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EX-32 - EX-32 - POTLATCHDELTIC CORPpch-ex32_14.htm
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EX-24 - EX-24 - POTLATCHDELTIC CORPpch-ex24_13.htm
EX-23 - EX-23 - POTLATCHDELTIC CORPpch-ex23_12.htm
EX-21 - EX-21 - POTLATCHDELTIC CORPpch-ex21_16.htm
EX-18 - EX-18 - POTLATCHDELTIC CORPpch-ex18_263.htm
EX-12 - EX-12 - POTLATCHDELTIC CORPpch-ex12_9.htm
EX-10.(E) - EX-10.(E) - POTLATCHDELTIC CORPpch-ex10e_351.htm

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

Form 10-K

 

(Mark One)

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016

 

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

For the transition period from            to

 

 

Commission File Number 1-32729

POTLATCH CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

 

82-0156045

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

(IRS Employer Identification No.)

601 West 1st Ave., Suite 1600

 

 

Spokane, Washington

 

99201

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (509) 835-1500

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

TITLE OF EACH CLASS

 

NAME OF EACH EXCHANGE ON WHICH

REGISTERED

Common Stock

 

The Nasdaq Global Select Market

($1 par value)

 

 

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.      Yes      No

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act      Yes      No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).      Yes      No

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer      Accelerated filer      Non-accelerated filer  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)      Smaller reporting company  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).     Yes      No

The aggregate market value of the common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant at June 30, 2016, was approximately $1,381.7 million, based on the closing price of $34.10.

As of January 31, 2017, 40,547,225 shares of the registrant's common stock, par value $1 per share, were outstanding.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the definitive proxy statement for the 2017 annual meeting of stockholders expected to be filed with the Commission on or about April 3, 2017 are incorporated by reference in Part III hereof.

 

 

 


POTLATCH CORPORATION AND CONSOLIDATED SUBSIDIARIES

Table of Contents 

 

  

  

PAGE

NUMBER

 

 

 

PART I

 

 

ITEM 1.

BUSINESS

3

ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS

9

ITEM 1B.

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

19

ITEM 2.

PROPERTIES

19

ITEM 3.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

19

ITEM 4.

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

19

 

 

 

PART II

 

 

ITEM 5.

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

20

ITEM 6.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

23

ITEM 7.

MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

24

ITEM 7A.

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

38

ITEM 8.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

39

 

Consolidated Statements of Income

40

 

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income

41

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets

42

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

43

 

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders' Equity

44

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

45

ITEM 9.

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

70

ITEM 9A.

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

70

ITEM 9B.

OTHER INFORMATION

70

 

 

 

PART III

 

 

ITEM 10.

DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

72

ITEM 11.

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

72

ITEM 12.

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS 

73

ITEM 13.

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

73

ITEM 14.

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

73

 

 

 

PART IV

 

 

ITEM 15.

EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

74

 

 

 

SIGNATURES

78

 

 

 


 

EXPLANATORY NOTE

For purposes of this report, any references to "the company,” “us,” “we” and “our” include Potlatch Corporation and its consolidated subsidiaries.

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

This report contains, in addition to historical information, certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including without limitation, statements regarding:

 

timber inventory;

 

lumber demand and pricing in North America in 2017;

 

increased North American housing starts and repair and remodel activity;

 

decreased Chinese demand for North American lumber;

 

excess log supply in the South;

 

the expected positive effect on timber prices of increased lumber demand and higher lumber prices;

 

expected sawlog prices in 2017;

 

expected timber harvest level of between 3.8 million and 4.6 million tons each year over the next several years;

 

expected 2017 timber harvest of 4.2 million tons;

 

expected sale of 40% of timber volume under log supply agreements in 2017;

 

expected sales of 50,000 acres of higher and better use (HBU) property,105,000 acres of rural real estate property and 55,000 acres of non-strategic timberland over the next decade or more;

 

funding of our dividends in 2017;

 

compliance with REIT tax rules;

 

Forest Steward Council® (FSC®) and Sustainable Forest Initiative® (SFI®) certification of our timberlands;

 

expectations regarding premium prices for FSC®-certified logs and FSC®-certified lumber;

 

realization of deferred tax assets;

 

expected capital expenditures in 2017;

 

expectations regarding funding of our pension plans in 2017 and over the next 10 years;

 

estimated non-qualified pension plan payments in 2017;

 

estimated future benefit payments;

 

estimated future payments under operating leases;

 

estimated long-term rate of return on pension assets and discount rate;

 

estimated future debt payments;

 

expectations regarding the effect of ASU No. 2014-9, ASU No. 2016-02, ASU No. 2016-09, and ASU No. 2016-13; and

 

expected liquidity in 2017 to fund our operations, regular stockholder dividends, capital expenditures and debt service obligations and related matters.

Words such as “anticipate,” “expect,” “will,” “intend,” “plan,” “target,” “project,” “believe,” “seek,” “schedule,” “estimate,” “could,” “can,” “may” and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements reflect our current views regarding future events based on estimates and assumptions, and are therefore subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties and are not guarantees of future performance.

1


 

Our actual results of operations could differ materially from our historical results or those expressed or implied by forward-looking statements contained in this report. Important factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, the following: 

 

changes in timber growth rates;

 

changes in silviculture;

 

timber cruising variables;

 

changes in state forest acts or best management practices;

 

changes in timber harvest levels on our lands;

 

changes in timber prices;

 

changes in timberland values;

 

changes in policy regarding governmental timber sales;

 

changes in the United States and international economies;

 

changes in interest rates and discount rates;

 

changes in exchange rates;

 

changes in requirements for FSC® or SFI® certification;

 

changes in the level of residential and commercial construction and remodeling activity;

 

changes in tariffs, quotas and trade agreements involving wood products;

 

changes in demand for our products;

 

changes in production and production capacity in the forest products industry;

 

competitive pricing pressures for our products;

 

unanticipated manufacturing disruptions;

 

changes in general and industry-specific environmental laws and regulations;

 

unforeseen environmental liabilities or expenditures;

 

weather conditions;

 

changes in raw material and other costs;

 

collectability of amounts owed by customers;

 

changes in federal and state tax laws;

 

the ability to satisfy complex rules in order to remain qualified as a REIT; and

 

changes in tax laws that could reduce the benefits associated with REIT status.

For a discussion of some of the factors that may affect our business, results and prospects, see Part 1 - Item 1A. Risk Factors.

Forward-looking statements contained in this report present our views only as of the date of this report. Except as required under applicable law, we do not intend to issue updates concerning any future revisions of our views to reflect events or circumstances occurring after the date of this report.

2


 

Part I

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS

General

Potlatch Corporation, formerly known as Potlatch Holdings, Inc., was incorporated in Delaware in September 2005 to facilitate a restructuring to qualify for treatment as a REIT for federal income tax purposes. It is the successor to the business of the original Potlatch Corporation, which was incorporated in Maine in 1903.

We are focused on the ownership of timberland, which we view as a unique and attractive asset due to the renewable nature of timber resources and timber’s long-term history of price appreciation in excess of inflation. Our primary objectives include using our timberland investments to generate income and maximizing the long-term value of our assets. We pursue these objectives by adhering to the following strategies: 

 

Managing our timberlands to improve their long-term sustainable yield. We manage our timberlands in a manner designed to optimize the balance among timber growth, prudent environmental management and current cash flow, in order to achieve increasing levels of sustainable yield over the long-term. We may choose to harvest timber at levels above or below our current estimate of sustainability for short periods of time, for the purpose of improving the long-term productivity of certain timber stands or in response to market conditions. In addition, we focus on optimizing timber returns by continually improving productivity and yields through advanced silvicultural practices that take into account soil, climate and biological considerations.

 

Pursuing attractive acquisitions. We actively pursue timberland acquisitions that meet our financial and strategic criteria. The critical elements of our acquisition strategy generally include acquiring properties that complement our existing land base, are cash flow accretive and have attractive timber or higher and better use (HBU) values.

 

Maximizing the value of our timberland real estate. A portion of our acreage is more valuable for recreational purposes or to other timberland or real estate investors rather than for growing timber. We continually assess the potential uses of our lands and manage them proactively for the highest value. We have identified approximately 15% of our timberlands as having values that are potentially greater than timberland values.

 

Practicing sound environmental stewardship. We pursue a program of environmental stewardship and active involvement in federal, state and local policymaking to maximize our assets’ long-term value. We manage our timberlands in a manner consistent with the principles set forth by SFI® or FSC®.

Our businesses are organized into three operating segments:

 

Resource: Our Resource segment manages our timberlands to optimize revenue producing opportunities while adhering to our strict stewardship standards. Management activities include planting and harvesting trees and building and maintaining roads. The Resource segment also generates revenues from activities such as hunting leases, recreation permits and leases, mineral rights leases, biomass production and carbon sequestration.

 

Wood Products: Our Wood Products segment manufactures and markets lumber, plywood and residual products.

 

Real Estate: Our Real Estate segment consists primarily of land holding sales deemed non-strategic or identified as having higher and better use alternatives. The Real Estate segment engages in real estate sales and limited subdivision activity through Potlatch TRS.

