chester, NY

 

Industrial

 

 

68,259

 

 

 

2.3

 

165-25 147th Avenue, Jamaica, NY

 

Industrial

 

 

151,068

 

 

 

6.6

 

114-15 Guy Brewer Boulevard, Jamaica, NY

 

Industrial

 

 

75,800

 

 

 

4.6

 

49-19 Rockaway Beach Boulevard, Far Rockaway, NY

 

Industrial

 

 

28,790

 

 

 

3.0

 

23-85 87th Street, East Elmhurst, NY (1)

 

Industrial

 

 

363,500

 

 

 

7.1

 

85-01 24th Avenue, East Elmhurst, NY

 

Industrial

 

 

118,430

 

 

 

6.4

 

612 Wortman Avenue, Brooklyn, NY (1)

 

Industrial

 

 

453,247

 

 

 

10.4

 

28-20 Borden Avenue, Long Island City, NY (1)

 

Industrial

 

 

83,635

 

 

 

1.9

 

606 Cozine Avenue, Brooklyn, NY

 

Industrial

 

 

57,786

 

 

 

1.3

 

New Jersey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100 American Road, Morris Plains, NJ

 

Industrial

 

 

128,564

 

 

 

7.0

 

200 American Road, Morris Plains, NJ

 

Industrial

 

 

45,898

 

 

 

6.0

 

300 American Road, Morris Plains, NJ

 

Industrial

 

 

84,863

 

 

 

10.3

 

400 American Road, Morris Plains, NJ

 

Industrial

 

 

97,715

 

 

 

9.2

 

500 American Road, Morris Plains, NJ

 

Industrial

 

 

98,169

 

 

 

11.4

 

20 East Halsey Road, Parsippany, NJ

 

Industrial

 

 

60,600

 

 

 

7.8

 

1110 Centennial Avenue, Piscataway, NJ

 

Industrial

 

 

21,189

 

 

 

2.8

 

11 Constitution Avenue, Piscataway, NJ

 

Industrial

 

 

60,000

 

 

 

5.6

 

21 Constitution Avenue, Piscataway, NJ

 

Industrial

 

 

288,115

 

 

 

21.1

 

4 Corporate Place, Piscataway, NJ

 

Industrial

 

 

137,203

 

 

 

8.4

 

8 Corporate Place, Piscataway, NJ

 

Industrial

 

 

143,115

 

 

 

8.4

 

25 Corporate Place South, Piscataway, NJ

 

Office

 

 

49,355

 

 

 

7.4

 

Connecticut

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

466 Bridgeport Avenue, Shelton, CT

 

Industrial

 

 

46,649

 

 

 

4.3

 

470 Bridgeport Avenue, Shelton, CT

 

Industrial

 

 

152,000

 

 

 

12.8

 

15 Progress Drive/ 30 Commerce Drive, Shelton, CT

 

Industrial

 

 

53,570

 

 

 

10.0

 

33 Platt Road, Shelton, CT

 

Industrial

 

 

125,794

 

 

 

21.5

 

950 Bridgeport Avenue, Milford, CT

 

Industrial

 

 

108,320

 

 

 

5.2

 

12 Cascade Boulevard, Orange, CT

 

Industrial

 

 

98,634

 

 

 

4.8

 

15 Executive Boulevard, Orange, CT

 

Industrial

 

 

112,574

 

 

 

5.2

 

25 Executive Boulevard, Orange, CT

 

Industrial

 

 

27,151

 

 

 

2.8

 

35 Executive Boulevard, Orange, CT

 

Office

 

 

66,000

 

 

 

3.8

 

22 Marsh Hill Road, Orange, CT

 

Industrial

 

 

89,630

 

 

 

6.4

 

269 Lambert Road, Orange, CT

 

Industrial

 

 

102,610

 

 

 

6.3

 

8 Farm Springs Road, Farmington, CT

 

Office

 

 

107,654

 

 

 

10.5

 

110 Old County Circle, Windsor Locks, CT

 

Industrial

 

 

226,661

 

 

 

13.6

 

229 Old County Road, Windsor Locks, CT

 

Land

 

 

 

 

 

9.0

 

4 Meadow Street, Norwalk, CT

 

Industrial

 

 

50,460

 

 

 

2.9

 

777 Brook Street, Rocky Hill, CT

 

Industrial

 

 

92,500

 

 

 

12.1

 

Delaware

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 McIntire Drive, Newark, DE

 

Industrial

 

 

208,656

 

 

 

12.4

 

Total

 

 

 

 

5,551,385

 

 

 

348.8

 

 

(1)

The square footage reflects the total leased area of land or land and building.

