Attached files

file filename
EX-4.1 - EXHIBIT 4.1 - Steel Excel Inc.exhibit41_12312015.htm
EX-21 - EXHIBIT 21 - Steel Excel Inc.exhibt21_12312015.htm
EX-32 - EXHIBIT 32 - Steel Excel Inc.exhibit32_12312015.htm
EX-31.2 - EXHIBIT 31.2 - Steel Excel Inc.exhibit312_12312015.htm
EX-31.1 - EXHIBIT 31.1 - Steel Excel Inc.exhibit311_12312015.htm
EX-10.23 - EXHIBIT 10.23 - Steel Excel Inc.exhibit1023_12312015.htm


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
_____________________ 

FORM 10-K
 
(Mark One)
ý
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015 or
o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from              to

Commission file number 0-15071
 _____________________

Steel Excel Inc.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

DELAWARE
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
94-2748530
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
 
1133 WESTCHESTER AVENUE, SUITE N222
WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK
(Address of principal executive offices)
10604
(Zip Code)
 
Registrant's telephone number, including area code (914) 461-1300
 _____________________

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $0.001 per share
 
Nasdaq Capital Market
Preferred Stock Purchase Rights
 
Nasdaq Capital Market

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
Yes ¨ No ý

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.
Yes ¨ No ý

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý  No ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ý No ¨





Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one).

Large accelerated filer o
Accelerated filer ý
Non-accelerated filer o
Smaller reporting company o
 
 
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o No ý

The aggregate market value of the Registrant's common stock held by non-affiliates of the Registrant as of June 30, 2015, the last business day of the Registrant's most recently completed second fiscal quarter, was approximately $96.8 million.

As of February 29, 2016, there were 11,347,038 shares of Steel Excel’s common stock outstanding.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

The information required by Items 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 of Part III will be incorporated by reference to certain portions of a definitive proxy statement, which is expected to be filed by the Registrant within 120 days after the close of its fiscal year.




TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
 
 
Business
 
Item 1A.
 
Risk Factors
 
Item 1B.
 
Unresolved Staff Comments
 
Item 2.
 
Properties
 
Item 3.
 
Legal Proceedings
 
Item 4.
 
Mine Safety Disclosures
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 5.
 
Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
 
Item 6.
 
Selected Financial Data
 
Item 7.
 
Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
 
Item 7A.
 
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
 
Item 8.
 
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
 
Item 9.
 
Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosures
 
Item 9A.
 
Controls and Procedures
 
Item 9B.
 
Other Information
 
 
 
 
 
Part III.
 
 
 
 
Item 10.
 
Directors, Executives Officers and Corporate Governance
 
Item 11.
 
Executive Compensation
 
Item 12.
 
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
 
Item 13.
 
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
 
Item 14.
 
Principal Accounting Fees and Services
 
 
 
 
 
Part IV.
 
 
 
 
Item 15.
 
Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Signatures

2



Certain statements contained in this annual report on Form 10-K that are not purely historical are forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended ( the “Exchange Act”). Such statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors that may cause actual results, performance, or achievements of the Company to be materially different from any future results, performance, or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are based upon reasonable assumptions, the Company’s actual results could differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements. See “Risk Factors” in Item I Part 1A of this annual report on Form 10-K for a description of certain factors that might cause such differences.
PART I

Item 1. Business

General
Steel Excel Inc. and its subsidiaries (“Steel Excel”, the “Company”, “we”, “us”, “our”) currently operate in two reporting segments - Energy and Sports. Through its wholly-owned subsidiary Steel Energy Services Ltd. ("Steel Energy Services"), the Company’s Energy business provides drilling and production services to the oil and gas industry. Through its wholly-owned subsidiary Steel Sports Inc., the Company’s Sports business is a social impact organization that strives to provide a first-class youth sports experience emphasizing positive experiences and instilling the core values of discipline, teamwork, safety, respect, and integrity. The Company also makes significant non-controlling investments in entities in industries related to its reporting segments as well as entities in other unrelated industries. The Company continues to identify business acquisition opportunities in both the Energy and Sports industries as well as in other unrelated industries. Steel Partners Holdings L.P. (“Steel Partners”), an affiliate, beneficially owned approximately 58.3% of the Company’s outstanding common stock as of December 31, 2015.
Through September 2010, the Company provided enterprise-class external storage products and software to original equipment manufacturers, at which time the Company wound down its remaining business operations. At such time the Company focused on capital redeployment and identification of new business opportunities in which it could utilize existing working capital and maximize the use of net operating losses.
The Company began its Energy business in December 2011 with the acquisition of the business and assets of Rogue Pressure Services, LLC (“Rogue”). The Company expanded the business with the acquisition of the business and assets of Eagle Well Services, Inc., in February 2012 and the acquisition of Sun Well Service, Inc. ("Sun Well") in May 2012, both of which operate as Sun Well Service as a combined business. In December 2013, the Company further expanded its Energy business with the acquisition of the business and assets of Black Hawk Energy Services, Inc. (“Black Hawk”).
The Company began its Sports business in June 2011 with the acquisition of the assets of Baseball Heaven LLC (“Baseball Heaven”), a provider of a wide variety of baseball services, including tournaments, training, teams, and camps. In August 2011, the Company acquired a 75% membership in The Show, LLC (“The Show”), a provider of baseball uniforms to Little League and softball players and coaches. The Company expanded the business in November 2012 with the acquisition of a 50% interest in two Crossfit® facilities located in Torrance, CA, and Hermosa Beach, CA, and in 2014 the Company increased its ownership interest in the Torrance Crossfit® facility to approximately 86%. In January 2013, the Company acquired a 20% membership interest in Ruckus Sports LLC (“Ruckus”), an obstacle course and mass-participation events company that was controlled by the Company through its majority representation on the Ruckus board. The Company increased its membership interest in Ruckus to 45% during 2013. Also in January 2013, the Company acquired a 40% membership interest in Again Faster LLC, a fitness equipment company that is accounted for as an equity-method investment. In June 2013, the Company further expanded its Sports business with the acquisition of 80% of UK Elite Soccer, Inc. (“UK Elite”), a provider of youth soccer programs, coaching services, tournaments, tours, and camps.
In July 2012 and November 2013 the Company shut down The Show and Ruckus, respectively, after they did not meet operational and financial expectations. The Show and Ruckus are each reported as discontinued operations in the Company’s consolidated financial statements. In September 2015, the Company fully impaired its investment in Again Faster based on the state of the business and the available strategic alternatives. In January 2016, the Company exchanged its 50% interest in the Hermosa Crossfit® facility for the remaining 14% interest in the Torrance Crossfit® facility.
The Company's effected a 1-for-500 reverse stock split (the "Reverse Split") in June 2014, immediately followed by a 500-for-1 forward stock split (the "Forward Split", and together with the Reverse Split, the "Reverse/Forward Split"), of its common stock. As a result of the Reverse Split, stockholders holding fewer than 500 shares received a cash payment for all of

3



their outstanding shares based on a per share price equal to the closing price of the Company’s common stock on June 18, 2014, the effective date of the Reverse/Forward Split. Stockholders holding 500 or more shares as of the effective date of the Reverse/Forward Split did not receive any payments for fractional shares resulting from the Reverse Split, and therefore the total number of shares held by such holders did not change as a result of the Reverse/Forward Split. 

In December 2010, we changed our fiscal year-end date from March 31 to December 31. Accordingly, we had a nine-month transition period from April 1, 2010, to December 31, 2010.
The Company was incorporated in California in 1981 under the name “Adaptec, Inc.”, and reincorporated in Delaware in March 1998. The Company subsequently changed its name to “ADPT Corporation” in June 2010 and to “Steel Excel Inc.” in October 2011. Our website is http://www.steelexcel.com. All reports we file electronically with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including annual reports on Forms 10-K, quarterly reports on Forms 10-Q, current reports on Forms 8-K, and proxy statements along with any amendments to those reports are available, free of charge, on or through our website as soon as reasonably practicable after we file such reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Segment Information
See Note 21 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements for information regarding segments.
Services
Energy business. The Energy business provides various services to exploration and production companies in the oil and gas business. The services provided include well completion and recompletion, well maintenance and workover, snubbing, flow testing, down hole pumping, plug and abatement, and rental of auxiliary equipment. Prior to the acquisition of the Black Hawk business in December 2013, the Energy business primarily provided its services to customers’ extraction and production operations in North Dakota and Montana in the Bakken basin, and to a lesser extent serviced customers in Colorado and Wyoming in the Niobrara basin. The acquisition of the Black Hawk business increased the Energy business’ heavy concentration in the Bakken basin, and expanded the business into Texas in the Permian basin and New Mexico in the San Juan basin.
Well completion services involve prepping the well for production, including running frac strings, setting production tubing, installing down hole equipment, drilling out vertical and horizontal plugs, cleaning out the wellbore, and starting production flow. Well recompletion services involve assisting in the re-stimulation of an existing well or plug-back to shut off the flow in the well from points before the plug. Well maintenance and workover services include pulling rods or tubing, installing submersible pumping equipment, repairing casing, and swabbing. Snubbing services involve installing or removing tubes to enable the customer to continue to work on a well and perform many tasks without having to stop production. Flow testing services involve separating the elements - oil, water, gas, and solids - so that the customer can maximize the quality and quantity of their product. Down hole pumping services involve pumping the necessary fluids into the wellbore. Plug and abatement services involve sealing the well and cleaning the site to reduce the potential for any pollution.
Sports business. The Sports business is focused on providing a first-class experience for all families that participate in our programs through the implementation of the Steel Coaching System. Our baseball business is focused on teams, tournaments, camps, lessons, and showcases. Baseball Heaven is equipped with four full-sized outdoor fields, three smaller youth-sized outdoor fields, and an indoor facility. Our soccer business covers a wide variety of programs, including teams, coaching services, tournaments, tours, and camps. Soccer programs are run at facilities owned by municipalities or schools and are run either in conjunction with local youth soccer leagues or as a stand-alone offering. Strength and conditioning services as well as yoga, pilates, and spin were provided at the Torrance and Hermosa Crossfit® facilities through January 2016, and are provided solely at the Torrance facility subsequently.
Customers
Our Energy business client base consists of exploration and production companies in the oil and gas industry. For the year ended December 31, 2015, revenues from Oasis Petroleum, XTO Energy, Continental Resources, and Whiting Petroleum represented 16.3%, 12.1%, 11.5%, and 10.5%, respectively, of the Company's consolidated revenues; for the year ended December 31, 2014, revenues from Oasis Petroleum and Continental Resources represented 20.7% and 20.3%, respectively, of the Company’s consolidated revenues; and for the year ended December 31, 2013, revenues from Continental Resources and XTO Energy represented 17.0% and 10.5%, respectively, of the Company’s consolidated revenues. For the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013, revenues from the Energy business’ five largest customers represented 55.7%, 61.2%, and 51.3%, respectively, of the Company's consolidated revenues. For the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013, the Energy business’ five largest customers represented 66.3%, 67.1%, and 56.1%, respectively, of the segment's revenues and the

4



fifteen largest customers represented 90.4%, 89.0%, and 88.2%, respectively, of the segment’s revenues. The loss of a significant customer could have a material adverse effect on the Energy business and Steel Excel.
Our Sports business client base consists of numerous municipalities, youth sports leagues and organizations, and individuals, none of which provide a significant percentage of the Company’s consolidated revenues. The loss of a customer would not have a material adverse effect on the Sports business or Steel Excel.
Sales and Marketing
We rely primarily on our local operations to sell and market our services. Because they have conducted business together over several years, the members of our local operations have established strong working relationships with certain of our clients. These strong client relationships provide a better understanding of region-specific issues and enable us to better address customer needs.
Competition
Energy business. The Energy business operates in a highly competitive industry that is influenced by price, capacity, reputation, and experience. When oil and natural gas prices and drilling activities are at high levels, service companies are ordering new equipment to expand their capacity as they are seeing increased demand for their services and attractive returns on investment. When oil and natural gas prices are declining, service companies may be willing to provide their services at reduced prices to be able to cover their equipment and other fixed costs. To be successful, we must provide quality services that meet the specific needs of oil and gas exploration and production companies at competitive prices. In addition, we need to maintain a safe work environment and a well-trained work force to remain competitive.
Our Energy services are affected by seasonal factors, such as inclement weather, fewer daylight hours, and holidays during the winter months. Heavy snow, ice, wind, or rain can make it difficult to operate and to move equipment between work sites, which can reduce our ability to provide services and generate revenues. These seasonal factors affect our competitors as well. Demand for services in the industry as a whole fluctuates with the supply and demand for oil and natural gas. In general, the need for our services increases when demand exceeds supply. The oil and gas exploration and production companies attempt to take advantage of a higher-priced environment when demand exceeds supply, which leads to an increased need for our services. Conversely, as supply equals or exceeds demand, the oil and gas exploration and production companies will cut back on their production resulting in a decline in their well servicing needs or seek pricing concessions from us and other service providers when the price of oil declines.
Sports business. The market for the Sports business’ baseball and soccer service offerings is very fragmented, and its competitors are primarily small local or regional operations. The market for its strength and conditioning services is fragmented, and its competitors vary from large national providers of such services to local providers of comparable or other niche services.
The baseball business and the soccer business are affected by seasonal factors, with business volume declining from late autumn through early spring as a result of colder temperatures and fewer daylight hours. In addition, inclement weather during peak seasons can have an adverse effect on the business since fields may not be available to reschedule any canceled events. In 2013, we completed the construction of an indoor baseball facility to enable us to provide year-round baseball services to partially mitigate the revenue declines experienced in non-peak months and during periods of inclement weather. In 2015, we also increased our focus on providing indoor soccer services during the non-peak months.
Government and Environmental Regulation
Our businesses are subject to multiple federal, state, and local laws and regulations pertaining to worker safety, the handling of hazardous materials, transportation standards, and the environment.
Among the various environmental laws we are subject to, the Clean Water Act established the basic structure for regulating discharges of pollutants into the waters of the United States and quality standards for surface waters. Our businesses could be required to obtain permits for the discharge of wastewater or stormwater. In addition, the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 imposed a multitude of requirements on responsible parties related to the prevention of oil spills and liability for damages resulting from such spills in the waters of the United States. These and comparable state laws provide for administrative, civil, and criminal penalties for unauthorized discharges and impose stringent requirements for spill prevention and response planning, as well as considerable potential liability for the costs of removal and damages in connection with unauthorized discharges.

