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EX-32.2 - VLL6INC 10-K 12.31.16 EXHIBIT 32.2 - Venture Lending & Leasing VI, Inc.vll612312016ex32210k.htm
EX-32.1 - VLL6INC 10-K 12.31.16 EXHIBIT 32.1 - Venture Lending & Leasing VI, Inc.vll612312016ex32110k.htm
EX-31.2 - VLL6INC 10-K 12.31.16 EXHIBIT 31.2 - Venture Lending & Leasing VI, Inc.vll612312016ex31210k.htm
EX-31.1 - VLL6INC 10-K 12.31.16 EXHIBIT 31.1 - Venture Lending & Leasing VI, Inc.vll612312016ex31110k.htm


FORM 10-K
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

[X]
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the year ended December 31, 2016
OR
[  ]
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from _______ to _______
Commission File Number 814-00799
VENTURE LENDING & LEASING VI, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Maryland
27-1682622
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

104 La Mesa Drive, Suite 102, Portola Valley, CA 94028
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)

Registrant's telephone number, including area code:  (650) 234-4300

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None
Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: Common Stock, $0.001 par value
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [ ] No [X]
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes [ ] No [X]
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has (i) filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (ii) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days: Yes [X] No [ ]
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the  preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [ ] No [ ]
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part II of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K: [X]
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer.  See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act (Check one):
Large accelerated filer [ ]
Accelerated filer [ ]
Non-accelerated filer [x]
Smaller reporting company [ ]
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).  Yes [ ] No [X]
As the registrant's shares are not publicly-traded, the aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant cannot be determined.
The number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer's classes of common stock, as of March 15, 2017 was 100,000.




Documents Incorporated by Reference
                                                                    
Document Description
 
10-K Part
Specifically Identified Portions of the Registrant's Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held
May 10, 2017
III

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PART I.
ITEM 1.
BUSINESS
Introduction.
Venture Lending & Leasing VI, Inc. (the “Fund”) was incorporated in Maryland on January 11, 2010, as a non-diversified, closed-end management investment company electing status as a business development company (“BDC”) under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (“1940 Act”).  The Fund is a wholly owned subsidiary of Venture Lending & Leasing VI, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (the “Company”).  The purpose of the Fund is to provide asset-based financing to venture-capital-backed companies, generally in the form of secured loans.  Additionally, the Fund may provide debt financing to public and late-stage private companies.  Prior to commencing its operations on June 29, 2010, the Fund had no operations other than the sale of 100,000 shares of common stock, $0.001 par value to the Company for $25,000 in January 2010.  As of December 31, 2016, the Fund meets the requirements, including diversification requirements, to qualify as a regulated investment company (“RIC”) under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.
The Fund's shares of Common Stock, at $.001 par value (“Shares”) are held entirely by the Company.  As capital is required to finance the acquisition of loans, additional capital is provided by the Company.
Investment Program.
General. As a BDC, the Fund must invest at least 70% of its total assets in qualifying assets (“Qualifying Assets”) consisting of (a) interests in Eligible Portfolio Companies and (b) certain other assets including cash and cash equivalents. An "Eligible Portfolio Company" is a United States company that is not an investment company, as defined, or excluded from the definition of an investment company in Section 3 of the 1940 Act, and that either: (i) does not have a class of securities listed on a national securities exchange, or does have a class of securities listed on a national securities exchange, but has an aggregate market value of outstanding voting and non-voting common equity of less than $250 million; or (ii) is actively controlled by a BDC and has an affiliate of a BDC on the Eligible Portfolio Company’s Board of Directors; or (iii) has total assets of not more than $4 million and capital and surplus of not less than $2 million; or (iv) meets such other criteria as may be established by the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"). Control under the 1940 Act is presumed to exist where a BDC owns more than 25% of the outstanding voting securities of the eligible portfolio company. Also included in Qualifying Assets are follow-on investments in a company that met the definition of Eligible Portfolio Company at the time of the Fund’s initial investment, but subsequently does not meet such definition because it has a class of securities listed on a national securities exchange, if, at the time of the follow-on investment, the Fund (a) owns at least 50% of (i) the greatest number of equity securities of such company, including securities convertible into or exchangeable for such securities, and (ii) the greatest amount of certain debt securities of such company held by the Fund at any time during the period when such company was an Eligible Portfolio Company, and (b) is one of the twenty largest holders of record of the company’s outstanding voting securities. The Fund may invest up to 30% of its total assets in non-Qualifying Assets, including interests in companies that are not Eligible Portfolio Companies (for example, because the company’s securities are quoted on the NASDAQ Global Market (“NASDAQ”)) and Eligible Portfolio Companies as to which the Fund does not offer to make available significant managerial assistance. As of December 31, 2016, the percentage of non-qualifying investments in the Fund was 11.2%.
BDCs cannot acquire any assets other than those Qualifying Assets described in subparagraphs (1) through (8) below unless, at the time of the acquisition, the assets described in subparagraphs (1) through (8) below represent at least 70% of the value of the BDC's total assets (the “70% basket”). Below is a general summary of Qualifying Assets in which the Fund may invest.
1. Securities issued in transactions not involving a public offering from issuers which are Eligible Portfolio Companies (including affiliated persons or persons that have been affiliated persons within the preceding 13 months) or from any other person, subject to such rules and regulations as the Commission may prescribe.
2. Securities purchased in transactions not involving any public offering from an issuer, or from any person who is an officer or employee of the issuer, if the issuer is a U.S. company that is not an investment company, but the issuer is not an Eligible Portfolio Company because it has issued a class of margin securities that is eligible for margin loans, and at the time of purchase the BDC owns at least 50% of (i) the greatest number of equity securities (on a fully diluted basis) of the issuer and (ii) the greatest amount of such issuer's debt securities held by the BDC at any point in time during the period when such issuer was an Eligible Portfolio Company, and, (iii) the BDC is one of the 20 largest holders of the issuer's outstanding voting securities.
3. Securities of any Eligible Portfolio Company that is controlled by the BDC (either alone or as part of a group acting together) and the BDC exercises a controlling influence over the management or policies, and has an affiliated person who is a director of, the Eligible Portfolio Company;
4. Securities issued in transactions not involving a public offering from U.S. non-investment company issuers subject to bankruptcy, reorganization, insolvency or similar proceeding or otherwise unable to meet their obligations without assistance (purchase may be made from affiliated persons or persons that have been affiliated persons within the preceding 13 months or in limited circumstances other persons);

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5. Securities of an Eligible Portfolio Company purchased from any person in transactions not involving a public offering when no public market for the securities exists and the BDC owned at least 60% of the outstanding equity (on a fully diluted basis) of the issuer immediately prior to the purchase;
6. Securities received in exchange for or distributed with respect to the foregoing securities (including securities obtained pursuant to the exercise of options, warrants or rights relating to such securities);
7. Cash, cash items, U.S. Government securities or high-quality debt securities maturing in one year or less from the time of investment; or
8. Office furniture and equipment, interests in real estate, deferred organization and operating expenses, and other non-investment assets necessary and appropriate to the BDC's operations.
"Making available significant managerial assistance" is defined under the 1940 Act, in relevant part, as (i) an arrangement whereby the business development company, through its officers, directors, employees or general partners, offers to provide and, if accepted, does provide, significant guidance and counsel concerning the management, operations or business objectives of a portfolio company; or (ii) the exercise by a business development company of a controlling influence over the management or polices of the portfolio company by the business development company acting individually or as part of a group acting together which controls the portfolio company. The officers of the Fund intend to offer to provide managerial assistance, including advice on equipment acquisition and financing, cash flow and expense management, general financing opportunities, acquisition opportunities and opportunities to access the public securities markets, to the great majority of companies to whom the Fund provides venture loans. In some instances, directors of the Fund might serve on the Board of Directors or as officers of borrowers.
Venture Loans.  Venture loans generally consist of a promissory note secured by the equipment or other assets of the borrower. The Fund generally obtains a security interest in the assets financed and receives periodic payments of interest and principal, and may receive a final payment constituting additional interest at the end of the transaction's term. The interest rate and amortization terms of venture loans are individually negotiated between the Fund and each borrower.

Typically, loans are structured as commitments by the Fund to finance assets of the borrower over a specified period of time. The commitment of the Fund to finance future asset acquisitions is typically subject to the absence of any default under the loan and compliance by the borrower with requirements relating to, among other things, the type of assets to be financed. Although the Fund's commitments generally provide that the Fund is not required to continue to fund additional loans if there is a material adverse change in the borrower's financial condition, it is possible that a borrower's financial condition will not be as strong at the time the Fund finances an asset acquisition as it was at the time the commitment was entered into.
Warrants and Equity Securities. The Fund generally acquires warrants to purchase equity securities of the borrower in connection with financings, and immediately distributes them to the Fund's shareholder. The terms of the warrants, including the expiration date, exercise price and terms of the equity security for which the warrant may be exercised, are negotiated individually with each borrower. Substantially all the warrants and underlying equity securities are restricted securities under the Securities Act of 1933 (“1933 Act”) at the time of issuance; the Fund generally negotiates registration rights with the borrower that may provide (i) "piggyback" registration rights, which permit the Fund under certain circumstances to include some or all of the securities owned by it in a registration statement filed by the borrower or (ii) under rare circumstances, "demand" registration rights permitting the Fund under certain circumstances to require the borrower to register the securities under the 1933 Act (in some cases at the Fund's expense).
Investment Policies. For purposes of the investment policies (other than the diversification standards below), references the percentage of the Fund’s total assets “invested” in securities of a company will be deemed to refer, in the case of financings in which the Fund commits to provide financing prior to funding the commitment, to the value of the maximum amount of securities to be issued by the borrower to the Fund pursuant to such commitment; the Fund will not be required to divest securities in its portfolio or decline to fund an existing commitment because of a subsequent change in the value of securities the Fund has previously acquired or committed to purchase.
Diversification Standards. The Fund is classified as a "non-diversified" closed-end investment company under the 1940 Act. However, the Fund seeks to qualify as a RIC, and therefore must meet diversification standards under the Internal Revenue Code.
To qualify as a RIC, the Fund must meet the issuer diversification standards under the Internal Revenue Code that require that, at the close of each quarter of the Fund's taxable year, (i) not more than 25% of the market value of its total assets is invested in the securities of a single issuer and (ii) at least 50% of the market value of its total assets is represented by cash, cash items, government securities, securities of other RICs and other securities (with each investment in such other securities limited so that not more than 5% of the market value of the Fund's total assets is invested in the securities of a single issuer and the Fund does not own more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of a single issuer). For purposes of the diversification requirements under the Internal Revenue Code, the percentage of the Fund's total assets "invested" in securities of a company will be deemed to refer, in the case of financings in which the Fund commits to provide financing prior to funding the commitment, to the amount of the Fund's total assets represented by the value of the securities issued by the borrower to the Fund at the time each portion of the commitment is funded.

Industry Segment Diversification. The Fund will generally invest no more than 30% of its total assets in securities of companies in any single industry. The broad industry categories in which the Fund anticipates that most of its investments will fall (and within each of which there may be several "industries" for purposes of the industry diversification policy) include computers and storage, semiconductor and equipment, medical devices, software, and several other categories.

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Investment Guidelines.  In selecting investments for the Fund's portfolio, Westech Investment Advisors LLC (the “Manager”) will endeavor to meet the investment guidelines established by the Fund's Board of Directors. The Fund may, however, make investments that do not conform to one or more of these guidelines when deemed appropriate by the Manager. Such investments might be made if the Manager believes that a failure to conform in one area is offset by exceptional strength in another or is compensated for by a higher yield, favorable warrant issuance or other attractive transaction terms or features.

Leverage. The Fund is permitted to borrow money from and issue debt securities to banks, insurance companies and other lenders to obtain additional funds to originate venture loans. Under the 1940 Act, the Fund may not incur borrowings unless, immediately after the borrowing is incurred, such borrowings would have "asset coverage" of at least 200 percent. "Asset coverage" means the ratio which the value of the Fund's total assets, less all liabilities not represented by the borrowings and any other liabilities constituting "senior securities" under the 1940 Act, bears to the aggregate amount of such borrowings and senior securities. The practical effect of this limitation is to limit the Fund's borrowings and other senior securities to 50% of its total assets less its liabilities other than the borrowings and other senior securities.
Temporary Investments. Pending investment, and until distributions to the shareholders are made, the Fund will invest excess cash in: (i) time deposits, certificates of deposit and similar instruments of highly-rated banks; (ii) securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities; (iii) repurchase agreements that are: (a) issued by highly-rated banks
or securities dealers; and (b) fully collateralized by U.S. government securities; (iv) short-term high-quality debt instruments of U.S. corporations; and (v) money market funds and other pooled investment funds whose investments are restricted to those described above. The average maturity of such investments, weighted by their par value, will not exceed 90 days.
Other Investment Policies.  The Fund will not sell securities short (except to the extent the Fund has a warrant for, or owns, shares equal to the number of shares which is the subject of the proposed short sale), purchase securities on margin (except to the extent the Fund’s permitted borrowings are deemed to constitute margin purchases), purchase or sell commodities or commodity contracts (except interest rate hedging transactions in connection with the Fund’s permitted borrowings), or purchase or sell real estate. The Fund may, however, write puts and calls, and acquire options, as a hedge for equity investments or to increase return through a covered call. The Fund will not underwrite the securities of other companies, except to the extent they may be deemed underwriters upon the disposition of restricted securities acquired in the ordinary course of their business. The Fund may, however, use borrowed funds for its lending activities.
The Fund's investment objectives, investment policies and investment guidelines (other than its status as a BDC) are not fundamental policies and may be changes by the Fund's Board of Directors at any time.
Regulation. As a BDC, the Fund is required to invest in Eligible Portfolio Companies and (with certain exceptions) make available to them significant managerial assistance.  Eligible portfolio companies, and the regulations governing assets a BDC can acquire, are described under the heading “Investment Program” above.
The Fund, as a BDC, may sell its securities at a price that is below its net asset value per share, provided that a majority of the Fund's disinterested directors has determined that such sale would be in the best interests of the Fund and its shareholder and upon the approval by the holders of a majority of its outstanding voting securities, including a majority of the voting securities held by non-affiliated persons, of such policy or practice within one year of such sale.  A majority of the disinterested directors also must determine in good faith, in consultation with the underwriters of the offering if the offering is underwritten, that the price of the securities being sold is not less than a price which closely approximates market value of the securities, less any distribution discounts or commissions.  As defined in the 1940 Act, the term "majority of the outstanding voting securities" of the Fund means the vote of (i) 67% or more of the Fund's Shares present at a meeting, if the holders of more than 50% of the outstanding Shares are present or represented by proxy, or (ii) more than 50% of the Fund's outstanding Shares, whichever is less.