20


 

Our Leases

Substantially all of our leases are net or ground leases under which the tenant, in addition to its rental obligation, typically is responsible for expenses attributable to the operation of the property, such as real estate taxes and operating costs. The tenant is also generally responsible for maintaining the property and for restoration following a casualty or partial condemnation. The tenant is typically obligated to indemnify us for claims arising from the property and is responsible for maintaining insurance coverage for the property it leases and naming us an additional insured. The Company typically evaluates a tenant’s credit quality by reviewing the tenant’s financial information, rating agency reports and credit reports, when available, and other sources of information that can be useful in determining a tenant’s credit worthiness and financial condition. The Company monitors the tenants’ credit worthiness and financial condition throughout the term of their leases by requiring them to provide financial and other information necessary as per the terms of their respective leases, by reviewing rating agency reports and credit reports, when available and reviewing other available sources of information.

Our typical lease provides for contractual rent increases periodically throughout the term of the lease or for rent increases pursuant to a formula based on the consumer price index. Our policy has been to acquire properties that are subject to existing long-term leases or to enter into long-term leases with our tenants. Our leases generally provide the tenant with one or more renewal options.

The following table sets forth scheduled lease expirations of leases for our properties as of December 31, 2016:

 

Year of Lease Expiration (1)

 

Number of

Expiring Leases (2)

 

 

Square Foot of

Expiring Leases

 

 

2017 Contractual

Rental Income

Under Expiring

Leases

 

 

Percent of 2017

Contractual Rental

Income

Represented by

Expiring Leases

 

2017

 

 

5

 

 

 

260,879

 

 

$

2,056,119

 

 

 

5

%

2018

 

 

6

 

 

 

500,108

 

 

 

3,299,081

 

 

 

8

%

2019

 

 

8

 

 

 

804,294

 

 

 

5,123,238

 

 

 

12

%

2020

 

 

5

 

 

 

211,095

 

 

 

2,357,387

 

 

 

6

%

2021

 

 

9

 

 

 

573,681

 

 

 

4,326,217

 

 

 

10

%

2022

 

 

4

 

 

 

464,630

 

 

 

1,009,963

 

 

 

3

%

2023

 

 

6

 

 

 

793,194

 

 

 

5,672,666

 

 

 

13

%

2024

 

 

3

 

 

 

72,275

 

 

 

930,206

 

 

 

2

%

2025

 

 

5

 

 

 

768,026

 

 

 

2,691,393

 

 

 

6

%

2026

 

 

3

 

 

 

99,876

 

 

 

918,032

 

 

 

2

%

2027 and after

 

 

8

 

 

 

748,409

 

 

 

14,217,577

 

 

 

33

%

 

 

 

62

 

 

 

5,296,467

 

 

$

42,601,879

 

 

 

100

%

 

(1)

Lease expirations assume tenants do not exercise existing renewal options.

(2)

The Number of Expiring Leases does not include one Month-to-Month tenant.

Portfolio of Real Estate Investments

The following represents information about our portfolio as of December 31, 2016:

 

Location of Property

 

Principal Property Types

 

Number of

Tenants

 

 

Number of

Properties

 

 

2017 Contractual

Rental Income

 

 

Percent of 2017

Contractual

Rental Income

 

NYC, NY

 

Industrial

 

 

10

 

 

 

8

 

 

$

16,231,874

 

 

 

38

%

Westchester, NY

 

Industrial/Retail

 

 

19

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

7,256,738

 

 

 

17

%

Connecticut

 

Industrial/Office

 

 

17

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

8,870,607

 

 

 

21

%

New Jersey

 

Industrial/Office

 

 

16

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

9,199,380

 

 

 

22

%

Delaware

 

Industrial

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1,043,280

 

 

 

2

%

Total

 

 

 

 

63

 

 

 

47

 

 

$

42,601,879

 

 

 

100

%

 

21


 

Financing, Re-Renting and Disposition of Our Properties

We may borrow funds on a secured and unsecured basis and intend to do so in the future. We also mortgage specific properties on a non-recourse basis subject to industry standard carve-outs, to enhance the return on our investment. The proceeds of mortgage loans may be used for property acquisitions, investments in joint ventures or other entities that own real property, to reduce bank debt and for working capital purposes. Net proceeds received from the sale of a property are generally required to be used to repay amounts outstanding under debt secured by the property sold.