5



The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, as amended, and comparable state laws (“CERCLA” or “Superfund”) impose liability without regard to fault or the legality of the original conduct on certain defined parties, including current and prior owners or operators of a site where a release of hazardous substances occurred and entities that disposed or arranged for the disposition of the hazardous substances found at the site. Under CERCLA, these parties may be subject to joint and several liability for the costs of cleaning up the hazardous substances that were released into the environment and for damages to natural resources. Further, claims may be filed for personal injury and property damages allegedly caused by the release of hazardous substances and other pollutants. We may encounter materials that are considered hazardous substances in the course of our operations. As a result, we may incur CERCLA liability for cleanup costs and be subject to related third-party claims. We also may be subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, and comparable state statutes (“RCRA”) related to solid wastes. Under CERCLA or RCRA, we could be required to clean up contaminated property (including contaminated groundwater) or to perform remedial activities to prevent future contamination.
Our businesses are also subject to the Clean Air Act, as amended, and comparable state laws and regulations that restrict the emission of air pollutants and impose various monitoring and reporting requirements. These laws and regulations may require us to obtain approvals or permits for construction, modification, or operation of certain projects or facilities and may require use of emission controls. Various scientific studies suggest that emissions of greenhouse gases, including, among others, carbon dioxide and methane, contribute to global warming. While it is not possible to predict how legislation or new regulations that may be adopted to address greenhouse gas emissions would impact our business, any new restrictions on emissions that are imposed could result in increased compliance costs for, or additional operating restrictions on, our customers and, which could have an adverse effect on our business.
We are also subject to the Occupational Safety and Health Act, as amended, (“OSHA”) and comparable state laws that regulate the protection of employee health and safety. OSHA’s hazard communication standard requires that information about hazardous materials used or produced in our operations be maintained and provided to employees and state and local government authorities. We believe we are in substantial compliance with OSHA and comparable state law requirements, including general industry standards, record keeping requirements, and monitoring of occupational exposure to regulated substances.
We cannot predict the level of enforcement or the interpretation of existing laws and regulations by enforcement agencies in the future, or the substance of future court rulings or permitting requirements. In addition, we cannot predict what additional laws and regulations may be put in place in the future, or the effect of those laws and regulations on our business and financial condition. We believe we are in substantial compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations. While we do not believe that the cost of compliance is material to our business or financial condition, it is possible that substantial costs for compliance or penalties for non-compliance may be incurred in the future.
Employees
As of December 31, 2015, we had 763 employees, of which 658 were full-time employees and 105 were part-time employees. All of our employees are located in the United States. We also hire additional full-time and part-time employees during peak seasonal periods. None of our employees are covered by collective bargaining agreements. We consider our employee relations to be satisfactory.

Item 1A. Risk Factors

Our business faces significant risks, including those described is this Item 1A. If any of the events or circumstances described below as possible risk factors actually occur, our business, financial condition, or results of operations could be adversely affected and could result in a decline in the trading price of our common stock. Additional risks that we are not aware of or that we currently think are immaterial may also ultimately have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.
Our Energy business is susceptible to the impact of fluctuations in energy prices, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations. High oil and natural gas prices result in an increase in drilling activity, increasing the demand for oilfield services. Oilfield service companies invest in new equipment in such an environment to expand their capacity to take advantage of this increased activity, which could result in an increasingly competitive environment. Declining oil and natural gas prices can result in our customers reducing their drilling and work over activities, which can result in a reduced demand for our services and requests for price concessions. Oilfield service companies may be willing to provide their services at reduced prices in such an environment to be able to cover their equipment and other fixed costs. The increased competition, reduced demand, or competitive pricing pressure could lead to declines in our prices and utilization, which would have an adverse effect on our results of operations.

6



We are heavily dependent on the oil and gas industry in North America. Several factors affect our customers’ willingness to continue to undertake exploration and production activities, the adverse effects of any of which could have a significant adverse effect on our results of operations. Our Energy business is dependent on our customers’ willingness to continue to explore for and produce oil and natural gas in North America, primarily in the Bakken and Permian basins. Factors affecting our customers’ willingness to continue to undertake exploration and production activities include the following:
the prices for oil and natural gas and our customers’ perceptions of such prices in the future;
the supply and demand for oil and natural gas;
the cost for our customers to conduct the necessary exploration and production activities;
the discovery of new oil and gas reserves;
the availability of pipelines and other means of transportation;
increased regulation of the means of transporting oil out of the Bakken basin by rail or road;
the availability and cost of capital;
production levels and geopolitical factors in other oil and gas producing countries;
the price and availability of alternative sources of energy; and
weather conditions.

The adverse effects of any of these factors could result in a reduction in our customers’ exploration efforts, which could have a significant adverse effect on our results of operations.
We are exposed to potential litigation and unrecoverable losses that could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. Our Energy business is subject to many hazards inherent in the industry, including blowouts, cratering, explosions, fires, loss of well control, loss of or damage to the wellbore or underground reservoir, damaged or lost drilling equipment, and damage or loss from inclement weather or natural disasters. Any of these hazards could result in personal injury or death, damage to or destruction of equipment and facilities, suspension of operations, environmental and natural resources damage, and damage to the property of others. In addition, we may be subject to litigation as a result of any of these hazards or in the normal course of business. We may be unable to obtain desired contractual indemnities for such hazards, and our insurance may not provide adequate coverage in certain instances. The occurrence of an event not fully indemnified or insured, or the failure or inability of a customer or insurer to meet its financial obligations, and resulting claims and litigation could result in substantial losses and have a significant adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.
Increased regulation of hydraulic fracturing could have an adverse impact on our customers. Many of our customers utilize hydraulic fracturing services, which is the process of creating or expanding cracks, or fractures, in formations underground where water, sand, and other additives are pumped under high pressure into the formation. Although we are not a provider of hydraulic fracturing services, many of our services complement the hydraulic fracturing process. Legislation for broader federal regulation of hydraulic fracturing operations and the reporting and public disclosure of chemicals used in the fracturing process could be enacted. Additionally, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has asserted federal regulatory authority over certain hydraulic fracturing activities involving diesel fuel under the Safe Drinking Water Act and is completing the process of drafting guidance documents related to this asserted regulatory authority. Our customers’ operations could be adversely affected if additional regulation or permitting requirements were to be required for hydraulic fracturing activities, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations.
Severe weather conditions could have an adverse effect on our customers and our ability to provide our services. Our Energy business is heavily concentrated in North Dakota and Montana, where severe weather conditions could result in a curtailment of our customers’ service requirements, damage to our facilities and equipment resulting in increased repair costs and a suspension of our operations, our inability to deliver services, and an overall decline in productivity, all of which could result in an adverse effect on our results of operations. In addition, inclement weather could result in the cancellation of events and tournaments in our Sports business during peak seasons, which would have an adverse effect on our results of operations.
We may not be able to attract and retain qualified workers, which could have a significant adverse effect on our Energy business. Our Energy business operations require personnel with specialized skills and experience who can perform physically demanding work, and there is intense competition for these workers in the Bakken basin where our Energy business is concentrated. As a result workers may choose to pursue employment in fields that offer a more desirable work environment or better pay. Our inability to attract and retain such qualified workers could have an adverse effect on our productivity, the quality of our service offerings, and our ability to expand our operations, all of which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations.

7



We may sustain losses in our investment portfolio, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition, and liquidity. A substantial portion of our assets consists of investments in marketable securities that we classify as available-for-sale securities, which are adjusted to fair value each period. An adverse change in global economic conditions may result in a decline in the value of our marketable securities. Declines in the value of marketable securities may not be recognized if such unrealized losses are deemed to be temporary. However, any such declines in value will be recognized as losses upon the sale of such securities or if such declines are deemed to be other than temporary. For the year ended December 31, 2015, the Company incurred impairment charges related to its marketable securities totaling $59.8 million. Any adverse changes in the financial markets and resulting declines in value of our marketable securities may result in additional impairment charges and could have an adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition, and liquidity.
Certain of our investments may subject us to greater risk and be less liquid than other investments in our portfolio. Our investments include significant interests in equity-method investees, participation in corporate term loans, and promissory notes. We have also entered into short sale transactions on certain financial instruments and have sold call and put options. We may continue to engage in similar investing activities in the future. Such investments may be subject to greater price fluctuations, may be more difficult to sell, and may be sold at prices that do not reflect their intrinsic value.
We may be unable to identify and acquire new businesses, which could have an adverse effect on our long term growth. Acquisitions are a key element of our business strategy. We may not be able to identify and acquire acquisition candidates on acceptable terms. Our inability to identify and acquire new businesses on acceptable terms could have an adverse effect on our long-term growth.
We may be unable to integrate new businesses, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition, and long-term growth. We may not be able to properly integrate acquired businesses, which could result in such businesses not performing as expected when the acquisition was consummated and possibly being dilutive to our overall operating results. Our inability to properly integrate acquired businesses could result from, among other things, the following:
our failure to retain and attract key employees;
our failure to retain and attract new customers;
our failure to develop effective sales and marketing capabilities; and
our failure to properly operate new lines of business.

Our inability to integrate new businesses could have an adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition, and our long-term growth.
We may issue shares of our common stock in the future, which could result in dilution to existing stockholders and have an adverse effect on the price of our common stock. As part of our strategy to grow through acquisitions we may issue additional shares of common stock as consideration for such acquisitions and also may issue common stock to employees and contractors as compensation. Any such issuances of common stock will result in our existing stockholders’ equity interest being diluted. Such issuances of common stock will also increase the number of outstanding shares of common stock that will be available for sale in the open market, and those individuals receiving shares of our common stock may be more likely to sell, which could have an adverse effect on the price of our common stock.
Restrictions on the transfer of our common stock could inhibit certain transactions that may be beneficial to shareholders. In order to preserve our tax benefit carryforwards, our Certificate of Incorporation generally prohibits the transfer of our common stock and other corporate securities if such a transfer would result in (i) a party having an ownership interest of 4.9% or greater in the Company or (ii) an increased ownership interest of a party that already has an ownership interest of 4.9% or greater in the Company. This restriction, which is in effect until July 2018, could inhibit or prevent certain transactions that would otherwise be beneficial to stockholders.
We may be deemed an investment company, which could impose on us burdensome compliance requirements and restrict our activities. The Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “Investment Company Act”), requires companies to register as an investment company if they are engaged primarily in the business of investing, reinvesting, owning, holding, or trading securities. Generally, companies may be deemed investment companies under the Investment Company Act if they are viewed as engaging in the business of investing in securities or they own investment securities having a value exceeding 40% of certain assets. Depending on our future activities and operations, we may become subject to the Investment Company Act. Although the Investment Company Act provides certain exemptions, we may not qualify for any of these exemptions. If we are deemed to be an investment company we may be subject to certain restrictions that may make it difficult for us to complete business combinations, including restrictions on the nature of and custodial requirements for holding our

8



investments and restrictions on our issuance of securities, which we may use as consideration in a business combination. In addition, if we are deemed to be an investing company we may have imposed upon us additional burdensome requirements, including the following:
having to register as an investment company;
adopting a specific form of corporate structure; and
having to comply with certain reporting, record keeping, voting, proxy, and disclosure requirements.

Such additional requirements would require us to incur additional costs and have an adverse effect on our results of operations and our ability to effectively carry out our business plan.
Our cash balances could be adversely affected by the instability of financial institutions. We maintain our cash, cash equivalents, and marketable securities with certain financial institutions at which our balances exceed the limits that are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. There could be an impact on our cash balances if financial institutions at which we maintain our cash and investments experience financial difficulties, which would have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.
We may not be able to fully utilize our tax benefits, which could result in increased cash payments for taxes in future periods. Net operating losses (“NOLs”) may be carried forward to offset federal and state taxable income in future years and reduce the amount of cash paid for income taxes otherwise payable on such taxable income, subject to certain limits and adjustments. If fully utilized, our NOLs and other carry-forwards could provide us with significant tax savings in future periods. Our ability to utilize these tax benefits in future years will depend upon our ability to generate sufficient taxable income and to comply with the rules relating to the preservation and use of NOLs. The potential benefit of the NOLs and other carry-forwards may be limited or permanently lost as a result of the following:
our inability to generate sufficient taxable income in future years to use such benefits before they expire;
a change in control of the Company that would trigger limitations on the amount taxable income in future years that may be offset by NOLs and other carry-forwards that existed prior to the change in control; and
examinations and audits by the Internal Revenue Service and other taxing authorities could reduce the amount of NOLs and other credit carry-forwards that are available for future years.