Many of the transactions involving a company and its affiliates (as well as affiliates of those affiliates) which were prohibited without the prior approval of the SEC under the 1940 Act prior to its amendment by the 1980 provisions are permissible for BDCs, including the Fund, upon the prior approval of a majority of the Fund's disinterested directors, defined as not interested parties of the Fund under section 2(a)(19) of the Investment Act of 1940 (ie. Independent Directors), and a majority of the directors having no financial interest in the transactions. However, certain transactions involving certain persons related to the Fund, including its directors, officers, and the Managers, may still require the prior approval of the SEC. In general, (i) any person who owns, controls, or holds power to vote, more than 5% of the Fund's outstanding Shares; (ii) any director, executive officer, or general partner of that person; and (iii) any person who directly or indirectly controls, is controlled by, or is under common control with, that person, must obtain the prior approval of a majority of the Fund's disinterested directors, and, in some situations, the prior approval of the SEC, before engaging in certain transactions involving the person or any company controlled by the Fund. The 1940 Act generally does not restrict transactions between the Fund and its Eligible Portfolio Companies. While a BDC may change the nature of its business so as to cease being a BDC (and in connection therewith withdraw its election to be treated as a BDC) only if authorized to do so by a majority vote (as defined by the 1940 Act) of its outstanding voting securities, shareholder approval of changes in other fundamental investment policies of a BDC is not required (in contrast to the general 1940 Act requirement, which requires shareholder approval for a change in any fundamental investment policy).

Distributions.  The Fund intends to distribute to the Company (its sole shareholder), substantially all of the Fund’s net investment income and net realized capital gains, if any, determined for tax purposes and all equity securities received from portfolio companies immediately upon receipt. Applicable law, including provisions of the 1940 Act, may limit

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the amount of dividends and other distributions payable by the Fund, and all such dividends and other distributions must be authorized by the Board of Directors of the Fund. Income distributions generally will be paid by the Fund to the Company on a quarterly basis. Substantially all of the Fund’s net capital gain (the excess of net long-term capital gain over net short-term capital loss) and net short-term capital gain, if any, will be distributed at least annually as determined by the Manager.

The Fund made loan commitments to reinvest the proceeds of matured, repaid or resold investments, net of required distributions to its shareholder, principal payments on borrowings and expenses or other obligations of the Fund, in new loans. The Fund distributes to investors all proceeds received from principal payments and sales of investments, net of reserves and expenses, principal repayments on the Fund's borrowings, amounts required to fund financing commitments entered into before such date, and any amounts paid on exercise of warrants. Distributions of such amounts are likely to cause annual distributions to exceed the earnings and profits of the Fund available for distribution, in which case such excess will be considered a tax free return of capital to a shareholder to the extent of the shareholder's adjusted basis in its shares and then as capital gain. The Fund may borrow money to fund shareholder distributions, to the extent consistent with the 1940 Act and a prudent capital structure.
Competition. Other entities and individuals compete for investments similar to those made by the Fund, some of whom may have greater resources than the Fund.  Furthermore, the Fund's need to comply with provisions of the 1940 Act pertaining to BDCs and provisions of the Internal Revenue Code pertaining to RICs might restrict the Fund's flexibility as compared with its competitors.  The need to compete for investment opportunities may make it necessary for the Fund to offer borrowers more attractive transaction terms than otherwise might be the case.
Employees. The Fund has no employees; all of its officers are officers and/or employees of the Manager, and all of its required services are performed by officers and employees of the Manager.
ITEM 1A.  
RISK FACTORS.
GENERAL
Reliance on Management. The Fund is wholly dependent for the structuring and monitoring of its investments on the diligence and skill of the Manager, acting under the supervision of the Fund’s Board of Directors. Although the operating principals of the Manager have over 55 years’ of combined experience in investing in venture lending transactions and equity investments, there can be no assurance that the Fund will attain its investment objective. Furthermore, the Manager does not have substantial experience investing in special situations such as convertible and subordinated debt of public and late-stage private companies. Although the officers of the Manager intend to devote such time as is necessary to the affairs of the Fund, they are not required to devote full time to the management of the Fund. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that any officer will remain associated with the Manager or that, if an officer ceased to be associated with the Manager, the Manager would be able to find a qualified person or person to fill the position.

Illiquid and Long-Term Investment.  The Fund has ceased to make new equity investments as well as investments in venture loans and continues to distribute to its shareholder all proceeds received from principal payments except for reserves and expenses. The Fund's Articles of Incorporation provide that, on December 31, 2020, the Fund automatically will be dissolved without any action by its shareholder. From and after such dissolution, the Fund's activities will be limited to the winding-up of its affairs, the liquidation of its remaining assets and the distribution of the net proceeds thereof to its shareholder. Although the Fund generally would not make any loan with a stated maturity date later than December 31, 2020, it is possible that, due to a default by a borrower or a transaction restructuring due to a borrower's financial difficulties, such a loan may remain outstanding in whole or in part beyond its original maturity date. Furthermore, the Fund may not be able to sell warrants it receives from borrowers, or the equity securities (including those received upon exercise of warrants or conversion of debt instruments or in connection with restructuring of a troubled loan), to the extent those investments were retained by the Fund and not distributed earlier to its shareholder, for a significant period of time due to legal or contractual restrictions on resale or the absence of a liquid secondary market. As a result, the liquidation process might not be completed for a significant period after the Fund's dissolution. In addition, it is possible that, if certain of the Fund's assets are not liquidated within a reasonable time after the Fund's dissolution, the Fund may elect to make a distribution in kind of all or part of such assets to its shareholders. In such case, the shareholders would bear any expenses attendant to the liquidation of such assets.

Although shares of the Fund have been registered under the 1934 Act, there will be no trading market for shares in the Fund (which are all owned by the Company), and thus shares of the Fund should be considered illiquid.

Competition.  Other entities and individuals compete for investments similar to those proposed to be made by the Fund, some of whom, with respect to investments in the form of loans, and many of whom, with respect to the equity investments and convertible and subordinated debt, have greater resources than the Fund. Furthermore, competition could increase given the low barriers to entry in the industry. Additionally, the Fund’s need to comply with provisions of the 1940 Act pertaining to BDCs and, if the Fund continues to qualify as a RIC, provisions of the Internal Revenue Code pertaining to RICs, might restrict the Fund’s flexibility as compared with its competitors.
The need to compete for investment opportunities may make it necessary for the Fund to offer borrowers or companies in which it makes equity investments more attractive terms than otherwise might be the case.

Convertible Debt.  Convertible debt instruments issued by public and late-stage private companies may comprise some of the special situations in which the Fund may invest. Convertible debt generally offers lower interest yields than non-convertible debt of similar quality. The market value of debt tends to decline as interest rates increase and, conversely, to increase as interest rates decline. The market

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value of convertible debt, however, often reflects the market price of common stock of the issuing company when that stock price is greater than the conversion price of the convertible debt. The conversion price is the predetermined price at which the debt instrument could be exchanged for the associated stock. As the market price of the underlying common stock declines, the price of the convertible debt tends to be influenced more by the yield of the debt instrument. Thus, it may not decline in price to the same extent as the underlying common stock.

Subordinated Debt. Part of the special situations in which the Fund may invest may consist of subordinated debt instruments, which tend to be predominantly high-yield non-convertible debt securities. Investments in high-yield securities involve substantial risk of loss. Sub-investment grade non-convertible debt securities, or comparable unrated securities, are commonly referred to as “junk debt” and are considered speculative with respect to the issuer’s ability to pay interest and principal, and are susceptible to default or decline in market value due to adverse economic or business developments. The market values for high-yield securities tend to be very volatile, and these securities are less liquid than investment grade debt securities.

Regulation.  The Fund has elected to be treated as a BDC under the Small Business Incentive Act of 1980, which modified the 1940 Act. Although BDCs are not required to register under the 1940 Act and are relieved from compliance with a number of the provisions of the 1940 Act, there are now greater restrictions in some respects on permitted types of investments for BDCs. Moreover, the applicable provisions of the 1940 Act continue to impose numerous restrictions on the activities of the Fund, including restrictions on leverage and on the nature of its investments. While the Fund is not aware of any judicial rulings under, and is aware of only a few administrative interpretations of, the Small Business Incentive Act of 1980, there can be no assurance that such Act will be interpreted or administratively implemented in a manner consistent with the Fund’s objectives or manner of operation.

Litigation.  The Fund could be subject to litigation by borrowers, based on theories of breach of contract to lend, “lender liability,” or otherwise in connection with its loan and investment transactions. The defense of such a lawsuit, even if ultimately determined to be without merit, could be costly and time-consuming to the Fund.

Tax Status.  The Fund must meet a number of requirements, described herein under the caption “Federal Income Taxation,” to qualify for the pass-through status as a RIC and, if qualified, to continue to so qualify. For example, the Fund must meet specified asset diversification standards under the Internal Revenue Code which might be difficult to meet if the borrowers under some loans drew down their committed financing at a faster rate than other borrowers, particularly during the early periods of the Fund’s operations. If the Fund experiences difficulty in meeting the diversification requirement for any fiscal quarter of its taxable year, it might accelerate capital calls or, if available, borrowings in order to increase the portion of the Fund’s total assets represented by cash, cash items, and U.S. government securities as of the close of the following fiscal quarter and thus attempt to meet the diversification requirement. The Fund, however, would incur additional interest and other expenses in connection with any such accelerated borrowings, and increased investments by the Fund in cash, cash items, and U.S. government securities (whether the funds to make such investments are derived from called equity capital or from accelerated borrowings) are likely to reduce the Fund’s return. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that the Fund would be able to meet the diversification requirements through such actions. Failure to qualify as a RIC would deny the Fund pass-through status and, in a year in which the Fund has taxable income, would have a significant adverse effect on the return of the Fund.

The Fund has received an opinion that, assuming the Fund’s election to be a BDC under Sections 6(f) and 54 of the 1940 Act will remain in effect and that the Fund otherwise meets the qualification requirements set forth in Section 851(b) and the distribution requirements in Section 852(a) of the Internal Revenue Code, if the Fund’s status as a RIC is challenged by the IRS in court and properly litigated, a court of competent jurisdiction will respect that status for federal income tax purposes. If the SEC were to disallow the Fund’s election to be treated as a BDC, then the Fund would not be eligible to be treated as a RIC and, therefore, would be subject to federal corporate tax on its income and gains. The opinion referred to above is based on the Internal Revenue Code, regulations thereunder, Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) rulings, procedures and pronouncements, court decisions and other applicable law as of the date hereof, and certain representations that the Fund has made to its legal counsel. Legal opinions, however, are not binding on the IRS or the courts, and no ruling has been or will be requested from the IRS. No assurance can be given that the IRS will concur with such opinion.

Allocation of Expenses.  If the Fund is not deemed to be engaged in a trade or business, individuals and certain other persons who are members of the Company will be required to include in their gross income an amount of certain Fund expenses relating to the production of gross income that are allocable to the Company. These members, therefore, will be deemed to receive gross income from the Fund in excess of the distributions they actually receive. Such allocated expenses may be deductible by an individual Member as a miscellaneous itemized deduction, subject to the limitation on miscellaneous itemized deductions not exceeding 2% of adjusted gross income to the extent the Fund is not engaged in a trade or business.

Calculation of Investment Management Fee. As compensation for its services to the Fund, the Manager receives a management fee (“Management Fee”) computed and paid at the end of each quarter at an annual rate of 2.5 percent of the Company's committed equity capital (regardless of when or if the capital is called) as of the last day of each fiscal quarter in a two-year period commencing with the first capital closing, which took place on June 29, 2010. Following this two-year period, Management Fees are calculated and paid at the end of each quarter at an annual rate of 2.5 percent of the Fund's total assets (including amounts derived from borrowed funds) as of the last day of each quarter.
Risks Related to Cyber Security. As the Fund and its service providers reliance on technology has increased, so have the risks posed to their information systems, both internally and those used by the service providers. The Fund and its service providers are susceptible to cyber security risks that include, among other things, theft, unauthorized monitoring, release, misuse, loss, destruction or corruption of confidential and highly restricted data; denial of service attacks; unauthorized access to relevant systems; compromises to networks or devices that the Fund and its service providers use to service the Fund’s operations; or operational disruption or failures in the

7



physical infrastructure or operating systems that support the Fund and its service providers. Cyber attacks against or security breakdowns of the Fund or its service providers may adversely impact the Fund and its shareholders, potentially resulting in, among other things, financial losses; the inability of Fund shareholders to transact business and the Fund to process transactions; inability to calculate a Portfolio’s NAV; violations of applicable privacy and other laws; regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs; and/or additional compliance costs. The Fund may incur additional costs for cyber security risk management and remediation purposes. In addition, cyber security risks may also impact issuers of securities in which a Portfolio invests, which may cause a Portfolio’s investment in such issuers to lose value. There can be no assurance that the Fund or its service providers will not suffer losses relating to cyber attacks or other information security breaches in the future.