Additional information regarding each of our operating segments is included in this section, as well as in Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and Note 15: Segment Information in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

3


 

Effective January 1, 2006, we restructured our operations to qualify for treatment as a REIT. As a REIT, we generally are not subject to federal and state corporate income taxes on our income from investments in real estate that we distribute to our stockholders, including the income derived from the sale of standing timber. As of January 1, 2016, we are no longer subject to corporate taxes on certain built-in gains, the excess of fair market value over tax basis, on sales of real property held by the REIT at the time of our conversion. We are required to pay federal corporate income taxes on income from our non-real estate investments, principally the operations of Potlatch TRS.

Available Information

We make our periodic and current reports that we file with, or furnish to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) available on or through our website, www.potlatchcorp.com (under “Investor Resources – Financial Information”), at no charge as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file the information with, or furnish it to, the SEC. Information on our website is not part of this report. In addition, the reports and materials that we file with the SEC are available at the SEC’s website (www.sec.gov) and at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington DC 20549. Interested parties may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330.

Business Segments

Resource Segment

Industry Background. The demand for timber depends primarily upon the markets for wood related products, including lumber, panel products, paper and other pulp-based products. The end uses for timber vary widely, depending on species, size and quality. Historically, timber demand has experienced cyclical fluctuations, although sometimes at different times and rates for products or geographic regions. The demand for sawlogs, lumber and other manufactured wood products is significantly dependent upon the level of new residential construction and remodeling activity, which, in turn, is affected by general economic and demographic factors, including population growth, new household formations, interest rates for home mortgages and construction loans and credit availability. Increases in residential construction and remodeling activities are generally followed by higher lumber prices, which are usually followed by higher log prices. The demand for pulpwood is dependent on the paper and pulp-based manufacturing industries. Both pulpwood and sawlogs are affected by domestic and international economic conditions, global population growth and other demographic factors, industry capacity and the value of the U.S. dollar in relation to foreign currencies. Locally, timber demand also fluctuates due to the expansion or closure of individual wood products and pulp-based manufacturing facilities.

Timber supplies can fluctuate depending upon factors such as changes in weather conditions and harvest strategies, as well as occasionally high timber salvage efforts due to storm damage, unusual pest infestations such as the mountain pine beetle, or fires. Local timber supplies also change in response to prevailing timber prices. Rising timber prices often lead to increased harvesting on private timberlands, including lands not previously made available for commercial timber operations. The supply of timber generally is adequate to meet demand, although this could tighten in the event of higher demand due to increased U.S. housing starts, increased log and lumber exports and the impacts from a natural disaster, such as fire, hurricane, earthquake, insect infestation, drought, disease, ice storms, windstorms, flooding or other factors.

Timberland Acquisition. On December 7, 2014, we acquired approximately 201,000 acres of timberland in Alabama and Mississippi for $384 million. The acquisition complemented our existing ownership in our Southern Region. The acquired timber consisted of approximately 73% softwood and 27% hardwoods. We bought the timberland subject to three supply agreements. In addition, we assumed recreational leases that cover approximately 90% of the timberlands acquired.

Timberland Sale. On April 21, 2016, we sold approximately 172,000 acres of timberlands located in central Idaho for $114 million. We purchased the property in 2007 and 2008 for the purpose of growing and harvesting timber and selling rural recreational parcels.  In the recent recession, the central Idaho rural recreational real estate market collapsed and has not recovered. Historical earnings generated by the property were positive, but not material. The sale freed up capital without having to wait for the rural recreational real estate market in central Idaho to recover.

4


 

Ownership. The Resource segment manages approximately 1.4 million acres of timberlands including approximately 18,000 acres under long-term leases. We are the largest private landowner in Idaho. The following table provides additional information about our timberlands.

 

(Acres in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Region

 

State

 

Description

 

Acres

 

Northern region

 

Idaho

 

Variety of commercially viable softwood species,

   such as grand fir, Douglas fir and inland red cedar

 

 

615

 

 

 

Minnesota

 

Primarily pine, aspen and hardwoods

 

 

155

 

 

 

 

 

Total Northern region

 

 

770

 

Southern region

 

Alabama

 

Primarily southern yellow pine and hardwoods

 

 

96

 

 

 

Arkansas

 

Primarily southern yellow pine and hardwoods

 

 

410

 

 

 

Mississippi

 

Primarily southern yellow pine and hardwoods

 

 

98

 

 

 

 

 

Total Southern region

 

 

604

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

1,374

 

 

Operation. The primary business of the Resource segment is the management of our timberlands to optimize the value of all possible revenue producing opportunities while adhering to our strict stewardship standards. Management activities include planting and harvesting trees and building and maintaining roads. The segment also generates revenue from non-timber resources such as from hunting leases, recreation permits and leases, mineral rights leases, biomass production and carbon sequestration.

We strive to maximize cash flow while managing our timberlands sustainably over the long-term. From time to time, we may choose, within the parameters of our environmental commitments, to harvest timber at levels above or below our estimate of sustainability for short periods in order to take advantage of strong demand or to adjust to weak demand. To maximize our timberlands' long-term value, we manage them intensively, based upon timber species and local growing conditions. Our harvest plans take into account changing market conditions, are designed to contribute to the growth of the remaining timber, and reflect our policy of environmental stewardship. We reforest our acreage in a timely fashion to enhance its long-term value. We employ silvicultural techniques to improve timber growth rates, including vegetation control, fertilization and thinning. In deciding whether to implement any silvicultural practice, we analyze the associated costs and long-term benefits, with the goal of achieving an attractive return over time.

Inventory. At the end of 2016, our estimated standing merchantable timber inventory was 62 million tons, including 33 million tons in the North and 29 million tons in the South. During 2016, we sold 172,000 acres of timberlands located in central Idaho, which included 4 million tons of standing merchantable timber as of December 31, 2015. Excluding the effect of this timberland sale, our standing merchantable timber inventory was equal to the volume at the end of 2015. Our timber harvest volumes approximated growth in 2016.

The aggregate estimated volume of current standing merchantable timber inventory is updated annually to reflect increases due to reclassification of young growth to merchantable timber when the young growth meets defined diameter specifications, the annual growth rates of merchantable timber and the acquisition of additional merchantable timber, and to reflect decreases due to timber harvests and land sales. This estimate is derived using methods consistent with industry practice and is based on statistical methods and field sampling. The estimated inventory volume includes timber in environmentally sensitive areas where the timberlands are managed in a manner consistent with best management practices, state forest practice acts and the SFI® or FSC® forest management standards.

Timber volumes are estimated from cruises of the timber tracts, which are generally completed on a five to ten year cycle. Since the individual cruises collect field data at different times for specific sites, the growth model projects standing inventory from the cruise date to a common reporting date. Annual growth rates for the merchantable inventory have historically been in the range of 2% to 5% in the North and 6% to 9% in the South.

5


 

Harvest. Our short-term and long-term harvest plans are critical factors in our long-term management process. Each year, we prepare a harvest plan designating the timber tracts and volumes to be harvested during that particular year. Each harvest plan reflects our analysis of the age, size and species distribution of our timber, as well as our expectations about harvest methods, growth rates, the volume of each species to be harvested, anticipated acquisitions and dispositions, thinning operations, regulatory constraints and other relevant information. Among other things, the optimal harvest cycles, or rotations, for timber vary by location and species and tend to change over time as a result of silvicultural advances, changes in the markets for different sizes and ages of timber and other factors. Since harvest plans are based on projections of weather, timber growth rates, regulatory constraints and other assumptions, many of which are beyond our control, there can be no assurance that we will be able to harvest the volumes projected or the specific timber stands designated in our harvest plans.

Detailed harvest information by region and product is presented in Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. The following table presents a summary of our total 2016 timber harvest by region.

 

 

 

Timber Harvested

 

(Tons in thousands)

 

Sawlogs

 

 

Pulpwood

 

 

Stumpage

 

 

Total

 

Northern region

 

 

1,809

 

 

 

195

 

 

 

19

 

 

 

2,023

 

Southern region

 

 

853

 

 

 

1,116

 

 

 

244

 

 

 

2,213

 

Total

 

 

2,662

 

 

 

1,311

 

 

 

263

 

 

 

4,236

 

 

We expect our harvest level to range between 3.8 million and 4.6 million tons each year over the next several years, depending on market conditions and other factors, assuming no significant timberland acquisitions or dispositions. Based on our current projections, which are based on constant timberland holdings, and that take into consideration such factors as market conditions, the ages of our timber stands and recent timberland sales and acquisitions, we expect to harvest approximately 4.2 million tons in 2017.

The Resource segment sells a portion of its logs at market prices to our wood products manufacturing facilities. Intersegment sales to our wood products manufacturing facilities in 2016 were 22% of our total Resource segment revenues. The segment also sells sawlogs and pulpwood to a variety of forest products companies located near our timberlands. The segment’s customers range in size from small operators to multinational corporations. Idaho Forest Group, LLC operates five sawmills in Idaho and represented slightly more than 10% of our consolidated revenues in 2016, 2015 and 2014. The segment competes with owners of timberlands that operate in areas near our timberlands, ranging from private owners of small tracts of land to some of the largest timberland companies in the United States. The segment competes principally on the basis of distance to market, price, log quality and customer service.

In 2016, approximately 40% of our harvest volumes in both the Northern and Southern regions were sold under log supply agreements. We expect approximately the same amount to be sold under log supply agreements in 2017. In general, our log supply agreements require a specified volume of timber to be delivered to defined customer facilities at prices that are adjusted periodically to reflect market conditions. Prices in our Northern region contracts are adjusted periodically by species to prevailing market prices for logs, lumber, wood chips and other residuals. Prices in our Southern region contracts are adjusted every three months based on prevailing market prices for logs. Currently, our log supply agreements are in place for one to five years.