We maintain a full valuation allowance against our NOLs and other carry-forwards due to uncertainty regarding our ability to generate sufficient taxable income in future periods. Our inability to utilize the NOLs and other carry-forwards could result in increased cash payments for taxes in future periods.
We may be liable for additional income taxes upon examination or audit by the taxing authorities. We are subject to income and other taxes in the United States and certain foreign jurisdictions in which we formerly operated. Our tax provision reflects judgments and estimates, including settlements, that are subject to audit and redetermination by the various taxing authorities. Although we believe our estimates are reasonable, the ultimate outcome of these tax matters may differ materially from the amounts recorded in our consolidated financial statements, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial position.
Internal controls weaknesses that are currently immaterial may become material in future periods. We have identified certain deficiencies in internal controls over financial reporting as immaterial and therefore not requiring disclosure in our public filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Changes in circumstances could result in such deficiencies becoming material, which could result in material misstatements in our financial statements and required public disclosure if the appropriate remediation action is not undertaken.
A significant disruption in, or breach in security of, our information technology systems could adversely affect our business. We rely on information technology systems, some of which are managed by third parties, to process, transmit and store electronic information, and to manage or support a variety of critical business processes and activities. We also collect and store sensitive data, including confidential business information and personal data. These systems may be susceptible to damage, disruptions, or shutdowns due to attacks by computer hackers, computer viruses, employee error or malfeasance, power outages, hardware failures, telecommunication or utility failures, catastrophes, or other unforeseen events. In addition, security breaches of our systems could result in the misappropriation or unauthorized disclosure of confidential information or personal data belonging to us or to our employees, partners, customers, or suppliers. Any such events could disrupt our operations, inhibit our ability to produce financial information, damage customer relationships and our reputation, and result in legal claims or proceedings, liability, or penalties under privacy laws, each of which could adversely affect our business and our financial statements.

9



We may incur impairments charges related to our long-lived assets. We periodically evaluate the carrying value of our long-lived assets, including our property and equipment, identified intangible assets, and goodwill for impairment. In performing these assessments we rely on cash flow projections based on our current operating plans, estimates, and judgments. We could incur impairment charges if our actual results are materially different from such cash flow projections, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial position and results of operations. For the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, the Company incurred goodwill and intangible asset impairment charges of $25.6 million and $36.7 million, respectively.
We could incur significant costs in the future to maintain regulatory compliance. Our Energy and Sports businesses are currently subject to federal, state, and local laws and regulations pertaining to worker safety, the handling of hazardous materials, transportation standards, and the environment, and may be subject to additional regulations in the future, including any regarding the emission of greenhouse gases. We may be required to obtain and maintain permits, approvals, and certificates from various authorities and incur other capital and operational costs in order to comply with such laws and regulations. Failure to comply with such laws and regulations could result in the assessment of penalties, imposition of cleanup and site restoration costs and liens, revocation of permits, or orders to limit or cease certain operations. In addition, certain such laws impose joint and several liability that could cause us to become liable for the conduct of others or for consequences of our own actions that were in compliance with all applicable laws at the time of those actions. While the cost of such compliance has not been significant in the past, new laws, regulations, and enforcement policies could become more stringent and significantly increase our compliance costs or limit our future business opportunities, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.
We are subject to certain banking regulatory requirements that could impact our investing decisions. Under Section 619 (the “Volcker Rule”) of The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, we are a banking entity by virtue of being an affiliate of WebBank, an industrial bank owned by Steel Partners, which beneficially owned approximately 58.3% of the Company's common stock as of December 31, 2015. The Volcker Rule generally restricts certain banking entities from engaging in proprietary trading activities and owning equity in or sponsoring any private equity or hedge fund. The restrictions on proprietary trading activities went into effect on July 21, 2015. Under these restrictions and subject to certain exclusions, we are prohibited from engaging in certain trading activities, including trading for short-term resale and benefiting from short-term price movements. We generally have a long-term investment strategy, and we do not believe that our recent investing activities would have been prohibited by restrictions under the Volcker Rule, although such restrictions could prohibit us from making certain investment decisions in the future.

We may not be able to implement commercially competitive services and products, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations. The market for our Energy business is characterized by continual technological developments to provide better and more reliable performance and services. Our inability to implement commercially competitive services and access commercially competitive products in a timely manner in response to changes in technology or our existing technologies and work processes becoming obsolete could have an adverse effect on our results of operations.
Our businesses do not have long-term contracts with their customers, which could result in customer turnover and other adverse effects to our business. Neither our Energy business nor our Sports business has long-term contracts with its customers. Both businesses rely on the quality of the service provided and established long-term relationships to retain customers. Absent such long-term contracts, customers can cease using our services for any reason with minimal notice. This can lead to us losing customers or making price concessions in order to retain customers, which could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
Loss of a significant customer could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. The customer base of our Energy business is concentrated. For the year ended December 31, 2015, revenues from Oasis Petroleum, XTO Energy, Continental Resources, and Whiting Petroleum represented 16.3%, 12.1%, 11.5%, and 10.5%, respectively, of our consolidated revenues, and the fifteen largest customers in the Energy business represented approximately 75.9% of our consolidated revenues. The loss of a significant customer could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.
The beneficial ownership of our common stock by Steel Partners provides it with control, and the common management shared with other Steel Partners’ entities may result in the interests of Steel Partners differing from the interests of other shareholders. At December 31, 2015, SPH Group Holdings LLC, an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of Steel Partners, beneficially owned approximately 58.3% of our outstanding common stock. Warren G. Lichtenstein, the chairman of our board and chairman of our Sports business, serves as executive chairman of the general partner of Steel Partners; Jack Howard, a director and our principal executive officer, serves as President and a director of the general partner of Steel Partners. In their capacities as directors and senior executive officers of the general partner of Steel Partners, Messrs. Lichtenstein and Howard generally have the ability to determine the outcome of any action requiring a stockholder vote,

10



including the election of our Board of Directors, the approval of amendments to our certificate of incorporation, as amended, and the approval of any proposed merger. The interests of Messrs. Lichtenstein and Howard, as well as those of Steel Partners and its affiliates in such matters may differ from the interests of our other stockholders in some respects. In addition, employees and affiliates of Steel Partners hold positions with us, including James F. McCabe, Jr., our chief financial officer, and Leonard McGill, our general counsel.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

Not applicable.

Item 2. Properties

The Energy business owns four buildings in Williston, ND, including one that serves as its headquarters and operations hub in the Bakken basin along with separate buildings with office and shop space. To support its operations in other locations, the Energy business owns shop space in Texas and leases shop space in Colorado under an arrangement that expires in November 2016. The Energy business also leases shop space and office space under month-to-month arrangements on an as needed basis, and owns and leases housing for temporary living arrangements for certain of its employees.
The Sports business has a lease for office space in Hermosa Beach, CA, that expires in April 2016, which serves as its headquarters, and a month-to-month arrangement in Sacramento, CA, for executive office space. The Sports business has a lease for approximately 27.9 acres of land in Yaphank, NY, for its baseball services operation that expires in December 2016. Under this lease the Company has two extension options and a right of first refusal to purchase the parcel. The Sports business also has a lease for 9,940 square feet for its Crossfit® facility in Torrance, CA, that expires in March 2023. In addition, the Sports business has a lease for office space in Cedar Knolls, NJ, that expires in February 2019, which serves as the headquarters for its youth soccer operation, and also has leases in various states for small administrative offices to support the soccer operation.
The Company believes that its facilities are adequate to meet its needs.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings

From time to time we are subject to litigation or claims that arise in the normal course of business. While the results of such litigation matters and claims cannot be predicted with certainty, we believe that the final outcome of such matters will not have a material adverse impact on our financial position or results of operations. However, because of the nature and inherent uncertainties of litigation, should the outcome of these actions be unfavorable, our business, financial condition, and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

Not applicable.

11




PART II
 
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

On July 7, 2015, our common stock commenced trading on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the ticker symbol "SXCL". Prior to such date, our common stock traded in the over the counter market and was quoted on the OTCQB marketplace under the ticker symbol "SXCL". On March 11, 2016, the Company notified the Nasdaq Stock Market of its intention to voluntarily delist its common stock, with associated preferred stock purchase rights, from the Nasdaq Capital Market.  The Company intends to cease trading on Nasdaq at the close of business on March 31, 2016.  After the effective date of delisting, the Company intends to file a Form 15 with the Securities and Exchange Commission to voluntarily effect deregistration of its securities pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.  The Company's obligation to file current and periodic reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") will be terminated the same day upon the filing of the Form 15 with the SEC.  The Company is eligible to deregister its common stock, with associated preferred stock purchase rights, because it has fewer than 300 stockholders of record.

The following table sets forth the high and low closing prices for each period indicated.
 
2015
 
2014
 
High
 
Low
 
High
 
Low
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Quarter Ended March 31,
$
25.49

 
$
21.50

 
$
33.00

 
$
29.00

Quarter Ended June 30,
$
22.00

 
$
18.15

 
$
50.00

 
$
30.00

Quarter Ended September 30,
$
24.00

 
$
19.26

 
$
35.35

 
$
32.00

Quarter Ended December 31,
$
20.85

 
$
12.86

 
$
32.50

 
$
23.50

As of February 29, 2016, there were approximately 21 registered holders of record of our common stock, which does not include holders that have shares of common stock held for them by a broker or other nominee. No dividends have been paid on the Company’s common stock.
The following table sets forth information as of December 31, 2015, with respect to the Company's equity compensation plans under which securities of the Company are authorized for issuance.

Plan Category
 
Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants and rights
 
Weighted-average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights
 
Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans (excluding securities reflected in column (a))
 
 
(a)
 
(b)
 
(c)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders
 
70,750

 
$
23.75

 
1,767,429

Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders
 

 

 


On June 24, 2015, the Company's Board of Directors authorized a stock repurchase program to acquire up to 500,000 shares of the Company's common stock (the "2015 Repurchase Program"). The 2015 Repurchase Program superseded and canceled all previously approved repurchase programs. Any repurchases under the 2015 Repurchase Program will be made from time to time on the open market at prevailing market prices or in negotiated transactions off the market in compliance with applicable laws and regulations.  The 2015 Repurchase Program is expected to continue indefinitely, unless shortened by the Board of Directors.  During the three months ended December 31, 2015, no repurchases were made under the 2015 Repurchase Program, but 3,973 shares were surrendered by employees to satisfy tax withholding obligations in connection with

12



the vesting of restricted stock awards . The maximum number of shares that may be repurchased under the 2015 Repurchase Program was 281,625 at December 31, 2015.  

The following stock performance graph compares the cumulative total stockholder return on our common stock to the Russell 2000 Index and the PHLX Oil Service Sector. The graph assumes that $100 was invested in each of the investments on December 31, 2010, with any dividends reinvested. This stock performance graph shall not be deemed “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the Securities and Exchange Commission, nor shall such information be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”) except to the extent that we specifically incorporate it by reference into such filing.

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

The following Selected Financial Data has been derived from our consolidated financial statements. Through September 2010, the Company provided enterprise-class external storage products and software to original equipment manufacturers (the "Predecessor Business"), at which time the Company wound down its remaining business operations. The Predecessor Business is reported as a discontinued operation in all periods presented in the Selected Financial Data. The Company began its Sports and Energy businesses in June 2011 and December 2011, respectively.
The Selected Financial Data should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and notes thereto and with “Item 7 - Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.


13



 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2015 (A)
 
2014 (B)
 
2013 (C)
 
2012 (D)
 
2011
 
(in thousands, except per share data)
Statements of Operations Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net revenues
$
132,620

 
$
210,148

 
$
120,028

 
$
100,104

 
$
2,502

Income (loss) from continuing operations before income taxes
$
(88,004
)
 
$
(19,522
)
 
$
7,911

 
$
6,467

 
$
(158
)
Net income (loss) from continuing operations
$
(97,783
)
 
$
(24,269
)
 
$
12,867

 
$
22,179

 
$
68

Net income (loss) from continuing operations attributable to Steel Excel Inc. per share of common stock - basic and diluted
$
(8.50
)
 
$
(2.06
)
 
1.03

 
$
1.83

 
$
0.01

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Balance Sheet Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total assets
$
344,822

 
$
476,946

 
$
538,694

 
$
466,495

 
$
368,677

Long-term obligations
$
42,666

 
$
79,242

 
$
92,400

 
$
14,397

 
$


(A)
Includes marketable securities impairment charges of $59.8 million, goodwill and intangible assets impairment charges of $25.6 million, and a benefit from income taxes of $6.3 million.
(B)
Includes goodwill impairment charges of $36.7 million.
(C)
Includes a benefit from income taxes of $5.8 million.
(D)
Includes a benefit from income taxes of $15.7 million.

No cash dividends have been paid or declared on the Company’s common stock.




14



Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Steel Excel Inc. (“Steel Excel” or the “Company”) currently operates in two reporting segments - Energy and Sports. The Energy segment focuses on providing drilling and production services to the oil and gas industry. The Sports segment is a social impact organization that strives to provide a first-class youth sports experience emphasizing positive experiences and instilling the core values of discipline, teamwork, safety, respect, and integrity. The Company also makes significant non-controlling investments in entities in industries related to its reporting segments as well as entities in other unrelated industries. The Company continues to identify business acquisition opportunities in both the Energy and Sports industries as well as in other unrelated industries.

The Company began its Energy business in December 2011 with the acquisition of the business and assets of Rogue Pressure Services Ltd. (“Rogue”). The Company expanded the business with the acquisition of the business and assets of Eagle Well Services, Inc. ("Eagle Well"), in February 2012 and the acquisition of Sun Well Service, Inc. ("Sun Well") in May 2012, both of which operate under Sun Well as a combined business. In December 2013, the Company further expanded its Energy business with the acquisition by its wholly-owned subsidiary Black Hawk Energy Services, Ltd. ("Black Hawk Ltd.") of the business and assets of Black Hawk Energy Services, Inc. (“Black Hawk Inc.”).
The Company began its Sports business in June 2011 with the acquisition of the assets of Baseball Heaven LLC (“Baseball Heaven”), a provider of a wide variety of baseball services, including tournaments, training, teams, and camps. The Company expanded the business in November 2012 with the acquisition of a 50% interest in two Crossfit® facilities located in Torrance, CA, and Hermosa Beach, CA, and in 2014 the Company increased its ownership interest in Torrance facility to approximately 86%. In January 2013, the Company acquired a 20% membership interest in Ruckus Sports LLC ("Ruckus"), an obstacle course and mass-participation events company that was controlled by the Company through its representation on the Ruckus board. The Company increased its membership interest in Ruckus to 45% during 2013. Also in January 2013, the Company acquired a 40% membership interest in Again Faster LLC, a fitness equipment company that is accounted for as an equity-method investment. In June 2013, the Company further expanded its Sports business with the acquisition of 80% of UK Elite Soccer, Inc. (“UK Elite”), a provider of youth soccer programs, coaching services, tournaments, tours, and camps. In 2014, UK Elite acquired the business and assets of three independent providers of soccer clinics and camps.