INVESTMENT RISKS

International Investments.  The Fund could invest up to, but not more than, 30% of its total assets in foreign based companies. Foreign investments are subject to most of the same risks as domestic investments, as well as the political, economic and other uncertainties associated with foreign activities, including the risk of war and political unrest, the impact of laws and policies of foreign governments and the United States affecting foreign investment, and the possibility of being subject to the jurisdiction of foreign courts in connection with legal disputes and the possible inability to subject foreign persons to the jurisdiction of courts in the United States. Furthermore, there may be practical and local law impediments to cost-effective recovery against collateral located in a foreign country. Moreover, it is possible that taxes may be required to be withheld by the foreign company on dividend and interest payments received by the Fund with respect to such foreign investments. Although capital gains derived by the Fund with respect to such investments in such foreign company may often be exempt from non-U.S. income or withholding taxes, the treatment of capital gains varies among jurisdictions. If the income from such foreign investments is subject to non-U.S. income or withholding taxes, the Fund will attempt to negotiate offsetting gross-up payments from the foreign-based company. No assurances, however, can be given that the Fund would be able to negotiate such offsetting payments.

Foreign Currency & Exchange Rate Risks. Fund assets and income may be denominated in various currencies. Contributions and distributions, however, will be denominated in U.S. dollars. As a result, the return of the Fund on any investment may be adversely affected by fluctuations in currency exchange rates, any future imposed devaluations of local currencies, inflationary pressures, and the success of the investment itself. In addition, the Fund may incur costs in connection with conversions between various currencies.

Accounting & Disclosure Standards. Accounting, auditing, financial, and other reporting standards, practices, and disclosure requirements in countries in which the Fund may invest are not necessarily equivalent to those required under United States Generally Accepted Accounting Principles ("US GAAP"). Accordingly, less information may be available to investors.

Credit Risks.  Most of the companies with which the Fund will enter into financing transactions will not have achieved profitability, may experience substantial fluctuations in their operating results or, in many cases, will not have significant operating revenues. The ability of any borrower to meet its obligations to the Fund, therefore, will depend to a significant extent on the willingness of such borrower’s venture capital equity investors or outside investors to provide additional equity financing, which in turn will depend on the borrower’s success in meeting its business plan, the market climate for venture capital investments generally, and many other factors. The companies to which the Fund will provide financing will frequently be engaged in the development of new products or technologies, and the success of these efforts, or the ability of the companies to successfully manufacture or market products or technologies developed, cannot be assured. These companies frequently face intense competition, including competition from companies with greater resources, and may face risks of product or technological obsolescence, non-acceptance in the market, or rapidly changing regulatory environments, any of which could adversely affect their prospects. The success of such companies often depends on the management talents and efforts of one person or small group of persons whose death, disability or resignation would adversely affect the company.

Remedies Upon Default.  In the event of a default on a portfolio loan, the available remedies to the Fund would include legal action against the borrower and foreclosure or repossession of collateral given by the borrower. The Fund could experience significant delays in exercising its rights as a secured lender, and might incur substantial costs in taking possession of and liquidating its collateral and in taking other steps to protect its investment. The Fund generally will require that it have a first priority security interest in any equipment of a borrower financed with the proceeds of the Fund’s loans, although that security interest may extend to the borrower’s other assets in which another lender might have a senior or parity security interest. It is anticipated that the Fund will make loans to a borrower that has one or more other secured lenders. In such circumstances, the Fund may share all or a portion of its collateral with the other lender(s) and will enter into intercreditor agreements governing the respective rights of the Fund and such other lender(s), which could limit the Fund’s flexibility in pursuing its remedies as a secured creditor, and reduce the proceeds realized from foreclosing or taking possession of the collateral. In the case of growth capital or working capital loans (where the loan proceeds can be used by the company for general corporate purposes), the Fund will typically receive either a broader lien on substantially all of the borrower’s assets, including its intellectual property, or a lien on substantially all of the borrower’s assets, excluding intellectual property, and a negative pledge on such intellectual property.

As noted above, the Fund may utilize certain of its funds in investments that involve the financing of equipment assets. Equipment assets are often subject to rapid depreciation or obsolescence such that it is likely the value of the assets underlying a loan to finance such assets will depreciate during the term of the loan transaction below the amount of the borrower’s obligations. In addition, although borrowers will be required under the transaction documents to provide customary insurance for the assets underlying a loan, and will be prohibited from disposing of the assets without the Fund’s consent, compliance with these covenants cannot be assured and, in the event of non-compliance, the assets could become unavailable to the Fund due to destruction, theft, sale or other circumstances. Realization of value from intellectual property collateral can also be time consuming and present special challenges, given the often unique nature and limited market for such assets. The Fund’s ability to obtain payment beyond the collateral underlying the loan from the borrower might be limited by bankruptcy or

8



similar laws affecting creditors’ rights. In limited instances where the Fund takes security interests in a borrower’s assets located in a foreign country, there may be practical and local law impediments to cost-effective recovery against such collateral. Therefore, there can be no assurance that the Fund would ultimately collect the full amount owed on a defaulted loan.

Emerging Company Risks. The possibility that the companies in which the Fund invests will not be able to commercialize their technology or product concept presents significant risk. Additionally, although some of such companies may already have a commercially successful product or product line at the time of investment, technology products and services often have a more limited market or life span than products in other industries. Thus, the ultimate success of these companies may depend on their ability to continually innovate in increasingly competitive markets. Most of the companies in which the Fund invests will require substantial additional equity financing to satisfy their continuing growth and working capital requirements. Each round of venture financing is typically intended to provide a company with enough capital to reach the next stage of development. The circumstances or market conditions under which such companies will seek additional capital is unpredictable. It is possible that certain of such companies will not be able to raise additional financing or may be able to do so only at a price or on terms which are unfavorable.

Privately-held Company Risks.  The Fund invests primarily in privately-held companies. Generally, very little public information exists about these companies and the Fund required to rely on the ability of the Manager to obtain adequate information to evaluate the potential returns from investing in these companies. Moreover, these companies typically depend upon the management talents and efforts of a small group of individuals and the loss of one or more of these individuals could have a significant impact on the investment returns from a particular company. Also, these companies frequently have less diverse product lines and smaller market presence than larger companies. They are thus generally more vulnerable to economic downturns and may experience substantial variations in operating results.

Due diligence risks. Before making investments, the Manager intends to conduct a limited amount of due diligence that it deems reasonable and appropriate based on the facts and circumstances applicable to each investment. When conducting due diligence and making an assessment regarding an investment, the Manager will be required to rely on resources available to it, including information provided by the target of the investment and, in some circumstances, third party investigations. The due diligence process may at times be subjective with respect to newly organized companies for which only limited information is available. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that the due diligence investigation that the Manager will carry out with respect to any investment opportunity will reveal or highlight all relevant facts that may be necessary or helpful in evaluating such investment opportunity. Further, there can be no assurance that such an investigation will result in an investment being successful.

Financial Markets Risks. The ability of the Fund to provide an acceptable return may be adversely affected by economic factors to which the market place is subject. Volatility in the global financial markets reached unprecedented levels during 2008 and 2009, and these volatile conditions continued for some period thereafter (albeit to a lesser extent) and may recur into the future. This market turmoil could have a material adverse effect on the Fund’s business and operations. The tightening of the credit markets could impair the Fund’s ability to either acquire or utilize leverage to maximize the return it achieves on investments.

Market conditions could also adversely impact the ability of the Fund’s borrowers to meet their obligations to the Fund and the value of the Fund’s direct investments in companies. Most of the companies in which the Fund will invest will not have achieved profitability and will require substantial equity financing to satisfy their continuing growth and working capital requirements. The economic downturn could decrease the demand for such borrower’s products and technology, thereby impairing such borrower’s financial condition and ability to raise additional equity financing from outside investors. Should these events occur, there could be an increase in borrower defaults under their obligations to the Fund, or a decrease in the value of the Fund’s direct equity investments.

Other Global Economic Risks.  In addition to the crisis in the financial markets discussed above, the ability of the Fund to provide an acceptable return may be adversely affected by other economic and business factors to which the U.S. market place is subject. These factors, which generally are beyond the control of the Manager, include: general economic conditions, such as inflation and fluctuations in general business conditions; the impact of terrorist attacks against the United States or any other country in which the Fund may make loans; the effects of strikes, labor disputes and foreign political unrest; and uncertainty in the U.S. economy.

Speculative Nature of Warrants and Equity Investments.  The value of the warrants that the Fund generally will receive and distribute to its shareholder in connection with its financing investments is dependent on the value of the equity securities for which the warrants can be exercised. The value of such warrants, direct equity investments, and equities received upon conversion of debt instruments is dependent primarily on the success of the company’s business strategy and the growth of its earnings, but also depends on general economic and equity market conditions. The prospects for achieving consistent profitability in the case of many companies in which the Fund invests are speculative. The warrants, equity securities for which the warrants can be exercised, direct equity investments, and equities received upon conversion of debt instruments generally will be restricted securities that cannot readily be sold for some period of time. If the value of the equity securities underlying a warrant does not increase above the exercise price during the life of the warrant, the Fund would permit the warrant to expire unexercised and the warrant would then have no value.

Illiquidity of Investments.  Substantially all of the Fund's portfolio investments (other than short-term investments) will consist of securities that, at the time of acquisition, are subject to restrictions on sale and for which no ready market will exist. Restricted securities cannot be sold publicly without prior agreement with the issuer to register the securities under the 1933 Act, or by selling such securities under Rule 144 or other provisions of the 1933 Act which permit only limited sales under specified conditions. Venture loans and equity investments are privately negotiated transactions, and there is no established trading market in which such loans and equity investments can be sold. Convertible and subordinated debt investments may also be privately negotiated transactions. In the case of warrants or equity

9



securities, the Fund generally will realize the value of such securities only if the issuer is able to make an initial public offering of its shares, or enters into a business combination with another company which purchases the Fund’s warrants or equity securities or exchanges them for publicly-traded securities of the acquiror. The feasibility of such transactions depends upon the entity’s financial results as well as general economic and equity market conditions. In the past, crises in the financial markets have dramatically reduced the volume of initial public offerings and mergers and acquisitions in the market place. If such a crisis recurs, the Fund’s ability to realize liquidity through its investments would likely be impaired. Furthermore, even if the restricted warrants or equity securities owned become publicly-traded, the Fund’s ability to sell such securities may be limited by the lack (or limited nature) of a trading market for such securities. If the Fund holds material nonpublic information regarding the issuer of the securities, the Fund’s ability to sell such securities may also be limited by insider trading laws. When restricted securities are sold to the public, the Fund, under certain circumstances, may be deemed an “underwriter” or a controlling person with respect thereto for the purposes of the 1933 Act, and be subject to liabilities as such under that Act.

Because of the illiquidity of the Fund’s investments, most of its assets will be carried at fair value as determined by the Manager, in accordance with the Fund' policy, as approved by the Fund's Board of Directors. This value will not necessarily reflect the amount ultimately realized upon a sale of the assets.

Non-Diversified Status.  The Fund is classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the 1940 Act.  The Fund intends to continue to qualify as a RIC under the Internal Revenue Code and will thereafter seek to continually meet the diversification standards thereunder. Nevertheless, the Fund’s assets may be subject to a greater risk of loss than if its investments were more widely diversified.

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

Transactions with Fund V.  The Manager also served as investment manager for Venture Lending & Leasing V, Inc.
("Fund V"), which was dissolved on August 6, 2014 and no longer funds any commitments. Previously, the Fund allocated the amount of each Investment 50% to the Fund and 50% to Fund V. After February 2011, Fund V was no longer permitted to enter into new commitments to borrowers. As of June 30, 2014, the Fund was no longer permitted to enter into new commitments to borrowers. All commitments by the Fund to borrowers are now expired.

To the extent that clients, other than Fund V, advised by the Manager (but in which the Manager has no proprietary interest) invest in opportunities available to the Fund, the Manager will allocate such opportunities among the Fund and such other clients in a manner deemed fair and equitable considering all of the circumstances in accordance with procedures approved by the Fund's Board of Directors (including a majority of the disinterested directors).

Transactions with Fund VII.  The Manager also serves as investment manager for Venture Lending & Leasing VII, Inc. ("Fund VII"). The Fund's Board of Directors determined that so long as the Fund has capital available to invest in loan transactions with final maturities earlier than December 31, 2020 (the date on which the Fund will be dissolved), the Fund will, provided it is still in its commitment period, invest in each portfolio company in which Fund VII invests (“Investments”). Initially the amount of each Investment had been allocated 50% to the Fund and 50% to Fund VII so long as the Fund had capital available to invest. As of June 30, 2014, the Fund was no longer permitted to enter into new commitments to borrowers. All commitments by the Fund to borrowers are now expired.

To the extent that clients, other than Fund VII, advised by the Manager (but in which the Manager has no proprietary interest)
invest in opportunities available to the Fund, the Manager will allocate such opportunities among the Fund and such other clients in a manner
deemed fair and equitable considering all of the circumstances in accordance with procedures approved by the Fund's Board of Directors
(including a majority of the disinterested directors).

