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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
 
 
 
FORM 10-K
 
 
 
 (Mark One)
ý
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2015
or
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
Commission file number 001-35917
 
 
 
 
 Tallgrass Energy Partners, LP
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
 
 
Delaware
 
 
 
46-1972941
(State or other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)
 
 
 
(IRS Employer Identification Number)
 
 
 
 
 
4200 W. 115th Street, Suite 350
 
 
 
 
Leawood, Kansas
 
 
 
66211
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
 
 
 
(Zip Code)
(913) 928-6060
(Registrant's Telephone Number, Including Area Code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Units Representing Limited Partner Interests
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None
 
 
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes  ¨    No  ý Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer", "accelerated filer", and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filer
 
x
  
Accelerated filer
 
¨
 
 
 
 
Non-accelerated filer
 
¨  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  
Smaller reporting company
 
¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  ý
The aggregate market value of voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates on June 30, 2015, the last business day of the Registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter (based on the closing sale price of $48.08 of the Registrant’s Common Units, as reported by the New York Stock Exchange on such date) was approximately $1,622.7 million.
On February 17, 2016, the Registrant had 67,162,232 Common Units and 834,391 General Partner Units outstanding.






TALLGRASS ENERGY PARTNERS, LP
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 






Glossary of Common Industry and Measurement Terms
Bakken oil production area: Montana and North Dakota in the United States and Saskatchewan and Manitoba in Canada.
Barrel (or bbl): forty two U.S. gallons.
Base Gas (or Cushion Gas): the volume of gas that is intended as permanent inventory in a storage reservoir to maintain adequate pressure and deliverability rates.
BBtu: one billion British Thermal Units.
Bcf: one billion cubic feet.
British Thermal Units or Btus: the amount of heat energy needed to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit.
Commodity sensitive contracts or arrangements: contracts or other arrangements, including tariff provisions, that directly expose our cash flows to increases and decreases in the price of commodities such as crude oil, natural gas and NGLs. Examples are Keep Whole Processing Contracts and Percent of Proceeds Processing Contracts, as well as pipeline loss allowances on our pipelines.
Condensate: a NGL with a low vapor pressure, mainly composed of propane, butane, pentane and heavier hydrocarbon fractions.
Contract barrels: barrels of crude oil that our customers have contractually agreed to ship in exchange for firm service assurance of capacity and deliverability to delivery points.
Delivery point: any point at which product in a pipeline is delivered to or for the account of a customer.
Dry gas: a gas primarily composed of methane and ethane where heavy hydrocarbons and water either do not exist or have been removed through processing.
Dth: a dekatherm, which is a unit of energy equal to 10 therms or one million British thermal units.
End-user markets: the ultimate users and consumers of transported energy products.
EPA: the United States Environmental Protection Agency.
FERC: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.
Firm fee contracts: firm fee contracts generally obligate our customers to pay a fixed recurring charge to reserve an agreed upon amount of capacity and/or deliverability on our assets, regardless if the contracted capacity is actually used by the customer. Such contracts are also commonly known as "take-or-pay" contracts.
Firm services: services pursuant to which customers receive firm assurances regarding the availability of capacity and/or deliverability of natural gas, crude oil or other hydrocarbons or water on our assets up to a contracted amount.
Fractionation: the process by which NGLs are further separated into individual, typically more valuable components including ethane, propane, butane, isobutane and natural gasoline.
GAAP: generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America.
GHGs: greenhouse gases.
Header system: networks of medium-to-large-diameter high pressure pipelines that connect local gathering systems to large diameter high pressure long-haul transportation pipelines.
Interruptible services: services pursuant to which customers receive limited, or no, assurances regarding the availability of capacity and deliverability in our assets.
Keep Whole Processing Contracts: natural gas processing contracts in which we are required to replace the Btu content of the NGLs extracted from inlet wet gas processed with purchased dry natural gas.
Line fill: the volume of oil, in barrels, in the pipeline from the origin to the destination.






Liquefied natural gas or LNG: natural gas that has been cooled to minus 161 degrees Celsius for transportation, typically by ship. The cooling process reduces the volume of natural gas by 600 times.
Local distribution company or LDC: LDCs are involved in the delivery of natural gas to consumers within a specific geographic area.
Long-term: with respect to any contract, a contract with an initial duration greater than one year.
MMBtu: one million British Thermal Units.
Mcf: one thousand cubic feet.
MMcf: one million cubic feet.
Natural gas liquids or NGLs: those hydrocarbons in natural gas that are separated from the natural gas as liquids through the process of absorption, condensation, adsorption or other methods in natural gas processing or cycling plants. Generally such liquids consist of propane and heavier hydrocarbons and are commonly referred to as lease condensate, natural gasoline and liquefied petroleum gases. Natural gas liquids include natural gas plant liquids (primarily ethane, propane, butane and isobutane) and lease condensate (primarily pentanes produced from natural gas at lease separators and field facilities).
Natural Gas Processing: the separation of natural gas into pipeline-quality natural gas and a mixed NGL stream.
Non-contract barrels (or walk-up barrels): barrels of crude oil that our customers ship based solely on availability of capacity and deliverability with no assurance of future capacity.
No-notice service: those services pursuant to which customers receive the right to transport or store natural gas on assets outside of the daily nomination cycle without incurring penalties.
NYMEX: New York Mercantile Exchange.
Park and loan services: those services pursuant to which customers receive the right to store natural gas in (park), or borrow gas from (loan), our facilities on a seasonal basis.
Percent of Proceeds Processing Contracts: natural gas processing contracts in which we process our customer’s natural gas, sell the resulting NGLs and residue gas and divide the proceeds of those sales between us and the customer. Some percent of proceeds contracts may also require our customers to pay a monthly reservation fee for processing capacity.
PHMSA: the United States Department of Transportation’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.
Play: a proven geological formation that contains commercial amounts of hydrocarbons.
Produced water: all water removed from a well as a byproduct of the production of hydrocarbons and water removed from a well in connection with operations being conducted on the well, including naturally occurring water in the recovery formation, flow back water recovered during completion and fracturing operations and water entering the recovery formation through water flooding techniques.
Receipt point: the point where a product is received by or into a gathering system, processing facility, or transportation pipeline.
Reservoir: a porous and permeable underground formation containing an individual and separate natural accumulation of producible hydrocarbons (such as crude oil and/or natural gas) which is confined by impermeable rock or water barriers and is characterized by a single natural pressure system.
Residue gas: the natural gas remaining after being processed or treated.
Shale gas: natural gas produced from organic (black) shale formations.
Tailgate: the point at which processed natural gas and NGLs leave a processing facility for transportation to end-user markets.
TBtu: one trillion British Thermal Units.
Tcf: one trillion cubic feet.






Throughput: the volume of products, such as crude oil, natural gas or water, transported or passing through a pipeline, plant, terminal or other facility during a particular period.
Uncommitted shippers (or walk-up shippers): customers that have not signed long-term shipper contracts and have rights under the FERC tariff as to rates and capacity allocation that are different than long-term committed shippers.
Volumetric fee contracts: volumetric fee contracts generally obligate a customer to pay fees based upon the extent to which such customer utilizes our assets for midstream energy services. Unlike firm fee contracts, under volumetric fee contracts our customers are not generally required to pay a charge to reserve an agreed upon amount of capacity and/or deliverability.
Wellhead: the equipment at the surface of a well that is used to control the well’s pressure; also, the point at which the hydrocarbons and water exit the ground.
Working gas: the volume of gas in the storage reservoir that is in addition to the cushion or base gas. It may or may not be completely withdrawn during any particular withdrawal season. Conditions permitting, the total working capacity could be used more than once during any season.
Working gas storage capacity: the maximum volume of natural gas that can be cost-effectively injected into a storage facility and extracted during the normal operation of the storage facility. Effective working gas storage capacity excludes base gas and non-cycling working gas.
X/d: the applicable measurement metric per day. For example, MMcf/d means one million cubic feet per day.