In November 2013 the Company shut down Ruckus after it did not meet operational and financial expectations. Ruckus is reported as a discontinued operation in the Company’s consolidated financial statements. In 2015, the Company fully impaired its investment in Again Faster based on the state of the business and the available strategic alternatives.

In July 2013, Steel Energy Services Ltd. ("Steel Energy Services"), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, entered into a credit agreement, as amended (the “Amended Credit Agreement”), that provides for a borrowing capacity of $105.0 million consisting of a $95.0 million secured term loan and up to $10.0 million in revolving loans. A pre-existing credit agreement at Sun Well (the “Sun Well Credit Agreement”) that had been fully repaid was terminated upon the initial closing of the Amended Credit Agreement.
During 2015, the Company identified an error related to the manner in which the change in the valuation allowance for deferred tax assets was reflected in its financial statements for all annual and quarterly periods in the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013. The change in the valuation allowance, which resulted from a change in deferred tax liabilities related to unrealized gains on available-for-sale securities, was recognized as a component of income from continuing operations, resulting in a benefit from or provision for income taxes allocated to continuing operations in each period, with an offsetting provision for or benefit from income taxes allocated to other comprehensive income relating to unrealized gains or losses on available-for-sale securities. Upon subsequent review, the Company determined that proper intra-period allocation of the provision for income taxes would have resulted in this change in the valuation allowance being allocated to other comprehensive income, resulting in no provision or benefit for such item. In periods in which the valuation allowance decreased, the impact of this error was an overstatement of income from continuing operations and an understatement of other comprehensive income; in periods in which the valuation allowance increased, the impact of this error was an understatement of income from continuing operations and an overstatement of other comprehensive income. The correction of this error has resulted in adjustments to the Company's balance sheet at December 31, 2014, and its statement of operations, statement of comprehensive income, statement of stockholders' equity, and statement of cash flows for the year ended December 31, 2013.

In June 2014, following stockholder approval and authorization from its board of directors, the Company effected a 1-for-500 reverse stock split (the "Reverse Split"), immediately followed by a 500-for-1 forward stock split (the "Forward Split", and together with the Reverse Split, the "Reverse/Forward Split"), of its common stock effective as of the close of business on June 18, 2014. In connection with the Reverse Split, the Company paid $10.1 million in July 2014 for 295,659 shares of common stock and the return of 1,388 non-vested restricted stock awards previously awarded to employees.

15




The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the Company’s consolidated financial statements and notes thereto.

Results of Operations

The continuing weakness in the oil services industry had an adverse effect on the results of operations of the Company's Energy segment in 2015. The decline in energy prices, particularly the significant decline in oil prices, has resulted in the Energy segment's customers, the oil and gas exploration and production companies (the "E&P Companies"), cutting back on their capital expenditures, which has resulted in reduced drilling activity. In addition, the E&P Companies have sought price concessions from their service providers to offset their drop in revenue. Such actions on the part of the E&P Companies had an adverse effect on the operations of the Energy segment in 2015 and will further adversely impact its operations in 2016. The Energy segment has experienced a decline in rig utilization in all of its operations and prices for its services have declined. The Company has taken certain actions and instituted cost-reduction measures in an effort to mitigate these adverse effects. The Energy segment's results of operations going forward will be dependent on the price of oil in the future, the resulting well production and drilling rig count in the basins in which it operates, and the Company's ability to return to the pricing and service levels of the past as oil prices increase. The drilling rig count in North America has declined significantly, which has directly impacted the segment's rig utilization, and the pricing for the segment's services has declined. The North American drilling rig count has continued to decline in early 2016, and as a result, the Company expects the Energy segment to experience a further decline in operating income in 2016 as compared to the 2015 results. As a result of the adverse effects the decline in energy prices had on the oil services industry and the projected future results of operations of the Company's Energy segment, the Company recognized goodwill and intangible asset impairment charges of $25.6 million and $36.7 million for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014. At December 31, 2015, the remaining goodwill associated with the energy business was $10.6 million, all of which related to one reporting unit of the Company's Energy segment and which is at risk of future impairment if the fair value of this reporting unit declines in value.

Year ended December 31, 2015, compared with 2014

Net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2015, decreased by $77.5 million as compared to 2014. Net revenues from the Company's Energy segment decreased by $80.2 million primarily from the decline in rig utilization and the decline in prices that resulted from the adverse effects the decline in energy prices had on the oil services industry. Net revenues in the Company's Sports segment increased by $2.7 million from an increase in revenues of $2.1 million from UK Elite primarily as a result of operating the businesses acquired during the 2014 period for the full period in 2015 and an increase in revenues of $0.6 million from Baseball Heaven.

Gross profit for the year ended December 31, 2015, decreased by $31.4 million as compared to 2014, and as a percentage of revenue declined to 20.1% from 27.6%. Gross profit in the Energy segment decreased by $31.2 million, and as a percentage of revenue declined to 16.5% in 2015 from 25.9% in 2014. Gross profit in the Energy segment decreased as a result of the decline in revenues. Gross profit in the Sports segment in 2015 decreased by $0.3 million primarily as a result of a decrease in gross profit of $0.2 million from UK Elite.

Selling, general and administrative ("SG&A") expenses in 2015 decreased by $1.7 million as compared to 2014. SG&A expenses in the Energy segment decreased by $2.3 million primarily from cost reduction initiatives and the receipt of a purchase price adjustment of $0.5 million related to a 2013 acquisition. SG&A expenses also decreased $0.3 million from corporate and other business activities. Such decreases were partially offset by SG&A expenses in the Sports segment that increased by $0.9 million primarily from UK Elite as a result of the businesses acquired during the 2014 period and additional segment management costs.

The Company incurred an operating loss of $40.7 million in 2015 as compared to an operating loss of $23.4 million in 2014. The Company incurred goodwill and intangible asset impairment charges relating primarily to the Energy segment of $25.6 million and $36.7 million in 2015 and 2014, respectively. The operating loss before goodwill and other asset impairments was $15.0 million in 2015 as compared to operating income of $13.3 million in 2014. Operating income before goodwill and other asset impairments in the Energy segment decreased by $27.4 million primarily as a result of the decline in revenues and margins that resulted from the adverse effects the decline in energy prices had on the oil services industry. The operating loss before goodwill and other asset impairments in the Sports segment increased by $1.2 million primarily due to increased losses incurred at UK Elite of $0.6 million and additional segment management costs of $0.4 million. The operating loss from Corporate and other business activities decreased by $0.3 million.


16



Amortization of intangibles in 2015 decreased by $1.4 million as compared to 2014 as a result of a declining rate of amortization for the intangible assets recognized in connection with prior period acquisitions.

The Company recognized impairment charges of $25.6 million in 2015 related to the goodwill and intangible assets primarily associated with its Energy segment. The impairments resulted from the adverse effects the decline in energy prices had on the oil services industry and the projected future results of operations of the Energy segment.

Interest expense of $2.5 million in 2015 decreased by $0.7 million as compared to 2014 primarily as a result of the repayment of long-term debt.

The Company incurred an impairment charge of $59.8 million related to its marketable securities in 2015. The impairment charge resulted from the Company's determination that certain unrealized losses in available-for-sale securities represented other-than-temporary impairments during 2015.

Other income of $14.9 million in 2015 primarily represented a gain on a non-monetary exchange of $9.3 million, investment income of $4.7 million, and realized gains on the sale of marketable securities of $5.2 million, partially offset by a loss of $2.8 million recognized upon initially accounting for an investment under the equity method of accounting at fair value, a foreign exchange loss of $0.7 million, and a loss of $0.5 million recognized on financial instrument obligations,

The Company recognized a benefit from income taxes of $6.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2015, primarily from the allowable benefit recognizable on unrealized gains on marketable securities included in other comprehensive income and from the recognition of state deferred income tax benefits.

Year ended December 31, 2014, compared with 2013

Net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2014, increased by $90.1 million as compared to 2013. Net revenues from the Company's Energy segment increased by $82.0 million as a result of an increase of $75.5 million from Black Hawk Ltd., which business was acquired in December 2013, and an increase in revenues of $6.5 million in the Energy segment's other operations due primarily to an increase in rig utilization for its snubbing services and an increase in revenues from its flow back services related to new equipment purchased in 2014. Net revenues from the Company's Sports segment increased by $8.1 million primarily as a result of an increase in revenues of $6.8 million from UK Elite, which was acquired in June 2013, and an increase in revenues of $1.1 million from Baseball Heaven.

Gross profit for year ended December 31, 2014, increased by $25.9 million as compared to 2013, and as a percentage of revenue increased to 27.6% from 26.8%. Gross profit in the Energy segment increased by $22.5 million and as a percentage of revenue increased to 25.9% in 2014 from 24.7% in 2013. Gross profit in the Energy segment increased as a result of an increase of $23.4 million from Black Hawk Ltd., partially offset by a decrease in gross profit of $0.9 million in the Energy segment's other operations. Gross profit in the Sports segment in 2014 increased by $3.4 million primarily as a result of an increase in gross profit of $2.7 million from UK Elite and an increase in gross profit of $0.6 million from Baseball Heaven.

SG&A expenses in 2014 increased by $14.3 million as compared to 2013. SG&A expenses in the Energy segment increased by $4.4 million primarily as a result of an increase of $4.0 million in costs incurred at Black Hawk Ltd. in 2014. SG&A expenses in the Sports segment increased by $3.8 million primarily as a result of costs incurred at UK Elite, including costs associated with operating the businesses acquired in the current period. SG&A expenses in corporate and other business activities increased by $6.1 million primarily as a result of increased costs incurred for services provided by affiliates of the Company and an increase in stock-based compensation expense in the 2014 period. 

The Company incurred an operating loss of $23.4 million in 2014 as compared to operating income of $2.6 million in 2013 primarily as a result of the goodwill impairment charge of $36.7 million relating to the Energy segment. Operating income before goodwill impairments was $13.3 million in 2014 as compared to $2.6 million in 2013. Operating income before goodwill impairments in the Energy segment increased by $17.5 million primarily as a result of the an increase of $16.8 million from Black Hawk Ltd. The operating loss in the Sports segment increased by $0.8 million primarily due to the expected seasonal losses incurred in the first half of 2014 at UK Elite with no corresponding losses in the prior year. The operating loss from Corporate and other business activities increased by $6.1 million from increased costs incurred for services provided by affiliates of the Company and an increase in stock-based compensation expense in 2014.

Amortization of intangibles in 2014 increased by $0.9 million as compared to 2013 as a result of amortization expense on the intangible assets recognized in connection with the businesses acquired by Black Hawk Ltd. and UK Elite, partially offset by a declining rate of amortization for the intangible assets recognized in connection with prior period acquisitions.

17




The Company recognized an impairment charge of $36.7 million in 2014 related to the goodwill associated with its Energy segment. The impairment resulted from the adverse effects the decline in energy prices had on the oil services industry and the projected future results of operations of the Energy segment.

Interest expense of $3.2 million in 2014 increased by $1.5 million as compared to 2013 primarily primarily as a result of the borrowings under the Amended Credit Agreement being outstanding for the full year in 2014.

Other income of $7.1 million in 2014 primarily represented investment income of $6.6 million and realized gains on the sale of marketable securities of $3.8 million, partially offset by a loss of $0.6 million recognized upon initially accounting for an investment under the equity method of accounting at fair value, a foreign exchange loss of $1.1 million, and a loss of $1.8 million recognized on financial instrument obligations,

The Company recognized a benefit from income taxes of $1.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, primarily as a result of a foreign tax benefit of $1.7 million recognized upon the conclusion of tax examinations by a foreign tax authority.

The results of operations for the year ended December 31, 2014, included income from discontinued operations of $0.5 million primarily related to an adjustment to the outstanding obligations of Ruckus.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

The Amended Credit Agreement entered into by Steel Energy Services in July 2013 and amended in December 2013 provides for a borrowing capacity of $105.0 million consisting of a $95.0 million secured term loan (the “Term Loan”) and up to $10.0 million in revolving loans (the “Revolving Loans”) subject to a borrowing base of 85% of the eligible accounts receivable. Of the total proceeds from the Term Loan, $70.0 million was used to partially fund a dividend of $80.0 million paid to the Company and $25.0 million was used to partially fund the acquisition of the business and substantially all of the assets of Black Hawk Inc. At December 31, 2015, the Company had $7.2 million of borrowing capacity under the Revolving Loans, all of which was available as no Revolving Loans were outstanding. As of December 31, 2015, the Company had $42.9 million outstanding under the Term Loan.

Borrowings under the Amended Credit Agreement are collateralized by substantially all the assets of Steel Energy Services and its wholly-owned subsidiaries Sun Well, Rogue, and Black Hawk Ltd., and a pledge of all of the issued and outstanding shares of capital stock of Sun Well, Rogue, and Black Hawk Ltd. Borrowings under the Amended Credit Agreement are fully guaranteed by Sun Well, Rogue, and Black Hawk Ltd.