Intercreditor Agreements.  In each transaction in which both the Fund and either Fund V or Fund VII (or the Fund and a successor fund) invest or in which the other lender has either invested or may later invest (or in the event a successor fund is raised, in which the Fund and the successor fund invest), it is expected that the Fund and Fund V or Fund VII (or the Fund and the successor fund as the case may be) will enter into an intercreditor agreement pursuant to which the Fund and Fund V or Fund VII (or the Fund and a successor fund) will cooperate in pursuing their remedies following a default by the common borrower.  Generally, under such intercreditor agreements, each party would agree that its security interest would be treated in parity with the security interest of the other party, regardless of which security interest would have priority under applicable law.  Accordingly, proceeds realized from the sale of any collateral or the exercise of any other creditor's rights will be allocated between the Fund and Fund V or Fund VII (or the Fund and a successor fund) pro rata in accordance with the amounts of their respective investments.  An exception to the foregoing arrangement would occur in situations where, for example, one of the lenders financed specific items of equipment collateral; in that case, usually the lender who financed the specific assets will have a senior lien on that asset, and the other lender will have a junior priority lien (even though they may ratably share liens of equal priority on other assets of the common borrower).  

As a result of such intercreditor agreements, the Fund may have less flexibility in pursuing its remedies following a default than it would have had there been no intercreditor agreement, and the Fund may realize fewer proceeds.  In addition, because the Fund and Fund V or Fund VII (or the Fund and a successor fund) invest or invested at the same time in the same borrower, such borrower would be required to service two loans rather than one.  Any additional administrative costs or burdens resulting there from may make the Fund a less attractive lender, and may make it more difficult for the Fund to acquire such loans.
Effect of Borrowings.  During the first two years of the Fund's investment operations, the Management Fee was calculated with reference to the committed equity capital of the Company, regardless of when or if all of such capital is called.  Thereafter, the Management

10



Fee is computed and paid quarterly, at an annual rate of 2.5% of the total value of the Fund's assets (including amounts derived from borrowed funds) as of the last day of each such fiscal quarter.  Therefore, decisions by the Manager to cause the Fund to borrow additional funds may increase the quarterly fees payable to the Manager.  The Fund's overall borrowing limits, however, are set by the Fund's Board of Directors in light of its fiduciary obligations. The Fund no longer has a debt facility and does not anticipate acquiring one.

Valuation. The manager is responsible for valuing the Fund’s assets and liabilities, subject to oversight by the Fund's Board of Directors in the case of the Fund and has an inherent conflict in performing this function. The Fund does not intend to engage an independent valuation agent to value its assets and therefore is entirely reliant upon the Manager and its delegates for valuing the assets. There is a conflict in that the Manager will have an incentive to increase the value of the assets for its performance record and to increase the Investment Management Fees that it receives.
Indemnification and Exculpation.  The organizational documents of the Fund provide for indemnification of directors, officers, employees, advisory board members and agents (including the Manager) of the Fund, generally to the full extent permitted by applicable state law and the 1940 Act, including the advance of expenses and reasonable counsel fees.  The charter of the Fund also contains a provision eliminating personal liability of a Fund director or officer to the Fund or its stockholder for money damages, subject to specified exceptions. In addition, the Fund has entered into an indemnification agreement with its directors and officers. A successful claim for indemnification, including payment of any expenses and counsel fees, would reduce the Fund’s assets by the amounts paid. Furthermore, Fund assets are used to obtain insurance policies that generally protect the Fund's directors and officers from personal liability for actions taken in their roles as the Fund's directors and officers.
Disinterested Directors and Advisory Board Members. The members of the Fund’s Board of Directors will overlap with the members of the Company’s advisory board, with the members of the Company’s advisory board being the same as, or a subset of, the disinterested directors of the Fund. Although the manager expects that, given the Company’s 100% ownership of the Fund, the interests of the two entities will not diverge, it is conceivable that a conflict of interest could exist between the Fund and the Company. In addition, as compensation for services, the disinterested directors will receive an annual fee of $20,000 (plus $1,000 per meeting attended in person and an additional $10,000 for the chair of the Audit Committee), and any change to the compensation to be paid to the disinterested directors will be determined by the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee of the Fund’s Board of Directors. Upon the liquidation of the Fund, the disinterested advisory board members will receive an annual fee in an amount determined by the Member (it is currently anticipated that such annual amount shall be $10,000). The disinterested directors and advisory board members will also be reimbursed for certain expenses. The payment of such fees may limit the objectivity and independence of the disinterested directors and the advisory board members on behalf of the Members.
Personal Trading. The Manager has a code of ethics that contains personal securities trading procedures that apply to its “access persons.” Access persons are required to report if they have an investment in a company in which the Fund is considering making an investment. Pre-approval is required before an access person may buy or sell securities in an initial public offering, private placement, or any security listed on a “restricted list” maintained by the Manager.

Interests in Potential Portfolio Companies. The officers, principals and employees of the Manager may be passive investors in companies in which the Fund is considering an investment, either directly or indirectly through an investment in a venture capital fund that, in turn, is an investor in such a company. The officers, principals and employees of the Manager may recommend that the Fund invests in a company in which such person may serve as a director or advisor. Such a relationship presents potential conflicts of interest in that the relationship could provide the principal or employee with an incentive to influence the Manager's decision to recommend an investment in the company in question. There is also a potential conflict of interest in such principal or employee could use information acquired through association with the Manager to influence or benefit his or her personal investment. The Manager addresses these potential conflicts through its policies and procedures that are designed to insulate its investment decision-making process from these incentives. For example, the policies require that principals with a prior direct investment in a company be recused from the investment decision-making process with respect to that company.

Principals that serve as advisors to unaffiliated funds may make investment recommendations to these unaffiliated funds, which may be the same investment that the Fund has made or may make. The Manager's policies and procedures require such principals to first offer an investment opportunity to the Fund prior to offering such opportunity to an unaffiliated fund.
ITEM 1B.  
UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.
    
On February 1, 2016, the Fund filed a letter with the Division of the Investment Management that was intended to respond to their comments.
ITEM 2.
PROPERTIES.
All of the Fund's office space is provided by the Manager.


11



ITEM 3.
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.
The Fund is not a party to any material legal proceedings.
ITEM 4.
MINE SAFETY ISSUES.
Not applicable

PART II.
ITEM 5.
MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON STOCK AND RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS.
The Fund's Common Stock is not listed on any securities exchange, and all holders of the Fund's Common Stock are subject to agreements significantly restricting the transferability of their shares.
The number of holders of record of the Fund's Common Stock at March 15, 2017 was 1.
The Fund has a policy of distributing securities as acquired.  The Fund values these securities at fair value at the time of acquisition in accordance with the Fund's policy on valuation detailed in Note 2 to the financial statements.  In addition, some expenses of the Company may be paid by the Fund, and will be deemed as distributions to the Company.  The Fund has established a policy of declaring dividends on a quarterly basis to the extent that taxable income of the fund less applicable reserves exceeds warrant distributions and deemed distributions.  As of December 31, 2016, the Fund had distributed $324.4 million to date to its shareholder, of which $263.6 million was in cash.

12



ITEM 6.    SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA.
The following table summarizes certain financial data and should be read in conjunction with the “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this Form 10-K. The selected financial data set forth below have been derived from the audited financial statements.
 
For the Year Ended December 31
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
Statement of Operations Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Investment income:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest on loans
$
8,620,247

 
$
27,798,922

 
$
49,218,072

 
$
59,366,653

 
$
43,739,317

Other interest and other income
9,909

 
60,438

 
401,840

 
100,285

 
186,205

Total investment income
8,630,156

 
27,859,360

 
49,619,912

 
59,466,938

 
43,925,522

Expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Management fees
1,219,550

 
3,663,506

 
7,004,350

 
8,435,598

 
7,615,663

Interest expense
762,506

 
2,339,888

 
4,301,581

 
4,801,009

 
4,161,447

Banking and professional fees
387,269

 
550,018

 
475,184

 
549,267

 
350,339

Other operating expenses
129,703

 
142,009

 
217,273

 
167,085

 
142,283

Total expenses
2,499,028

 
6,695,421

 
11,998,388

 
13,952,959

 
12,269,732

Net investment income
6,131,128

 
21,163,939

 
37,621,524

 
45,513,979

 
31,655,790

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net realized loss from investments
(6,436,828
)
 
(9,752,799
)
 
(2,687,141
)
 
(4,701,647
)
 
(2,061,637
)
Net change in unrealized gain (loss) from investments
729,331

 
(1,912,379
)
 
(9,471
)
 
(6,254,917
)
 
(3,845,263
)
Net realized and change in unrealized gain (loss) from investments
(5,707,497
)
 
(11,665,178
)
 
(2,696,612
)
 
(10,956,564
)
 
(5,906,900
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net increase in net assets resulting from operations
$
423,631

 
$
9,498,761

 
$
34,924,912

 
$
34,557,415

 
$
25,748,890

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AMOUNTS PER COMMON SHARE:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net increase in net assets resulting from operations
$
4.24

 
$
94.99

 
$
349.25

 
$
345.57

 
$
257.49

Weighted average shares outstanding
100,000

 
100,000

 
100,000

 
100,000

 
100,000

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
As of December 31,
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
Balance sheet data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Loans
$
24,246,739

 
$
95,005,982

 
$
227,745,693

 
$
293,800,885

 
$
313,848,702

Net assets
$
27,142,734

 
$
58,505,200

 
$
137,015,488

 
$
194,365,857

 
$
195,928,871

ITEM 7.
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.
Overview
The Fund is a financial services company providing financing and advisory services to a variety of carefully selected venture-backed companies primarily throughout the United States with a focus on growth oriented companies. The Fund’s portfolio is well diversified and consists of companies in the communications, information services, media, and technology, including software and technology-enabled business services, bio-technology, and medical devices industry sectors, among others. The Fund’s capital is generally used by portfolio companies to finance acquisitions of fixed assets and working capital. On June 29, 2010, the Fund completed its first closing of capital, made its first investment, and became a non-diversified, closed-end investment company that elected to be treated as a business development company (a "BDC") under the Investment Company Act of 1940. The Fund elected to be treated for federal income tax purposes as a

13



regulated investment company ("RIC") under the Internal Revenue Code with the filing of its federal corporate income tax return for 2010. Pursuant to this election, the Fund generally will not have to pay corporate-level taxes on any income distributed to our shareholder as dividends, allowing the Fund to substantially reduce or eliminate its corporate-level tax liability.

The Fund will seek to meet the ongoing requirements, including the diversification requirements, to qualify as a RIC under the Internal Revenue Code. If the Fund fails to meet these requirements, it will be taxed as an ordinary corporation on its taxable income for that year (even if that income is distributed to the Company) and all distributions out of its earnings and profits will be taxable to the Members of the Company as ordinary income; thus, such income will be subject to a double layer of tax. There is no assurance that the Fund will meet the ongoing requirements to qualify as a RIC for tax purposes.

The Fund's investment objective is to achieve a superior risk adjusted investment returns. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by providing debt financing to portfolio companies. Since inception, the Fund's investing activities have focused primarily on private debt securities. The Fund generally receives warrants to acquire equity securities in connection with its portfolio investments. The Fund generally distributes these warrants to its shareholder upon receipt. The Fund also has guidelines for the percentages of total assets which will be invested in different types of assets.

The portfolio investments of the Fund will primarily consist of debt financing to venture capital backed technology companies. The borrower's ability to repay its loans may be adversely impacted by a number of factors, and as a result, the loan may not fully be repaid. Furthermore, the Fund's security interest in any collateral over the borrower's assets may be insufficient to make up any shortfall in payments.
CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Critical Accounting Policies and Practices are those accounting policies and practices that are both the most important to the portrayal of the Fund’s net assets and results of operations and require the most difficult, subjective or complex judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain. Critical accounting estimates are accounting estimates where the nature of the estimates are material due to the levels of subjectivity and judgment necessary to account for highly uncertain matters or the susceptibility of such matters to change and the impact of the estimates of the on net assets or operating performance is material.
The Manager has identified the most critical accounting policies and estimates to be the estimate of the fair value of the Fund’s loan investments. The Fund defines fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date; that is, an exit price. The exit price assumes the asset or liability was exchanged in an orderly transaction; it was not a forced liquidation or distressed sale. There is no secondary market for the loans made by the Fund to borrowers, hence Management determines fair value based on hypothetical market and the estimates are subject to high levels of judgment and uncertainty. The Fund’s loan investments are considered Level 3 fair value measurements in the fair value hierarchy due to the lack of observability over many of the important inputs used in determining fair value.
Critical judgments and inputs in determining the fair value of a loan include payment history, available cash and “burn rate,” revenues, net income or loss, operating results, financial strength of borrower, prospects for the borrower's raising future equity rounds, likelihood of sale or acquisition of the borrower, length of expected holding period of the loan, collateral position, the timing and amount of liquidation of collateral for loans that are experiencing significant credit deterioration and collection becomes collateral dependent as well as an evaluation of the general interest rate environment. Management has evaluated these factors and has concluded that the effect of a deterioration in the quality of the underlying collateral, increase in the size of the loan, increase in the estimated time to recovery, and increase in the hypothetical market coupon rate would have the effect of decreasing the fair value of loan investments. The risk profile of a loan changes when events occur that impact the credit analysis of the borrower and the loan. Such changes result in the fair value being adjusted from par value of the individual loan. Where the risk profile is consistent with the original underwriting, the par value of the loan often approximates fair value.
The actual value of the loans may differ from management’s estimates, which would affect net change in net assets resulting from operations as well as assets.    
Results of Operations – For the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014
    
Total investment income for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014 was $8.6 million, $27.9 million and $49.6 million respectively, which primarily consisted of interest on venture loans outstanding. The remaining income consisted of interest and dividends on the temporary investment of cash, and other income from commitment fees and unamortized warrants. The average gross outstanding performing loans calculated on a monthly basis was $47.2 million, $146.2 million and $261.2 million as of December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014 respectively. The average interest rate on gross outstanding performing loans was 17.26%, 18.44% and 18.68% for the year ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014 respectively. Interest is calculated using the effective interest method, and rates earned by the Fund will fluctuate based on many factors including early payoffs, volatility of values ascribed to warrants, and new loans funded during the year. Interest income continued to decrease as performing loans continued to decrease.
Expenses for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014 were $2.5 million, $6.7 million and $12.0 million respectively. Management fees were calculated based on the Company’s committed capital for the first two years of the Fund’s life and thereafter as a percentage of Fund assets. Management fees for the Fund were $1.2 million, $3.7 million and $7.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014 respectively. Management fees decreased in 2016 due to the decline in assets under management.