PART I
As used in this Annual Report, unless the context otherwise requires, "we," "us," "our," the "Partnership," "TEP" and similar terms refer to Tallgrass Energy Partners, LP, together with its consolidated subsidiaries. The terms our "general partner" or "TEP GP" refer to Tallgrass MLP GP, LLC. References to "Tallgrass Development" or "TD" refer to Tallgrass Development, LP. References to "Kelso" are to Kelso & Company and its affiliated investment funds and, as the context may require, other entities under its control, and references to "EMG" are to The Energy & Minerals Group, its affiliated investment funds and, as the context may require, other entities under its control.
A reference to a "Note" herein refers to the accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements contained in Item 8.Financial Statements and Supplementary Data. In addition, please read "Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements" and "Risk Factors" for information regarding certain risks inherent in our business.
Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements
This Annual Report and the documents incorporated by reference herein contain forward-looking statements concerning our operations, economic performance and financial condition. Forward-looking statements give our current expectations, contain projections of results of operations or of financial condition, or forecasts of future events. Words such as "could," "will," "may," "assume," "forecast," "position," "predict," "strategy," "expect," "intend," "plan," "estimate," "anticipate," "believe," "project," "budget," "potential," or "continue," and similar expressions are used to identify forward-looking statements. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report include our expectations of plans, strategies, objectives, growth and anticipated financial and operational performance, including guidance regarding our and Tallgrass Development’s infrastructure programs, revenue projections, capital expenditures and tax position. Forward-looking statements can be affected by assumptions used or by known or unknown risks or uncertainties. Consequently, no forward-looking statements can be guaranteed.
A forward-looking statement may include a statement of the assumptions or bases underlying the forward-looking statement. We believe that we have chosen these assumptions or bases in good faith and that they are reasonable. However, when considering these forward-looking statements, you should keep in mind the risk factors and other cautionary statements in this Annual Report. Actual results may vary materially. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements. You should also understand that it is not possible to predict or identify all such factors and should not consider the following list to be a complete statement of all potential risks and uncertainties. Factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from the results contemplated by such forward-looking statements include:
our ability to complete and integrate acquisitions from Tallgrass Development or from third parties, including our acquisition of water business assets in Weld County, Colorado that was completed in December 2015 and our purchase of an additional 31.3% interest in Tallgrass Pony Express Pipeline, LLC ("Pony Express") that was completed in January 2016;
changes in general economic conditions;
competitive conditions in our industry;
actions taken by third-party operators, processors and transporters;
the demand for our services, including crude oil transportation services, natural gas transportation, storage and processing services and water business services;
our ability to successfully implement our business plan;
our ability to complete internal growth projects on time and on budget;
the price and availability of debt and equity financing;
the level of production of crude oil, natural gas and other hydrocarbons and the resultant market prices of crude oil, natural gas, NGLs, and other hydrocarbons;
the availability and price of natural gas and crude oil, and fuels derived from both, to the consumer compared to the price of alternative and competing fuels;
competition from the same and alternative energy sources;
energy efficiency and technology trends;
operating hazards and other risks incidental to transporting crude oil, transporting, storing and processing natural gas, and transporting, gathering and disposing of water produced in connection with hydrocarbon exploration and production activities;

1





natural disasters, weather-related delays, casualty losses and other matters beyond our control;
interest rates;
labor relations;
large or multiple customer defaults;
changes in tax status;
the effects of existing and future laws and governmental regulations;
the effects of future litigation; and
certain factors discussed elsewhere in this Annual Report.
Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which they are made. While we may update these statements from time to time, we are not required to do so other than pursuant to the securities laws.
Item 1. Business
Overview
We are a publicly traded, growth-oriented limited partnership formed in 2013 to own, operate, acquire and develop midstream energy assets in North America. We currently provide crude oil transportation to customers in Wyoming, Colorado, and the surrounding regions through Pony Express, which owns a crude oil pipeline commencing in Guernsey, Wyoming and terminating in Cushing, Oklahoma that includes a lateral in Northeast Colorado that commences in Weld County, Colorado, and interconnects with the pipeline just east of Sterling, Colorado (the "Pony Express System"). We provide natural gas transportation and storage services for customers in the Rocky Mountain and Midwest regions of the United States through the Tallgrass Interstate Gas Transmission system, a FERC-regulated natural gas transportation and storage system located in Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska and Wyoming (the "TIGT System"), and a FERC-regulated natural gas pipeline system extending from the Colorado and Wyoming border to Beatrice, Nebraska (the "Trailblazer Pipeline"). We also provide services for customers in Wyoming at the Casper and Douglas natural gas processing facilities and the West Frenchie Draw natural gas treating facility (collectively, the "Midstream Facilities"), and NGL transportation services in Northeast Colorado. We perform water business services in Colorado and Texas through BNN Water Solutions, LLC ("Water Solutions"). Our operations are strategically located in and provide services to certain key United States hydrocarbon basins, including the Denver-Julesburg, Powder River, Wind River, Permian and Hugoton-Anadarko Basins and the Niobrara, Mississippi Lime, Eagle Ford and Bakken shale formations.
We intend to continue to leverage our relationship with Tallgrass Development and utilize the significant experience of our management team to execute our growth strategy of acquiring midstream assets from Tallgrass Development and third parties, increasing utilization of our existing assets and expanding our systems through construction of additional assets. Our reportable business segments are:
Crude Oil Transportation & Logistics—the ownership and operation of a crude oil pipeline system;
Natural Gas Transportation & Logistics—the ownership and operation of FERC-regulated interstate natural gas pipelines and integrated natural gas storage facilities; and
Processing & Logistics—the ownership and operation of natural gas processing, treating and fractionation facilities, the provision of water business services primarily to the oil and gas exploration and production industry and the transportation of NGLs.
Additional segment and financial information is contained in our segment results included in Item 7.—Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and the notes to our consolidated financial statements included in Item 8.—Financial Statements and Supplementary Data of this Annual Report.

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Our Assets
Our assets primarily consist of the Pony Express System, the TIGT System, the Trailblazer Pipeline, the Midstream Facilities, and Water Solutions, each of which is described in more detail below. The following map shows the Pony Express System, the TIGT System, the Trailblazer Pipeline, the Midstream Facilities, and our Northeast Colorado and NGL infrastructure, which includes our NGL transportation line and Water Solutions' freshwater delivery and storage and produced water gathering and disposal systems.
Crude Oil Transportation & Logistics Segment
Pony Express. The Pony Express System is an approximately 764-mile crude oil pipeline commencing in Guernsey, Wyoming, and terminating in Cushing, Oklahoma, with delivery points at the Ponca City Refinery and in Cushing, Oklahoma. It includes a lateral in Northeast Colorado that commences in Weld County, Colorado, and interconnects with the pipeline just east of Sterling, Colorado. As of December 31, 2015, we owned a 66.7% membership interest in Pony Express, but effective January 1, 2016, we acquired an additional 31.3% membership interest, bringing our total membership interest in Pony Express to 98.0%. For the year ended December 31, 2015, Continental Resources and Shell Trading (US) Company ("Shell") accounted for approximately 28% and 19% of our segment revenue in the Crude Oil Transportation & Logistics segment, respectively, and approximately 16% and 15% of our revenues on a consolidated basis, respectively.
The table below sets forth certain information regarding our Crude Oil Transportation & Logistics segment as of December 31, 2015 and for the three months ended December 31, 2015:
Approximate Design Capacity (bbls/d) (1)
 
Approximate Contractible Capacity Under Contract (2)
 
Weighted Average Remaining Firm Contract Life (3)
 
Approximate Average Daily Throughput (bbls/d) (4)
320,000

 
100
%
 
4 years
 
288,362

(1) 
Excludes additional capacity related to the Pony Express System's ability to inject drag reducing agent, which is an additive that increases pipeline flow efficiency.
(2) 
We are required to make no less than 10% of design capacity available for non-contract, or "walk-up", shippers. Approximately 100% of the remaining design capacity (or available contractible capacity) is committed under contract.