The Amended Credit Agreement has a term that runs through July 2018, with the Term Loan amortizing in quarterly installments of $3.3 million and a balloon payment due on the maturity date. In December 2015, the Company made a prepayment of $23.1 million on the Term Loan, with the prepayment applied to the next seven quarterly installments. The Company recognized a loss on extinguishment of $0.1 million in connection with the prepayment from the write off of unamortized debt issuance costs, which was reported as a component of "Other income (expense), net" in the consolidated statement of operations for the year ended December 31, 2015.
Borrowings under the Amended Credit Agreement bear interest at annual rates of either (i) the Base Rate plus an applicable margin of 1.50% to 2.25% or (ii) LIBOR plus an applicable margin of 2.50% to 3.25%. The “Base Rate” is the greatest of (i) the prime lending rate, (ii) the Federal Funds Rate plus 0.5%, and (iii) the one-month LIBOR plus 1.0%. The applicable margin for both Base Rate and LIBOR is determined based on the leverage ratio calculated in accordance with the Amended Credit Agreement. LIBOR-based borrowings are available for interest periods of one, three, or six months. In addition, the Company is required to pay commitment fees of between 0.375% and 0.50% per annum on the daily unused amount of the Revolving Loans.

The Amended Credit Agreement contains certain financial covenants, including (i) a leverage ratio not to exceed 2.75:1 for quarterly periods through June 30, 2017, and 2.5:1 thereafter and (ii) a fixed charge coverage ratio of 1.15:1 for quarterly periods through December 31, 2016, and 1.25:1 thereafter. The Company was in compliance with all financial covenants as of December 31, 2015.
The Amended Credit Agreement also contains standard representations, warranties, and non-financial covenants. The repayment of the Term Loan can be accelerated upon (i) a change in control, which would include Steel Energy Services owning less than 100% of the equity of Sun Well or Rogue or Steel Partners Holdings L.P. (“SPLP”) owning, directly or

18



indirectly, less than 35% of Steel Energy Services or (ii) other events of default, including payment failure, false representations, covenant breaches, and bankruptcy.

The Company finances its operations and capital expenditure requirements from its existing cash and marketable securities balances, which at December 31, 2015, totaled $31.7 million and $96.2 million, respectively. Working capital in 2015 decreased by $41.8 million due primarily to a decrease of $10.9 million from a reclassification of current available-for-sale securities to non-current equity method investments, a decrease of $34.8 million from net investment losses, a decrease of $4.8 million from capital expenditures, a decrease of $23.1 million from the repayment of long-term debt, and a decrease of $4.6 million from repurchases of the Company's common stock, partially offset by an increase of $34.3 million from the receipt of marketable securities in exchange for an investment in a limited partnership that was liquidated in 2015.

Cash flows from operating activities of continuing operations decreased by $17.4 million in 2015 as compared to 2014 due primarily to a decrease in cash generated from net income of $31.1 million, an increase in payments for accounts payable and accrued expenses of $4.6 million, and an increase in payments for prepaid expenses of $1.6 million, partially offset by an increase in net collections of accounts receivable of $19.9 million.

During 2015, the Company used $5.2 million of cash for investing activities primarily for purchases of property and equipment of $4.8 million.

During 2015, the Company used $41.5 million of cash for financing activities primarily for debt repayments on the Amended Credit Facility of $36.3 million and the acquisition of treasury shares for $4.6 million.

At December 31, 2015, the Company had $127.9 million in cash and marketable securities, exclusive of $21.6 million of restricted cash related to short sale transactions on certain financial instruments for which the Company has an obligation to deliver or purchase securities at a later date.

Available-for-sale securities at December 31, 2015, included short-term deposits, corporate debt and equity instruments, and mutual funds, and were recorded on the consolidated balance sheet at fair market value, with any related unrealized gain or loss, except for other-than-temporary impairments, reported as a component of “Accumulated other comprehensive income” in stockholders’ equity. We expect to realize the full value of all our marketable securities upon maturity or sale, as we have the intent and ability to hold the securities until the full value is realized. However, we cannot provide any assurance that our invested cash and marketable securities will not be impacted by adverse conditions in the financial markets, which may require us to record an impairment charge that could adversely impact our financial results. In 2015, the Company incurred an impairment charge of $59.8 million related to its marketable securities that resulted from the Company's determination that certain unrealized losses in available-for-sale securities represented other-than-temporary impairments. In addition, we maintain our cash and marketable securities with certain financial institutions, in which our balances exceed the limits that are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. If the underlying financial institutions fail or other adverse events occur in the financial markets, our cash balances may be impacted.

We believe that our cash balances will be sufficient to satisfy our anticipated cash needs for working capital and capital expenditures for at least the next twelve months. We anticipate making additional acquisitions and investments, and we may be required to use a significant portion of our available cash balances for such acquisitions and investments or for working capital needs thereafter. The consummation of additional acquisitions, prevailing economic conditions, and financial, business and other factors beyond our control could adversely affect our estimates of our future cash requirements. As such, we could be required to fund our cash requirements by alternative financing. In these instances, we may seek to raise such additional funds through public or private equity or debt financings or from other sources. As a result, we may not be able to obtain adequate or favorable equity financing, if needed. Any equity financing we obtain may dilute existing ownership interests, and any debt financing could contain covenants that impose limitations on the conduct of our business. There can be no assurance that additional financing, if needed, would be available on terms acceptable to us or at all.

Off-balance Sheet Arrangements
The Company does not have any off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on its financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures, or capital resources that are material to investors.


19



Contractual Obligations
Our contractual obligations at December 31, 2015, were as follows:
 
Payments Due By Period
 
Total
 
Less Than
1 Year
 
1-3 Years
 
3-5 Years
 
More Than 5 Years
 
(in thousands)
Long-term debt
$
42,946

 
$

 
$
42,946

 
$

 
$

Interest on long-term debt (1)
3,409

 
1,396

 
2,013

 

 

Operating lease obligations
2,865

 
796

 
1,033

 
1,036

 

Deferred compensation
3,546

 
3,546

 

 

 

Total
$
52,766

 
$
5,738

 
$
45,992

 
$
1,036

 
$

(1) Interest on variable-rate long-term debt is an estimate based on current interest rates. Interest excludes commitment fees and non-cash amortization of debt issuance costs, which are included as components of interest expense in the consolidated statements of operations.

Critical Accounting Policies
The Company’s management must make certain estimates and assumptions in preparing the financial statements. Certain of these estimates and assumptions relate to matters that are inherently uncertain as they pertain to future events. The Company’s management believes that the estimates and assumptions used in preparing the financial statements were the most appropriate at that time, although actual results could differ significantly from those estimates under different conditions.
Note 2, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies,” to the Company’s consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K provides a detailed discussion of the various accounting policies of the Company. We believe that the following accounting policies are critical since they require subjective or complex judgments that could potentially affect the financial condition or results of operations of the Company.
Allowance for Doubtful Accounts:  We assess the carrying value of our accounts receivable based on management's assessment of the collectibility of specific client accounts, which includes consideration of the creditworthiness and financial condition of those specific clients.  We also assess the carrying value of accounts receivable balances based on other factors, including historical experience with bad debts, client concentrations, the general economic environment, and the aging of such receivables.  We record an allowance for doubtful accounts to reduce the accounts receivable balance to the amount that is reasonably believed to be collectible.  Based on our estimates, we established an allowance for doubtful accounts of $38,000 at December 31, 2015; there was no allowance for doubtful accounts at December 31, 2014.  A change in our assumptions, including the creditworthiness of clients and the default rate on receivables, would result in us recovering an amount of our accounts receivable that differs from the current carrying value.  Such difference, either positive or negative, would be reflected as a component of SG&A expense in future periods.
Marketable Securities: Our marketable securities are classified as available-for-sale securities. Accordingly, marketable securities are reported at fair value with unrealized gains and losses, except for other-than-temporary impairments, recognized in stockholders' equity as "other comprehensive income (loss)". Declines in the fair value of securities below their amortized cost basis are evaluated to determine if the decline in value is other than temporary, with other-than-temporary declines recognized as an impairment charge. This determination requires a high degree of judgment and is based on several factors, including the length of time and extent to which fair value has been less than the cost basis, the financial condition and near-term prospects of the entity, our intent and ability to hold the corporate securities for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in market value, and other factors specific to the individual security. Based on our assessment of these factors, we incurred a marketable securities impairment charge of $59.8 million in 2015. A change in any one of the aforementioned factors could result in additional other-than-temporary impairment charges in future periods, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations.
Fair Value Measurements: Certain of our assets and liabilities, primarily marketable securities, certain equity-method investments, and financial instrument obligations are reported at their estimated fair value. We estimate the fair value of such assets and liabilities based on quoted market prices (Level 1), quoted prices of similar instruments with an active market (Level

20



2), or prices obtained from funds statements or from third-party pricing services (Level 3). Securities valued as Level 2 and Level 3 securities consist primarily of marketable securities that are classified as “available for sale” securities, with changes in fair value recognized in stockholders' equity as "other comprehensive income (loss)". A change in our assumptions, including obtaining quoted market prices for specific securities valued as a Level 2 or Level 3 securities or obtaining quoted prices of similar securities with an active market for securities valued as a Level 3 security, would result in a fair value of such securities that differs from the previously estimated fair value. Such difference, either positive or negative, would be reflected as an increase or decrease in the carrying value of such securities.
Valuation of Long-Lived Assets:  We review the carrying value of our property and equipment and other long-lived assets for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable.  Recoverability is assessed by comparing the carrying value of the assets to the future undiscounted cash flows the assets are expected to generate.  If it is determined that the carrying amount is not recoverable, an impairment charge is recognized equal to the amount by which the carrying value of the asset exceeds its fair market value. The adverse effect on the Energy business of declining oil prices resulted in the need for the Company to assess the recoverability of certain of its finite-lived intangible assets and property and equipment. In 2015, the undiscounted cash flows expected to be generated by such assets in one of the operations in the Energy business did not exceed their carrying value. Accordingly, the Company recognized an impairment charge on such long-lived assets of $7.4 million in 2015. For the other operations in the Energy business in 2015 and for all operations in the Energy business in 2014, the undiscounted cash flows expected to be generated by the long-lived assets exceeded their carrying value, and therefore the Company has not recognized any impairment charges on such long-lived assets. A change in the Company’s business climate in future periods, including a general downturn in one of the Company’s businesses, could lead to a required assessment of the recoverability of the Company’s long-lived assets, which may subsequently result in an impairment charge.
Impairment of Goodwill:  We assess the carrying value of goodwill for impairment by comparing the carrying value of underlying businesses to their fair values.  We are required to test goodwill for impairment at least annually, and more frequently if an event occurs or circumstances change to indicate that an impairment may have occurred.  The Company performs its annual goodwill impairment test during the fourth quarter of each year.  We estimated the fair value of the operations in our Energy business based on valuations, which relied on certain assumptions we made including projections of future revenues based on assumed long-term growth rates, estimated costs, and the appropriate discount rates. The estimates we used for long-term revenue growth and future costs are based on historical data, various internal estimates, and a variety of external sources, and were developed as part our long-range assessment of our Energy business given the recent developments in the oil services industry. Based primarily on the use of these assumptions in estimating the fair value of the operations in the Energy business, we incurred goodwill impairment charges of $18.3 million and $36.7 million in 2015 and 2014, respectively. After the impairment charges, the carrying value of the goodwill in the Energy business was $10.6 million at December 31, 2015. A change in our assumptions, including lower long-term growth rates, higher operating costs, or higher discount rates could cause a change in the estimated fair value of the operations in the Energy business, and therefore could result in an additional impairment of goodwill, which would have an adverse effect on our results of operations.
Stock-Based Compensation: The amount of stock-based compensation expense to be recognized on stock options and restricted stock granted to employees and non-employee directors is based on their fair value on the grant date. We determine the fair value of restricted stock awards based on the market price of the Company's common stock on the date of grant; we determine the fair value of stock option awards using the Black-Scholes pricing model. We must make certain assumptions in determining the fair value of the stock option awards, including the volatility of our common stock, the future dividend yield on our common stock, and the term over which equity awards will remain outstanding. In addition, we must make certain assumptions regarding the rate at which options will be forfeited to estimate the service period that will be completed by the holders of stock options. Any deviation in the actual volatility of our common stock, the actual dividend yield, and the actual early exercise behavior of holders of stock options from that assumed in estimating the fair value of the awards will not result in a change in the amount of compensation expense recognized, but will result in the actual value realized by the holder of the award to be different from the amount of compensation expense recognized. Any deviation in the actual forfeitures of non-vested stock options during the service period from that assumed will result in a change to the amount of compensation expense recognized, either as additional compensation expense or a reversal of previously recognized compensation expense in the period of change.