14



Total interest expense was $0.8 million, $2.3 million and $4.3 million for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively. Interest expense decreased in 2016 due to a decrease in average debt outstanding to $0.8 million in 2016, from $69.7 million in 2015 and $119.9 million in 2014. This decrease also because of the decrease in the interest rate to 3.03% in 2016 from 3.36% in 2015 and 3.59% in 2014. The Fund entered into agreements with Union Bank, N.A. that established a secured revolving loan facility on January 14, 2011. The facility was terminated in August 2016 (see Note 7).
The banking and professional fees were $0.4 million, $0.6 million and $0.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively. The banking and professional fees was comprised of legal, audit and other professional fees. These fees remained similar in 2016, 2015 and 2014.
Other operating expenses were $0.1 million $0.1 million, and $0.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively. These expenses included director fees, custody fee, tax fees, and other expenses related to the operation of the Fund.

Net investment income for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014 was $6.1 million, $21.2 million and $37.6 million, respectively.

Total net realized loss from investments was $6.4 million, $9.8 million and $2.0 million for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively. Net realized loss amounts are net of recoveries of previously written off loans.

Net change in unrealized gain (loss) from investments was $0.7 million, $(1.9) million and $(0.8) million for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively.  The unrealized loss consists of fair value adjustments taken to estimate the fair value decline as a result of deterioration in the underlying companies .  

Net realized loss from hedging activities was $0.0 million for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, and $0.7 million for the years ended December 31, 2014. Net change in unrealized gain (loss) from hedging activities was less than $0.1 million, less than $(0.1) million and $0.8 million for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively. The realized and change in unrealized loss from hedging activities consists of the unrealized losses from hedging activities and the net interest received or paid on the interest rate swap transaction as well as interest rate cap transactions. The Fund entered into an interest rate swap transaction with Union Bank, N.A. to convert floating rate liabilities to fixed rates on February 18, 2011 and entered into an additional interest rate swap transaction with Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. on June 26, 2012. Both interest rate swap transactions terminated on September 23, 2014 (see Note 9). On September 30, 2014, the Fund entered into interest rate cap transactions with MUFG Union Bank, N.A and Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. to cap the floating rate liabilities at a fixed rate (see Note 10).
Net increase in net assets resulting from operations for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014 was $0.4 million, $9.5 million and $34.9 million, respectively. On a per share basis, for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, there was a net increase in net assets resulting from operations of $4.24, $94.99 and $349.25.
Liquidity and Capital Resources - December 31, 2016 and 2015
The Fund is owned entirely by the Company. The Company is expected, but not required, to make further contributions to the capital of the Fund to the extent of the Company’s members’ capital commitment to the Company and excess cash balances. As of December 31, 2016 the Company had received subscriptions for capital in the amount of $294.0 million, of which $279.3 million had been called and received. The remaining $14.7 million in uncalled committed capital as of December 31, 2016 expired in June 2015 as the five year anniversary passed. No further capital can be called.
As of December 31, 2016 and 2015, 11% and 3%, respectively, of the Fund’s assets consisted of cash and cash equivalents. The Fund invested its assets in venture loans during 2016. No loan was disbursed under the Fund’s loan commitments for the year ended December 31, 2016. Net loan amounts outstanding after amortization and valuation adjustment were approximately $24.2 million as of December 31, 2016. There were no unexpired, unfunded commitments as of December 31, 2016.
Year Ended
Cumulative Amount Disbursed
Principal Amortization and Fair Market Adjustment
Balance Outstanding– Fair Value
Unexpired
Unfunded Commitments
December 31, 2016
$715.4 million
$691.2 million
$24.2 million
$0 million
December 31, 2015
$715.4 million
$620.4 million
$95.0 million
$1.8 million
Because venture loans are privately negotiated transactions, investments in these assets are relatively illiquid. It is the Fund’s experience that not all unfunded commitments will be used by borrowers.
The Fund seeks to meet the requirements to qualify for the special pass-through status available to RICs under the Internal Revenue Code, and thus to be relieved of federal income tax on that part of its net investment income and realized capital gains that it distributes to its shareholder. To qualify as a RIC, the Fund must distribute to its shareholder for each taxable year at least 90% of its investment company taxable income (consisting generally of net investment income and net short-term capital gain) (“Distribution Requirement”). To the extent that the terms of the Fund’s venture loans provide for the receipt by the Fund of additional interest at the end of the loan term or provide for

15



the receipt by the Fund of a purchase price for the asset at the end of the loan term (“residual income”), the Fund would be required to accrue such residual income over the life of the loan, and to include such accrued income in its gross income for each taxable year even if it receives no portion of such residual income in that year. Thus, in order to meet the Distribution Requirement and avoid payment of income taxes or an excise tax on undistributed income, the Fund may be required in a particular year to distribute as a dividend an amount in excess of the total amount of income it actually receives. Those distributions will be made from the Fund's cash assets, from amounts received through amortization of loans or from borrowed funds.
The Fund established a secured revolving loan facility in an amount of up to $160 million with Union Bank, N.A., Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. and Bank Leumi USA on September 23, 2011 (the "Loan Agreement").  The Loan Agreement was extended on September 23, 2014 and then amended and restated in its entirely on September 30, 2014, reducing the size to $120 million, and securing an initial 12-month revolver plan and a subsequent 18-month amortized repayment plan. Amounts borrowed under the Loan Agreement may be, at the option of the Fund, either Reference Rate loans (as defined in the Loan Agreement) or LIBOR loans. The facility was paid off and the Fund terminated the facility on August 5, 2016.
The Fund has adequate cash reserves and approximately $14.2 million in scheduled loan receivable payments over the next year.  These amounts are sufficient to meet the operational expenses of the Fund over the next year.  Since the Fund is no longer funding new loans, liquidity demands will continue to decrease.  The Fund no longer needs to borrow as the Fund has sufficient cash on hand and from operations to meet the Fund’s foreseeable cash needs.

ITEM 7A .    Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
The Fund's business activities contain elements of risk. The Fund considers the principal types of market risk to be interest rate risk and valuation risk. The Fund considers the management of risk essential to conducting its business and to maintaining profitability. Accordingly, the Fund's risk management procedures are designed to identify and analyze the Fund's risks, to set appropriate policies and limits and to continually monitor these risks and limits by means of reliable administrative and information systems and other policies and programs.
The Fund manages its market risk by maintaining a portfolio that is diverse by industry, size of investment, stage of development, and borrower. The Fund has limited exposure to public market price fluctuations as the Fund primarily invests in private business enterprises and the Fund distributes all equity investments upon receipt to the Company.
The Fund's sensitivity to changes in interest rates is regularly monitored and analyzed by measuring the characteristics of assets and liabilities. The Fund utilizes various methods to assess interest rate risk in terms of the potential effect on interest income net of interest expense, the value of net assets and the value at risk in an effort to ensure that the Fund is insulated from any significant adverse effects from changes in interest rates. The Fund terminated the debt facility on August 5, 2016. At December 31, 2016, the outstanding debt balance was $0.0 million.
The Fund has a small interest cap agreement in place which will pay the Fund if monthly LIBOR rate exceeds 0.7%. The interest rate cap agreement will expire in March 2017.
ITEM 8.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
Quarterly Results
This information has been derived from unaudited financial statements that, in the opinion of management, include all normal recurring adjustments necessary for a fair presentation of such information.  The operating results for any quarter are not necessarily indicative of results for any future year.  The format of the statements have been modified, thus certain numbers have been combined in order to fit the format of the statements.  Prior to commencing its operations on June 29, 2010, the Fund had no operations other than the sale to the Company of 100,000 shares of common stock, $0.001 par value for $25,000 in January 2010.  This issuance of stock was a requirement in order to apply for a finance lender's license from the California Commissioner of Corporations, which was obtained on April 13, 2010.

16



December 31, 2016 (Unaudited)

 
Quarterly Information for the Three Months Ended
 
March 31, 2016
 
June 30, 2016
 
September 30, 2016
 
December 31, 2016
Investment Income:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest on loans
$
3,102,628

 
$
2,557,302

 
$
1,620,261

 
$
1,340,056

Other interest and other income
3,722

 
2,426

 
1,572

 
2,189

Total investment income
3,106,350

 
2,559,728

 
1,621,833

 
1,342,245

Expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Management fees
460,152

 
349,066

 
237,406

 
172,926

Interest expense
340,074

 
247,114

 
152,318

 
23,000

Banking and professional fees
88,232

 
108,216

 
76,779

 
114,042

Other operating expenses
24,598

 
28,474

 
26,322

 
50,309

Total expenses
913,056

 
732,870

 
492,825

 
360,277

Net investment income
2,193,294

 
1,826,858

 
1,129,008

 
981,968

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net realized loss from investments
(1,042,091
)
 
7,960

 
(3,934,382
)
 
(1,468,315
)
Net change in unrealized gain (loss) from investments
(164,659
)
 
(3,187,001
)
 
3,604,113

 
408,729

Net change in unrealized gain (loss) from hedging activities
4,393

 
18,655

 
21,838

 
23,263

Net realized and change in unrealized gain (loss) from investment and hedging activities
$
(1,202,357
)
 
$
(3,160,386
)
 
$
(308,431
)
 
$
(1,036,323
)
Net increase in net assets resulting from operations
$
990,937

 
$
(1,333,528
)
 
$
820,577

 
$
(54,355
)
Amount per common share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net increase in net assets resulting from operations
$
9.91

 
$
(13.34
)
 
$
8.21

 
$
(0.54
)
Weighted average shares outstanding
100,000

 
100,000

 
100,000

 
100,000



17



December 31, 2015 (Unaudited)

 
Quarterly Information for the Three Months Ended
 
March 31, 2015
 
June 30, 2015
 
September 30, 2015
 
December 31, 2015
Investment Income:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest on loans
$
10,291,534

 
$
8,523,890

 
$
5,029,170

 
$
3,954,328

Other interest and other income
58,227

 
1,602

 
248

 
361

Total investment income
10,349,761

 
8,525,492

 
5,029,418

 
3,954,689

Expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Management fees
1,284,958

 
975,207

 
780,587

 
622,754

Interest expense
771,347

 
643,611

 
503,878

 
421,052

Banking and professional fees
154,565

 
93,224

 
91,218

 
211,011

Other operating expenses
26,953

 
15,595

 
29,465

 
69,996

Total expenses
2,237,823

 
1,727,637

 
1,405,148

 
1,324,813

Net investment income
8,111,938

 
6,797,855

 
3,624,270

 
2,629,876

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net realized loss from investments
(1,018,031
)
 
(410,929
)
 
(2,679,239
)
 
(5,644,600
)
Net change in unrealized gain (loss) from investments
(4,522,997
)
 
(4,448,691
)
 
2,331,181

 
4,760,632

Net change in unrealized gain (loss) from hedging activities
(53,383
)
 
1,201

 
(6,876
)
 
26,554

Net realized and change in unrealized gain (loss) from investment and hedging activities
$
(5,594,411
)
 
$
(4,858,419
)
 
$
(354,934
)
 
$
(857,414
)
Net increase in net assets resulting from operations
$
2,517,527

 
$
1,939,436

 
$
3,269,336

 
$
1,772,462

Amount per common share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net increase in net assets resulting from operations
$
25.18

 
$
19.39

 
$
32.69

 
$
17.72

Weighted average shares outstanding
100,000

 
100,000

 
100,000

 
100,000

ITEM 9.
CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE
Not applicable.
ITEM 9A.
CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.
At the end of the period covered by this report, we carried out an evaluation under the supervision and with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures pursuant to Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Based upon that evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that the Fund’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective in ensuring that information required to be disclosed was recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and in providing reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed by the Fund in such reports is accumulated and communicated to the Fund’s management, including its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures.
There have not been any changes in the Fund’s internal control over financial reporting identified in connection with Management’s Report that occurred during the Fund’s fiscal quarter ended December 31, 2016 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the Fund’s internal control over financial reporting.
MANAGEMENT’S ANNUAL REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING
Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Exchange Act. Under the supervision of and with the participation of our management,

18



including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission 2013 (“COSO 2013”) updated Internal Control - Integrated Framework. Based on our evaluation under the COSO 2013 Internal Control - Integrated Framework, our management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2016.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements and even when determined to be effective, can only provide reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
This report of management on internal control over financial reporting shall not be deemed to be filed for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 or otherwise subject to the liabilities of that section.
Changes in Internal Controls
There were no significant changes in the Fund's internal controls or in other factors that could significantly affect these controls during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016.
ITEM 9B.
OTHER INFORMATION
Not applicable.