With respect to properties we acquire on a free and clear basis, we usually seek to obtain long-term fixed-rate mortgage financing, when available at acceptable terms, shortly after the acquisition of such property to avoid the risk of movement of interest rates and fluctuating supply and demand in the mortgage markets. We also will acquire a property that is subject to (and will assume) a fixed-rate mortgage. Some of our properties may be financed on a cross-defaulted or cross-collateralized basis.

After termination or expiration of any lease relating to any of our properties, we will seek to re-rent or sell such property in a manner that will maximize the return to us, considering, among other factors, the income potential and market value of such property. We acquire properties for long-term investment for income purposes and do not typically engage in the turnover of investments. We will consider the sale of a property if a sale appears advantageous in view of our investment objectives. We may take back a purchase money mortgage as partial payment in lieu of cash in connection with any sale and may consider local customary and prevailing market conditions in negotiating the terms of repayment. If there is a substantial tax gain, we may seek to enter into a tax deferred transaction and reinvest the proceeds in another property. It is our policy to use any cash realized from the sale of properties, net of any distributions to stockholders, to pay down amounts due under our credit facility, if any, and for the acquisition of additional properties.

Real Property Used By Us in Our Businesses

The real property used by us as of December 31, 2016, for the day to day conduct of our businesses is as follows (this property is leased):

 

Location

 

Facility

 

Monthly Rent/

Expiration

 

Purpose

West Hempstead, NY

 

Office

 

$ 24,137 / 12/31/2020

 

Executive Offices

 

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

We are involved in lawsuits and other disputes which, from time to time, arise in the ordinary course of business. However, management believes that these matters will not have a material adverse effect, individually or in the aggregate, on our financial position or results of operations.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

 

 

 

22


 

PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market for Common Equity

Currently, there is no public market for our common stock, and we do not expect a market to develop in the near future. We have no current plans to list our common stock on any securities exchange or quoted on any market system.

Outstanding Common Stock and Holders

As of March 23, 2017, we had 13,618,884 shares issued and outstanding, held by approximately 482 stockholders of record.

Distributions

Our Board of Directors has declared and paid cash dividends on a quarterly basis. On January 31, 2017, our Board of Directors declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.10 per share of common stock, payable with respect to the first quarter ended March 31, 2017 to common stockholders of record as of the close of business on March 31, 2017, payable on or about April 12, 2017. On March 23, 2017, our Board of Directors declared a supplemental cash dividend of $0.11 per share of common stock, payable with respect to the year ended December 31, 2016, to stockholders of record as of the close of business on April 4, 2017, payable on or about April 14, 2017. The following table shows the declaration dates and the amounts distributed per share for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015:

 

Record

Date

 

Dividend

Type

 

Declaration

Date

 

Payment

Date

 

$ Amount

Per Share

 

12/31/2016

 

Regular

 

11/8/2016

 

1/13/2017

 

 

0.09

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09/30/2016

 

Regular

 

8/9/2016

 

10/11/2016

 

 

0.09

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

06/30/2016

 

Regular

 

6/9/2016

 

7/15/2016

 

 

0.09

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4/10/2016

 

Regular

 

3/24/2016

 

04/15/2016

 

 

0.09

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12/31/2015

 

Supplemental

 

11/10/2015

 

1/22/2016

 

 

0.09

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12/31/2015

 

Regular

 

11/10/2015

 

1/15/2016

 

 

0.09

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09/30/2015

 

Regular

 

8/11/2015

 

10/15/2015

 

 

0.09

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

06/30/2015

 

Regular

 

6/18/2015

 

7/15/2015

 

 

0.09

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

03/31/2015

 

Regular

 

3/26/2015

 

04/15/2015

 

 

0.09

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

03/31/2015

 

Supplemental

 

3/26/2015

 

4/15/2015

 

 

0.09

 

 

We have determined for income tax purposes that the 2016 regular dividends were considered ordinary dividends. The total distributions paid in 2016 were the result of cash flow from operations.

 

Although we intend to continue to declare and pay quarterly dividends, no assurances can be made as to the amounts of any future payments. The declaration of any future dividends is within the discretion of the Board of Directors and will be dependent upon, among other things, our earnings, financial condition and capital requirements, as well as any other factors deemed relevant by the Board. Two principal factors in determining the amounts of distributions are (i) the Code requirement that a REIT distribute to stockholders at least 90% of its REIT taxable income, and (ii) the amount of available cash.