21



Income Taxes:  We make certain assumptions and judgments in determining income tax expense for financial reporting purposes. These include estimates of taxable income for the current and future periods, the timing of utilization of tax benefits, the amount of business we will conduct in the jurisdictions in which we operate, and the applicable tax rates. We also must make certain judgments in assessing the likelihood that certain tax positions will be sustained upon examination, including those in foreign jurisdictions. A change in these assumptions would result in a change in our tax provision for financial reporting purposes in future periods and could result in our cash payments for taxes to be more or less than originally estimated.
We assess the recoverability of our deferred tax assets based on our historical taxable income and estimates of future taxable income. In estimating its future taxable income, we have to make various assumptions about our future operating performance, including assumptions regarding the energy industry. We believe that it was more likely than not that the benefit associated with the deferred tax assets will not be fully realized in future periods. Accordingly, a valuation allowance in the amount of $93.4 million and $78.0 million at December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively, was established to reserve against the carrying value of certain of our deferred tax assets. A change in the assumptions, including better or worse operating performance than projected, could result in a change in the amount of deferred tax assets that will be recovered, and therefore could result in a reduction or increase to the valuation allowance established at December 31, 2015. Such an adjustment would be reflected as a component of the provision for income taxes in the period of the adjustment
Contingent Liabilities: We are subject to subject to litigation or claims that arise in the normal course of business. We are also subject to multiple federal, state, and local laws and regulations pertaining to worker safety, the handling of hazardous materials, transportation standards, and the environment. We assessed our potential exposure to legal and environmental claims based on the facts and circumstances and our knowledge of any potential exposure. Based on such assessments we have not recognized a contingent liability for environmental or legal claims. A change in assumptions could result in us being deemed liable for certain such matters, which would be result in additional expense and an increased liability.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements
In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which establishes a core principle, achieved through a five-step process, that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-14, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which deferred the effective date of ASU No. 2014-09 by one year for all entities. ASU 2014-09 is effective for public companies for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and for interim reporting periods within those years. Upon adoption, ASU No. 2014-09 can be applied either retrospectively to each reporting period presented or retrospectively with the cumulative effect of initially applying the standard recognized at the date of initial application. Early application is not permitted. The Company is evaluating the potential impact on its consolidated financial statements of adopting ASU No. 2014-09 and has not yet determined the implementation method to be used.
In April 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the "FASB") issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2015-03, Interest—Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30), which requires that debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability be presented in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the carrying amount of that debt liability, consistent with debt discounts. The recognition and measurement guidance for debt issuance costs are not affected by ASU No. 2015-03. ASU No. 2015-03 is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015, and interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted for financial statements that have not been previously issued. Upon adoption, ASU No. 2015-03 should be applied retrospectively, with the balance sheet of each individual period presented adjusted to reflect the period-specific effects of applying the standard. The Company adopted ASU No. 2015-03 in 2015 and has reflected the impact in the current and prior years in its statement of financial position.

In September 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-16, Business Combinations (Topic 805), which requires that adjustments to provisional amounts recognized at the time of a business combination that are identified during the measurement period be recognized in the reporting period in which the adjustment amounts are determined. ASU No. 2015-16 also requires that the effect on earnings of changes in depreciation, amortization, or other income effects, if any, as a result of the change to the provisional amounts, calculated as if the accounting had been completed at the acquisition date, be recognized in the same period’s financial statements, with disclosure of the portion of the amount recorded in current-period earnings that would have been recorded in previous reporting periods if the adjustment to the provisional amounts had been recognized as of the acquisition date. ASU No. 2015-16 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015, including interim periods within those fiscal years, and should be applied prospectively to adjustments to provisional amounts that occur after the effective date. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU No. 2015-16 to have a material effect on its consolidated financial statements.

22




In November 2015, the FASB issued No. 2015-17, Income Taxes (Topic 740), which requires that deferred tax liabilities and assets be classified as non-current in a classified statement of financial position. The current requirement that deferred tax liabilities and assets of a tax-paying component of an entity be offset and presented as a single amount is not affected by ASU No. 2015-17. ASU No. 2015-17 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted. A reporting entity may apply the provisions of ASU No. 2015-17 prospectively or retrospectively to all prior periods presented in the financial statements. The Company retrospectively adopted ASU No. 2015-17 in 2015 and has reflected the impact in the current and prior years in its statement of financial position.

In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-01, Financial Instruments—Overall (Subtopic 825-10), which eliminates the requirement to classify equity securities with readily determinable market values as either available-for-sale securities and trading securities, and requires that equity investments, other than those accounted for under the traditional equity method of accounting, be measured at their fair value with changes in fair value recognized in net income. Equity investments that do not have readily determinable market values may be measured at cost, subject to an assessment for impairment. ASU No. 2016-01 also requires enhanced disclosures about such equity investments. ASU No. 2016-01 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption prohibited. Upon adoption, a reporting entity should apply the provisions of ASU No. 2016-01 by means of a cumulative effect adjustment to the balance sheet as of the beginning of the fiscal year of adoption. The Company is evaluating the potential impact on its consolidated financial statements of adopting ASU No. 2016-01.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), which requires, among other things, a lessee to recognize a liability representing future lease payments and a right-of-use asset representing its right to use the underlying asset for the lease term. For operating leases, a lessee will be required to recognize at inception a right-of-use asset and a lease liability equal to the net present value of the lease payments, with lease expense recognized over the lease term on a straight-line basis. For leases with a term of twelve months or less, ASU 2016-02 allows a reporting entity to make an accounting policy election to not recognize a right-of-use asset and a lease liability, and to recognize lease expense on a straight-line basis. ASU No. 2016-02 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted. Upon adoption, a reporting entity should apply the provisions of ASU 2016-02 at the beginning of the earliest period presented using a modified retrospective approach, which includes certain optional practical expedients that an entity may elect to apply. The Company is evaluating the potential impact on its consolidated financial statements of adopting ASU 2016-02.

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

Interest Rate Risk
We are exposed to interest rate risk in connection with our borrowings under a credit facility that aggregated $42.9 million at December 31, 2015. Interest rates on funds borrowed under the credit facility vary based on changes to the prime rate, LIBOR, or the Federal Funds Rate. A change in interest rates of 1.0% would result in an annual change in income before taxes of $0.4 million based on the outstanding balance under the credit facility at December 31, 2015.
We are also exposed to interest rate risk related to certain of our investments in marketable securities. At December 31, 2015, our marketable securities aggregated $96.2 million, of which $25.3 million represented corporate obligations that pay a fixed rate of interest and are reported at fair value. A change in interest rates would result in a change in the value of such securities in future periods. Although a change in interest rates in future periods will not affect the amount of interest income earned on the specific securities held at December 31, 2015, a change in interest rates of 1.0% would result in an annual change in income before taxes of $0.3 million in future periods if comparable amounts were invested in similar securities.
Equity Price Risk
We are exposed to equity price risk related to certain of our investments in marketable securities. At December 31, 2015, our marketable securities aggregated $96.2 million, of which $70.9 million represented corporate equities and mutual funds that are reported at fair value, and our investments in equity-method investees accounted for using the fair value option aggregated $22.0 million. In addition, our financial instrument obligations aggregated $21.6 million at December 31, 2015. A change in the equity price of the marketable securities or equity method investments or in the equity price of the securities underlying the financial instrument obligations would result in a change in value of such securities and obligations in future periods.

23



Foreign Currency Exchange Risk
We hold certain investments denominated in a currency other than the United States dollar. We also hold assets and have legacy obligations in foreign countries even though we no longer have any operations outside of the United States. Changes in foreign currency exchange rates can have an impact on our results of operations since we translate foreign currencies into United States dollars for financial reporting purposes. Changes in foreign currency exchange rates would also result in changes in the value received or paid in United States dollars for the assets and obligations denominated in a foreign currency.
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

See financial statements beginning on page F-1 of this Form 10-K
.
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

None.

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

Disclosure Controls and Procedures
As required by Rule 13a-15(b) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the "Exchange Act"), we conducted an evaluation under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based on that evaluation, our Principal Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that as of December 31, 2015, our disclosure controls and procedures are effective in ensuring that all information required to be disclosed in reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission rules and forms and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, in a manner that allows timely decisions regarding required disclosure.
Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
Management of the Company is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act. Our internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of the Company's consolidated financial statements for external reporting purposes in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles.
Under the supervision and with the participation of the Company's management, including our Principal Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, the Company conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the internal control over financial reporting of the Company as referred to above as of December 31, 2015, as required by Rule 13a-15(c) under the Exchange Act. In making this assessment, the Company used the criteria set forth in the framework in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on its evaluation under the framework in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013), management concluded that the Company's internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2015.
BDO USA LLP, the independent registered public accounting firm, who audited the Company's 2015 consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, has issued a report on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015, which is included herein.
Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting
During the quarter ended December 31, 2015, the Company had a change in internal control over financial reporting by enhancing the timing and effectiveness of their review and evaluation of its annual goodwill impairment test.


24



Inherent Limitations on Effectiveness of Controls
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

Item 9B. Other Information

None.

25



PART III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

The information with respect to directors, executive officers, and corporate governance required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference to our Definitive Proxy Statement to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by April 29, 2016.

Item 11. Executive Compensation

The information with respect to executive compensation required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference to our Definitive Proxy Statement to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by April 29, 2016.

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

The information with respect to security ownership of certain beneficial owners and management and related stockholder matters required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference to our Definitive Proxy Statement to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by April 29, 2016.

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence

The information with respect to certain relationships and related transactions and director independence required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference to our Definitive Proxy Statement to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by April 29, 2016.

Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services

The information with respect to principal accounting fees and services required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference to our Definitive Proxy Statement to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by April 29, 2016.


26



PART IV
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

(a)
Listed below are the documents filed as part of this report.

1.Financial Statements and Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm:

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss) for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2015 and 2014
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the years December 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

2.Financial Statement Schedule:

Schedule II - Valuation and Qualifying Accounts for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013

3.
Exhibits:

See Exhibit Index beginning on page G-1



27



SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

Steel Excel Inc.
 
 
 
 
By:
/s/ Jack L. Howard
 
 
Jack L. Howard
 
 
Vice Chairman
 
Date:
March 11, 2016
 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 
Signature
 
Title
 
 
 
 
By:
/s/ Jack L. Howard
 
Vice Chairman
 
Jack L. Howard
 
(Principal executive officer)
Date:
March 11, 2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
By:
/s/ James F. McCabe, Jr.
 
Chief Financial Officer
 
James F. McCabe, Jr.
 
(Principal financial officer)
Date:
March 11, 2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
By:
/s/ Warren G. Lichtenstein
 
Chairman of the Board
 
Warren G. Lichtenstein
 
 
Date:
March 11, 2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
By:
/s/ John J. Quicke
 
Director
 
John J. Quicke
 
 
Date:
March 11, 2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
By:
/s/ John Mutch
 
Director
 
John Mutch
 
 
Date:
March 11, 2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
By:
/s/ Gary Ullman
 
Director
 
Gary Ullman
 
 
Date:
March 11, 2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
By:
/s/ Robert Valentine
 
Director
 
Robert Valentine
 
 
Date:
March 11, 2016
 
 
 
 
 
 



28





Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

Board of Directors and Stockholders
Steel Excel Inc.
White Plains, New York

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Steel Excel Inc. (the "Company") as of December 31, 2015 and 2014 and the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive income (loss), stockholders' equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2015. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
As discussed in Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has restated its 2014 and 2013 consolidated financial statements.
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Steel Excel Inc. at December 31, 2015 and 2014, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2015, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
Also, in our opinion, the financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic consolidated financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein.
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), Steel Excel Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO), and our report dated March 11, 2016 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.
/s/ BDO USA, LLP
New York, New York
March 11, 2016





F-1



Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Board of Directors and Stockholders
Steel Excel Inc.
White Plains, New York

We have audited Steel Excel Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (the COSO criteria). Steel Excel Inc.’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying “Item 9A, Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting”. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.
We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audit also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
In our opinion, Steel Excel Inc. maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015, based on the COSO criteria.
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of Steel Excel Inc. as of December 31, 2015 and 2014, and the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive income (loss), stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2015, and our report dated March 11, 2016 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.
BDO USA, LLP
New York, New York
March 11, 2016


F-2




Steel Excel Inc.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Revised)
 
 
(in thousands, except per-share data)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net revenues
 
$
132,620

 
$
210,148

 
$
120,028

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of revenues
 
106,005

 
152,119

 
87,874

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross profit
 
26,615

 
58,029

 
32,154

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 

 
 

Selling, general and administrative expenses
 
33,449

 
35,184

 
20,883

Amortization of intangibles
 
8,211

 
9,582

 
8,709

Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets
 
25,622

 
36,666

 

Total operating expenses
 
67,282

 
81,432

 
29,592

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating income (loss)
 
(40,667
)
 
(23,403
)
 
2,562

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest expense
 
(2,455
)
 
(3,177
)
 
(1,725
)
Impairment of marketable securities
 
(59,781
)
 

 

Other income (expense), net
 
14,899

 
7,058

 
7,074

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) from continuing operations before income taxes and equity method loss
 
(88,004
)
 
(19,522
)
 
7,911

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Benefit from income taxes
 
6,323

 
1,323

 
5,818

Loss from equity method investees, net of tax
 
(16,102
)
 
(6,070
)
 
(862
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss) from continuing operations
 
(97,783
)
 
(24,269
)
 
12,867

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of taxes
 

 
506

 
(5,540
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
 
(97,783
)
 
(23,763
)
 
7,327

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net loss (income) attributable to non-controlling interests in consolidated entities
 
 
 
 

 
 

Continuing operations
 
376

 
235

 
156

Discontinued operations
 

 
(279
)
 
3,188

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss) attributable to Steel Excel Inc.
 