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(3) 
Based on the average annual reservation capacity for each such contract's remaining life.
(4) 
Approximate average daily throughput for the year ended December 31, 2015 was 236,256 bbls/d and is reflective of the volumetric ramp-up during the year due to the construction and expansion efforts of the Pony Express lateral in Northeast Colorado and third-party pipelines with which Pony Express shares joint tariffs.
Natural Gas Transportation & Logistics Segment
TIGT System. The TIGT System is a FERC-regulated natural gas transportation and storage system with approximately 4,655 miles of varying diameter transportation pipelines serving Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska. The TIGT System includes the Huntsman natural gas storage facility located in Cheyenne County, Nebraska. The TIGT System primarily provides transportation and storage services to on-system customers such as local distribution companies and industrial users, including ethanol plants, and irrigation and grain drying operations, which depend on the TIGT System’s interconnections to their facilities to meet their demand for natural gas and a majority of whom pay FERC-approved recourse rates. For the year ended December 31, 2015, approximately 87% of the TIGT System's transportation revenue was generated from contracts with on-system customers.
Trailblazer Pipeline. The Trailblazer Pipeline is a FERC-regulated natural gas pipeline system with approximately 454 miles of transportation pipelines that begins along the border of Wyoming and Colorado and extends to Beatrice, Nebraska. Substantially all of Trailblazer Pipeline's currently available design capacity of approximately 902 MMcf/d is subscribed for under firm transportation contracts.
The following tables provide information regarding our Natural Gas Transportation & Logistics segment assets as of December 31, 2015 and for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013:
 
Approximate Average Daily Throughput (MMcf/d)
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Transportation
1,129

 
955

 
991

 
Approximate Number of Miles
 
Approximate Capacity
 
Total Firm Contracted Capacity (1)
 
Approximate % of Capacity Subscribed under Firm Contracts
 
Weighted Average Remaining Firm Contract Life (2)
Transportation
5,109

 
1,982 MMcf/d
 
1,428 MMcf/d
 
72
%
 
2 years
Storage
n/a

 
15.974 Bcf
(3) 
11 Bcf
 
69
%
 
6 years
(1) 
Reflects total capacity reserved under long-term firm fee contracts, including backhaul service, as of December 31, 2015.
(2) 
Weighted by contracted capacity as of December 31, 2015.
(3) 
The FERC certificated working gas storage capacity.
Processing & Logistics Segment
Midstream Facilities. We own and operate natural gas processing plants in Casper and Douglas, Wyoming and a natural gas treating facility at West Frenchie Draw, Wyoming. The Casper and Douglas plants currently have combined processing capacity of approximately 190 MMcf/d. The Casper plant also has a NGL fractionator with a capacity of approximately 3,500 barrels per day. The natural gas processed and treated at these facilities primarily comes from the Wind River Basin and the Powder River Basin, both in central Wyoming. In the fourth quarter of 2015, we completed construction and commenced commercial service on a new NGL pipeline with an approximate capacity of 19,500 barrels per day that transports NGLs from a processing plant in Northeast Colorado to an interconnect with Overland Pass Pipeline. As of December 31, 2015, approximately 92% of our reserved processing capacity was subject to firm or volumetric fee contracts, with the majority of fee revenue based on the volumes actually processed. The remaining 8% was subject to commodity sensitive contracts. Our NGL pipeline in Northeast Colorado is supported by a 10-year lease for 100% of the pipeline capacity.

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The table below sets forth certain information regarding the Midstream Facilities in our Processing & Logistics segment as of December 31, 2015 and for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013:
Approximate Plant Capacity (MMcf/d) (1)
 
Approximate Capacity Under Contract
 
Weighted Average Remaining Contract Life (2)
 
Approximate Average Inlet Volumes (MMcf/d)
 
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
190

 
89
%
 
3 years
 
122

 
152

 
133

(1) 
The West Frenchie Draw natural gas treating facility treats natural gas before it flows into the Casper and Douglas plants and therefore does not result in additional inlet capacity.
(2) 
Based on the average annual reservation capacity for each such contract's remaining life.
Water Solutions. We provide water business services through our approximate 92% membership interest in Water Solutions. Water Solutions owns and operates a freshwater delivery and storage system and a produced water gathering and disposal system in Weld County, Colorado. This system is used to support third party exploration, development, and production of oil and natural gas. Water Solutions also sources treated wastewater from municipalities in Texas and recycles flowback water and other water produced in association with the production of oil and gas in Colorado.
The table below sets forth certain information regarding the Water Solutions assets in our Processing & Logistics segment as of December 31, 2015 and for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013:
 
 
Approximate Capacity Under Contract
 
Approximate Current Design Capacity (bbls/d)
 
Remaining Contract Life
 
Approximate Average Volumes (bbls/d)
 
 
 
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
 
 
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Freshwater
 
56
%
 
30,863

(1) 
5 years
 
14,579

 
16,433

 

Gathering and Disposal
 
80
%
 
35,000

(2) 
9 years
 
7,951

(2) 

 

(1) 
Represents the average daily fresh water supply for the BNN Redtail, LLC fresh water pipeline acquired in 2014 and the BNN Western, LLC ("Western") fresh water delivery and storage system in Weld County, Colorado acquired in December 2015 as discussed under "Acquisitions" below.
(2) 
Represents the daily disposal well injection capacity and the average daily disposal injection volumes, respectively, for the Western produced water gathering and disposal system in Weld County, Colorado acquired in December 2015 as discussed under "Acquisitions" below.
Organizational Structure
Our general partner interest and all of our incentive distribution rights ("IDRs"), are held by our general partner, whose sole member is Tallgrass Equity, LLC ("Tallgrass Equity"). Tallgrass Equity also directly owns 20 million TEP common units. Tallgrass Energy GP, LP ("TEGP"), a Delaware limited partnership that completed its initial public offering in May 2015 and has elected to be treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, owns a 30.35% membership interest in, and is the managing member of, Tallgrass Equity. TEGP Management, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company ("TEGP Management"), is TEGP's general partner. Tallgrass Energy Holdings, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company ("Tallgrass Energy Holdings"), is the sole member of TEGP Management. Tallgrass Energy Holdings is also the general partner of Tallgrass Development.
Our operations are conducted directly and indirectly through, and our operating assets are owned by, our subsidiaries. Our general partner is responsible for conducting our business and managing our operations. However, Tallgrass Energy Holdings effectively controls our business and affairs through the exercise of its rights as the party that controls the sole member of our general partner, including its right to appoint members to the board of directors of our general partner.

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The chart below shows the structure of Tallgrass Energy Holdings and its subsidiaries as of February 17, 2016 in a summary format.