PART III
ITEM 10.
DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT
The following are the executive officers of the Fund.  All officers serve at the pleasure of the Fund's Board.
Name and Position With Fund
Age
Occupation During Past Five Years
Ronald W. Swenson, Chairman, and Director
72
Chairman, Chief Executive Officer, Director, and other positions for Westech Investment Advisors since 1994
Maurice C. Werdegar, President and Chief Executive Officer
52
Chief Executive Officer, President, Chief Operating Officer, Director and other positions for Westech Investment Advisors since 2001
Jay L. Cohan, Vice President, Assistant Secretary
52
Vice President, Assistant Secretary and other positions for Westech Investment Advisors since 1999
Martin D. Eng, Vice President, CFO, Treasurer, and Secretary
65
Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer, Treasurer and Secretary for Westech Investment Advisors since 2005.
David R. Wanek, Vice President
44
Vice President and other positions for Westech Investment Advisors since 2001
The information required by this item concerning the directors of the Fund and Section 16(a) compliance will be contained in the Fund's Proxy Statement filed in connection with the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on May 10, 2017 (“Proxy Statement”) under the captions “Proposal 1 - To Elect Five Directors of the Fund” and “Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance” and is incorporated herein by reference.
The Fund has adopted a Code of Ethics that is applicable to all of its officers.  A free copy of the Code of Ethics may be requested by contacting the Chief Financial Officer of the Fund.  
ITEM 11.
EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
The information required by this item will be contained in the Fund's Proxy Statement under the caption “Proposal 1 - To Elect Five Directors of the Fund” and is incorporated herein by reference.



19



ITEM 12.
SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDERS MATTERS
The information required by this item will be contained in the Fund's Proxy Statement under the caption “Annex A - Beneficial Ownership of Fund Shares” and is incorporated herein by reference.
ITEM 13.    CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE
The information required by this item will be contained in the Fund's Proxy Statement under the captions: “Other Information - Managers” and is incorporated herein by reference.
ITEM 14.    PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES
The information required by this item will be contained in the Fund's Proxy Statement under the captions: “Other Information - Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.”

PART IV.
ITEM 15.
EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES
(a)
1.     Index to Financial Statements and Financial Statement Schedules
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm    
Statements of Assets and Liabilities as of December 31, 2016 and 2015   
Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014
Statements of Changes in Net Assets for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014
Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014
Notes to Financial Statements 
No schedules are required because the required information is not present or not present in amounts sufficient to require submission of the schedule, or because the required information is included in the financial statements and the notes thereto.
(a)
2.    Exhibits
Exhibit    
Exhibit Title
 
 
3(i)
Articles of Incorporation of the Fund as filed with the Maryland Secretary of State on January 11, 2010, incorporated by reference to the Fund's Form 10 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 9, 2010.

 
 
3(ii)
Bylaws of the Fund, incorporated by reference to the Fund's Form 10 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, February 9, 2010.
 
 
4.1
Form of Purchase Agreement between the Fund and the Company, incorporated by reference to the Fund's Registration Statement on Form 10 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 9, 2010.
 
 
10.1
Custodian Agreement between the Fund and Wells Fargo Bank, incorporated by reference to the Fund's 10-K dated March 15, 2012
 
 
10.3
Form of Management Agreement between the Fund, and the Manager, incorporated by reference to the Fund's Registration Statement on Form 10 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 9, 2010.
 
 
31.1 - 32.2
Certifications pursuant to The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Rule 13a-14 and section 1350 Certifications)
 
 


20



Signatures
Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
VENTURE LENDING & LEASING VI, INC.
(Registrant)

By:
/S/Maurice C. Werdegar
 
By:
/S/Martin D. Eng
 
 
Maurice C. Werdegar
 
 
Martin D. Eng
 
 
President and Chief Executive Officer
 
Chief Financial Officer
 
 
Date:  
March 15, 2017
 
Date:
March 15, 2017
 
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.
 
NAME
TITLE
DATE
 
 
 
 
 
 
By:
/S/ William Miller
Director
March 15, 2017
 
 
William R. Miller
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
By:
/S/ Roger V. Smith
Director
March 15, 2017
 
 
Roger V. Smith
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
By:
/S/ Ronald W. Swenson
Chairman & Director
March 15, 2017
 
 
Ronald W. Swenson
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
By:
/S/ Alan Zafran
Director
March 15, 2017
 
 
Alan Zafran
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
By:
/S/ Maurice C. Werdegar
President, CEO & Director
March 15, 2017
 
 
Maurice C. Werdegar
 
 
 


21




REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors and Shareholder of
Venture Lending & Leasing VI, Inc.:

We have audited the accompanying statements of assets and liabilities of Venture Lending & Leasing VI, Inc. (the "Fund"), including the schedules of investments presented in Note 3, as of December 31, 2016 and 2015, and the related statements of operations, changes in net assets and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2016, and the financial highlights (presented in Note 10) for each of the five years in the period then ended. These financial statements and financial highlights are the responsibility of the Fund's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and financial highlights based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements and financial highlights are free of material misstatement. The Fund is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audits included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Fund's internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. Our procedures included confirmation of loans owned as of December 31, 2016 and 2015, by correspondence with the borrowers; where replies were not received, we performed other auditing procedures. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, such financial statements and financial highlights present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Venture Lending & Leasing VI, Inc. as of December 31, 2016 and 2015, and the results of its operations, changes in its net assets and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2016, and the financial highlights for each of the five years in the period then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

As discussed in Note 2, the financial statements include nonmarketable investments valued at $24.2 million (88% of total assets) and $95.0 million (95% of total assets) as of December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively, whose fair values have been estimated by management in the absence of readily determinable fair values. Also discussed in Note 2 is the information used by management in making these estimates.





/s/ Deloitte & Touche LLP
March 15, 2017
San Francisco, California



22



VENTURE LENDING & LEASING VI, INC.
Statements of Assets and Liabilities
As of December 31, 2016 and 2015
 
December 31, 2016
 
December 31, 2015
ASSETS
 
 
 
Investments:
 
 
 
   Loans, at estimated fair value
 
 
 
   (Cost of $37,628,445 and $109,048,869)
$
24,246,739

 
$
95,005,982

   Interest Rate Caps (Cost of $23,000 and $115,000)
1,489

 
$
25,340

Total Investments (Cost of $37,651,445 and $109,163,869)
24,248,228

 
95,031,322

Cash and cash equivalents
2,927,861

 
2,646,011

Other assets
492,013

 
1,963,441

 
 
 
 
Total assets
27,668,102


99,640,774

 
 
 
 
LIABILITIES
 
 
 
Borrowings under debt facility

 
40,400,000

Accrued management fees
172,926

 
622,755

Accounts payable and other accrued liabilities
352,442

 
112,819

 
 
 
 
Total liabilities
525,368

 
41,135,574

 
 
 
 
NET ASSETS
$
27,142,734

 
$
58,505,200

 
 
 
 
Analysis of Net Assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capital paid in on shares of capital stock
$
241,525,000

 
$
241,525,000

Unrealized depreciation on investments
(13,403,217
)
 
(14,132,547
)
Distribution in excess of net investment income
(200,979,049
)
 
(168,887,253
)
Net assets (equivalent to $271.43 and $585.05 per share based on 100,000 shares of capital stock outstanding - See Note 6)
$
27,142,734

 
$
58,505,200

Commitments & Contingent Liabilities:
 
 
 
Unfunded unexpired commitments (See Note 4)
$

 
$
1,750,000




See notes to financial statements.


23



VENTURE LENDING & LEASING VI, INC.
Statements of Operations
For the Years Ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014

 
For the Year Ended
 
For the Year Ended
 
For the Year Ended
 
December 31, 2016
 
December 31, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
INVESTMENT INCOME:
 
 
 
 
 
Interest on loans
$
8,620,247

 
$
27,798,922

 
$
49,218,072

Other interest and other income
9,909

 
60,438

 
401,840

Total investment income
8,630,156

 
27,859,360

 
49,619,912

 
 
 
 
 
 
EXPENSES:
 
 
 
 
 
Management fees
1,219,550

 
3,663,506

 
7,004,350

Interest expense
762,506

 
2,339,888

 
4,301,581

Banking and professional fees
387,269

 
550,018

 
475,184

Other operating expenses
129,703

 
142,009

 
217,273

Total expenses
2,499,028

 
6,695,421

 
11,998,388

Net investment income
6,131,128

 
21,163,939

 
37,621,524

 
 
 
 
 
 
Net realized loss from investments
(6,436,828
)
 
(9,752,799
)
 
(2,687,141
)
Net change in unrealized gain (loss) from investments
729,331

 
(1,912,379
)
 
(9,471
)
Net realized and change in unrealized loss from investments
(5,707,497
)
 
(11,665,178
)
 
(2,696,612
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net increase in net assets resulting from operations
$
423,631

 
$
9,498,761

 
$
34,924,912

Net increase in net assets resulting from operations per share
$
4.24

 
$
94.99

 
$
349.25

Weighted average shares outstanding
100,000

 
100,000

 
100,000





See notes to financial statements.


24



VENTURE LENDING & LEASING VI, INC.
Statements of Changes In Net Assets
For the Years Ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014
 
 
For the Year ended
 
For the Year ended
 
For the Year Ended
 
December 31, 2016
 
December 31, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
Net increase in net assets resulting from operations:
 
 
 
 
 
Net investment income
$
6,131,128

 
$
21,163,939

 
$
37,621,524

Net realized loss from investments
(6,436,828
)
 
(9,752,799
)
 
(2,687,141
)
Net change in unrealized gain (loss) from investments
729,331

 
(1,912,379
)
 
(9,471
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net increase in net assets resulting from operations
423,631

 
9,498,761

 
34,924,912

Distributions of income to shareholder
305,699

 
(11,411,140
)
 
(34,934,383
)
Return of capital to shareholder
(32,091,796
)
 
(76,597,909
)
 
(57,340,898
)
Contributions from shareholder

 

 

Net decrease in net assets
(31,362,466
)
 
(78,510,288
)
 
(57,350,369
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net assets
 
 
 
 
 
Beginning of year
58,505,200

 
137,015,488

 
194,365,857

 
 
 
 
 
 
End of year (Undistributed net investment income of $0, $0 and $0)
$
27,142,734

 
$
58,505,200

 
$
137,015,488




See notes to financial statements.

25



VENTURE LENDING & LEASING VI, INC.
Statements of Cash Flows
For the Years Ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014
 
For the Year Ended
 
For the Year Ended
 
For the Year Ended
 
December 31, 2016
 
December 31, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
 
 
 
 
 
Net increase in net assets resulting from operations
$
423,631

 
$
9,498,761

 
$
34,924,912

Adjustments to reconcile net increase in net assets resulting from operations to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Net realized loss from investments
6,436,828

 
9,752,799

 
1,990,790

Net change in unrealized (gain) loss from investments
(729,331
)
 
1,912,379

 
9,471

Amortization of deferred costs related to borrowing facility
261,992

 
227,993

 
425,848

Net decrease in other assets
1,301,436

 
1,751,960

 
544,634

Receipt of equity securities as payment for waiver

 

 
(327,440
)
Net decrease in accounts payable, other accrued liabilities, and accrued management fees
(210,205
)
 
(1,452,830
)
 
(2,029,607
)
Origination of loans

 
(3,362,500
)
 
(104,567,500
)
Principal payments on loans
63,097,499

 
122,547,456

 
166,465,742

Acquisition of equity securities

 
(86,968
)
 
(6,787,095
)
Net cash provided by operating activities
70,581,850

 
140,789,050

 
90,649,755

 
 
 
 
 
 
Contributions from shareholder

 

 

Cash distribution to shareholder
(29,900,000
)
 
(86,000,000
)
 
(83,800,000
)
Repayment of borrowings under debt facility
(40,400,000
)
 
(66,150,000
)
 
(27,650,000
)
Investment in interest rate cap agreement

 

 
(230,000
)
Payment of bank facility and fees and costs

 

 
(339,983
)
Net cash used in financing activities
(70,300,000
)
 
(152,150,000
)
 
(112,019,983
)
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
281,850

 
(11,360,950
)
 
(21,370,228
)
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS:
 
 
 
 
 
Beginning of year
2,646,011

 
14,006,961

 
35,377,189

End of year
$
2,927,861

 
$
2,646,011

 
$
14,006,961

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURES:
 
 
 
 
 
CASH PAID DURING THE YEAR FOR:
 
 
 
 
 
Interest
$
661,673

 
$
2,281,352

 
$
4,602,356

Settlement under interest rate swap agreement

 
$

 
$
696,351

NON-CASH ACTIVITIES:
 
 
 
 
 
Distributions of equity securities to shareholder
$
1,886,097

 
$
2,009,049

 
$
8,475,281

Receipt of equity securities as repayment of loans
$
1,886,097

 
$
1,922,081

 
$
1,360,746



See notes to financial statements.