23


 

Equity Compensation Plan Information

On June 11, 2007, the Board approved the Company’s 2007 Incentive Award Plan (the “Plan”) with the effective date of the Plan of June 11, 2007, which was then approved by our stockholders on February 7, 2008. The aggregate number of shares of common stock which may be awarded under the Plan is 1,000,000 shares. These shares were registered on the Registration Statement on Form S-8 on September 23, 2010. See Item 11 and Footnote 6 of this Report Form 10-K for additional information regarding the Plan.

The following information is provided as of December 31, 2016, with respect to compensation plans, including individual compensation arrangements, under which our equity securities are authorized for issuance:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plan category

 

Number of securities

to be issued upon

exercise of

outstanding options,

warrants and rights

 

 

Weighted-average

exercise price of

outstanding options,

warrants and rights

 

 

Number of

securities issued of

restricted stock

 

 

Number of securities

remaining available

for future issuance

under equity

compensation plans

 

Equity compensation plans approved

   by security holders(1)

 

 

465,000

 

 

$

10.82

 

 

 

874,620

 

 

 

125,380

 

Equity compensation plans not

   approved by security holders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

465,000

 

 

$

10.82

 

 

 

874,620

 

 

 

125,380

 

 

(1)

This equity compensation is under the 2007 Stock Incentive Award Plan.

Purchase of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers

On February 8, 2016, the Company purchased 227,043 shares of GTJ REIT, Inc. for approximately $1.2 million in connection with a settlement agreement with certain parties involving litigation. These shares, along with 35,974 shares of GTJ REIT, Inc. stock acquired by the Company at various times, were subsequently retired.  

 

On November 8, 2016, the Board of Directors (the “Board”) of GTJ REIT, Inc. (the “Company”) approved a share redemption program (the “Program”) authorizing redemption of the Company’s shares of common stock (the “Shares”), subject to certain conditions and limitations. The following is a summary of terms and provisions of the Program:

 

 

the Company will redeem the Shares on a semi-annual basis (each redemption period ending on May 31st and November 30th of each year), at a specified price per share (which price will be equal to 90% of its net asset value per share for the most recently completed calendar year, subject to adjustment) up to a yearly maximum of $1.0 million in Shares, subject to sufficient funds being available.  

 

the Program will be open to all stockholders, indefinitely with no specific end date (although the Board may choose to amend, suspend or terminate the Program at any time by providing 30 days’ advance notice to stockholders).

 

stockholders can tender their Shares for redemption at any time during the period in which the Program is open; stockholders can also withdraw tendered Shares at any time prior to 10 days before the end of the applicable semi-annual period.

 

if the annual volume limitation is reached in any given semi-annual period or the Company determines to redeem fewer Shares than have been submitted for redemption in any particular semi-annual period due to the insufficiency of funds, the Company will redeem Shares on a pro rata basis in accordance with the policy on priority of redemptions set forth in the Program.

 

the redemption price for the Shares will be paid in cash no later than 3 business days following the last calendar day of the applicable semi-annual period.

 

the Program will be terminated if the Shares are listed on a national securities exchange or included for quotation in a national securities market, or in the event a secondary market for the Shares develops or if the Company merges with a listed company.

 

the Company’s transfer agent, American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, LLC, will act as the redemption agent in connection with the Program.

 

24


 

The first semi-annual period under the Program will be open commencing on June 1, 2017.

 

 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussions contain forward-looking statements that involve numerous risks and uncertainties. Our actual results could differ materially from those discussed in the forward-looking statements as a result of these risks and uncertainties, including those set forth in this report under “Forward-Looking Statements” and under “Risk Factors.” You should read the following discussion in conjunction with “Selected Financial Data” and our consolidated financial statements and notes appearing elsewhere in this filing. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those reflected in the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, those discussed in “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this report and the risks discussed in our other filings with the SEC.  Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which reflect management’s analysis, judgment, belief or expectation only as of the date hereof.  Although we believe that our expectations are based on reasonable assumptions, we can give no assurance that our expectations will materialize. We undertake no obligation to publicly revise these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances that arise after the date hereof.

Executive Summary

We are a fully integrated, self-administered and self-managed REIT, engaged in the acquisition, ownership, and management of commercial real estate. As of December 31, 2016, we owned 47 properties, which are predominately industrial/warehouse locations leased on a net lease basis.  The Company typically evaluates a tenant’s credit quality by reviewing their financial information, rating agency reports and credit reports, when available, and other sources of information that can be useful in determining a tenant’s creditworthiness and financial condition.

We formerly owned a group of outdoor maintenance businesses, an electrical contracting business, and a parking garage business, which are presented as part of our consolidated financial statements. These businesses have all been disposed as of December 31, 2016.