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Tallgrass Development
Tallgrass Development owns 12,873,480 of our common units, representing approximately 18.9% of our outstanding equity at February 17, 2016. Tallgrass Development is controlled by its general partner, Tallgrass Energy Holdings, which also indirectly controls our general partner. In connection with our initial public offering on May 17, 2013 (the "IPO"), Tallgrass Development contributed to us 100% of the membership interest in Tallgrass Interstate Gas Transmission, LLC ("TIGT"), which owns and operates the TIGT System, and 100% of the membership interest in Tallgrass Midstream, LLC ("TMID"), which owns and operates the Midstream Facilities. Since then, we have acquired the following additional assets from Tallgrass Development: (1) in April 2014, a 100% membership interest in Trailblazer Pipeline Company LLC ("Trailblazer"), which owns and operates the Trailblazer Pipeline, and (2) in three separate transactions, the most recent of which was effective on January 1, 2016, a 98.0% membership interest in Pony Express, which owns and operates the Pony Express System. Tallgrass Development continues to own and manage a portfolio of midstream assets, including the following:
a 50% interest in, and operation of, the Rockies Express Pipeline, or REX Pipeline, an approximately 1,713 mile natural gas pipeline with a bi-directional design capacity of up to 1.8 Bcf/d, that extends from Opal, Wyoming and Meeker, Colorado to Clarington, Ohio; and
Tallgrass Terminals, LLC, or Terminals, which holds a 20% membership interest in Deeprock Development, LLC (the owner of a crude oil terminal in Cushing, Oklahoma with approximately 2.3 million bbls of storage capacity), and a crude oil terminal in Sterling, Colorado with approximately 1.3 million bbls of storage capacity.
Pursuant to an Omnibus Agreement entered into upon the closing of our IPO, among us, TEP GP, Tallgrass Development and Tallgrass Energy Holdings (the "TEP Omnibus Agreement"), Tallgrass Development granted us a right of first offer to acquire certain assets held by Tallgrass Development at the time of our IPO, which we refer to as the Retained Assets, if Tallgrass Development decides to sell such assets. The Retained Assets include Tallgrass Development's interest in Rockies Express Pipeline LLC and Tallgrass Development's remaining noncontrolling interest in Pony Express. Terminals is not a Retained Asset. Tallgrass Development is otherwise under no obligation to offer to sell us additional assets or to pursue acquisitions jointly with us, and we are under no obligation to buy any assets from Tallgrass Development or pursue any such joint acquisitions. However, given the significant economic interest in us held by Tallgrass Development and its affiliates, including Tallgrass Energy Holdings, we believe Tallgrass Development will be incentivized to offer us the opportunity to acquire the Retained Assets and Terminals as each continues maturing into an operating profile conducive to our principal business objective of increasing the quarterly cash distributions that we pay to our unitholders over time while ensuring the ongoing stability of our business.
Acquisitions
The acquisition of midstream assets and businesses that are strategic and complementary to our existing operations constitutes an integral component of our business strategy and growth objectives. Such assets and businesses include crude oil and NGL logistics assets, natural gas transportation and storage assets and other energy assets that have characteristics and provide opportunities similar to our existing business lines and enable us to leverage our assets, knowledge and skill sets. Below are summaries of significant acquisitions we completed in 2015. See Note 4Acquisitions to our Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8.—Financial Statements and Supplementary Data for a full discussion regarding our acquisition activities.
Pony Express System. Effective March 1, 2015, we acquired an additional 33.3% membership interest in Pony Express for cash consideration of approximately $700 million, bringing our total ownership in Pony Express to 66.7% on such date. Effective January 1, 2016, we acquired an additional 31.3% membership interest in exchange for cash consideration of $475 million and the issuance of 6,518,000 of our common units, bringing our total ownership interest in Pony Express to 98.0%.
Weld County, Colorado Water Assets. On December 16, 2015, we acquired the following assets located in Weld County, Colorado from Whiting Oil and Gas Corporation ("Whiting") in exchange for total cash consideration of $75 million: a fresh water delivery system and a produced water gathering and disposal system, seven fresh water ponds with approximately 2.4 million barrels of storage and three produced water disposal wells, along with long-term firm fee contracts and acreage dedications from Whiting.
Competition
All of our businesses face strong competition for acquisitions and development of new projects from both established and start-up companies. Competition may increase the cost to acquire existing facilities or businesses and may result in fewer commitments and lower returns for new pipelines or other development projects. Our competitors may have greater financial resources than we possess or may be willing to accept lower returns or greater risks. Competition differs by region and by the nature of the business or the project involved.

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Pony Express encounters competition in the crude oil transportation business. A number of pipeline companies compete with Pony Express to service takeaway volumes in markets that Pony Express currently serves, including pipelines owned and operated by Spectra Energy, Plains All American, Suncor, SemGroup, Magellan Midstream Partners, Anadarko, Noble, NGL Energy Partners, Energy Transfer Partners, and Enbridge Energy Partners. Pony Express also competes with rail facilities, which can provide more delivery optionality to crude oil producers and marketers looking to capitalize on basis differentials between two primary crude oil price benchmarks (West Texas Intermediate Crude and Brent Crude), and with refineries that source barrels in areas served by Pony Express.
Our principal competitors in our natural gas transportation and storage business include companies that own major natural gas pipelines, such as Wyoming Interstate Company, LLC, Colorado Interstate Gas Company, LLC, Cheyenne Plains Gas Pipeline Company, LLC, Northern Natural Gas Company, and Southern Star Central Gas Pipeline, Inc., some of whom also have existing storage facilities connected to their transportation systems that compete with our storage facilities. In addition to this competition, which is primarily comprised of other pipeline companies that transport gas out of the Rocky Mountain region, Trailblazer also delivers gas into a very competitive marketplace that receives gas from the developing shale plays like the Bakken, Marcellus and Utica. As these supplies increase, it reduces the need for traditional Rockies gas production that is accessible from Trailblazer.
We also experience competition in the natural gas processing business. Our principal competitors for processing business include other facilities that service our supply areas, such as the other regional processing and treating facilities in the greater Powder River Basin which include plants owned and operated by Kinder Morgan, Inc., which we refer to as Kinder Morgan, ONEOK Partners, LP, Western Gas Partners, LP, Williams Partners L.P. and Meritage Midstream Services II, LLC. In addition, due to the competitive nature of the liquids-rich plays in the Wind River Basin and Powder River Basin, it is possible that one of our competitors could build additional processing facilities that service our supply areas.
Further, we experience competition in the water business services. Our principal competitors in such business are transactional water service companies and larger produced water disposal well owners. An example of a competitor that is a transactional water service company would be Select Energy Services, as they provide temporary fresh water supply and water recycling that competes with Water Solutions. An example of a competitor that is a larger disposal well owner would be NGL Energy Partners, as they compete with Water Solutions through produced water gathering and disposal in areas of concentrated production activity.
Additionally, pending and future construction projects, if and when brought online, may also compete with our crude oil transportation, natural gas transportation and storage, water transportation, gathering and disposal, and processing services. Further, as a provider of midstream services to the natural gas and crude oil industries, we generally compete with other forms of energy available to consumers, including electricity, coal, propane and fuel oils. Several factors influence the demand for natural gas and crude oil, including price changes, the availability of natural gas and crude oil and other forms of energy, the level of business activity, conservation, legislation and governmental regulations, weather, and the ability to convert to alternative fuels.
Regulatory Environment
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
We provide open-access interstate transportation service on our natural gas transportation systems pursuant to tariffs approved by the FERC. As interstate transportation and storage systems, the rates, terms of service and continued operations of the TIGT System and the Trailblazer Pipeline are subject to regulation by the FERC, under among other statutes, the Natural Gas Act of 1938, or NGA, the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or the NGPA, and the Energy Policy Act of 2005, or EPAct 2005. The rates and terms of service on the Pony Express System are subject to regulation by the FERC under the Interstate Commerce Act, or the ICA, and the Energy Policy Act of 1992. We provide interstate transportation service on the Pony Express System pursuant to tariffs on file with the FERC. Our NGL pipeline is leased to a third party who has obtained a temporary waiver for itself from the FERC from the tariff, filing and reporting requirements of the ICA.
The FERC has jurisdiction over, among other things, the construction, ownership and commercial operation of pipelines and related facilities used in the transportation and storage of natural gas in interstate commerce, including the modification, extension, enlargement and abandonment of such facilities. The FERC also has jurisdiction over the rates, charges and terms and conditions of service for the transportation and storage of natural gas in interstate commerce. The FERC’s authority over crude oil pipelines is less broad than its authority over interstate natural gas pipelines and includes rates, rules and regulations for service, the form of tariffs governing service, the maintenance of accounts and records, and depreciation and amortization policies.