Other. Our timberlands include a wide diversity of softwood and hardwood species and are certified to either the SFI® or FSC® standards. We adhere to principles that include commitments to sustainable forestry, responsible practices, forest health and productivity and protection of special sites. We are generally able to sell some FSC®-certified logs at premium prices.

Our operations are subject to numerous federal, state and local laws and regulations, including those relating to the environment, endangered species, our forestry activities and health and safety. Due to the significance of regulation to our business, we integrate wildlife, habitat and watershed management into our resource management practices. We also take an active approach to regulatory developments by participating in standard-setting where possible. We work cooperatively with regulators to create voluntary conservation plans that address environmental concerns while preserving our ability to operate our timberlands efficiently. Despite our active participation in governmental policymaking and regulatory standard-setting, there can be no assurance that endangered species, environmental and other laws will not restrict our operations or impose significant costs, damages, penalties or liabilities on us. In particular, we anticipate that endangered species and environmental laws will generally become increasingly stringent.

6


 

The volume and value of timber that can be harvested from our lands may be affected by natural disasters such as fire, insect infestation, disease, ice storms, hurricanes, wind storms, floods and other weather conditions and causes. We assume substantially all risk of loss to the standing timber we own from fire and other hazards, consistent with industry practice in the United States, because insuring for such losses is not practicable.

Wood Products Segment

Our Wood Products segment manufactures and markets lumber, plywood and residual products at five mills located in Arkansas, Idaho, Michigan and Minnesota. The segment’s products are largely commodity products, which are sold through our sales department to end users, retailers or wholesalers for nationwide distribution primarily for use in home building, repair and remodeling, industrial products and other construction activity.

A description of our wood products manufacturing facilities, which are all owned by us, together with their respective 2016 capacities and actual production, are as follows:

 

 

 

Annual Capacity1,2

 

Production2

Sawmills:

 

 

 

 

Warren, Arkansas

 

190 mmbf

 

195 mmbf

St. Maries, Idaho

 

170 mmbf

 

181 mmbf

Gwinn, Michigan

 

175 mmbf

 

183 mmbf

Bemidji, Minnesota

 

135 mmbf

 

142 mmbf

Plywood Mill:

 

 

 

 

St. Maries, Idaho

 

150 mmsf

 

161 mmsf

 

1

Capacity represents the proven annual production capabilities of the facility under normal operating conditions and producing a normal product mix. Normal operating conditions are based on the configuration, efficiency and the number of shifts worked at each individual facility. In general, the definition includes two shifts per day for five days (two 40-hour shifts) per week at each facility, which is consistent with industry-wide recognized measures. Production can exceed capacity due to efficiency gains and overtime.

2mmbf stands for million board feet; mmsf stands for million square feet, 3/8 inch panel thickness basis.

We are a top 10 lumber manufacturer in the United States.  We believe that competitiveness in this industry is largely based on individual mill efficiency and on the availability of competitively priced raw materials on a facility-by-facility basis, rather than the number of mills operated. This is due to the fact that it is generally not economical to transfer logs between or among facilities, which might permit a greater degree of specialization and operating efficiencies. Instead, each facility must utilize the raw materials that are available to it in a relatively limited geographic area. For these reasons, we believe we are able to compete effectively with companies that have a larger number of mills. We compete based on product quality, customer service and price. We can produce and sell FSC®-certified products that generally command premium pricing.

The principal raw material used is logs, which are obtained from our Resource segment or purchased on the open market. We generally do not maintain long-term supply contracts for a significant volume of logs. During 2016, 2015 and 2014, 34%, 33% and 38% of our log purchases, respectively, were provided by our Resource segment.

Real Estate Segment

The activities of our Real Estate segment consist primarily of the sale of non-core timberlands in the categories of HBU, rural recreational real estate and non-strategic properties.

 

HBU properties have characteristics that provide primarily home site or other development potential as a result of superior location or other attractive amenities. These properties tend to have a much higher value than timberlands.

 

Rural recreational real estate properties also have a higher value than timberlands, but do not have the same developmental potential as HBU properties. For example, these properties may be appropriate for hunting, conservation or secondary rural housing.

 

Non-strategic properties are typically on the fringe of our ownership areas and are more valuable to another timberland owner.

7


 

The Real Estate segment engages in real estate sales and limited subdivision activities through Potlatch TRS.

From time to time, we also take advantage of opportunities to sell timberland where we believe pricing to be particularly attractive, to match a sale with a purchase of more desirable property while deferring taxes in a like-kind exchange (LKE) transaction, or to meet various other financial or strategic objectives. Sales of conservation properties and conservation easements on our properties are also included in this segment. Results for the segment depend on the demand for our non-core timberlands, the types of properties sold, the basis of these properties and the timing of closings of property sales. Although large sales of non-strategic properties can cause results that are not comparable or predictable between periods, we have maintained a relatively consistent level of rural real estate and HBU sales.

A main focus of this segment is to continually assess the highest value and best use of our lands. We conduct periodic stratification assessments on our lands and as new lands are acquired. The following tools are used in assessing our lands:

 

on-the-ground analysis and verification of modeling assumptions;

 

electronic analysis, using geographic information systems; and

 

certain measured and ranked attributes, such as timber potential, recreational opportunities, accessibility, special features and population and demographic trends.

We have identified approximately 210,000 acres of non-core timberland real estate. This includes approximately 50,000 acres of HBU property, 55,000 acres of non-strategic timberland and 105,000 acres of rural recreational real estate property. Sales of these lands are expected to occur over a decade or more.

Seasonality

Log and pulpwood sales volumes in our Resource segment are typically lower in the first half of each year as winter rains in the Southern region and spring thaw in the Northern region limit timber harvesting operations due to softened roadbeds and wet logging conditions that restrict access to logging sites. The third quarter is typically our Resource segment's strongest production quarter. Real Estate dispositions and acquisitions can be adversely affected when access to any properties to be sold or considered for acquisition are limited due to adverse weather conditions. Demand for our manufactured wood products typically decreases in the winter months when construction activity is slower, while demand typically increases during the spring, summer and fall when construction activity is generally higher.

Geographic Areas

All of our timberlands, wood products manufacturing facilities and other real estate assets are located within the continental United States. In 2016, 2015 and 2014, less than 1% of our Wood Products' segment revenues were derived from sales of manufactured wood products outside of the United States, primarily to Canada and Mexico. The remainder of our revenues were from domestic sales.

Environmental Regulation

Our operations are subject to federal and state laws and regulations, including those relating to our emissions, wastewater discharges, solid and hazardous waste management, site remediation, endangered species and our forestry activities. We are also subject to the requirements of the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Act and comparable state statutes relating to the health and safety of our employees. We maintain environmental and safety compliance programs and conduct regular internal and independent third-party audits of our facilities and timberlands to monitor compliance with these laws and regulations. Compliance with environmental regulations is a significant factor in our business and requires capital expenditures as well as additional operating costs.

Due to the significance of regulation to our business, we integrate wildlife, habitat and watershed management into our resource management practices. We also take an active approach to regulatory developments by participating in standard-setting where possible. We work cooperatively with regulators to create voluntary conservation plans that address environmental concerns while preserving our ability to operate our timberlands efficiently.

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Enactment of new environmental laws or regulations, or changes in existing laws or regulations, particularly relating to air and water quality, or their enforcement, may require significant expenditures by us or may adversely affect our timberland management, harvesting activities and manufacturing operations.

Similarly, a number of species indigenous to our timberlands have been listed as threatened or endangered or have been proposed for one or the other status under the Endangered Species Act. As a result, our activities in or adjacent to the habitat of these species may be subject to restrictions on the harvesting of timber, reforestation activities and the construction and use of roads.

We expect legislative and regulatory developments in the area of climate change to address carbon dioxide emissions and renewable energy and fuel standards. It is unclear as of this date how any such developments will affect our business.

We believe that our manufacturing facilities and timberland operations are currently in substantial compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations. We cannot be certain, however, that situations that give rise to material environmental liabilities will not be discovered.

At this time, we believe that federal and state laws and regulations related to the protection of endangered species and air and water quality will not have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations or liquidity. We anticipate, however, that increasingly strict laws and regulations relating to the environment, natural resources and forestry operations, as well as increased social concern over environmental issues, may result in additional restrictions on us, leading to increased costs, additional capital expenditures and reduced operating flexibility.

Information regarding potentially material environmental proceedings is included in Note 14: Commitments and Contingencies in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements contained in this report and incorporated herein by reference.

Employees

As of December 31, 2016, we had 953 employees. The workforce consisted of 230 salaried, 687 hourly and 36 temporary or part-time employees. As of December 31, 2016, 18% of the workforce was covered under a collective bargaining agreement, which expires in 2020.

ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS

Investing in our common stock involves a significant degree of risk. Our business, financial condition, results of operations or liquidity could be materially adversely affected by any of the following risks and, as a result, the trading price of our common stock could decline. The risks described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial may also impair our business, financial condition, results of operations or liquidity. In addition to the risk factors discussed below, investors should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties presented in Part 1 - Item 1. Business.