$
(97,407
)
 
$
(23,807
)
 
$
10,671

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic income (loss) per share attributable to Steel Excel Inc.:
 
 
 
 

 
 

Net income (loss) from continuing operations
 
$
(8.50
)
 
$
(2.06
)
 
$
1.03

Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of taxes
 
$

 
$
0.02

 
$
(0.19
)
Net income (loss)
 
$
(8.50
)
 
$
(2.04
)
 
$
0.85

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Diluted income (loss) per share attributable to Steel Excel Inc.:
 
 
 
 

 
 

Net income (loss) from continuing operations
 
$
(8.50
)
 
$
(2.06
)
 
$
1.03

Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of taxes
 
$

 
$
0.02

 
$
(0.19
)
Net income (loss)
 
$
(8.50
)
 
$
(2.04
)
 
$
0.85

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Shares used in computing income (loss) per share:
 
 
 
 

 
 

Basic
 
11,454

 
11,678

 
12,584

Diluted
 
11,454

 
11,678

 
12,602

 
See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

F-3



Steel Excel Inc.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)
 
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Revised)
 
 
(in thousands)
Net income (loss)
 
$
(97,783
)
 
$
(23,763
)
 
$
7,327

Other comprehensive income (loss):
 
 

 
 

 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustment
 
(8
)
 
20

 
(63
)
Reclassification to realized gains
 

 

 
(361
)
Net foreign currency translation adjustment (A)
 
(8
)
 
20

 
(424
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Marketable securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross unrealized gains (losses) on marketable securities, net of tax (B)
 
(24,927
)
 
(20,043
)
 
12,126

Reclassification to realized losses (gains), net of tax (C)
 
34,595

 
(5,223
)
 
(2,608
)
Net unrealized gain (loss) on marketable securities, net of taxes
 
9,668

 
(25,266
)
 
9,518

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Comprehensive income (loss)
 
(88,123
)
 
(49,009
)
 
16,421

Comprehensive loss (income) attributable to non-controlling interest
 
376

 
(44
)
 
3,344

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Comprehensive income (loss) attributable to Steel Excel Inc.
 
$
(87,747
)
 
$
(49,053
)
 
$
19,765

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(A) No tax effect on cumulative translation adjustments
 
 
 
 
 
 
(B) Tax benefit (provision) on gross unrealized gains (losses)
 
$
13,990

 
$

 
$

(C) Tax benefit (provision) on reclassifications to realized gains (losses)
 
$
(19,416
)
 
$

 
$

 
See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

F-4



Steel Excel Inc.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
 
December 31,
2015
 
December 31, 2014
 
 
 
(Revised)
 
(in thousands. except per-share data)
Assets
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
31,707

 
$
51,910

Restricted cash
21,639

 
21,311

Marketable securities
96,189

 
138,457

Receivable from securities sales not settled
23,229

 

Accounts receivable (net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $38 in 2015)
10,614

 
28,016

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
3,937

 
4,228

Total current assets
187,315

 
243,922

Property and equipment, net
95,793

 
107,187

Goodwill
12,594

 
30,864

Intangible assets, net
20,219

 
35,782

Other investments
3,555

 
28,525

Investments in equity method investees ($21,954 in 2015 and $24,355 in 2014 reported at fair value)
24,815

 
30,060

Other long-term assets
531

 
606

Total assets
$
344,822

 
$
476,946

 
 
 
 
Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity:
 

 
 

Current liabilities:
 

 
 

Accounts payable
$
2,781

 
$
3,936

Accrued expenses and other liabilities
8,458

 
8,916

Financial instrument obligations
21,639

 
21,311

Current portion of long-term debt (net of unamortized debt issuance costs of $57 in 2014)

 
13,157

Current portion of capital lease obligations

 
412

Current liabilities of discontinued operations
450

 
450

Total current liabilities
33,328

 
48,182

Capital lease obligations, net of current portion

 
177

Long-term debt (net of current portion and unamortized debt issuance costs of $280 in 2015 and $575 in 2014)
42,666

 
65,496

Deferred income taxes
737

 
1,858

Other long-term liabilities
236

 
3,715

Total liabilities
76,967

 
119,428

 
 
 
 
Commitments and contingencies


 


 
 
 
 
Stockholders' equity:
 

 
 

Common stock ($0.001 par value, 18,000 shares authorized; 14,392 and 14,220 shares issued in 2015 and 2014, respectively; 11,347 and 11,406 shares outstanding in 2015 and 2014, respectively)
14

 
14

Additional paid-in capital
270,516

 
267,444

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(5,546
)
 
(15,206
)
Retained earnings
89,229

 
186,636

Treasury stock, at cost (2015 - 3,045 shares; 2014 - 2,814 shares)
(85,967
)
 
(81,355
)
Total Steel Excel Inc. stockholders' equity
268,246

 
357,533

Non-controlling interest
(391
)
 
(15
)
Total stockholders' equity
267,855

 
357,518

 
 
 
 
Total liabilities and stockholders' equity
$
344,822

 
$
476,946


See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

F-5



Steel Excel Inc.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY
(in thousands)
 
Steel Excel Inc. Stockholders' Equity
 
 
 
 
 
Common Stock
 
Treasury Stock
 
Additional Paid-in Capital
 
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
 
Retained Earnings
 
Non-Controlling Interest
 
 
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
 
 
 
 
Total
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Balance, January 1, 2013
14,365

 
14

 
(1,458
)
 
(41,617
)
 
272,786

 
946

 
199,772

 
61

 
431,962

Net income attributable to Steel Excel Inc. (Revised)

 

 

 

 

 

 
10,671

 

 
10,671

Net loss attributable to non-controlling interest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
(3,344
)
 
(3,344
)
Other comprehensive income (Revised)

 

 

 

 

 
9,094

 

 

 
9,094

Net issuance of restricted shares
143

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

 

 
2,040

 

 

 

 
2,040

Repurchases of common stock

 

 
(1,045
)
 
(29,384
)
 

 

 

 

 
(29,384
)
Non-controlling interest of acquired entities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
2,896

 
2,896

Balance, December 31, 2013
14,508

 
$
14

 
(2,503
)
 
$
(71,001
)
 
$
274,826

 
$
10,040

 
$
210,443

 
$
(387
)
 
$
423,935

Net loss attributable to Steel Excel Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 
(23,807
)
 

 
(23,807
)
Net loss attributable to non-controlling interests

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
44

 
44

Other comprehensive loss

 

 

 

 

 
(25,246
)
 

 

 
(25,246
)
Net issuance of restricted shares
9

 
1

 

 

 
(120
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(119
)
Stock-based compensation

 

 

 

 
2,807

 

 

 

 
2,807

Reverse/forward stock split
(297
)
 
(1
)
 

 

 
(10,069
)
 

 

 

 
(10,070
)
Repurchases of common stock
 
 
 
 
(311
)
 
(10,354
)
 

 

 

 

 
(10,354
)
Contribution from non-controlling interest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
328

 
328

Balance, December 31, 2014
14,220

 
$
14

 
(2,814
)
 
$
(81,355
)
 
$
267,444

 
$
(15,206
)
 
$
186,636

 
$
(15
)
 
$
357,518

Net loss attributable to Steel Excel Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 
(97,407
)
 

 
(97,407
)
Net loss attributable to non-controlling interests

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
(376
)
 
(376
)
Other comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 
9,660

 

 

 
9,660

Net issuance of restricted shares
172

 

 

 

 
(85
)
 

 

 

 
(85
)
Stock-based compensation

 

 

 

 
3,157

 

 

 

 
3,157

Repurchases of common stock

 

 
(231
)
 
(4,612
)
 

 

 

 

 
(4,612
)
Balance, December 31, 2015
14,392

 
$
14

 
(3,045
)
 
$
(85,967
)
 
$
270,516

 
$
(5,546
)
 
$
89,229

 
$
(391
)
 
$
267,855


See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

F-6



Steel Excel Inc.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
 
 
 
 
(Revised)
 
(in thousands)
Cash Flows From Operating Activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
$
(97,783
)
 
$
(23,763
)
 
$
7,327

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
 

 
 

 
 
Loss (income) from discontinued operations

 
(506
)
 
5,540

Stock-based compensation expense
3,157

 
2,807

 
2,040

Depreciation and amortization
23,613

 
24,156

 
19,185

Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets
25,622

 
36,666

 

Impairment of marketable securities
59,781

 

 

Deferred income tax provision (benefit)
(6,547
)
 
(198
)
 
1,988

Gain on sales of marketable securities
(5,247
)
 
(3,765
)
 
(2,608
)
Reversal of tax reserves
110

 
(45
)
 
(7,236
)
Loss from equity-method investees
16,102

 
6,070

 
862

Loss on financial instrument obligations
477

 
1,820

 

Loss on change to equity method at fair value
2,807

 
568

 

Gain on non-monetary exchanges
(9,268
)
 

 

Other
1,019

 
1,116

 
935

Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of effects of acquisitions:
 

 
 

 
 
Accounts receivable
17,364

 
(2,488
)
 
2,653

Prepaid expenses and other assets
225

 
1,782

 
(833
)
Accounts payable and other liabilities
(4,908
)
 
(305
)
 
(2,044
)
Net cash used in operating activities of discontinued operations

 

 
(2,116
)
Net cash provided by operating activities
26,524

 
43,915

 
25,693

 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash Flows From Investing Activities:
 

 
 

 
 
Purchases of businesses, net of cash acquired

 
(517
)
 
(61,888
)
Purchases of property and equipment
(4,785
)
 
(15,939
)
 
(8,932
)
Proceeds from sale of property and equipment
171

 
632

 
552

Other investments

 
(3,000
)
 
(25,000
)
Investments in equity method investees

 
(144
)
 
(9,202
)
Purchases of marketable securities
(43,426
)
 
(111,648
)
 
(189,268
)
Sales of marketable securities
43,338

 
116,314

 
75,825

Maturities of marketable securities

 
4,302

 
145,994

Proceeds from issuance of financial instrument obligations
490

 
385

 

Repayments of financial instrument obligations
(639
)
 
(381
)
 

Reclassification of restricted cash
(328
)
 
(21,311
)
 

Net cash used in investing activities
(5,179
)
 
(31,307
)
 
(71,919
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash Flows From Financing Activities:
 

 
 

 
 
Repurchases of common stock - treasury shares
(4,612
)
 
(10,354
)
 
(29,384
)
Repurchases of common stock - reverse/forward stock split

 
(10,070
)
 

Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt

 

 
95,000

Payments for debt issuance costs

 

 
(1,368
)
Repayments of long-term debt
(36,339
)
 
(13,215
)
 
(15,500
)
Other financing activities
(589
)
 
(681
)
 
(413
)
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
(41,540
)
 
(34,320
)
 
48,335

 
 
 
 
 
 
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
(20,195
)
 
(21,712
)
 
2,109

Effect of foreign currency translation on cash and cash equivalents
(8
)
 
20

 
(63
)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
51,910

 
73,602

 
71,556

 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
$
31,707

 
$
51,910

 
$
73,602


See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

F-7



Steel Excel Inc.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

1.
Organization and Basis of Presentation

Steel Excel Inc. (“Steel Excel” or the “Company”) currently operates in two reporting segments - Energy and Sports. Through its wholly-owned subsidiary Steel Energy Services Ltd. ("Steel Energy Services"), the Company’s Energy business provides drilling and production services to the oil and gas industry. Through its wholly-owned subsidiary Steel Sports Inc., the Company’s Sports business is a social impact organization that strives to provide a first-class youth sports experience emphasizing positive experiences and instilling the core values of discipline, teamwork, safety, respect, and integrity. The Company also makes significant non-controlling investments in entities in industries related to its reporting segments as well as entities in other unrelated industries. The Company continues to identify business acquisition opportunities in both the Energy and Sports industries as well as in other unrelated industries. The Company began its Sports and Energy businesses in June 2011 and December 2011, respectively. Prior to that the Company provided enterprise-class external storage products and software to original equipment manufacturers (the "Predecessor Business"). Steel Partners Holdings L.P. (“Steel Partners”), an affiliate, beneficially owned approximately 58.3% of the Company’s outstanding common stock as of December 31, 2015.

The consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States, and include the accounts of the Company and all of its subsidiaries. The Company consolidates entities in which it owns greater than 50% of the voting equity of an entity or otherwise is able to exert control. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in the consolidated financial statements.
During 2015, the Company identified an error in the manner in which the provision for income taxes had been recorded for all quarterly and annual periods in the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013. The Company's balance sheet at December 31, 2014, and its statement of operations, statement of comprehensive income, statement of stockholders' equity, and statement of cash flows for the year ended December 31, 2013, have been revised to reflect the correction of these errors (see Note 3).
The Company shut down the operations of Ruckus Sports LLC (“Ruckus”), a provider of obstacle course and mass-participation events that was part of the Company’s Sports business, in November 2013. The consolidated financial statements reflect Ruckus as a discontinued operation in all periods (see Note 5).

The Company's effected a 1-for-500 reverse stock split (the "Reverse Split") in June 2014, immediately followed by a 500-for-1 forward stock split (the "Forward Split", and together with the Reverse Split, the "Reverse/Forward Split"), of its common stock. The consolidated financial statements reflect the effects of the Reverse/Forward Split (see Note 22).

Certain other prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the 2015 presentation.

2.
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Cash and Cash Equivalents: Cash and cash equivalents include all cash balances and highly liquid investments having original maturities of three months or less.

Marketable Securities: Marketable securities are classified as available-for-sale and consist of short-term deposits, corporate debt and equity instruments, and mutual funds. The Company classifies its marketable securities as current assets based on the nature of the securities and their availability for use in current operations. Marketable securities are reported at fair value, with unrealized gains and losses recognized in stockholders’ equity as “other comprehensive income (loss)”. Declines in fair value that are determined to be other than temporary are recognized as an impairment charge. Realized gains or losses on marketable securities are determined based on specific identification of the securities sold and are recognized as “other income (loss)” at the time of sale. In 2015, the Company incurred impairment charges on its marketable securities of $59.8 million (see Note 6).

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts: The Company recognizes bad debt expense on trade receivables through an allowance account using estimates based on past experience, and writes off trade receivables against the allowance account when the Company believes it has exhausted all available means of collection. The allowance for doubtful accounts was $38,000 as of December 31, 2015; there was no allowance for doubtful accounts recognized as of December 31, 2014.