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The rates and terms for access to natural gas pipeline transportation services are subject to extensive regulation and the FERC has undertaken various initiatives to increase competition within the natural gas industry. As a result of these initiatives, interstate natural gas transportation and marketing entities have been substantially restructured to remove barriers and practices that historically limited non-pipeline natural gas sellers, including producers, from competing effectively with interstate pipelines for sales to local distribution companies and large industrial and commercial customers. The FERC’s regulations require, among other things, that interstate natural gas pipelines provide firm and interruptible transportation service on an open access basis, provide internet access to current information about available pipeline capacity and other relevant information, and permit pipeline shippers under certain circumstances to release contracted transportation and storage capacity to other shippers, thereby creating secondary markets for such services. The result of the FERC’s initiatives has been to eliminate interstate natural gas pipelines’ historical role of providing bundled sales service of natural gas and to require pipelines to offer unbundled storage and transportation services on a not unduly discriminatory or preferential basis. The rates for such transportation and storage services are subject to the FERC’s ratemaking authority, and the FERC exercises its authority by applying cost-of-service principles to limit the maximum and minimum levels of tariff-based recourse rates; however it also allows for the negotiated rates as an alternative to cost-based rates and may grant market-based rates in certain circumstances, typically with respect to storage services. The FERC regulations also restrict interstate natural gas pipelines from sharing transportation or customer information with marketing affiliates and require that the transmission function personnel of interstate natural gas pipelines operate independently of the marketing function personnel of the pipeline or its affiliates.
TIGT 2015 Cost and Revenue Study
On October 3, 2015, TIGT submitted a cost and revenue study in compliance with Article IV of the Stipulation and Agreement of Settlement filed on May 5, 2011 in FERC Docket No. RP11-1494 ("2011 Settlement") and approved by the FERC on September 22, 2011. The cost and revenue study demonstrates that TIGT is under-recovering its cost of service. Consistent with the 2011 Settlement, the study was based on the unadjusted actual costs, revenues and volumes for a 12-month base period ended June 30, 2015, in compliance with Section 154.303(a)(1) of the FERC’s regulations. The cost and revenue study did not propose any change to TIGT’s currently effective rates. The cost and revenue study was accepted by FERC on February 1, 2016 in compliance with the 2011 Settlement.
TIGT 2015 General Rate Case Filing
On October 30, 2015, TIGT filed a general rate case with the FERC pursuant to Section 4 of the NGA. The rate case proposed a general system-wide increase in the maximum tariff rates for all firm and interruptible services offered by TIGT. In addition, TIGT proposed certain changes to the transportation rate design of its system to replace the current rate zone structure with a single "postage stamp" rate. TIGT also proposed new incremental charges, including (i) a charge for deliveries made to points without certain electronic flow measurement equipment, and (ii) a Cost Recovery Mechanism ("CRM") charge to completely or partially reimburse TIGT for certain expenses and costs it incurs to comply with anticipated new PHMSA and EPA regulations. TIGT also proposed to replace its fixed fuel and lost and unaccounted for ("FL&U") charge with a FL&U tracker that would compensate TIGT for its actual FL&U expenses and adjust each year to reflect the previous period’s under/over collection and the forecasted FL&U expense for the upcoming period. TIGT also proposed to implement a power cost tracker to recover the actual power costs incurred by TIGT to power its compressors. Finally, TIGT proposed certain revisions to its FERC Gas Tariff addressing a number of other rate and non-rate matters. Under the NGA and the FERC’s regulations, TIGT’s shippers and other interested parties, including the FERC’s Trial Staff, have a right to challenge any aspect of TIGT’s rate case filing. Accordingly, numerous TIGT customers have protested aspects of TIGT’s NGA Section 4 rate filing.
On November 30, 2015, the FERC issued an order accepting and suspending the proposed rates and a majority of the proposed tariff records to be effective upon motion May 1, 2016, subject to refund, certain modifications to TIGT’s proposed CRM charge, and the outcome of an evidentiary hearing before a FERC Administrative Law Judge (the "Suspension Order"). In the Suspension Order, the FERC also accepted two tariff records related to force majeure events and reservation charge crediting to be effective December 1, 2015, subject to certain modifications. On December 21, 2015, TIGT made a compliance filing with the FERC to modify TIGT’s proposed CRM charge and update the tariff records related to force majeure events and reservation charge crediting as directed by the FERC in the Suspension Order. No comments or protests were filed in response to the compliance filing and FERC accepted the compliance filing on February 1, 2016. One request for rehearing of the Suspension Order is currently pending before the FERC with respect to the Suspension Order’s acceptance, subject to a five-month suspension period, refund, the outcome of the hearing, and the modifications made in TIGT's December 21, 2015 compliance filing, of TIGT’s proposed CRM charge. The FERC Administrative Law Judge assigned to the proceeding has issued an order establishing the procedural schedule and TIGT, the FERC’s Trial Staff, and other participants that successfully intervened are actively participating in the litigated proceeding to address those rate and tariff matters set for hearing by the FERC in its Suspension Order. On January 27, 2016, the FERC issued a tolling order to afford the FERC additional time for consideration of matters raised on rehearing regarding the Suspension Order. Additional FERC action is pending.

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2014 Trailblazer Rate Settlement
On January 22, 2014, Trailblazer, the FERC’s Trial Staff, and the active parties in the pipeline’s general rate case finalized a settlement in principle resolving the pending rate issues, including: (i) establishing transportation rates, as well as FL&U charges; (ii) providing a limited profit sharing arrangement for certain revenues earned from interruptible and short-term firm transport; and (iii) setting the minimum and maximum time that can elapse before Trailblazer’s next rate case at the FERC. Trailblazer filed a motion with the FERC’s Chief Administrative Law Judge to accept the settlement rates on an interim basis ("Interim Rates") while the participants finalized a definitive settlement. The Chief Administrative Law Judge accepted the Interim Rates effective February 1, 2014. On February 24, 2014, Trailblazer filed an uncontested offer of settlement ("Stipulation and Agreement") among active party shippers. The Stipulation and Agreement established the Interim Rates as final settlement rates effective February 1, 2014, subject to the issuance of refunds to certain shippers for January 2014 transportation services and revised fuel and lost and unaccounted for rates, effective July 1, 2014. On March 11, 2014, the Presiding Administrative Law Judge certified the Stipulation and Agreement. On May 29, 2014, the FERC approved the Stipulation and Agreement. On June 30, 2014, Trailblazer filed tariff sheets to implement the Stipulation and Agreement effective July 1, 2014. Estimated refunds were reserved from revenues recorded in January 2014. On July 1, 2014, Trailblazer submitted refunds to its customers for amounts collected in excess of amounts that would have been collected under the Settlement Rates, with interest, and on July 18, 2014, filed a report of refunds with the FERC. The FERC issued orders accepting the tariff sheets with the requested effective date of July 1, 2014 and accepting the refund report filing on July 25, 2014 and August 7, 2014, respectively. Per the terms of the Stipulation and Agreement, Trailblazer is required to file a new rate case by January 1, 2019, and no settling party was permitted to file a change to the settlement rates before January 1, 2016.
Trailblazer Annual Fuel Tracker Filing
On April 1, 2015, Trailblazer made its annual fuel tracker filing with a proposed effective date of May 1, 2015 in Docket No. RP15-841-000. This filing incorporates the revised fuel tracker and power cost tracker mechanisms agreed to in the Stipulation and Agreement, which resolves all outstanding issues related to Trailblazer fuel recoveries. The FERC approved this filing on April 23, 2015.
Trailblazer Notice to Vacate Authorization for the Niobrara Lateral Project
On December 18, 2015, Trailblazer filed a notice in Docket No. CP15-27-000 informing FERC that, based upon current market conditions, it will not be constructing certain gas supply facilities located in Weld County, Colorado and Kimball County, Nebraska interconnecting Trailblazer to the Rockies Express pipeline system, referred to as the Niobrara Lateral.
Initiation of Service on the Pony Express System
In 2013, TIGT received FERC authorization to remove from natural gas service approximately 433 miles of mainline natural gas pipeline facilities, along with associated rights of way and other related equipment (collectively, the "Pony Express Assets"), abandon those assets by sale to Pony Express for redeployment to provide transportation of oil as part of the Pony Express System, and construct certain replacement facilities. The construction of the Pony Express System consisted of three primary phases: (1) conversion of 433 miles of the Pony Express Assets from a natural gas pipeline into a crude oil pipeline; (2) construction of an approximately 265 mile extension from the converted pipeline to Cushing, Oklahoma; and (3) construction of an approximate 66 mile lateral in Northeast Colorado. The facilities constructed in phases (1) and (2) of the Pony Express System were placed in service in the fall of 2014. The lateral in Northeast Colorado constructed under phase (3) was placed in service during the second quarter of 2015. Following completion of the lateral in Northeast Colorado, the total system design capacity of the Pony Express System was approximately 320,000 bbls/d. Approximately 90% of the pipeline capacity is committed to contract shippers under 5 year firm contracts and at least 10% is reserved for non-contract shippers.
In anticipation of completing the construction of various facilities and commencing various transportation services three petitions for declaratory orders were submitted over time to the FERC by Pony Express, and certain joint tariff upstream pipelines interconnected with Pony Express to address considerations related to the Pony Express System, local services and rate structures, joint tariff services and rate structures, cost recovery, prorationing policies, committed shipper contract provisions, and other matters. In response to these petitions, the FERC issued declaratory orders (two in 2012 and one in 2014) granting each of the three petitions.