Business and Operating Risks

Our cash dividends are not guaranteed and may fluctuate, which could adversely affect our stock price.

Under the REIT rules, to remain qualified as a REIT, a REIT must distribute, within a certain period after the end of each year, 90% of its ordinary taxable income for such year. Our REIT income, however, consists primarily of net capital gains resulting from payments received under timber cutting contracts with Potlatch TRS and third parties, rather than ordinary taxable income. Therefore, unlike most REITs, we are not required to distribute material amounts of cash to remain qualified as a REIT. If, after giving effect to our dividends, we have not distributed an amount equal to 100% of our REIT taxable income, then we would be required to pay tax on the undistributed portion of such taxable income at regular corporate tax rates and our stockholders would be required to include their proportionate share of any undistributed capital gain in income and would receive a credit or refund for their share of the tax paid by us.

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Our board of directors, in its sole discretion, determines the actual amount of dividends to be made to stockholders based on consideration of a number of factors, including, but not limited to, our results of operations, cash flow and capital requirements, economic conditions in our industry and in the markets for our products, tax considerations, borrowing capacity, debt covenant restrictions, timber prices, harvest levels on our timberlands, market demand for timberlands, including timberland properties we have identified as potentially having a higher and better use, and future acquisitions and dispositions. For a description of debt covenants that could limit our ability to make dividends to stockholders in the future, see Liquidity and Capital Resources in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. Consequently, the level of future dividends to our stockholders may fluctuate, and any reduction in the dividend rate may adversely affect our stock price.

The cyclical nature of our business could adversely affect our results of operations.

The financial performance of our operations is affected by the cyclical nature of our business. The markets for timber, manufactured wood products and real estate are influenced by a variety of factors beyond our control. The demand for our timber and manufactured wood products is affected by the level of new residential construction activity and, to a lesser extent, home repair and remodeling activity, which are subject to fluctuations due to changes in economic conditions, interest rates, credit availability, population growth, weather conditions and other factors. The demand for logs is also affected by the demand for wood chips in the pulp and paper markets. The supply of timber and logs has historically increased during favorable pricing environments, which then causes downward pressure on prices. Historical prices for our manufactured wood products have been volatile, and we have limited direct influence over the timing and extent of price changes for our manufactured wood products. The demand for real estate can be affected by changes in factors such as interest rates, credit availability and economic conditions, as well as by the impact of federal, state and local land use and environmental protection laws.

All of our timberlands are located in Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Minnesota, and Mississippi. As a result, we may be susceptible to adverse economic and other developments in these regions, including industry slowdowns, business layoffs or downsizing, relocations of businesses, changes in demographics, increases in real estate and other taxes and increased regulation, any of which could have a material adverse effect on us.

Our operating results and cash flows will be materially affected by supply and demand for timber.

A variety of factors affect prices for timber, including factors affecting demand, such as changes in economic conditions, the level of domestic new construction and remodeling activity, foreign demand, interest rates, credit availability, population growth, weather conditions and pest infestation, as well as changes in timber supply and other factors. All of these factors can vary by region, timber type (sawlogs or pulpwood logs) and species.

Timber prices are affected by changes in demand on a local, national or international level. The closure of a mill in the regions where we own timber can have a material adverse effect on demand and therefore pricing. As the demand for paper nationwide continues to decline, closures of pulp mills have adversely affected the demand for pulpwood and wood chips in certain of the regions in which we operate. Also, demand in other parts of the world may affect timber prices in the markets in which we compete. For example, during the past year, demand from Asia has declined from previous years, and although we do not sell into the Asian markets, Asian demand has affected supply in North American markets. The recent decrease in Asian demand has had a negative impact on lumber and timber prices in the North American markets.

Timber prices are also affected by changes in timber availability at the local, national and international level. Our timberland ownership is currently concentrated in Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Minnesota and Mississippi. In Alabama, Arkansas, Minnesota and Mississippi, most timberlands are privately owned. Historically, increases in timber prices have often resulted in substantial increases in harvesting on private timberlands, including lands not previously made available for commercial timber operations, causing a short-term increase in supply that has tended to moderate price increases. Decreases in timber prices have often resulted in lower harvest levels, causing short-term decreases in supply that have tended to moderate price decreases. In the South, harvest deferrals during recent years have led to an oversupply of timber in the region, which has reduced prices. In Idaho, where a greater proportion of timberland is government-owned, any substantial increase in timber harvesting from government-owned land could significantly reduce timber prices, which would harm our results of operations. For more than 20 years, environmental concerns and other factors have limited timber sales by

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federal agencies, which historically had been major suppliers of timber to the U.S. forest products industry, particularly in the West. Any reversal of policy that substantially increases timber sales from government-owned land could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and cash flows.

On a local level, timber supplies can fluctuate depending upon factors such as changes in weather conditions and harvest strategies of local timberland owners, as well as occasionally high timber salvage efforts due to events such as unusual pest infestations or fires.

Our wood products are commodities that are widely available from other producers.

Because commodity products have few distinguishing properties from producer to producer, competition for these products is based primarily on price, which is determined by supply relative to demand and competition from substitute products. Prices for our products are affected by many factors outside of our control, and we have no influence over the timing and extent of price changes, which often are volatile. Our profitability with respect to these products depends, in part, on managing our costs, particularly raw material and energy costs, which represent significant components of our operating costs and can fluctuate based upon factors beyond our control.

The wood products industry is highly competitive.

The markets for our wood products are highly competitive and companies that have substantially greater financial resources than we do compete with us in each of our lines of business. Our wood products are subject to competition from wood products manufacturers in the United States and Canada. After years of trade disputes over Canadian softwood lumber imports, the United States and Canada signed a Softwood Lumber Agreement in 2006, which expired in October 2015. The agreement established a system of tiered taxes and volume restrictions relating to Canadian lumber imports to the United States. Following expiration of the softwood lumber agreement, imports of Canadian lumber to the United States at lower prices increased, depressing U.S. lumber prices.  There is no assurance that the Softwood Lumber Agreement will be renegotiated in the future. Even if the Softwood Lumber Agreement is renegotiated, there can be no assurance that it will at all times, or at any time, effectively create a fair trade environment.  Additional information regarding the expiration of the Softwood Lumber Agreement is included in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

In addition, our wood products manufacturing facilities are relatively capital intensive, which leads to high fixed costs and generally results in continued production as long as prices are sufficient to cover variable costs. These conditions have contributed to substantial price competition, particularly during periods of reduced demand. Some of our wood products competitors may currently be lower-cost producers than we are, or may benefit from weak currencies relative to the U.S. dollar, and accordingly these competitors may be less adversely affected than we are by price decreases. Wood products also are subject to significant competition from a variety of substitute products, including non-wood and engineered wood products. To the extent there is a significant increase in competitive pressure from substitute products or other domestic or foreign suppliers, our business could be adversely affected.

Changes in demand for our real estate and delays in the timing of real estate transactions may affect our revenues and operating results.

A number of factors, including availability of credit, a slowing of residential real estate development, population shifts and changes in demographics could reduce the demand for our real estate and negatively affect our results of operations. Changes in investor interest in purchasing timberlands could reduce our ability to execute sales of non-core timberlands and could also negatively affect our results of operations. In addition, changes in the interpretation or enforcement of current laws, or the enactment of new laws, regarding the use and development of real estate, or changes in the political composition of federal, state and local governmental bodies could lead to new or greater costs, delays and liabilities that could materially adversely affect our real estate business, profitability or financial condition.

There are inherent uncertainties in the timing of real estate transactions that could adversely affect our operating results in any particular quarter. The timing of real estate sales is a function of many factors, including the general state of the economy, demand in local real estate markets, the number of properties listed for sale, the seasonal nature of sales, the plans of adjacent landowners and our expectations of future price appreciation. Delays in the

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completion of transactions or the termination of potential transactions may be beyond our control. These events could adversely affect our operating results.

We may be unable to harvest timber or we may elect to reduce harvest levels due to market, weather and regulatory conditions, either of which could adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows.

Our timber harvest levels and sales may be limited due to weather conditions, timber growth cycles, restrictions on access, availability of contract loggers and regulatory requirements associated with the protection of wildlife and water resources, as well as by other factors, including damage by fire, pest infestation, disease and natural disasters such as ice storms, wind storms, tornadoes, hurricanes and floods. Changes in global climate conditions could intensify one or more of these factors. Although damage from such natural causes usually is localized, affecting only a limited percentage of our timber, there can be no assurance that any damage affecting our timberlands will be limited. We typically experience seasonally lower harvest activity during the winter and early spring due to weather conditions. Severe weather conditions and other natural disasters can also reduce the productivity of timberlands and disrupt the harvesting and delivery of logs. Our financial results and cash flows are dependent to a significant extent on our continued ability to harvest timber at adequate levels.

On a short-term basis, we may adjust our timber harvest levels in response to market conditions. Longer term, our timber harvest levels will be affected by acquisitions of additional timberlands, sales of existing timberlands and shifts in harvest from one region to another. In addition to timberland acquisitions and sales, future timber harvest levels may be affected by changes in estimates of long-term sustainable yield because of silvicultural advances, natural disasters, fires, pests, insects and other hazards, regulatory constraints and other factors beyond our control.

We do not insure against losses of standing timber from fire or any other causes.