On January 17, 2013, we acquired all outstanding ownership interests of a portfolio consisting of 25 commercial properties located in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut in exchange for 33.29% of the outstanding limited partnership interest in the Operating Partnership. The outstanding limited partnership interest in the Operating Partnership was increased to 33.78% due to post-closing adjustments, and to 34.21% due to the redemption of certain shares of GTJ REIT, Inc. stock.  As a result of the transaction, as well as the six properties acquired in 2014, seven properties in 2015, and two properties in 2016, we currently beneficially own a 65.79% interest in the 47 property portfolio, consisting of approximately 5.6 million square feet of industrial, warehouse, office, retail and other properties on 349 acres of land in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Delaware.

We continue to seek opportunities to acquire properties. We will seek to acquire properties within geographic areas that will satisfy our primary investment objectives of providing our stockholders with stable cash flow, preservation of capital and growth of income and principal without taking undue risk. Because a significant factor in the valuation of income-producing property is the potential for future income, we anticipate that the majority of properties that we will acquire will have both the potential for growth in value and provide for cash distributions to stockholders.

Critical Accounting Policies

Management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations is based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“GAAP”). The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires the use of estimates and assumptions that could affect the reported amounts in our consolidated financial statements. Actual results could differ from these estimates. A summary of our significant accounting policies is presented in Note 2 of the “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements” set forth in Item 8 hereof. Set forth below is a summary of the accounting policies that management believes are critical to the preparation of the consolidated financial statements included in this report. Certain of the accounting policies used in the preparation of these consolidated financial statements are particularly important for an understanding of the financial position and results of operations presented in the historical consolidated financial statements included in this report and require the application of significant judgment by management and, as a result, are subject to a degree of uncertainty.

25


 

Revenue Recognition:

We recognize our rental revenue on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease unless another systematic and rational basis is more representative of the time pattern in which the use benefit is derived from the leased property. In those instances, in which we fund tenant improvements and the improvements are deemed to be owned by us, revenue recognition will commence when the improvements are substantially completed and possession or control of the space is turned over to the tenant. When we determine that the tenant allowances are lease incentives, we commence revenue recognition when possession or control of the space is turned over to the tenant for tenant work to begin. The properties are being leased to tenants under operating leases.  

Property operating expense recoveries from tenants of common area maintenance, real estate taxes, insurance, and other recoverable costs are recognized in the period the related expenses are incurred.

Real Estate:

Real estate assets are stated at cost, less accumulated depreciation and amortization. All costs related to the improvement or replacements of real estate properties are capitalized. Additions, renovations and improvements that enhance and/or extend the useful life of a property are also capitalized. Expenditures for ordinary maintenance, repairs and improvements that do not materially prolong the normal useful life of an asset are charged to operations as incurred.

Upon the acquisition of real estate properties, the fair value of the real estate purchased is allocated to the acquired tangible assets (generally consisting of land, buildings and building improvements, and tenant improvements) and identified intangible assets and liabilities (generally consisting of above-market and below-market leases and the origination value of in-place leases) in accordance with GAAP. We utilize methods similar to those used by independent appraisers in estimating the fair value of acquired assets and liabilities. The fair value of the tangible assets of an acquired property considers the value of the property “as-if-vacant.” In allocating the purchase price to identified intangible assets and liabilities of an acquired property, the value of above-market and below-market leases is estimated based on the differences between contractual rentals and the estimated market rents over the applicable lease term discounted back to the date of acquisition utilizing a discount rate adjusted for the credit risk associated with the respective tenants. Fixed-rate renewal options have been included in the calculation of the fair value of acquired leases where applicable. The aggregate value of in-place leases is measured based on the avoided costs associated with lack of revenue over a market oriented lease-up period, the avoided leasing commissions, and other avoided costs common in similar leasing transactions.

Mortgage notes payable assumed in connection with acquisitions are recorded at their fair value using current market interest rates for similar debt at the time of acquisitions. Acquisition related costs are expensed as incurred.

The capitalized above-market lease values are amortized as a reduction of rental revenue over the remaining term of the respective leases and the capitalized below-market lease values are amortized as an increase to rental revenue over the remaining term of the respective leases. The value of in-place leases is based on our evaluation of the specific characteristics of each tenant’s lease. Factors considered include estimates of carrying costs during expected lease-up periods, current market conditions, and costs to execute similar leases. The value of in-place leases is amortized over the remaining term of the respective leases. If a tenant vacates its space prior to its contractual expiration date, any unamortized balance of the related intangible assets or liabilities is recorded as income or expense in the period.