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Thereafter, Pony Express made certain public tariff filings with the FERC to establish initial tariff rates and initial tariff rules and regulations for oil transportation services as each service was commenced upon completion of facilities. Initial local tariff non-contract rates from the Guernsey origin, along with initial Rules and Regulations for all services, were filed to be effective October 1, 2014. Initial local tariff contract rates from the Guernsey origin were filed to be effective November 1, 2014. Initial joint tariff contract rates for oil received from Belle Fourche Pipeline were filed to be effective November 1, 2014. Initial joint tariff non-contract and contract rates for oil received from Hiland Pipeline were filed to be effective January 1, 2015, but contract service under the Hiland joint tariff did not commence until April 1, 2015. Initial local tariff non-contract rates from origins on the Northeast Colorado lateral were filed to be effective April 2, 2015. Initial local tariff contract rates from origins on the Northeast Colorado lateral were filed to be effective June 1, 2015. Following these initial tariff filings, additional filings were made in 2015 for each contract and non-contract rate service provided by Pony Express to implement a 4.6% rate increase related to the annual FERC index adjustment. The increases became effective during the third and fourth quarters of 2015 in accordance with the provisions of various shipper contracts with respect to contract rates, and in accordance with FERC regulations with respect to non-contract rates.
Compliance with 2014 FERC Show Cause Order Issued to All Interstate Pipelines Regarding Notice of Offers to Purchase Released Capacity
On March 20, 2014, the FERC issued an Order to Show Cause to all interstate natural gas pipelines requiring the pipelines to revise their respective FERC Gas Tariffs to provide for the posting of offers to purchase released capacity as required by 18 C.F.R. §284.8(d). Both TIGT and Trailblazer submitted compliance filings proposing revisions to their respective tariffs, and the FERC accepted their compliance filings effective October 21, 2014.
FERC; Market Behavior Rules; Posting and Reporting Requirement; Other Enforcement Authorities
EPAct 2005, among other matters, amended the NGA to add an anti-manipulation provision that makes it unlawful for any entity to engage in prohibited behavior in contravention of rules and regulations to be prescribed by the FERC and, furthermore, provides the FERC with additional civil penalty authority. The FERC adopted rules implementing the anti-manipulation provision of EPAct 2005 that make it unlawful for any entity, directly or indirectly in connection with the purchase or sale of natural gas transportation services subject to the jurisdiction of the FERC to (1) use or employ any device, scheme or artifice to defraud; (2) to make any untrue statement of material fact or omit to make any such statement necessary to make the statements made not misleading; or (3) to engage in any act or practice that operates as a fraud or deceit upon any person.
These anti-manipulation rules apply to interstate gas pipelines and storage companies and intrastate gas pipelines and storage companies that provide interstate services as well as otherwise non-jurisdictional entities to the extent the activities are conducted ‘‘in connection with" gas sales, purchases or transportation subject to FERC jurisdiction. These anti-manipulation rules do not apply to activities that relate only to intrastate or other non-jurisdictional sales or gathering, but only to the extent such transactions do not have a ‘‘nexus’’ to jurisdictional transactions. EPAct 2005 also amended the NGA and the NGPA to give the FERC authority to impose civil penalties for violations of these statutes, up to $1 million per day per violation. In connection with this enhanced civil penalty authority, the FERC issued policy statements on enforcement to provide guidance regarding the enforcement of the statutes, orders, rules and regulations it administers, including factors to be considered in determining the appropriate enforcement action to be taken. Should we fail to comply with all applicable FERC-administered statutes, rule, regulations and orders, we could be subject to substantial penalties and fines, including the disgorgement of unjust profits.
EPAct 2005 also amended the NGA to authorize the FERC to facilitate price transparency in markets for the sale or transportation of physical natural gas in interstate commerce. The FERC has taken steps to enhance its market oversight and monitoring of the natural gas industry by adopting rules that (1) require buyers and sellers of annual quantities of 2,200,000 MMBtu or more of gas in any year to report by May on the aggregate volumes of natural gas they purchased or sold at wholesale in the prior calendar year; (2) report whether they provide prices to any index publishers and, if so, whether their reporting complies with the FERC’s policy statement on price reporting; and (3) increase the Internet posting obligations of interstate pipelines.
In addition, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, or CFTC, is directed under the Commodities Exchange Act, or CEA, to prevent price manipulations for the commodity and futures markets, including the energy futures markets. Pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, or Dodd-Frank Act, in July 2010 and other authority, the CFTC has adopted anti-market manipulation regulations that prohibit fraud and price manipulation in the commodity and futures markets. The CFTC also has statutory authority to seek civil penalties of up to the greater of $1 million or triple the monetary gain to the violator for violations of the anti-market manipulation sections of the CEA.

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Further, the Federal Trade Commission, or FTC, has the authority under the Federal Trade Commission Act, or FTCA, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, or EISA, to regulate wholesale petroleum markets. The FTC has adopted anti-market manipulation rules, including prohibiting fraud and deceit in connection with the purchase or sale of certain petroleum products, and prohibiting omissions of material information which distort or are likely to distort market conditions for such products. In addition to other enforcement powers it has under the FTCA, the FTC can sue violators under EISA and request that a court impose fines of up to $1 million per violation per day. FERC also has the authority under the ICA to regulate the interstate transportation of petroleum on common carrier pipelines, including whether a pipeline’s rates or rules and regulations for service are "just and reasonable." Among other enforcement powers, FERC can order prospective rate changes, suspend the effectiveness of rates, and order reparations for damages.
Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
We are also subject to safety regulations imposed by PHMSA, including those regulations requiring us to develop and maintain integrity management programs to comprehensively evaluate certain areas along our pipelines and take additional measures to protect pipeline segments located in areas, which are referred to as high consequence areas, or HCAs, where a leak or rupture could potentially do the most harm.
The President signed into law in January 2012 The Pipeline Safety, Regulatory Certainty, and Job Creation Act of 2011, or The Pipeline Safety Act of 2011, which amended the Pipeline Safety Improvement Act of 2002, increased penalties for violations of safety laws and rules, among other matters, and may result in the imposition of more stringent regulations in the next few years. This legislation also requires the U.S. Department of Transportation to study and report to Congress on other areas of pipeline safety, including expanding the reach of the integrity management regulations beyond high consequences areas, but restricts the U.S. Department of Transportation from promulgating expanded integrity management rules during the review period and for a period following submission of its report to Congress unless the rulemaking is needed to address a present condition that poses a risk to public safety, property or the environment. PHMSA issued a final rule effective October 25, 2013 that implemented aspects of the new legislation. Among other things, the final rule increases the maximum civil penalties for violations of pipeline safety statutes or regulations, broadens PHMSA’s authority to submit information requests, and provides additional detail regarding PHMSA’s corrective action authority.
Additionally, PHMSA is also currently considering changes to its regulations. In October 2015, PHMSA issued a notice of proposed rule-making to its hazardous liquid pipeline safety regulations. Among other things, the proposed regulations would expand the current leak-detection requirements, apply new, more conservative repair criteria and establish timelines for inspecting pipeline facilities potentially affected by an extreme weather event or natural disaster. The proposal would also increase the stringency of integrity management program requirements and set deadlines for the use of internal inspection tools on certain systems. Further, PHMSA issued an Advisory Bulletin in May 2012, which advised pipeline operators of anticipated changes in annual reporting requirements and that if they are relying on design, construction, inspection, testing, or other data to determine the pressures at which their pipelines should operate, the records of that data must be traceable, verifiable and complete. Locating such records and, in the absence of any such records, verifying maximum pressures through physical testing (including hydrotesting) or modifying or replacing facilities to meet the demands of such pressures, could significantly increase our costs. TIGT continues to investigate and, when necessary, report to PHMSA the miles of pipeline for which it has incomplete records for maximum allowable operating pressure, or MAOP. We are currently undertaking an extensive internal record review in view of the anticipated PHMSA annual reporting requirements. Additionally, failure to locate such records or verify maximum pressures could result in reductions of allowable operating pressures, which would reduce available capacity on our pipelines. At the state level, several states have passed legislation or promulgated rulemaking dealing with pipeline safety. There can be no assurance as to the amount or timing of future expenditures for pipeline integrity regulation, and actual future expenditures may be different from the amounts we currently anticipate. Regulations, changes to regulations or an increase in public expectations for pipeline safety may require additional reporting, the replacement of some of our pipeline segments, the addition of monitoring equipment and more frequent inspection or testing of our pipeline facilities. Any repair, remediation, preventative or mitigating actions may require significant capital and operating expenditures.