The volume and value of timber that can be harvested from our lands may be affected by natural disasters such as fire, pest infestation, disease, ice storms, wind storms, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods and other weather conditions and causes beyond our control. As is typical in the forest industry, we assume substantially all risk of loss to the standing timber we own from fire and other hazards because insuring for such losses is not practicable. Consequently, a reduction in our timber inventory could adversely affect our financial results and cash flows.

In addition, the geographic concentration of our property makes us more susceptible to adverse impacts from a single natural disaster such as fire, hurricane, earthquake, insect infestation, drought, disease, ice storms, windstorms, tornadoes, flooding and other factors that could negatively impact our timber production.

A material disruption at one of our manufacturing facilities could prevent us from meeting customer demand, reduce our sales or negatively affect our results of operations and financial condition.

Any of our manufacturing facilities, or any of our machines within an otherwise operational facility, could cease operations unexpectedly due to a number of events, including unscheduled maintenance outages, prolonged power failures, equipment failures, cyber-attacks, labor difficulties, disruptions in the transportation infrastructure, such as roads, bridges, railroad tracks and tunnels, fire, ice storms, floods, windstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes or other catastrophes, terrorism or threats of terrorism, governmental regulations and other operational problems.

Any such downtime or facility damage could prevent us from meeting customer demand for our products and/or require us to make unplanned capital expenditures. If one of these machines or facilities were to incur significant downtime, our ability to meet our production targets and satisfy customer requirements could be impaired, resulting in lower sales and income.

Our businesses are affected by logger and transportation availability and costs.

Our business depends on the availability of logging contractors and providers of transportation of wood products, and is materially affected by the cost of these service providers. Therefore, increases in the cost of fuel could negatively impact our financial results by increasing the cost associated with logging activities and transportation services, and could also result in an overall reduction in the availability of these services.

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We may be unsuccessful in carrying out our acquisition strategy.

We have pursued, and may continue to pursue, acquisitions of strategic timberland properties and other forest products assets. We compete with buyers that have substantially greater financial resources than we have for acquisition opportunities. We intend to finance acquisitions through cash from operations, borrowings under our credit facility, proceeds from equity or debt offerings, proceeds from asset dispositions or any combination thereof. In addition, it is uncertain whether any acquisitions we make will perform in accordance with our expectations. The failure to identify and complete acquisitions of suitable properties could adversely affect our operating results and cash flows.

Our businesses are subject to extensive environmental laws and regulations.

Our operations are subject to a variety of federal, state and local laws and regulations regarding protection of the environment, including those relating to the protection of timberlands, endangered species, timber harvesting practices, recreation and aesthetics, protection and restoration of natural resources, air and water quality and remedial standards for contaminated soil, sediments and groundwater. Failure to comply with these requirements can result in significant fines or penalties, as well as liabilities for remediation of contaminated sites, natural resource damages or alleged personal injury or property damage claims.

Laws, regulations and related judicial decisions and administrative interpretations affecting our business are subject to change and new laws and regulations that may affect our business are frequently enacted. These changes may adversely affect our ability to harvest and sell timber and operate our manufacturing facilities and may adversely affect the ability of others to develop property we intend to sell for higher and better use purposes. Over time, the complexity and stringency of these laws and regulations have increased markedly and the enforcement of these laws and regulations has intensified. We believe that these laws and regulations will continue to become more restrictive and over time could adversely affect our operating results. Regulatory restrictions on future harvesting activities may be significant. Federal, state and local laws and regulations, which are intended to protect threatened and endangered species, as well as waterways and wetlands, limit and may prevent timber harvesting, road building and other activities on our timberlands. For example, the Clean Water Act and comparable state laws, regulations and best management practices programs protect water quality. As a result, our resource management activities adjacent to rivers and streams, as well as the point source discharges from our manufacturing facilities, are subject to strict regulation and there can be no assurance that our forest management and manufacturing activities will not be subject to increased regulation under the Clean Water Act in the future.

Similarly, the threatened and endangered species restrictions apply to activities that would adversely impact a protected species or significantly degrade its habitat. A number of species on our timberlands have been, and in the future may be, protected under these laws. If current or future regulations or their enforcement become more restrictive, the amount of our timberlands subject to harvest restrictions could increase.

We anticipate that increasingly strict laws and regulations relating to the environment, natural resources and forestry operations, as well as increased social concern over environmental issues, may result in additional restrictions on us, leading to increased costs, additional capital expenditures and reduced operating flexibility.

Our manufacturing operations are subject to stringent environmental laws, regulations and permits covering air emissions, wastewater discharge, water usage and waste handling and disposal that govern how we operate our facilities. These laws, regulations and permits, now and in the future, may restrict our current production and limit our ability to increase production, and impose significant costs on our operations with respect to environmental compliance. Overall, it is expected that environmental compliance costs will likely increase over time as environmental requirements become more stringent and as the expectations of the communities in which we operate become more demanding.

Certain environmental laws, including the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) impose strict, and under certain circumstances joint and several, liability on responsible parties, including current and former owners and operators of contaminated sites, for costs of investigation and remediation of contamination. They also impose liability for related damages to natural resources. We have in the past been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a potentially responsible party under CERCLA at various locations, and we are currently identified as a potentially responsible party in connection with one of our properties. Additional information regarding this matter is included in Note 14: Commitments and Contingencies in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in this report, and that information is

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incorporated herein by reference. It is possible that other facilities we own or operate, or formerly owned or operated, or timberlands we now own or acquire, could also become subject to liabilities under these laws. The cost of investigation and remediation of contaminated properties could increase operating costs and adversely affect our financial results. Although we believe we have appropriate amounts accrued for the investigation and remediation of known matters, there can be no assurance that actual expenditures will not exceed our expectations and that amounts accrued will not be increased or that other unknown liabilities will not be discovered in the future.

Environmental groups and interested individuals may intervene in the regulatory processes in the locations where we own timberlands and operate our wood products mills. Delays or restrictions on our operations due to the intervention of environmental groups or interested individuals could adversely affect our operating results. In addition to intervention in regulatory proceedings, interested parties may file or threaten to file lawsuits that seek to prevent us from obtaining permits, harvesting timber under contract with federal or state agencies, implementing capital improvements or pursuing operating plans or require us to obtain permits before pursuing operating plans. Any lawsuit, or even a threatened lawsuit, could delay harvesting on our timberlands or impact our ability to operate or invest in our wood products mills.

Our defined benefit pension plans are currently underfunded.

We have qualified defined pension plans that cover the majority of our employees.  The determination of pension plan expense and the requirements for funding our pension plans are based on a number of actuarial assumptions. Two critical assumptions are the expected rate of return on plan assets and the discount rate applied to pension plan obligations. Pension plan assets primarily consist of equity and fixed income investments; therefore, fluctuations in actual equity market returns and changes in long-term interest rates may result in increased pension costs in future periods. Changes in assumptions regarding discount rates and expected rates of return on plan assets could also increase future pension costs. Changes in any of these factors may significantly impact future contribution requirements.  For additional information regarding this matter see Note 11:  Savings Plans, Pension Plans and Other Postretirement Employee Benefits in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements and Liquidity and Capital Resources and Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates included in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

We depend on external sources of capital for future growth.

Our ability to finance growth is dependent to a significant degree on external sources of capital. Our ability to access such capital on favorable terms could be hampered by a number of factors, many of which are outside of our control, including a decline in general market conditions, decreased market liquidity, a downgrade to our public debt rating, increases in interest rates, an unfavorable market perception of our growth potential, a decrease in our current or estimated future earnings or a decrease in the market price of our common stock. In addition, our ability to access additional capital may also be limited by the terms of our existing indebtedness, which, among other things, restricts our incurrence of debt and the payment of dividends. For additional details, see Liquidity and Capital Resources in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. Any of these factors, individually or in combination, could prevent us from being able to obtain the capital we require on terms that are acceptable to us, and the failure to obtain necessary capital could materially adversely affect our future growth.

A strike or other work stoppage, or our inability to renew collective bargaining agreements on favorable terms, could adversely affect our financial results.

As of December 31, 2016, approximately 18% of our workforce was covered by a collective bargaining agreement, which expires in 2020. If our unionized workers were to engage in a strike or other work stoppage, or other non-unionized operations were to become unionized, we could experience a significant disruption of operations at our facilities or higher ongoing labor costs. A strike or other work stoppage in the facilities of any of our major customers or suppliers could also have similar effects on us.

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Risks Related to Our Indebtedness

Our indebtedness could materially adversely affect our ability to generate sufficient cash to pay dividends to stockholders and fulfill our debt obligations, our ability to react to changes in our business and our ability to incur additional indebtedness to fund future needs.

Our debt requires interest and principal payments. As of December 31, 2016, we had long-term debt of $587.5 million, including $5.0 million due in June 2017 and $6.0 million due in December 2017.  Subject to the limits contained in our debt instruments, we may be able to incur additional debt from time to time to finance working capital, capital expenditures, investments or acquisitions or for other purposes. If we do so, the risks related to our indebtedness could intensify.