Asset Impairment:

Management reviews each real estate investment for impairment whenever events or circumstances indicate that the carrying value of a real estate investment may not be recoverable. The review of recoverability is based on an estimate of the undiscounted future cash flows that are expected to result from the real estate investment’s use and eventual disposition. Such cash flow analyses consider factors such as expected future operating income, trends and prospects, as well as the effects of leasing demand, competition and other factors. If an impairment event exists due to the projected inability to recover the carrying value of a real estate investment, an impairment loss is recorded to the extent that the carrying value exceeds estimated fair value. Management is required to make subjective assessments as to whether there are impairments in the value of its real estate properties. These assessments could have a direct impact on net income, because an impairment loss is recognized in the period that the assessment is made. Management has determined that there were no indicators of impairment relating to our long-lived assets at December 31, 2016.

Income Taxes:

We are organized and conduct our operations to qualify as a REIT for Federal income tax purposes. Accordingly, we will generally not be subject to Federal income taxation on that portion of our distributable income that qualifies as REIT taxable income,

26


 

to the extent that we distribute at least 90% of our REIT taxable income to our stockholders and comply with certain other requirements as defined under the Code.

We also participate in certain activities conducted by entities which elected to be treated as taxable subsidiaries under the Code. As such we are subject to Federal, state and local taxes on the income from these activities.

We account for income taxes under the asset and liability method, as required by the provisions of Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 740-10-30. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on differences between financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities and are measured using the enacted tax rates and laws that will be in effect when the differences are expected to reverse. We provide a valuation allowance for deferred tax assets for which we do not consider realization of such assets to be more likely than not.

Stock-Based Compensation:

We account for stock based compensation in accordance with GAAP, which establishes accounting for stock-based awards exchanged for employee services. Share-based compensation cost is measured at the grant date, based on the fair value of the award, and the expense is recognized in earnings at the grant date (for the portion that vests immediately) or ratably over the respective vesting periods.

Summary of Operations

Results of Operations:

Year Ended December 31, 2016 as compared with Year Ended December 31, 2015

The following table sets forth our results of operations for the years indicated (in thousands):

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

Increase/(Decrease)

 

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

Revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rental income

 

$

41,965

 

 

$

40,181

 

 

$

1,784

 

 

 

4

%

Tenant reimbursements

 

 

7,732

 

 

 

7,547

 

 

 

185

 

 

 

2

%

Total revenues

 

 

49,697

 

 

 

47,728

 

 

 

1,969

 

 

 

4

%

Expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General and administrative expenses

 

 

7,232

 

 

 

6,416

 

 

 

816

 

 

 

13

%

Acquisition costs

 

 

561

 

 

 

619

 

 

 

(58

)

 

 

-9

%

Property operating expenses

 

 

9,335

 

 

 

9,407

 

 

 

(72

)

 

 

-1

%

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

12,581

 

 

 

12,317

 

 

 

264

 

 

 

2

%

Total operating expenses

 

 

29,709

 

 

 

28,759

 

 

 

950

 

 

 

3

%

Operating income

 

 

19,988

 

 

 

18,969

 

 

 

1,019

 

 

 

5

%

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense

 

 

(15,334

)

 

 

(13,983

)

 

 

1,351

 

 

 

10

%

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

 

 

 

 

(14,876

)

 

 

(14,876

)

 

 

100

%

Other

 

 

(514

)

 

 

(95

)

 

 

419

 

 

 

441

%

Income (loss) from operations

 

 

4,140

 

 

 

(9,985

)

 

 

14,125

 

 

 

141

%

Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interest

 

 

1,506

 

 

 

(3,422

)

 

 

4,928

 

 

 

144

%

Net income (loss) attributable to common stockholders

 

$

2,634

 

 

$

(6,563

)

 

$

9,197

 

 

 

140

%

 

 

 

nm—not meaningful

Property Rental Revenues

Property rental revenue increased $1.8 million, or 4%, to $42.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 from $40.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. This increase is primarily attributable to the acquisition of two income producing properties during 2016, and the full year ownership in 2016 of seven income producing properties acquired in 2015.  

27


 

Tenant Reimbursements

Tenant reimbursements increased $0.2 million, or 2%, to $7.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 from $7.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. This increase is primarily attributable to the full year ownership in 2016 of seven income producing properties acquired in 2015.  

Operating Expenses

Operating expenses increased $0.9 million, or 3%, to $29.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 from $28.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. The increase is due to an increase in general and administrative expenses and depreciation and amortization.  