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Pipeline Integrity Issues
The ultimate costs of compliance with the integrity management rules are difficult to predict. Changes such as advances of in-line inspection tools, identification of additional threats to a pipeline’s integrity and changes to the amount of pipe determined to be located in HCAs or expansion of integrity management requirements to areas outside of HCAs can have a significant impact on the costs to perform integrity testing and repairs. Trailblazer recently conducted smart tool surveys and preliminary analysis on segments of its natural gas pipeline to evaluate the growth rate of corrosion downstream of compressor stations. Trailblazer currently believes that approximately 25 - 35 miles of pipe will likely need to be repaired or replaced in order for the pipeline to operate at its MAOP of 1,000 pounds per square inch. Such repair or replacement will likely occur over a period of years, depending upon final assessment of corrosion growth rates and the remediation and repair plan implemented by Trailblazer. Trailblazer is currently operating at less than its current MAOP, public notice of which was first provided in June 2014. The current pressure reduction is not expected to prevent Trailblazer from fulfilling its firm service obligations at existing subscription levels and to date it has not had a material adverse financial impact on us.
During 2015, Trailblazer completed 32 excavation digs at an aggregate cost of approximately $1.3 million based on preliminary analysis of the smart tool surveys performed in 2014. Segments of the Trailblazer Pipeline that require full replacement are currently expected to cost in the range of approximately $2.2 million to $2.7 million per mile. Repair costs on sections of the pipeline that do not require full replacement are expected to be less on a per mile basis. Trailblazer is continuing to develop a remediation and repair plan, which involves, among other things, finalizing cost recovery options, establishing project scope and timing and setting an overall project budget. In 2016, Trailblazer intends to replace approximately 8 miles of pipe at an estimated cost of $21.5 million. Trailblazer is currently exploring all possible cost recovery options. It may not ultimately be able to recover any or all of such out of pocket costs unless and until Trailblazer recovers them through a general rate increase or other FERC-approved recovery mechanism, or through negotiated rate agreements with its customers.
In connection with our acquisition of the Trailblazer Pipeline, Tallgrass Development agreed to contractually indemnify TEP for any out of pocket costs incurred between April 1, 2014 and April 1, 2017 related to repairing or remediating the Trailblazer Pipeline, to the extent that such actions are necessitated by external corrosion caused by the pipeline’s disbonded Hi-Melt CTE coating. The contractual indemnity provided by Tallgrass Development is currently capped at $20 million and is subject to an annual $1.5 million deductible. We will continue pipeline integrity testing programs to assess and maintain the integrity of our existing and future pipelines as required by the U.S. Department of Transportation regulations. The results of these tests could cause us to incur significant and unanticipated capital and operating expenditures for repairs or upgrades deemed necessary to ensure the continued safe and reliable operation of our pipelines, which expenditures could be material.
In addition, we may be subject to enforcement actions and penalties for failure to comply with pipeline regulations. For example, on March 12, 2015, an event occurred at the Yoder Pump Station in Goshen County, Wyoming, related to repair and replacement activities resulting in a spill of approximately 300 bbls of crude oil. In this instance, the remediation activities have been completed without material cost to the Pony Express System and the matters have been closed by the applicable agencies. In late 2015, anomalies were detected on the portion of the Pony Express System’s pipeline that was converted from gas service. These anomalies were reported to PHMSA on December 2, 2015. Pony Express is continuing to evaluate and remediate these issues on the converted pipeline section of the Pony Express System. Tallgrass Development has agreed to contractually indemnify us for out of pocket costs incurred to repair, replace or remediate anomalies in any part of the Pony Express System’s pipeline that was converted from gas service to the extent such anomalies are identified by in-line inspection tools during the period from January 1, 2015 until January 1, 2019. The contractual indemnity provided by Tallgrass Development is capped at $11 million and is subject to an annual $1 million deductible.
From time to time, our pipelines may experience integrity issues. These integrity issues may cause explosions, fire, damage to the environment, damage to property and/or personal injury or death. In connection with these incidents, we may be sued for damages caused by an alleged failure to properly mark the locations of our pipelines and/or to properly maintain our pipelines. For example, on June 13, 2013, a failure occurred on a segment of the TIGT System in Goshen County, Wyoming, resulting in the release of natural gas and the issuance of a Corrective Action Order, or CAO, by PHMSA. The line was promptly brought back into service and the failure did not cause any known injuries, fatalities, fires or evacuations. Pursuant to a letter dated August 14, 2015, PHMSA informed TIGT that it had complied with the terms of the CAO and declared the case closed. Depending upon the facts and circumstances of a particular incident, state and federal regulatory authorities may seek civil and/or criminal fines and penalties and we may also be subject to private civil liability for such matters.
For additional information, see Note 17 – Legal and Environmental Matters to our Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8.—Financial Statements and Supplementary Data in this Form 10-K.

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Environmental, Health and Safety Matters
General
The ownership, operation and expansion of our assets are subject to federal, state and local laws, regulations and potential liabilities arising under or relating to the protection or preservation of the environment, natural resources and human health. These laws and regulations can restrict or impact our business activities in many ways, such as restricting the way we can handle or dispose of our wastes, requiring remedial action to mitigate pollution conditions that may be caused by our operations or that are attributable to former operations, regulating future construction activities to mitigate harm to threatened or endangered species, wetlands and migratory birds, and requiring the installation and operation of pollution control or seismic monitoring equipment. The cost of complying with these laws and regulations can be significant, and we expect to incur significant compliance costs in the future as new, more stringent requirements are adopted and implemented.
Failure to comply with existing environmental laws, regulations, permits, approvals or authorizations or to meet the requirements of new environmental laws, regulations or permits, approvals and authorizations may trigger a variety of administrative, civil and criminal enforcement measures, including the assessment of monetary penalties and/or temporary or permanent interruptions in our operations that could influence our business, financial position, results of operations and prospects. Certain environmental statutes impose strict joint and several liability for costs required to clean up and restore sites where hazardous substances, hydrocarbons or wastes have been disposed or otherwise released. The costs and liabilities resulting from a failure to comply with environmental laws and regulations could negatively affect our business, financial position, results of operations and prospects. Moreover, it is not uncommon for neighboring landowners and other third parties to file claims for personal injury and property damage allegedly caused by the release of hazardous substances, hydrocarbons or other waste products into the environment.
In addition, we have agreed to a number of conditions in our environmental permits, approvals and authorizations that require the implementation of environmental habitat restoration, enhancement and other mitigation measures that involve, among other things, ongoing maintenance and monitoring. Governmental authorities may require, and community groups and private persons may seek to require, additional mitigation measures in the future to further protect ecologically sensitive areas where we currently operate, and would operate in the future, and we are unable to predict the effect that any such measures would have on our business, financial position, results of operations or prospects.
We are also subject to the requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, or OSHA, the Pipeline Safety Act and other comparable federal and state statutes. In general, we expect that we may have to increase expenditures in the future to comply with higher industry and regulatory safety standards. Such increases in expenditures could become significant over time.
Historically, our total expenditures for environmental control measures and for remediation have not been significant in relation to our consolidated financial position or results of operations. It is reasonably likely, however, that the trend in environmental legislation and regulations will continue towards more restrictive standards. Compliance with these standards is expected to increase the cost of conducting business.
For additional information regarding Environmental, Health and Safety Matters, please read Item 1A.—Risk Factors.
Air Emissions
Our operations are subject to the federal Clean Air Act, or CAA, and comparable state laws and regulations. These laws and regulations regulate emissions of air pollutants from various industrial sources, including natural gas processing plants and compressor stations, and also impose various monitoring and reporting requirements. Such laws and regulations may require that we obtain pre-approval for the construction or modification of certain projects or facilities expected to produce air emissions or result in the increase of existing air emissions (including GHG emissions, as discussed below), obtain and strictly comply with air permits containing various emissions and operational limitations and/or install emission control equipment. We may be required to incur certain capital expenditures in the future for air pollution control equipment and technology in connection with obtaining and maintaining operating permits and approvals for air emissions.
In September 2015, the EPA issued a proposed rule under the New Source Performance Standard Program, or NSPS Program, to limit methane emissions from the oil and gas and transmission sectors. The proposed rule would update and expand the NSPS Program by setting additional emissions limits for volatile organic compounds and regulating methane emissions for new and modified sources in the oil and gas industry. Also, in January 2016, the Bureau of Land Management of the U.S. Department of the Interior, or BLM, proposed new rules to reduce venting, flaring and leaks during oil and natural gas production activities onshore Federal and Indian lands.