Our indebtedness increases the possibility that we may be unable to generate cash sufficient to pay, when due, the principal of, interest on or other amounts due in respect of our indebtedness or to pay dividends to our stockholders. Our indebtedness, combined with our other financial obligations and contractual commitments, could have important consequences for stockholders. For example, it could:

 

make it more difficult for us to satisfy our obligations with respect to our indebtedness, and any failure to comply with the obligations under any of our debt instruments, including restrictive covenants, could result in an event of default under the agreements governing such indebtedness;

 

require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to payments on our indebtedness, thereby reducing funds available for dividends to stockholders, working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and other purposes;

 

increase our vulnerability to adverse economic and industry conditions, which could place us at a competitive disadvantage compared with our competitors that have relatively less indebtedness;

 

limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the industries in which we operate; and

 

limit our ability to borrow additional funds, or to dispose of assets to raise funds, if needed, for dividends to stockholders, working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and other corporate purposes.

Changes in credit ratings issued by nationally recognized statistical rating organizations could adversely affect our cost of financing and have an adverse effect on the market price of our securities.

Credit rating agencies rate our debt securities on factors that include our operating results, actions that we take, their view of the general outlook for our industry and their view of the general outlook for the economy. Actions taken by the rating agencies can include maintaining, upgrading or downgrading the current rating or placing us on a watch list for possible future downgrading. Downgrading the credit rating of our debt securities or placing us on a watch list for possible future downgrading could limit our access to the credit markets, increase our cost of financing, and have an adverse effect on the market price of our securities. For additional detail on our credit ratings see Liquidity and Capital Resources in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

REIT and Tax-Related Risks

If we fail to remain qualified as a REIT, income from our timberlands will be subject to taxation at regular corporate rates and we will have reduced cash available for dividends to our stockholders.

Qualification as a REIT involves the application of highly technical and complex provisions of the Internal Revenue Code to our operations, including satisfaction of certain asset, income, organizational, dividends, stockholder ownership and other requirements, on a continuing basis. Given the highly complex nature of the rules governing REITs, the ongoing importance of factual determinations and the possibility of future changes in our circumstances, no assurance can be given that we will remain qualified as a REIT.

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In addition, the rules dealing with federal income taxation are constantly under review by persons involved in the legislative process and by the IRS and the U.S. Department of the Treasury (Treasury). Changes to the tax laws affecting REITs or taxable REIT subsidiaries, which may have retroactive application, could adversely affect our stockholders or us. We cannot predict how changes in the tax laws might affect our stockholders or us. Accordingly, we cannot provide assurance that new legislation, Treasury regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions will not significantly affect our ability to remain qualified as a REIT, the federal income tax consequences of such qualification, the determination of the amount of REIT taxable income or the amount of tax paid by the TRS.

If in any taxable year we fail to remain qualified as a REIT:

 

we would not be allowed a deduction for dividends to stockholders in computing our taxable income; and

 

we would be subject to federal income tax on our taxable income at regular corporate rates, including any applicable alternative minimum tax.

Any such corporate tax liability could be substantial and would reduce the amount of cash available for dividends to our stockholders, which in turn could have an adverse impact on the value of our common stock. In addition, we would be disqualified from treatment as a REIT for the four taxable years following the year during which the qualification was lost, unless we are entitled to relief under certain statutory provisions. As a result, net income and the cash available for dividends to our stockholders could be reduced for up to five years, which would have an adverse impact on the value of our common stock.

Certain of our business activities are potentially subject to a prohibited transactions tax on 100% of our net income derived from such activities, which would reduce our cash flow and impair our ability to pay dividends.

REITs are generally intended to be passive entities and can thus only engage in those activities permitted by the Internal Revenue Code, which for us generally include owning and managing a timberland portfolio, growing timber and selling standing timber.

Accordingly, the manufacture and sale of wood products, certain types of timberland sales, and the harvest and sale of logs are conducted through Potlatch TRS because such activities generate non-qualifying REIT income and could constitute “prohibited transactions” if such activities were engaged in directly by the REIT. In general, prohibited transactions are defined by the Internal Revenue Code to be sales or other dispositions of property held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of a trade or business.

By conducting our business in this manner, we believe we will satisfy the REIT requirements of the Internal Revenue Code and thus avoid the 100% tax that could be imposed if a REIT were to conduct a prohibited transaction. We may not always be successful, however, in limiting such activities to Potlatch TRS. Therefore, we could be subject to the 100% prohibited transactions tax if such instances were to occur, which would adversely affect our cash flow and impair our ability to make quarterly dividends.

Our REIT structure may limit our ability to invest in our non-REIT qualifying operations.

Our use of Potlatch TRS enables us to continue to engage in non-REIT qualifying business activities consisting primarily of our manufacturing facilities, assets used for the harvesting of timber and the sale of logs and selected land parcels that we expect to be sold or developed for higher and better use purposes. However, under the Internal Revenue Code, no more than 25% of the value of the assets of a REIT may be represented by securities of our taxable REIT subsidiaries. This threshold decreases to 20% in 2018. This may limit our ability to make investments in our wood products manufacturing operations or in other non-REIT qualifying operations.

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Our ability to pay dividends and service our indebtedness using cash generated through our taxable REIT subsidiary may be limited.

The rules with which we must comply to maintain our status as a REIT limit our ability to use dividends from Potlatch TRS for the payment of stockholder dividends and to service our indebtedness. In particular, at least 75% of our gross income for each taxable year as a REIT must be derived from sales of our standing timber and other types of real estate income. No more than 25% of our gross income may consist of dividends from Potlatch TRS and other non-qualifying types of income. This requirement may limit our ability to receive dividends from Potlatch TRS and may impact our ability to pay dividends to stockholders and service the REIT's indebtedness using cash from Potlatch TRS.

We may not be able to realize our deferred tax assets.

We may not have sufficient future taxable income to realize all our deferred tax assets. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets depends on the generation of future taxable income during the periods in which our temporary differences are deductible as governed by the tax code. The amount of our deferred tax assets could be reduced in the near term if future taxable income does not materialize or management is unable to implement one or more strategies that it has identified to generate taxable income. See Note 13: Income Taxes in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements contained in this report for additional information about our deferred tax assets.

Risks Related to Ownership of Our Common Stock

The price of our common stock may be volatile.

The market price of our common stock may be influenced by many factors, some of which are beyond our control, including those described above under Business and Operating Risks and the following: actual or anticipated fluctuations in our operating results or our competitors’ operating results, announcements by us or our competitors of capacity changes, acquisitions or strategic investments, our growth rate and our competitors’ growth rates, the financial markets, interest rates and general economic conditions, changes in stock market analyst recommendations regarding us, our competitors or the forest products industry generally, or lack of analyst coverage of our common stock, failure to pay cash dividends or the amount of cash dividends paid, sales of our common stock by our executive officers, directors and significant stockholders or sales of substantial amounts of common stock, changes in accounting principles and changes in tax laws and regulations.

Certain provisions of our certificate of incorporation and bylaws and of Delaware law may make it difficult for stockholders to change the composition of our board of directors and may discourage hostile takeover attempts that some of our stockholders may consider to be beneficial.

Certain provisions of our certificate of incorporation and bylaws and of Delaware law may have the effect of delaying or preventing changes in control if our board of directors determines that such changes in control are not in the best interest of us and our stockholders. The provisions in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws include, among other things, the following:

 

a classified board of directors with three-year staggered terms;

 

the ability of our board of directors to issue shares of preferred stock and to determine the price and other terms, including preferences and voting rights, of those shares without stockholder approval;

 

stockholder action can only be taken at a special or regular meeting and not by written consent and stockholders cannot call a special meeting except upon the written request of stockholders entitled to cast not less than a majority of all of the votes entitled to be cast at the meeting;

 

advance notice procedures for nominating candidates to our board of directors or presenting matters at stockholder meetings;

 

removal of directors only for cause;

 

allowing only our board of directors to fill vacancies on our board of directors;

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in order to facilitate the preservation of our status as a REIT under the Internal Revenue Code, a prohibition on any single stockholder, or any group of affiliated stockholders, from beneficially owning more than 9.8% of our outstanding common or preferred stock, unless our board waives or modifies this ownership limitation;

 

unless approved by the vote of at least 80% of our outstanding shares, we may not engage in business combinations, including mergers, dispositions of assets, certain issuances of shares of stock and other specified transactions, with a person owning or controlling, directly or indirectly, 5% or more of the voting power of our outstanding common stock; and

 

supermajority voting requirements to amend our bylaws and certain provisions of our certificate of incorporation.

While these provisions have the effect of encouraging persons seeking to acquire control of our company to negotiate with our board of directors, they could enable the board of directors to hinder or frustrate a transaction that stockholders might believe to be in their best interests and, in that case, may prevent or discourage attempts to remove and replace incumbent directors. We are also subject to Delaware laws that could have similar effects. One of these laws prohibits us from engaging in a business combination with a significant stockholder unless specific conditions are met.

18


 

ITEM 1B.  UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

ITEM 2.  PROPERTIES

Information on our locations and facilities is included in Part I - Item 1. Business under each of the respective segment headers.

ITEM 3.  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

Other than the environmental proceedings described in Note 14: Commitments and Contingencies in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, which is incorporated herein by reference, we believe there is no pending or threatened litigation that could have a material adverse effect on our financial position, operations or liquidity.