Fair Value Measurements: The Company reports certain assets and liabilities at their fair value, which is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the

F-8



measurement date. Fair values of assets and liabilities are determined based on a three-level measurement input hierarchy. Level 1 inputs are quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the measurement date. Level 2 inputs are other than quoted market prices that are observable, either directly or indirectly, for an asset or liability. Level 2 inputs can include quoted prices in active markets for similar assets or liabilities, quoted prices in a market that is not active for identical assets or liabilities, or other inputs that can be corroborated by observable market data. Level 3 inputs are unobservable for the asset or liability when there is little, if any, market activity for the asset or liability. Level 3 inputs are based on the best information available, and may include data developed by the Company.

Property and Equipment, Net: Property and equipment is stated at cost. Depreciation is computed on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the assets, which generally range from four years for certain vehicles and equipment to thirty-nine years for buildings. Leasehold improvements and assets recorded under capital leases are amortized on a straight-line basis over the shorter of their estimated useful lives or the terms of the leases.

Long-Lived Assets: The Company evaluates the recoverability of its finite-lived intangible assets and its property and equipment by comparing their carrying values to the expected future undiscounted cash flows to be generated from such assets when events or circumstances indicate that an impairment may have occurred. If the carrying values of the long-lived assets exceed the sum of the undiscounted cash flows, an impairment charge is recognized in the amount by which the carrying values exceeds their fair values. In 2015, the Company incurred an intangible asset impairment charge of $7.4 million (see Note 9).
 
Goodwill: Goodwill is tested for impairment on an annual basis, or more frequently if an event occurs or circumstances change to indicate that an impairment may have occurred. The Company performs its annual impairment test in the fourth quarter of each year. The goodwill impairment test involves a two-step process. The first step compares the fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying amount, including goodwill. No potential impairment exists if the carrying value of the reporting unit is less than its fair value. If the carrying value of the reporting unit exceeds its fair value, then the second step is necessary to measure the impairment. The second step compares the implied fair value of the reporting unit goodwill with the carrying amount of that goodwill. Any excess of the reporting unit goodwill carrying value in excess of the implied fair value is recognized as an impairment. In 2015 and 2014, the Company incurred goodwill impairment charges of $18.3 million and $36.7 million, respectively (see Note 9).

Other Investments: Investments that do not have a readily determinable market value and in which the Company does not have a controlling financial interest are accounted for as cost-method investments or, if they Company has the ability to exert significant influence, as equity-method investments. The carrying values of equity-method investments are adjusted for either the Company’s proportionate share of the investee’s earnings, which may be reported on a lag of up to three months, or the change in fair value of the investee. Both cost-method investments and equity-method investments are monitored for indications of impairment. In 2015, the Company incurred an impairment on one of its equity-method investments of $2.5 million.

Financial Instrument Obligations: The Company recognizes a liability for short sale transactions on certain financial instruments in which the Company receives proceeds from the sale of such financial instruments and incurs obligations to deliver or purchase securities at a later date. Subsequent changes in the fair value of such obligations, determined based on the closing market price of the financial instruments, are recognized currently as gains or losses, with a comparable reclassification made between the amounts of the Company's unrestricted and restricted cash.

Contingent Liabilities: The Company recognizes a liability for certain contingencies, including those related to litigation or claims or to certain governmental laws and regulations, when it is probable that an asset has been impaired or a liability has been incurred, and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated.

Business Combinations: The Company allocates the fair value of the total consideration of its acquisitions to the tangible assets, liabilities, and identifiable intangible assets acquired based on their estimated fair values. The excess of the fair value of the total consideration over the fair values of these identifiable assets and liabilities is recognized as goodwill. Acquisition-related expenses are recognized separately from the business combination and are expensed as incurred as a component of “selling, general, and administrative expenses.”

Revenue Recognition: The Company recognizes revenue at the time the service is provided to the customer. Revenue is recognized in the Energy business when the services are rendered. Revenue is recognized in the Sports business when the service is rendered or the event occurs. Amounts received from customers in advance of the service or event are deferred until such time the service is rendered or the event occurs.

Stock-based Compensation: The Company recognizes compensation expense for stock options and restricted stock

F-9



granted to employees and non-employee directors over the requisite service period based on the estimated fair value on the grant date. The fair value of restricted stock awards is the market price of the Company's common stock on the date of grant. The fair value of option awards is estimated using the Black-Scholes pricing model.

Advertising expenses:  Advertising costs are expensed in the period in which the advertising appears in print or is broadcast.  The Company's advertising expense for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013, was $0.2 million, $0.2 million, and $0.1 million, respectively.

Foreign Currency Translation: Although the Company no longer has current operations in foreign jurisdictions, it consolidates certain foreign-based entities associated with the Predecessor Business. Assets and liabilities of foreign entities are translated from the functional currency into United States dollars using the exchange rate in effect at the balance sheet date.  Revenues and expenses of foreign operations are translated from the functional currency into United States dollars using the average exchange rate for the period.  Adjustments resulting from the translation into United States dollars are recognized in stockholders’ equity as “other comprehensive income (loss)”.

Income Taxes: The Company uses the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected tax consequences of temporary differences between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their reported amounts. Valuation allowances are recorded to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that will more likely than not be realized, with changes in valuation allowances recognized in the provision for income taxes. The Company accounts for uncertainty in income taxes using a two-step approach to recognizing and measuring uncertain tax positions. The first step is to evaluate the tax position for recognition by determining if the weight of available evidence indicates that it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained on audit. The second step is to measure the tax benefit as the largest amount that is more than 50% likely of being realized upon settlement. The Company classifies the liability for unrecognized tax benefits as current to the extent that the Company anticipates payment within one year. Interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions are recognized in the provision for income taxes.

Income (Loss) per Share: Basic net income (loss) per share of common stock is computed by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted net income (loss) per share gives effect to all potentially dilutive common shares outstanding during the period.

Concentration of Credit Risk: Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk consist principally of cash and cash equivalents, marketable securities, and trade receivables. The Company maintains its cash balances and marketable securities with high credit quality financial institutions. Deposits held with banks, including those held in foreign branches of global banks, may exceed the amount of insurance provided on such deposits. These deposits may be withdrawn upon demand and therefore bear minimal risk. The Company limits the amount of credit exposure through diversification and management regularly monitors the composition of its investment portfolio.

The Company provides credit to customers on an uncollateralized basis after evaluating client creditworthiness. The Company’s clients in its Energy business are concentrated in the oil and gas industry, and are concentrated in North Dakota and Montana in the Bakken basin and in Texas in the Permian basin. The Company’s five largest customers in the Energy business provided approximately 55.7% and 61.2% of consolidated revenues for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. In addition, amounts due from customers with the five largest outstanding receivable balances represented 51.8% and 65.5% of trade accounts receivable at December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. A significant reduction in business from a significant customer or their failure to pay outstanding trade accounts receivable could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s results of operations and financial condition.

Use of Estimates: The preparation of the Company’s consolidated financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions. These estimates affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ materially from these estimates.

Recently Issued Accounting Standards: In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which establishes a core principle, achieved through a five-step process, that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-14, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which deferred the effective date of ASU No. 2014-09 by one year for all entities. ASU 2014-09 is effective for public companies for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and for interim reporting periods within those years. Upon adoption, ASU No. 2014-09 can be applied either

F-10



retrospectively to each reporting period presented or retrospectively with the cumulative effect of initially applying the standard recognized at the date of initial application. Early application is not permitted. The Company is evaluating the potential impact on its consolidated financial statements of adopting ASU No. 2014-09 and has not yet determined the implementation method to be used.

In April 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the "FASB") issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2015-03, Interest—Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30), which requires that debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability be presented in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the carrying amount of that debt liability, consistent with debt discounts. The recognition and measurement guidance for debt issuance costs are not affected by ASU No. 2015-03. ASU No. 2015-03 is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015, and interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted for financial statements that have not been previously issued. Upon adoption, ASU No. 2015-03 should be applied retrospectively, with the balance sheet of each individual period presented adjusted to reflect the period-specific effects of applying the standard. The Company adopted ASU No. 2015-03 in 2015 and has reflected the impact in the current and prior years in its statement of financial position (see Note 3).

In September 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-16, Business Combinations (Topic 805), which requires that adjustments to provisional amounts recognized at the time of a business combination that are identified during the measurement period be recognized in the reporting period in which the adjustment amounts are determined. ASU No. 2015-16 also requires that the effect on earnings of changes in depreciation, amortization, or other income effects, if any, as a result of the change to the provisional amounts, calculated as if the accounting had been completed at the acquisition date, be recognized in the same period’s financial statements, with disclosure of the portion of the amount recorded in current-period earnings that would have been recorded in previous reporting periods if the adjustment to the provisional amounts had been recognized as of the acquisition date. ASU No. 2015-16 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015, including interim periods within those fiscal years, and should be applied prospectively to adjustments to provisional amounts that occur after the effective date. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU No. 2015-16 to have a material effect on its consolidated financial statements.

In November 2015, the FASB issued No. 2015-17, Income Taxes (Topic 740), which requires that deferred tax liabilities and assets be classified as non-current in a classified statement of financial position. The current requirement that deferred tax liabilities and assets of a tax-paying component of an entity be offset and presented as a single amount is not affected by ASU No. 2015-17. ASU No. 2015-17 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted. A reporting entity may apply the provisions of ASU No. 2015-17 prospectively or retrospectively to all prior periods presented in the financial statements. The Company retrospectively adopted ASU No. 2015-17 in 2015 and has reflected the impact in the current and prior years in its statement of financial position (see Note 3).

In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-01, Financial Instruments—Overall (Subtopic 825-10), which eliminates the requirement to classify equity securities with readily determinable market values as either available-for-sale securities and trading securities, and requires that equity investments, other than those accounted for under the traditional equity method of accounting, be measured at their fair value with changes in fair value recognized in net income. Equity investments that do not have readily determinable market values may be measured at cost, subject to an assessment for impairment. ASU 825-10 also requires enhanced disclosures about such equity investments. ASU No. 2016-01 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption prohibited. Upon adoption, a reporting entity should apply the provisions of ASU 2016-01 by means of a cumulative effect adjustment to the balance sheet as of the beginning of the fiscal year of adoption. The Company is evaluating the potential impact on its consolidated financial statements of adopting ASU 2016-01.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), which requires, among other things, a lessee to recognize a liability representing future lease payments and a right-of-use asset representing its right to use the underlying asset for the lease term. For operating leases, a lessee will be required to recognize at inception a right-of-use asset and a lease liability equal to the net present value of the lease payments, with lease expense recognized over the lease term on a straight-line basis. For leases with a term of twelve months or less, ASU 2016-02 allows a reporting entity to make an accounting policy election to not recognize a right-of-use asset and a lease liability, and to recognize lease expense on a straight-line basis. ASU No. 2016-02 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted. Upon adoption, a reporting entity should apply the provisions of ASU 2016-02 at the beginning of the earliest period presented using a modified retrospective approach, which includes certain optional practical expedients that an entity may elect to apply. The Company is evaluating the potential impact on its consolidated financial statements of adopting ASU 2016-02.


F-11



3.
Revised Financial Statements

During 2015, the Company identified an error related to the manner in which the change in the valuation allowance for deferred tax assets was reflected in its financial statements for all annual and quarterly periods in the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013. The change in the valuation allowance, which resulted from a change in deferred tax liabilities related to unrealized gains on available-for-sale securities, was recognized as a component of income from continuing operations, resulting in a benefit from or provision for income taxes allocated to continuing operations in each period, with an offsetting provision for or benefit from income taxes allocated to other comprehensive income relating to unrealized gains or losses on available-for-sale securities. Upon subsequent review, the Company determined that proper intra-period allocation of the provision for income taxes would have resulted in this change in the valuation allowance being allocated to other comprehensive income, resulting in no provision or benefit for such item. In periods in which the valuation allowance decreased, the impact of this error was an overstatement of income from continuing operations and an understatement of other comprehensive income; in periods in which the valuation allowance increased, the impact of this error was an understatement of income from continuing operations and an overstatement of other comprehensive income.

The correction of this error has resulted in adjustments to the Company's balance sheet at December 31, 2014, and its statement of operations, statement of comprehensive income, statement of stockholders' equity, and statement of cash flows for the year ended December 31, 2013. The correction of this error did not result in any adjustments to the statement of operations, statement of comprehensive income, statement of stockholders' equity, and statement of cash flows for the year ended December 31, 2014. In addition, the Company's disclosures for the year ended December 31, 2013, related to income taxes (see Note 14), net income (loss) per share (see Note 16), and selected quarterly financial date (see Note 24) have been revised to reflect the impact of these adjustments.

The impact on the individual line items of the Company's financial statements from the adjustments to correct this error and the adjustments to reflect the adoption of ASU No. 2015-03 and ASU No. 2015-17 (see Note 2) was as follows:

Balance Sheet at December 31, 2014:

 
Previously Reported
 
Adjustments
 
Revised
 
(in thousands)
Deferred income taxes - current
$
1,696

 
$
(1,696
)
 
$

Total current assets
$
245,618

 
$
(1,696
)
 
$
243,922

Deferred income taxes - non-current
$
80

 
$
(80
)
 
$

Other long-term assets
$
1,238

 
$
(632
)
 
$
606

Total assets
$
479,354

 
$
(2,408
)
 
$
476,946

 
 
 
 
 
 
Current portion of long-term debt
$
13,214

 
$
(57
)
 
$
13,157

Deferred income taxes - current
$
85

 
$
(85
)
 
$

Total current liabilities
$
48,324

 
$
(142
)
 
$
48,182

Long-term debt
$
66,071

 
$
(575
)
 
$
65,496

Deferred income taxes - non-current
$
3,549

 
$
(1,691
)
 
$
1,858

Total liabilities
$
121,836

 
$
(2,408
)
 
$
119,428

 
 
 
 
 
 
Accumulated other comprehensive income
$
(18,730
)
 
$
3,524

 
$
(15,206
)
Retained earnings