26



VENTURE LENDING & LEASING VI, INC.
Notes to Financial Statements for the Years Ended December 31, 2016 and 2015
1. ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS OF THE FUND
Venture Lending & Leasing VI, Inc. (the “Fund”), was incorporated in Maryland on January 11, 2010 as a non-diversified closed-end management investment company electing status as a business development company (“BDC”) under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended ("1940 Act") and is managed by Westech Investment Advisors, LLC, formerly known as Westech Investment Advisors, Inc., (“Manager” or “Management”).  The Fund will be dissolved on December 31, 2020 unless an election is made to dissolve earlier by the Board of Directors. The Manager was formed upon the conversion of Westech Investment Advisors, Inc. into a limited liability company. One hundred percent of the stock of the Fund is held by Venture Lending & Leasing VI, LLC (the “Company”).  Prior to commencing its operations on June 29, 2010, the Fund had no operations other than the sale to the Company of 100,000 shares of common stock, $0.001 par value for $25,000 in January 2010.  This issuance of stock was a requirement in order to apply for a finance lender's license from the California Commissioner of Corporations, which was obtained on April 13, 2010.

The Fund's investment objective is to achieve a superior risk-adjusted investment return.  The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by providing debt financing to portfolio companies.  The Fund's investing activities focus primarily on private debt securities.  The Fund generally receives warrants to acquire equity securities in connection with its portfolio investments.  The Fund generally distributes these warrants to its shareholder upon receipt.  The Fund also has guidelines for the percentage of total assets which will be invested in different types of assets.

The portfolio investments of the Fund consist of debt financing to early and late stage venture capital backed technology companies.  
2.   SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES:
Basis of Accounting
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period.  Actual results could differ from those estimates. Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to  the current year presentation.
Cash and Cash Equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash on hand and money market mutual funds with maturities of 90 days or less. Money market mutual funds held as cash equivalents are valued at their most recently traded net asset value. Within cash and cash equivalents, as of December 31, 2016, the Fund held 2,927,861 units in Blackrock Treasury Trust Institutional Fund valued at $1 per unit at a yield of 0.25%, which represents 10.79% of the net assets of the Fund.
Interest Income
Interest income on loans is recognized on an accrual basis using the effective interest method including amounts from the amortization of discounts attributable to equity securities received as part of the loan transaction.  Additionally, fees received as part of the transaction are added to the loan discount and amortized over the life of the loan.

Valuation Procedures
The Fund accounts for its assets and liabilities at fair value in accordance with the “Valuation Methods” below.  All valuations are determined under the direction of Management, in accordance with the valuation methods.
The Fund's loans are valued in connection with the issuance of its periodic financial statements, the issuance or repurchase of the Fund's shares at a price equivalent to the current net asset value per share, and at such other times as required by law. On a quarterly basis, Management will submit to the Board a “Valuation Report” and "Valuation Notes," which details the rationale for the valuation of debt and equity investments.

As of December 31, 2016 and 2015, the financial statements include nonmarketable investments ($24.2 million and $95.0 million or approximately 88% and 95% of the total assets) with fair values determined by the Manager in the absence of readily determinable market values.  Because of the illiquidity of the Fund's investments, a substantial portion of its assets are carried at fair value as determined by the Manager in accordance with the Fund's policy as approved by the Board. Due to the inherent uncertainty of these valuations, estimated fair values of such investments may differ significantly from the values that would have been used had a ready market for the securities existed, and the differences could be material.  Below is the information used by the Manager in making these estimates.


27



Loans

The Fund defines fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to lower a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants. There is no secondary market for the loans made by the Fund to borrowers, hence Management determines fair value based on hypothetical markets. Venture loans are generally held to maturity and are recorded at estimated fair value. The determination of fair value is based on a number of factors including the amount for which an investment could be exchanged in a current sale, which assumes an orderly disposition over a reasonable period other than in a forced sale. Management considers the fact that no ready market exists for substantially all of the loans held by the Fund. Management determines whether to adjust the estimated fair value of a loan based on a number of factors including but not limited to the borrower's payment history, available cash and “burn rate,” revenues, net income or loss, the likelihood that the borrower will be able to secure additional financing in the future, as well as an evaluation of the general interest rate environment. The amount of any valuation adjustment considers liquidation analysis and is determined based upon a credit analysis of the borrower and an analysis of the expected recovery from the borrower, including consideration of factors such as the nature and quality of the Fund's security interests in collateral, the estimated value of the Fund's collateral, the size of the loan, and the estimated time that will elapse before the Fund achieves a recovery. Management has evaluated these factors and has concluded that the effect of deterioration in the quality of the underlying collateral, increase in the size of the loan and increase in the estimated time to recovery and increase in the hypothetical market coupon rate would have the effect of lowering the value of the current portfolio of loans.

Non-accrual Loans

The Fund's policy is to place a loan on non-accrual when the portfolio company is delinquent for three months on its monthly loan payment, or ceases or drastically curtails its operation and Management deems that it is unlikely that the loan will return to performing status. When a loan is placed on non-accrual status, all interest previously accrued but not collected is reversed for the quarter in which the loan was placed on non-accrual status. Any uncollected interest related to quarters prior to when the loan was placed on non-accrual status is added to the principal balance, and the aggregate balance of the principal and interest is evaluated in accordance with the policy for valuation of loans in determining Management's best estimate of fair value. Interest received by the Fund on non-accrual loans will be recorded if and when the proceeds exceed the book value of loans.

If a borrower of a non-accrual loan resumes making regular payments and is deemed by Management to have the ability to service the loan on a sustainable basis, the loan is reclassified back to accrual or performing status. Interest that would have been accrued during the non-accrual status will be added back to the remaining payment schedule, and thus changing the effective interest rate.

As of December 31, 2016, loans with a cost basis of $20.5 million and a fair value of $7.1 million, have been classified as non-accrual. As of December 31, 2015, loans with a cost basis of $20.9 million and a fair value of $7.0 million, have been classified as non-accrual, respectively.

Warrants and Stock

Warrants and stock that are received in connection with loan transactions generally will be assigned a fair value at the time of acquisition. These securities are then distributed by the Fund to the Company at the assigned value. Warrants are valued based on a modified Black-Scholes option pricing model which takes into account underlying stock value, expected term, volatility, and risk-free interest rate, among other factors.

Underlying asset value is estimated based on information available, including information regarding recent rounds of funding of the portfolio company, or the publicly-quoted stock price at the end of the financial reporting period for warrants for comparable publicly-quoted securities.

Volatility, or the amount of uncertainty or risk about the size of the changes in the warrant price, is based on an
index of publicly traded companies grouped by industry and which are similar in nature to the underlying client companies issuing the warrant (“Industry Index”). The volatility assumption for each Industry Index is based on the average volatility for individual public companies within the client company's industry for a period of time approximating the expected life of the warrants. A hypothetical increase in the volatility of the warrants used in the modified Black-Scholes option pricing model would have the effect of increasing the value of the warrants.

The remaining expected lives of warrants are based on historical experience of the average life of the warrants, as
warrants are often exercised in the event of acquisitions, mergers, or initial public offerings, and terminated due to events such as bankruptcies, restructuring activities, or additional financings. These events cause the expected term to be less than the remaining contractual term of the warrants. The Fund assumed the average duration of a warrant is 3 years prior to October 1, 2014 and 3.5 years from October 1, 2014 to December 31, 2016. The effect of a hypothetical increase in the estimated initial term of the warrants used in the modified Black-Scholes option pricing model would have the effect of increasing the value of the warrants.


28



The risk-free interest rate is derived from the constant maturity tables issued by the U.S. Treasury Department. The effect of a hypothetical increase in the estimated risk free rate used in the modified Black-Scholes option pricing model would have the effect of increasing the value of the warrants.

The Fund engages an independent valuation company to provide valuation assistance including an evaluation of the
Fund's valuation methodology and the reasonableness of the assumptions used from the perspective of a market participant. The independent valuation company calculates several of the inputs used such as volatility and risk-free rate. Upon the receipt of such data from the valuation company, a sample test is performed to ensure the accuracy of their calculations and that the source of data is reliable and consistent with the way in which the calculations were made in prior periods. Such inputs are entered into the database with a second review to ensure the accuracy of the input information. All calculations of warrant values are performed by one employee and reviewed by a second employee. The inputs of the modified Black-Scholes option pricing model are reevaluated every quarter.

Other Assets and Liabilities

Other Assets include costs incurred in conjunction with borrowings under the Fund's debt facility and are stated at initial cost. The costs are amortized over the term of the facility.

As of December 31, 2016 and 2015, the fair values of Other Assets and Liabilities are estimated at their carrying values because of their short-term nature of these assets or liabilities.

As of December 31, 2016 and 2015, based on borrowing rates available to the Fund, which are Level 2 inputs, the estimated fair value of the borrowings under the debt facility was $0.0 million and $40.4 million, respectively.

Commitment Fees
Unearned income and commitment fees on loans are recognized using the effective interest method over the term of the loan.  Commitment fees are carried as liabilities when received for commitments upon which no draws have been made.  When the first draw is made, the fee is treated as unearned income and is recognized as described above.  If a draw is never made, the forfeited commitment fee less any applicable legal costs becomes recognized as other income after the commitment expires.
Interest Rate Swap Agreements

The Fund entered into interest rate swap agreements to hedge its interest rate on its expected long term borrowings under its debt facility (see Note 9). Interest rate swaps are primarily valued on the basis of quotes obtained from brokers and dealers and adjusted for counterparty risk. The valuation of the swap agreement also considers the future expected interest rates on the notional principal balance remaining which is comparable to what a prospective acquirer would pay on the measurement date. Valuation pricing models consider inputs such as forward rates, anticipated interest rate volatility relating to the reference rate, as well as time value and other factors underlying swap instruments. The contracts were recorded at fair value in either other assets or accounts payable and other accrued liabilities in the Statements of Assets and Liabilities, depending on whether the value of the contract is in favor of the Fund or the counter party. The changes in fair value are recorded in net change in unrealized gain (loss) from hedging activities in the Statements of Operations. The quarterly interest paid or received on the interest rate swap contracts was also recorded in net realized loss from hedging activities in the Statements of Operations. The interest swap agreements terminated on September 23, 2014.
Interest Rate Cap Agreements

On September 30, 2014, the Fund entered into interest rate cap agreements which are primarily valued on the basis of the future expected interest rates on the notional principal balance remaining, which is comparable to what a prospective acquirer would pay on the measurement date. Valuation pricing models consider inputs such as forward rates, anticipated interest rate volatility relating to the reference rate, as well as time value and other factors underlying cap instruments. The contracts are recorded at fair value in Interest Rate Caps in the Statements of Assets and Liabilities. The changes in fair value are recorded in Net change in unrealized gain (loss) from investments in the Statements of Operations. The monthly interest received on the interest rate cap contracts is also recorded in Net realized loss from investments in the Statements of Operations. Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation.

Deferred Bank Fees

The deferred bank fees and costs associated with the debt facility have been allocated over the estimated life of the facility, which was originally determined to be January 2014. Starting in October 2011, the estimated life of the facility changed to September 2014. The debt facility was extended again on September 23, 2014 and then on September 30, 2014, it was amended, restated and renewed through March 23, 2017. Deferred bank fees and costs associated with the renewal of the debt facility were amortized over the life of the renewed facility and the remaining unamortized costs were expensed in August 5, 2016 when the facility was paid off and terminated.

The amortization of these costs are recorded in interest expense in the Statements of Operations (see Note 7).



29



Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In April 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standard Update ("ASU")2015-03 Interest-Imputation of Interest, Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs, which changes the presentation of debt issuance costs in financial statements. Under the ASU, an entity presents such costs in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the related debt liability rather than as an asset. Amortization of the costs is reported as interest expense. The amended guidance is effective for the Fund’s interim and annual periods beginning on January 1, 2016. Management does not expect the adoption of this guidance to significantly impact the Fund’s financial position or results of operations.

In December 2016, the FASB released an accounting standards update (ASU) that makes technical changes to various sections of the ASC, including Topic 820, Fair Value Measurement. The changes to Topic 820 are intended to clarify the difference between a valuation approach and a valuation technique. The changes to ASC 820-10-50-2 require a reporting entity to disclose, for Level 2 and Level 3 fair value
measurements, a change in either or both a valuation approach and a valuation technique and the reason(s) for the change. The changes to
Topic 820 are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2016. At this time, management is evaluating the implications of the ASU and has not yet determined its impact on the financial statements and disclosures.
3.  SCHEDULES OF INVESTMENTS
As of December 31, 2016, all loans were made to non-affiliates as follows:
 
Percentage
 
Estimated Fair
 
 
Par Value
Final
Borrower
of Net Assets
 
Value 12/31/2016
 
 
Value 12/31/2016
Maturity Date
Computers & Storage
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
D-Wave Systems, Inc. **
 
$
197,224
 
$
197,224
2/1/2017
HyperGrid, Inc.
 
 
328,221
 
 
328,221
6/1/2017
Subtotal:
1.9%
$
525,445
 
$
525,445
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Internet
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cowboy Analytics, LLC
 
$
544,092
 
$
544,092
*
CustomMade Ventures Corp.
 
 
687,276
 
 
687,276
*
Digital Caddies, Inc. **
 
 
0
 
 
987,584
*
FanBridge, Inc.
 
 
300,000
 
 
340,140
*
Giddy Apps, Inc.
 
 
10,000
 
 
999,454
*
Giveforward, Inc.
 
 
0
 
 
346,472
*
Kiwi Crate, Inc.
 
 
535,822
 
 
535,822
4/1/2018
Leading Ed Inc.
 
 
2,735
 
 
2,735
*
Lightside Games, Inc.
 
 
0
 
 
109,230
*
Monetate, Inc.
 
 
1,546,197
 
 
1,546,197
6/1/2018
Pixalate, Inc.
 
 
27,919
 
 
27,919
3/1/2017
Playstudios, Inc.
 
 
1,213,425
 
 
1,213,425
6/1/2018
Quantcast Corp.
 
 
929,202
 
 
929,202
4/1/2017
Quri, Inc.
 