ITEM 4.  MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

19


 

Part II

ITEM 5.  MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Our common stock trades on The Nasdaq Global Select Market (NASDAQ). The quarterly high and low sales price per share of our common stock and the quarterly cash dividend payments per share for 2016 and 2015 were as follows:

 

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

Quarter

 

High

 

 

Low

 

 

Cash

Dividends

 

 

High

 

 

Low

 

 

Cash

Dividends

 

1st

 

$

32.00

 

 

$

24.01

 

 

$

0.375

 

 

$

43.55

 

 

$

37.95

 

 

$

0.375

 

2nd

 

$

35.94

 

 

$

31.06

 

 

$

0.375

 

 

$

40.11

 

 

$

35.00

 

 

$

0.375

 

3rd

 

$

39.91

 

 

$

33.01

 

 

$

0.375

 

 

$

36.34

 

 

$

28.40

 

 

$

0.375

 

4th

 

$

44.00

 

 

$

36.35

 

 

$

0.375

 

 

$

34.24

 

 

$

28.00

 

 

$

0.375

 

 

There were approximately 1,054 stockholders of record at January 31, 2017.

Our board of directors, in its sole discretion, determines the actual amount of dividends to be paid to stockholders based on consideration of a number of factors, including, but not limited to, our results of operations, cash flow and capital requirements, economic conditions in our industry and in the markets for our products, timber prices, harvest levels on our timberlands, market demand for timberlands, including timberland properties we have identified as potentially having a higher and better use, future acquisitions and dispositions, tax considerations, borrowing capacity, and debt covenant restrictions. Consequently, the level of dividends paid to our stockholders may fluctuate and any reduction in the dividend rate may adversely affect our stock price.

Reference is made to the discussion in Liquidity and Capital Resources in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations of (i) the covenants in our credit facility and term loan and the indenture governing our senior notes with which we must comply in order to make cash dividends and (ii) the REIT tax rules, which under certain circumstances may restrict our ability to receive dividends from Potlatch TRS, our taxable REIT subsidiary.

ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

On April 26, 2016, we announced that our board of directors had authorized management to repurchase up to $60 million of common stock over a period of 24 months (the “Repurchase Plan”).

 

Common Share Purchases

 

Total Number of Shares Purchased

 

 

Average Price Paid Per Share

 

 

Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of a Publicly Announced Plan

 

 

Maximum Dollar Value of Shares that May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plan

 

April (4/28/16 - 4/30/16)

 

 

94,625

 

 

$

35.46

 

 

 

94,625

 

 

$

56,644,779

 

May (5/1/16 - 5/31/16)

 

 

75,000

 

 

$

34.61

 

 

 

75,000

 

 

$

54,048,978

 

June (6/1/16 - 6/30/16)

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

54,048,978

 

July (7/1/16 - 7/31/16)

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

54,048,978

 

August (8/1/16 - 8/31/16)

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

54,048,978

 

September (9/1/16 - 9/30/16)

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

54,048,978

 

October (10/1/16 - 10/31/16)

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

54,048,978

 

November (11/1/16 - 11/30/16)

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

54,048,978

 

December (12/1/16 - 12/31/16)

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

54,048,978

 

Total Shares Purchased

 

 

169,625

 

 

$

35.08

 

 

 

169,625

 

 

 

 

 

During the second quarter of 2016, we repurchased 169,625 shares of common stock for $6.0 million (including transaction costs). Transaction costs are not counted against authorized funds under the Repurchase Plan. All purchases were made in open-market transactions.

20


 

We record share purchases upon trade date, as opposed to the settlement date when cash is disbursed. We record a liability to account for repurchases that have not been settled. There were no unsettled repurchases as of December 31, 2016.

EQUITY COMPENSATION PLAN INFORMATION

The following table provides information about securities authorized for issuance under our equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2016:

 

Plan Category

 

Number of securities

to be issued upon

exercise of

outstanding options,

warrants and rights1

 

 

Weighted-average

exercise price of

outstanding options,

warrants and rights2

 

 

Number of securities

remaining available

for future issuance

under equity

compensation plans

 

Equity compensation plans approved by security holders

 

 

602,143

 

 

$

 

 

 

1,086,633

 

Equity compensation plans not approved by security

   holders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

602,143

 

 

$

 

 

 

1,086,633

 

 

1

Includes 286,518 performance shares and 82,201 restricted stock units, or RSUs, which are the maximum number of shares that can be awarded under the performance share and RSU programs, not including future dividend equivalents. Also includes 233,424 deferred compensation stock equivalent units.

2

Performance shares and RSUs do not have exercise prices and are therefore not included in the weighted-average exercise price calculation.

21


 

Company Stock Price Performance

The following graph and table show a five year comparison of cumulative total stockholder returns for our company, the NAREIT Equity Index, the Standard & Poor’s 500 Composite Index and a group of five companies that we refer to as our Peer Group for the period ended December 31, 2016. The total stockholder return assumes $100 invested at December 31, 2011, with quarterly reinvestment of all dividends.

 

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

 

2012

 

 

2013

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

 

2016

 

Potlatch Corporation

 

$

130

 

 

$

143

 

 

$

149

 

 

$

113

 

 

$

161

 

NAREIT Equity Index

 

$

118

 

 

$

121

 

 

$

157

 

 

$

162

 

 

$

176

 

S&P 500 Composite

 

$

116

 

 

$

154

 

 

$

175

 

 

$

177

 

 

$

198

 

2016 Peer Group1, 2

 

$

141

 

 

$

149

 

 

$

165

 

 

$

146

 

 

$

162

 

 

1

Our peer group companies are Deltic Timber Corp., Rayonier Inc., St. Joe Co., Universal Forest Products Inc. and Weyerhaeuser Co. Returns are weighted based on market capitalizations as of the beginning of each year.

2

Plum Creek Timber Co., Inc. (PCL) was included in our 2015 peer group. PCL has been excluded from 2016 and prior years due to the merger with Weyerhaeuser Co. in 2016.

The performance graph above is being furnished solely to accompany this Report pursuant to Item 201(e) of Regulation S-K and is not being filed for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and is not to be incorporated by reference into any of our filings, whether made before or after the date hereof, regardless of any general incorporation in such filing.

 

22


 

ITEM 6.  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

POTLATCH CORPORATION AND CONSOLIDATED SUBSIDIARIES

 

(Dollars in thousands - except per share amounts)

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

2013

 

 

2012

 

Revenues

 

$

599,099

 

 

$

575,336

 

 

$

606,950

 

 

$

570,289

 

 

$

525,134

 

Net income1

 

$

10,938

 

 

$

31,714

 

 

$

89,910

 

 

$

70,581

 

 

$

42,594

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets1,2,3

 

$

927,681

 

 

$

1,016,612

 

 

$

1,031,746

 

 

$

677,202

 

 

$

714,787

 

Long-term debt (including current portion)1,2,3

 

$

583,988

 

 

$

603,881

 

 

$

625,668

 

 

$

316,764

 

 

$

353,465

 

Total stockholders’ equity

 

$

156,274

 

 

$

203,736

 

 

$

225,066

 

 

$

204,148

 

 

$

138,643

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital expenditures:4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property, plant and equipment

 

$

5,866

 

 

$

18,987

 

 

$

13,261

 

 

$

10,280

 

 

$

5,636

 

Timberlands reforestation and roads

 

 

13,422

 

 

 

13,745

 

 

 

10,971

 

 

 

12,313

 

 

 

11,774

 

Total capital expenditures

 

$

19,288

 

 

$

32,732

 

 

$

24,232

 

 

$

22,593

 

 

$

17,410

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

$

0.27

 

 

$

0.78

 

 

$

2.21

 

 

$

1.74

 

 

$

1.06

 

Diluted

 

$

0.27

 

 

$

0.77

 

 

$

2.20

 

 

$

1.73

 

 

$

1.05

 

Dividends per share

 

$

1.50

 

 

$

1.50

 

 

$

1.425

 

 

$

1.28

 

 

$

1.24

 

Weighted-average shares outstanding

   (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

 

40,798

 

 

 

40,842

 

 

 

40,749

 

 

 

40,503

 

 

 

40,333

 

Diluted

 

 

41,033

 

 

 

40,988

 

 

 

40,894

 

 

 

40,709

 

 

 

40,553

 

 

1

In the second quarter of 2016, we sold approximately 172,000 acres of timberlands located in central Idaho for $114 million at a loss of $48.5 million before taxes and repaid $42.6 million of revenue bonds.

2

In December 2014, we acquired approximately 201,000 acres of timberland in Alabama and Mississippi for a total purchase price of $384 million, which was funded with $310 million of new term loans and cash on hand.

3

Debt issuance costs in 2012 - 2014 were reclassified to conform with the 2015 and 2016 presentation.

4

Excludes the acquisition of timber and timberlands.

23


 

ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Introduction

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with Part I - Item 1. Business and Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

Our business is organized into three reporting segments: Resource, Wood Products and Real Estate. Sales between segments are recorded as intersegment revenues based on prevailing market prices. Approximately 20% of the Resource segment’s sales have been to Wood Products. Our other segments generally do not generate intersegment revenues.

In the discussion of our consolidated results of operations, our revenues are reported after elimination of intersegment revenues. In the business segment discussions, each segment’s revenues are presented before elimination of intersegment revenues.

The operating results of our Resource, Wood Products and Real Estate business segments have been and will continue to be influenced by a variety of factors, including the cyclical nature of the forest products industry, changes in timber prices and in harvest levels from our timberlands, competition, timberland valuations, demand for our non-strategic timberland for higher and better use purposes, lumber prices, the efficiency and level of capacity utilization of our wood products manufacturing operations, changes in our principal expenses such as log costs, asset dispositions or acquisitions and other factors. See Part I - Item 1A. Risk Factors for additional information.