Interest Expense

Interest expense increased $1.3 million, or 10%, to $15.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 from $14.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. The increase is primarily due to the debt service associated with seven property acquisitions during the first quarter of 2015, the AIG Loan financing, and the financing of two acquisitions in 2016 from the Company’s secured revolving credit facility with Key Bank.

Loss on Extinguishment of Debt

Loss on Extinguishment of Debt of $14.9 million represents prepayment fees and the write-off of loan costs associated with the retirement of $127.6 million of the then outstanding principal balances of various loans in connection with the AIG Loan financing which closed in February 2015.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

We derive substantially all of our revenues from rents received from tenants under existing leases on each of our properties. These revenues include fixed base rents and recoveries of certain property operating expenses that we have incurred and that we pass through to the individual tenants.

Our primary cash expenses consist of our property operating expenses, which include: real estate taxes, repairs and maintenance, insurance, utilities, general and administrative expenses, which include compensation costs, office expenses, professional fees and other administrative expenses, leasing and acquisition costs, which include third-party costs paid to brokers and consultants, and interest expense on our mortgage loans.

Our sources of liquidity and capital include cash flow from operations, cash and cash equivalents, borrowings under our revolving credit facility, refinancing existing mortgage loans, obtaining loans secured by our unencumbered properties, and property sales. On February 20, 2015, the Company secured a $233.1 million loan facility.  Available proceeds under the facility repaid approximately $56.0 million outstanding on the Capital One N.A. revolving credit facility, thereby paying off and terminating the revolving credit facility.

On December 2, 2015, the Company entered into a credit agreement with Key Bank for a $50.0 million secured revolving credit facility with an initial term of two years, with a one-year extension option. Our available liquidity at December 31, 2016 was approximately $38.1 million, consisting of cash and cash equivalents of $15.9 and $22.2 million from our Key Bank secured revolving credit facility. As of December 31, 2016, the Company had $27.8 million of outstanding borrowings on its secured revolving credit facility.  

We expect to meet substantially all of our operating cash requirements (including dividend payments required to maintain our REIT status and an estimated $3.9 million of 2017 principal mortgage debt amortization) from cash flow from operations. To the extent that cash flow from operations is not adequate to cover all of our operating needs, we will be required to use our available cash and cash equivalents to satisfy operating requirements. Additionally, in the normal course of our business, we may sell properties when we determine that it is in our best interests, which also generates additional liquidity.

28


 

Net Cash Flows

Year Ended December 31, 2016 vs. Year Ended December 31, 2015

Operating Activities

Net cash provided by operating activities was $17.0 million for 2016 compared to $17.4 million for 2015. For the 2016 period, cash provided by operating activities included (i) net income before depreciation, amortization, stock compensation and a loss from the Company’s investment in a limited liability partnership of $18.0 million, (ii) an increase in other liabilities of $0.5 million, and (iii) an increase to accounts payable and accrued expenses of $0.3 million partially offset by (iv) an increase in other assets of $1.3 million and (v) an increase in rental income in excess of amounts billed of $0.6 million. 2015 cash flow from operations of $17.4 million included (i) net income before depreciation, amortization, and stock compensation $3.1 million, (ii) the loss from extinguishment of debt of $14.9 million, (iii) a decrease in other assets of $0.8 million, and (iv) an increase to accounts payable and accrued expenses of $0.8 million, partially offset by (v) an increase in rental income in excess of amounts billed of $1.4 million and (vi) a decrease in other liabilities of $0.8 million.

Investing Activities

Net cash used in investing activities was $32.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 compared to $81.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. For the 2016 period, cash used in investing activities resulted from (i) the acquisition of two properties totaling $27.0 million, and (ii) property improvements of $6.5 million, offset by (iii) the release of a $1.0 million certificate of deposit in connection with the completion of certain site improvements at 20 East Halsey Road in Parsippany, New Jersey, (iv) the net release of leasing and capital reserves in connection with the AIG Loan of $0.2 million, and (v) the application of contract deposit of $0.2 million for a property acquired in 2016.  For the 2015 period, cash used in investing activities resulted from (i) the acquisition of seven properties totaling $76.2 million, (ii) property improvements of $3.3 million, (iii) the net funding of leasing and capital reserves in connection with the AIG Loan of $1.2 million, (iv) the posting of a 1.0 million letter of credit in connection with a performance guarantee to complete certain site improvements at 20 East Halsey Road in Parsippany, New Jersey, and (v) a contract deposit of $0.2 million for a property acquisition that closed in 2016.