 
976,446
 
 
976,446
6/1/2018
Radius Intelligence, Inc.
 
 
617,379
 
 
617,379
10/1/2017
Rivet Games, Inc.
 
 
8,582
 
 
102,582
*
THECLYMB
 
 
618,808
 
 
618,808
10/1/2017
WHI, Inc.
 
 
593,999
 
 
1,200,999
*
YouDocs Beauty, Inc.
 
 
1,192,024
 
 
1,192,024
*
Subtotal:
36.1%
$
9,803,906
 
$
12,977,786
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Medical Devices
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AxioMed, LLC
 
 
14,238
 
 
14,238
*
MimOSA, Inc.
 
 
49,706
 
 
209,706
*
Redox Medical, Inc.
 
 
195,000
 
 
3,602,382
*
Subtotal:
1.0%
$
258,944
 
$
3,826,326
 

30



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other Healthcare
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cogito Corporation
 
 
63,307
 
 
63,307
4/1/2017
Hi.Q, Inc.
 
 
745,642
 
 
745,642
6/1/2018
Physician Software Systems, LLC
 
 
75,000
 
 
158,223
*
Therapydia, Inc.
 
 
96,428
 
 
96,428
10/1/2017
Subtotal:
3.6%
$
980,377
 
$
1,063,600
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other Technology
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beeline Bikes, Inc.
 
$
32,635
 
$
32,635
6/1/2017
Daylight Solutions, Inc.
 
 
578,454
 
 
578,454
8/1/2017
InsideTrack, Inc.
 
 
348,324
 
 
348,324
9/1/2017
Lumo BodyTech, Inc.
 
 
527,793
 
 
527,793
12/1/2017
Neuehouse, LLC
 
 
861,755
 
 
861,755
7/1/2017
nWay, Inc.
 
 
259,194
 
 
690,907
*
Pinnacle Engines, Inc.
 
 
404,280
 
 
404,280
12/1/2017
Prana Holdings, Inc.
 
 
256,816
 
 
1,188,816
*
Scoot Networks, Inc.
 
 
55,920
 
 
55,920
3/1/2017
Skully, Inc.
 
 
12,925
 
 
128,667
*
Zeachem
 
 
0
 
 
2,759,807
*
Subtotal:
12.3%
$
3,338,096
 
$
7,577,358
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Security
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Agari Data, Inc.
 
$
336,977
 
$
336,977
9/1/2017
Guardian Analytics, Inc.
 
 
2,171,055
 
 
2,171,055
2/1/2019
Subtotal:
9.2%
$
2,508,032
 
$
2,508,032
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Software
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Appconomy, Inc.
 
$
0
 
$
1,839,362
*
Atigeo Corporation
 
 
870,000
 
 
1,170,880
*
Beanstock Media, Inc.
 
 
100,000
 
 
1,322,744
*
Corduro, Inc.
 
 
7,500
 
 
72,212
*
gloStream, Inc.
 
 
607,581
 
 
895,066
*
Mintigo, Inc.**
 
 
579,953
 
 
579,953
1/1/2018
Nectar Holdings, Inc.
 
 
381,833
 
 
381,833
12/1/2017
OrderGroove, Inc.
 
 
386,343
 
 
386,343
12/1/2017
SoundHound, Inc.
 
 
607,933
 
 
607,933
5/1/2017
StreetLight Data, Inc.
 
 
86,096
 
 
86,096
4/1/2017
ZeroTurnaround USA, Inc.**
 
 
800,381
 
 
800,381
6/1/2018
Subtotal:
16.3%
$
4,427,620
 
$
8,142,803
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Technology Services
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Akademos, Inc.***
 
$
232,217
 
$
232,217
6/1/2017
Blue Technologies Limited
 
 
163,071
 
 
163,071
6/1/2017
BountyJobs, Inc.
 
 
148,292
 
 
148,292
10/1/2017
FSA Store, Inc.
 
 
398,418
 
 
398,418
9/1/2017
Rated People, Ltd.**
 
 
1,296,739
 
 
1,296,739
*
TiqIQ, Inc.
 
 
80,696
 
 
80,696
7/1/2017
Subtotal:
8.5%
$
2,319,433
 
$
2,319,433
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

31



Wireless
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Azumio, Inc.
 
$
16,000
 
$
357,301
*
Kicksend Holdings
 
 
0
 
 
61,475
*
InfoReach, Inc.
 
 
68,886
 
 
68,886
3/1/2017
Subtotal:
0.4%
$
84,886
 
$
487,662
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total Loan (Cost of $37,628,445):
89.3%
$
24,246,739
 
$
39,428,445
 
Interest Rate Caps (Cost of $23,000)
0.0%
 
1,489
 
 
23,000
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total Investment (Cost of $37,651,445)
89.3%
$
24,248,228
 
$
39,451,445
 

*As of December 31, 2016, loans with a costs basis of $20.5 million and fair value of $7.1 million have been classified as non-accrual. These loans have been accelerated from their original maturity and are due in their entirety. During the period for which these loans have been on non-accrual status, no interest income has been recognized. 
** Indicates assets that the Fund deems "non-qualifying assets" under Section 55(a) of the 1940 Act, as amended. Qualifying assets must represent at least 70% of the Fund's total assets at the time of acquisition of any additional non-qualifying assets. As of December 31, 2016, 11.2% of the Fund's assets represented non-qualifying assets. As part of this calculation, the denominator consists of all eligible portfolio companies as defined in Section 2(a)(46); the numerator consists of total assets less the assets described in Section 55(a)(7).
*** Indicates assets that are not senior loans.
As of December 31, 2015, all loans were made to non-affiliates as follows:
 
Percentage
Estimated Fair
 
Par Value
Final
Borrower
of Net Assets
Value 12/31/15
 
Value12/31/15
Maturity Date
Computers & Storage
 
 
 
 
 
Clustrix, Inc.
 
 $ 1,258,439

 
 $ 1,258,439

5/1/2017
D-Wave Systems, Inc. **
 
1,003,360

 
1,003,360

2/1/2017
Gridstore, Inc.
 
913,030

 
913,030

6/1/2017
Veloxum, Inc.
 
0

 
                    416,093

*
Subtotal:
5.4%
 $ 3,174,829

 
 $ 3,590,922

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Enterprise Networking
 
 
 
 
 
Apprion, Inc.
 
 $ 147,799

 
 $ 147,799

4/1/2016
Subtotal:
0.3%
 $ 147,799

 
 $ 147,799

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Internet
 
 
 
 
 
CustomMade Ventures Corp.
 
 $ 687,276

 
 $ 687,276

*
DailyFeats, Inc.
 
18,441

 
18,441

1/1/2016
Digital Caddies, Inc. **
 
0

 
987,584

*
FanBridge, Inc.
 
453,896

 
643,896

*
Giddy Apps, Inc.
 
1,063,297

 
1,063,297

12/1/2017
Giveforward, Inc.
 
406,113

 
406,113

7/1/2017
Grovo Learning, Inc.
 
522,397

 
522,397

3/1/2017
HEXAGRAM 49, Inc.
 
18,716

 
18,716

1/1/2016
InsideVault, Inc.
 
259,715

 
259,715

5/1/2017
Kitsy Lane, Inc.
 
39,441

 
169,441

*
Kiwi Crate, Inc.
 
814,731

 
814,731

4/1/2018
Lightside Games, Inc.
 
54,230

 
127,230

*
Madison Reed, Inc.
 
1,276,132

 
1,276,132

6/1/2018
Monetate, Inc.
 
2,475,198

 
2,475,198

6/1/2018

32



Navigating Cancer, Inc.
 
184,646

 
184,646

7/1/2016
Osix Corp.
 
57,340

 
57,340

10/1/2016
Piryx, Inc.
 
1,187,196

 
1,467,196

*
Pixalate, Inc.
 
227,339

 
227,339

3/1/2017
Playstudios, Inc.
 
2,065,680

 
2,065,680

6/1/2018
Quantcast Corp.
 
3,404,740

 
3,404,740

4/1/2017
Quri, Inc.
 
1,696,743

 
1,696,743

6/1/2018
Radius Intelligence, Inc.
 
1,257,560

 
1,257,560

10/1/2017
Rivet Games, Inc.
 
63,082

 
130,082

*
Schooltube, Inc.
 
0

 
108,222

*
Schoola, Inc.
 
102,300

 
102,300

12/1/2016
Smart Lunches, Inc.
 
63,640

 
63,640

6/1/2016
Sociable Labs, Inc.
 
113,422

 
113,422

7/1/2016
THECLYMB
 
870,456

 
870,456

10/1/2017
Weddington Way, Inc.
 
306,628

 
306,628

11/1/2016
WHI, Inc.
 
1,160,565

 
1,160,565

7/1/2017
YouDocs Beauty, Inc.***
 
1,061,305

 
1,192,024

*
Yourmechanic, Inc.
 
                   151,324

 
                    151,324

7/1/2017
Subtotal:
37.7%
 $ 22,063,549

 
 $ 24,030,073

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Medical Devices
 
 
 
 
 
AxioMed, LLC
 
 $ 14,238

 
 $ 1,560,238

*
Blockade Medical, LLC
 
347,432

 
347,432

9/1/2017
Hourglass Technology, Inc.
 
0

 
872,325

*
MimOSA, Inc.
 
109,833

 
209,833

12/1/2016
Redox Medical, Inc.
 
                   250,000

 
                 3,600,000

*
Subtotal:
1.2%
 $ 721,503

 
 $ 6,589,828

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other Healthcare
 
 
 
 
 
Cogito Health, Inc.
 
 $ 309,223

 
 $ 309,223

4/1/2017
Health Integrated, Inc.
 
1,305,577

 
1,305,577

10/1/2017
HealthEquityLabs, Inc.
 
949,393

 
949,393

6/1/2018
Mulberry Health, Inc.
 
3,436,073

 
3,436,073

12/1/2017
Physician Software Systems, LLC
 
321,221

 
321,221

7/1/2017
Practice Fusion, Inc.
 
1,604,096

 
1,604,096

6/1/2016
Project Healthy Living, Inc.
 
444,667

 
444,667

10/1/2016
Therapydia, Inc.
 
352,299

 
352,299

10/1/2017
Urgent Care Centers of New England, Inc.
                3,050,202

 
                 3,050,202

9/1/2018
Subtotal:
20.1%
 $ 11,772,751

 
 $ 11,772,751

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other Technology
 
 
 
 
 
21, Inc.
 
 $ 10,680,985

 
 $ 10,680,985

9/1/2017
Automatic Labs, Inc.
 
401,358

 
401,358

12/1/2016
Beeline Bikes, Inc.
 
89,107

 
89,107

6/1/2017
Daylight Solutions, Inc.
 
1,338,564

 
1,338,564

8/1/2017
eco.logic brands, inc.
 
375,524

 
375,524

6/1/2017
General Assembly, Inc.
 
1,045,212

 
1,045,212

12/1/2016
InsideTrack, Inc.
 
906,204

 
906,204

9/1/2017

33



LanzaTech New Zealand Ltd.**
 
2,167,522

 
2,167,522

7/1/2016
Lumo BodyTech, Inc.
 
987,135

 
987,135

12/1/2017
Neuehouse, LLC
 
2,609,757

 
2,609,757

7/1/2017
nWay, Inc.
 
1,049,777

 
1,049,777

3/1/2018
Pinnacle Engines, Inc.
 
870,363

 
870,363

12/1/2017
Prana Holdings, Inc.
 
2,280,795

 
2,280,795

7/1/2016
Scoot Networks, Inc.
 
253,204

 
253,204

3/1/2017
Skully, Inc.
 
161,357

 
161,357

7/1/2017
Sproutling, Inc.
 
483,241

 
483,241

1/15/2016
Tribogenics, Inc.
 
471,201

 
471,201

9/1/2016
Zeachem
 
0

 
3,023,096

*
YPX Cayman Holdings Co. **
 
                   177,626

 
                    177,626

4/1/2016
Subtotal:
45.0%
 $ 26,348,932

 
 $ 29,372,028

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Security
 
 
 
 
 
Agari Data, Inc.
 
 $ 734,959

 
 $ 734,959

9/1/2017
Guardian Analytics, Inc.
 
2,124,840

 
2,124,840

2/1/2019
Uplogix, Inc.
 
                   421,843

 
                 1,121,843

*
Subtotal:
5.6%
 $ 3,281,642

 
 $ 3,981,642

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Software
 
 
 
 
 
3Scale, Inc.
 
 $ 594,565

 
 $ 594,565

9/1/2017
Appconomy, Inc.
 
400,000

 
1,839,362

*
Atigeo Corporation
 
2,088,385

 
2,088,385

9/1/2017
Beanstock Media, Inc. ***
 
85,000

 
1,322,744

*
BlazeMeter, Inc. **
 
697,581

 
697,581

1/1/2018
ClearPath, Inc.
 
95,856

 
95,856

5/1/2016
Clypd, Inc.
 
291,458

 
291,458

11/1/2016
Corduro, Inc.
 
12,212

 
102,212

*
Encoding.com, Inc.
 
239,707

 
239,707

11/1/2016
gloStream, Inc.
 
786,295

 
1,086,295

*
Innerworkings, Inc.
 
0

 
326,744

*
MediaPlatform, Inc.
 
165,244

 
165,244

9/1/2016
Mintigo, Inc.**
 
1,048,984

 
1,048,984

1/1/2018
Nectar Holdings, Inc.
 
872,439

 
872,439

12/1/2017
OrderGroove, Inc.
 
704,374

 
704,374

12/1/2017
Palantir Technologies, Inc.