Overview

Summary of 2016

All three of our business segments contributed to our positive results for 2016. The Resource segment successfully managed through challenging weather conditions to achieve our planned harvest volume for the year. Our recent capital projects at each of our lumber mills resulted in improved lumber recovery, better grade yield and increased production. The Real Estate segment sold approximately 172,000 acres of non-strategic timberlands located in central Idaho for $114 million and closed on three large conservation sales during the year.

Our business is affected by macroeconomic factors that can change the demand and supply of our products. While we expect volatile lumber prices in 2017, the U.S. economy is expected to continue to grow. Factors impacting the demand for North American lumber include:

 

U.S. housing starts have risen steadily and are forecasted to continue to improve;

 

The U.S. repair and remodel markets, including the do-it-yourself segment, were strong and are expected to increase;

 

The U.S. dollar has remained strong, resulting in elevated Canadian lumber imports into the United States;

 

Chinese demand for North American lumber has decreased;

 

The United States Lumber Coalition filed a trade case on November 25th against Canadian lumber imports; and

 

The U.S. South continues to experience excess sawlog supply.

Summary of 2015

During 2015, the Resource and Wood Products segment results were affected by lower lumber prices resulting from excess supply in the lumber markets. Lumber demand decreased in early 2015 due to adverse weather in the eastern part of the United States, which slowed housing starts, while a mild winter in the western part of the United States did not limit timber harvesting, which provided for strong log and lumber production volumes. A decrease in lumber exported by Canada to China, coupled with a weak Canadian dollar relative to the U.S. dollar, resulted in higher Canadian lumber sales into the United States.

24


 

Following the December 2014 acquisition of timberlands in Alabama and Mississippi, harvest volumes increased in 2015, as well as associated logging, hauling, and depletion costs.

In addition, during 2015, we completed large capital projects at each of our lumber mills, which increased log utilization, recovery of higher grade lumber and production. These capital projects resulted in lower production volumes in 2015 due to down time taken during installation.

We also encountered higher log costs in Michigan and Minnesota.

Summary of the Softwood Lumber Agreement

After years of trade disputes over Canadian softwood lumber imports, the United States and Canada signed a Softwood Lumber Agreement in 2006, which expired in October 2015. The 2006 agreement stipulated a one-year standstill period during which time the United States could not file a trade case.  Negotiations between the United States and Canada continued during the standstill, however, no agreement was reached.  On November 25, 2016, the U.S. lumber industry filed a petition seeking countervailing (CVD) and anti-dumping (AD) duties on Canadian lumber imports with the U.S. Department of Commerce.  On January 6, 2017, the U.S. International Trade Commission made a preliminary ruling that Canadian lumber imports have caused injury to the U.S. industry, which means the Department of Commerce will continue its investigation into the petition filed by the U.S. lumber industry. The U.S. Department of Commerce is expected to announce its preliminary ruling in the CVD investigation in April or May of 2017.  A ruling in the AD investigation will likely follow about 60 days later.  Final rulings on injury and CVD and AD duties are expected in the 4th quarter of 2017.  In the meantime, discussions between the United States and Canada continue in hopes of reaching a negotiated agreement.  Even if CVD and AD duties are assessed against Canada or an agreement is successfully negotiated, there can be no assurance that it will materially affect U.S. lumber prices.

CONSOLIDATED RESULTS

The following table sets forth year-over-year changes in items included in our Consolidated Statements of Income. Our Business Segment Results provide a more detailed discussion of our segments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016

 

2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

vs.

 

vs.

(Dollars in thousands)

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

2014

Revenues

 

$

599,099

 

 

$

575,336

 

 

$

606,950

 

 

4%

 

(5%)

Costs and expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of goods sold

 

 

462,304

 

 

 

470,037

 

 

 

429,789

 

 

(2%)

 

9%

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

 

52,719

 

 

 

46,392

 

 

 

44,655

 

 

14%

 

4%

Loss on sale of central Idaho timber and

   timberlands

 

 

48,522

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*

 

*

 

 

 

563,545

 

 

 

516,429

 

 

 

474,444

 

 

9%

 

9%

Operating income

 

 

35,554

 

 

 

58,907

 

 

 

132,506

 

 

(40%)

 

(56%)

Interest expense, net

 

 

(28,941

)

 

 

(32,761

)

 

 

(22,909

)

 

(12%)

 

43%

Income before income taxes

 

 

6,613

 

 

 

26,146

 

 

 

109,597

 

 

(75%)

 

(76%)

Income tax benefit (provision)

 

 

4,325

 

 

 

5,568

 

 

 

(19,687

)

 

(22%)

 

*

Net income

 

$

10,938

 

 

$

31,714

 

 

$

89,910

 

 

(66%)

 

(65%)

 

*

Percentage change not meaningful.

25


 

Revenues

2016 compared with 2015

Revenues increased $23.8 million, or 4%, due to a 10% increase in lumber shipments, a 2% increase in lumber sales prices and 7,155 more acres sold, partially offset by a decrease in harvest volumes due to the sale of central Idaho timberlands.

2015 compared with 2014

The 5% decrease in revenues was due to lower log and lumber prices across all of our regions. Sawlog prices decreased an average of 6% while pulpwood prices decreased an average of 2%, compared with 2014. Lumber sales prices decreased 14% in 2015, compared with 2014. The decrease in revenues was partially offset by a 20% increase in harvest volumes as a result of our acquisition of Alabama and Mississippi timberlands in December 2014. Real Estate revenues decreased $11.5 million due to less acres sold in 2015.

Cost of goods sold

2016 compared with 2015

Cost of goods sold decreased 2% due to lower log and haul and depletion on reduced harvest volumes, partially offset by an increase in the average land basis of real estate sold due to geographic mix.

2015 compared with 2014

Cost of goods sold increased 9% as a result of increased logging, hauling and depletion as a result of our acquisition of Alabama and Mississippi timberlands in December 2014, as well as higher fiber and lumber manufacturing costs in our Wood Products business.

Selling, general and administrative expenses

2016 compared with 2015

The increase in selling, general and administrative expenses is a combination of the annual cash incentive compensation, which was absent in 2015, and higher pension expense resulting from lower discount rates as compared with the prior year.

2015 compared with 2014

The increase in selling, general and administrative expenses is primarily due to higher pension expense resulting from the adoption of new mortality tables as of December 31, 2014, partially offset by the absence of annual cash incentive compensation expense in 2015.

Income taxes

Income taxes are primarily due to income or loss from Potlatch TRS. The TRS had a loss before income tax of $14.0 million and $14.2 million for 2016 and 2015, respectively, and income before income tax of $61.6 million for 2014.

26


 

BUSINESS SEGMENT RESULTS

Resource Segment

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016

 

2015

 

 

For the Years Ended December 31,

 

 

vs.

 

vs.

(Dollars in thousands)

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

2014

Revenues1

 

$

256,163

 

 

$

263,875

 

 

$

252,581

 

 

(3%)

 

4%

Cost of goods sold:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Logging and hauling

 

 

117,583

 

 

 

126,085

 

 

 

117,938

 

 

(7%)

 

7%

Depreciation, depletion and amortization

 

 

24,090

 

 

 

28,583

 

 

 

17,428

 

 

(16%)

 

64%

Other

 

 

26,086

 

 

 

26,289

 

 

 

25,815

 

 

(1%)

 

2%

 

 

 

167,759

 

 

 

180,957

 

 

 

161,181

 

 

(7%)

 

12%

Selling, general and administrative expenses2

 

 

6,486

 

 

 

6,568

 

 

 

6,424

 

 

(1%)

 

2%

Operating income

 

$

81,918

 

 

$

76,350

 

 

$

84,976

 

 

7%

 

(10%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harvest Volumes (in tons)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern region

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sawlog

 

 

1,809,288

 

 

 

1,992,965

 

 

 

1,982,113

 

 

(9%)

 

1%

Pulpwood

 

 

194,414

 

 

 

194,902

 

 

 

201,926

 

 

 

(3%)

Stumpage

 

 

18,592

 

 

 

23,574

 

 

 

16,312

 

 

(21%)

 

45%

Total

 

 

2,022,294

 

 

 

2,211,441

 

 

 

2,200,351

 

 

(9%)

 

1%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Southern region

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sawlog

 

 

853,377

 

 

 

736,333

 

 

 

619,750

 

 

16%

 

19%

Pulpwood

 

 

1,115,647

 

 

 

1,127,561

 

 

 

817,408

 

 

(1%)

 

38%

Stumpage

 

 

244,201

 

 

 

321,172

 

 

 

21,798

 

 

(24%)

 

*

Total

 

 

2,213,225

 

 

 

2,185,066

 

 

 

1,458,956

 

 

1%

 

50%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total harvest volume

 

 

4,235,519

 

 

 

4,396,507

 

 

 

3,659,307

 

 

(4%)

 

20%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales Price/Unit ($ per ton)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern region3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sawlog

 

$

90

 

 

$

87

 

 

$

91

 

 

3%

 

(4%)

Pulpwood

 

$

42

 

 

$

42

 

 

$

43

 

 

 

(2%)

Stumpage

 

$

13

 

 

$

9

 

 

$

11

 

 

44%