Financing Activities

Net cash provided by financing activities was $16.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 compared to $71.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. For the 2016 period, net cash provided by financing activities included (i) proceeds from the Company’s revolving credit facility with Key Bank of $27.8 million, partially offset by (ii) the payment of the Company’s quarterly and 2015 supplemental dividends totaling $6.2 million, (iii) distributions to non-controlling interests of $3.4 million, (iv) the repurchase of shares of GTJ REIT, Inc. stock of $1.2 million and (v) the payment of mortgage principal of $0.9 million.  For the 2015 period, net cash provided by financing activities included, (i) $272.2 million in proceeds from mortgage notes payable, (ii) proceeds of $12.1 million from our then revolving credit facility with Capital One, N.A., and (iii) the return of a good faith deposit of $3.3 million in connection with the closing of our AIG Loan in February 2015, partially offset by (iv) the repayment of our outstanding principal balance and fees associated with the early extinguishment of debt of $143.4 million, (v) the repayment of our revolving credit facility of $55.9 million, (vi) loan costs of $6.9 million in connection with the AIG and Allstate Loans, and the Key Bank revolving line of credit facility, (vii) payments of the Company’s 2015 regular and 2014 supplemental dividends of $6.1 million, (viii) distributions to non-controlling interests of $3.2 million and (ix) the payment of mortgage principal of $1.0 million.

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization)

EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA are non-GAAP financial measures. Our EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA computations may not be comparable to EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA reported by other companies that interpret the definitions of EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA differently than we do. Management believes EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA to be meaningful measures of a REIT’s performance because they are widely followed by industry analysts, lenders and investors and are used by management as measures of performance. EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA should be considered along with, but not as alternatives to, net income as measures of our operating performance.

Adjusted EBITDA allows investors to measure our operating performance independent of our capital structure and indebtedness. Additionally, costs related to the extinguishment of debt and acquisition costs have been excluded from Adjusted EBITDA in order to assist with measuring core real estate operating performance.

29


 

Reconciliation of Net Income (Loss) to EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA attributable to our stockholders is as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

Net income (loss) attributable to common stockholders

 

$

2,634

 

 

$

(6,563

)

Real estate depreciation

 

 

6,147

 

 

 

5,332

 

Amortization of intangible assets and deferred costs

 

 

2,662

 

 

 

3,016

 

Interest expense

 

 

9,505

 

 

 

8,870

 

EBITDA

 

 

20,948

 

 

 

10,655

 

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

 

 

 

 

9,851

 

Acquisition costs

 

 

369

 

 

 

410

 

Adjusted EBITDA

 

$

21,317

 

 

$

20,916

 

 

Funds from Operations and Adjusted Funds from Operations

We consider Funds from Operations (“FFO”) and Adjusted Funds from Operations (“AFFO”), each of which are non-GAAP measures, to be additional measures of an equity REIT’s operating performance. We report FFO in addition to our net income (loss) and net cash provided by operating activities. Management has adopted the definition suggested by the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts (“NAREIT”) and defines FFO to equal net income (loss) computed in accordance with GAAP; excluding gains or losses from sales of property, excluding asset impairments, plus real estate-related depreciation and amortization and loss from discontinued operations. We believe these measurements provide a more complete understanding of our performance when compared year over year and better reflect the impact on our operations from trends in occupancy rates, rental rates, operating costs and general and administrative expenses which may not be immediately apparent from net income.

Management considers FFO a meaningful, additional measure of operating performance because it primarily excludes the assumption that the value of our real estate assets diminishes predictably over time and industry analysts have accepted it as a performance measure. FFO is presented to assist investors in analyzing our performance. It is helpful because it excludes various items included in net income that are not indicative of our operating performance, such as gains or losses from sales of property and depreciation and amortization. Management believes Core FFO to be a meaningful, additional measure of operating performance because it provides information consistent with the Company’s analysis of the operating performance of its portfolio by excluding items such as the loss on extinguishment of debt and acquisition costs which affect the comparability of the Company’s period over period performance and are not indicative of the results provided by our operating portfolio. Management believes AFFO to be a meaningful, additional measure of operating performance because it provides information consistent with the Company’s analysis of its operating performance by excluding non-cash income and expense items such as straight lined rent, amortization of lease intangibles, mark to market debt adjustments, financing costs and our unrealized loss from an investment in a limited partnership which are not indicative of the results of our operating portfolio.

However, FFO, Core FFO and AFFO:

 

do not represent cash flows from operating activities in accordance with GAAP, which, unlike FFO, Core FFO and AFFO generally reflects all cash effects of transactions and other events in the determination of net income;