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Developments in GHG Regulations
Methane, a primary component of natural gas, and carbon dioxide, a byproduct of the burning of natural gas and products produced from crude oil, are examples of GHGs. The EPA has determined that the emission of GHGs present an endangerment to public health and the environment because emissions of such gases contribute to the warming of the Earth’s atmosphere and other climatic changes. Various laws and regulations exist or are under development that seek to regulate the emission of such GHGs, including the EPA programs to control GHG emissions and state actions to develop statewide or regional programs. In recent years, the U.S. Congress has considered, but not adopted, legislation to reduce emissions of GHGs. There have also been efforts to regulate GHGs at an international level, most recently in the Paris Agreement, negotiated in December 2015, which aims to limit global GHG emissions.
Because our operations, including our compressor stations, emit various types of GHGs, primarily methane and carbon dioxide, such new legislation or regulation could increase our costs related to operating and maintaining our facilities. Depending on the particular new law, regulation or program adopted, we could be required to incur capital expenditures for installing new emission controls on our facilities, acquire permits or other authorizations for emissions of GHGs from our facilities, acquire and surrender allowances for our GHG emissions, pay taxes related to our GHG emissions and administer and manage a GHG emissions program. We are not able at this time to estimate such increased costs; however, as is the case with similarly situated entities in the industry, they could be significant to us. While we may be able to include some or all of such increased costs in the rates charged by our pipelines, such recovery of costs in all cases is uncertain and may depend on events beyond our control including the outcome of future rate proceedings before the FERC and the provisions of any final legislation or other regulations. Similarly, while we may be able to recover some or all of such increased costs in the rates charged by our processing facilities, such recovery of costs is uncertain and may depend on the terms of our contracts with our customers. In addition, new laws, regulations, or programs adopted could also impact our customers’ operations or the overall demand for fossil fuels. Any of the foregoing could have an adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations and prospects.
Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing
A sizeable portion of the hydrocarbons we transport, process, and store comes from hydraulically fractured wells. Hydraulic fracturing is an important and common practice that is used to stimulate production of hydrocarbons from tight formations. The process typically involves the injection of water, sand and a small percentage of chemicals under pressure into the formation to fracture the surrounding rock and stimulate production. The process is regulated by state agencies, typically the state’s oil and gas commission. A number of federal agencies, including the EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy, are analyzing, or have been requested to review, a variety of environmental issues associated with hydraulic fracturing. In addition, some states, including those in which we operate, have adopted, and other states are considering adopting, regulations that could impose more stringent disclosure and/or well construction requirements on hydraulic fracturing operations. Other states, including states in which we operate, have restrictions on produced water storage from hydraulic fracturing operations and the operation of produced water disposal wells. If new laws or regulations that significantly restrict hydraulic fracturing are adopted, such laws could make it more difficult or costly for our customers to perform fracturing to stimulate production from tight formations. Restrictions on hydraulic fracturing could also reduce the volume of crude oil, natural gas, and NGLs that our customers produce, and could thereby adversely affect our revenues and results of operations.
Hazardous Substances and Waste
Our operations are subject to environmental laws and regulations relating to the management and release of hazardous substances, nonhazardous and hazardous wastes and petroleum hydrocarbons. These laws generally regulate the generation, storage, treatment, transportation and disposal of nonhazardous and hazardous waste and may impose strict joint and several liability for the investigation and remediation of affected areas where hazardous substances may have been released or disposed. For instance, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, or CERCLA, and comparable state laws impose liability, without regard to fault or the legality of the original conduct, on certain classes of persons that contributed to the release or threatened release of a hazardous substance into the environment. We may handle hazardous substances within the meaning of CERCLA, or analogous state laws, in the course of our ordinary operations and, as a result, may be jointly and severally liable under CERCLA for all or part of the costs required to clean up sites at which these hazardous substances have been released or threatened to be released into the environment.

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We also generate wastes that are subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, or RCRA, and comparable state laws. RCRA regulates both nonhazardous and hazardous solid wastes, but it imposes strict requirements on the generation, storage, treatment, transportation and disposal of hazardous wastes. It is possible that wastes resulting from our operations that are currently treated as non-hazardous wastes could be designated as "hazardous wastes" in the future, subjecting us to more rigorous and costly management and disposal requirements. It is also possible that federal or state regulatory agencies will adopt stricter management or disposal standards for non-hazardous wastes, including natural gas wastes. Any such changes in the laws and regulations could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations and prospects or otherwise impose limits or restrictions on our operations or those of our customers.
In some cases, we own or lease properties where hydrocarbons are being or have been handled for many years. Hydrocarbons or other wastes may have been disposed of or released on or under the properties owned or leased by us or on or under the locations where these hydrocarbons and wastes have been transported for treatment or disposal. We could also have liability for releases or disposal on properties owned or leased by others. These properties and the wastes disposed thereon may be subject to CERCLA, RCRA and analogous state laws. Under these laws, we could be required to remove or remediate previously disposed wastes (including wastes disposed of or released by prior owners and operators), to clean up contaminated property (including contaminated groundwater) or to perform remedial operations to prevent future contamination.
Our produced water disposal operations require us to comply with the Class II well standards under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act, or SDWA. The SDWA imposes requirements on owners and operators of Class II wells through the EPA’s Underground Injection Control program, including construction, operating, monitoring and testing, reporting and closure requirements. Our disposal wells are also subject to comparable state laws and regulations. Compliance with current and future laws and regulations regarding our produced water disposal wells may impose substantial costs and restrictions on our produced water disposal operations, as well as adversely affect demand for our produced water disposal services. State and federal regulatory agencies recently have focused on a possible connection between the operation of produced water injection wells used for oil and gas waste disposal and minor seismic activity and tremors. When caused by human activity, such events are called induced seismicity. In some instances, operators of produced water injection wells in the vicinity of minor seismic events have been ordered to reduce produced water injection volumes or suspend operations. Regulatory agencies are continuing to study possible linkage between produced water injection activity and induced seismicity. These developments could result in additional regulation of produced water injection wells, such regulations could impose additional costs and restrictions on our produced water disposal operations.
Federal and State Waters
The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, also known as the Clean Water Act, or the CWA, and comparable state laws impose restrictions and strict controls regarding the discharge of pollutants, including petroleum products, into state waters or waters of the United States. The EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recently adopted a rule to clarify the meaning of the term "waters of the United States" with respect to federal jurisdiction. Many interested parties believe that the proposed rule expands federal jurisdiction under the CWA. Regulations promulgated pursuant to these laws require that entities that discharge into federal and state waters obtain National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, or NPDES, permits and/or state permits authorizing these discharges. The CWA and analogous state laws assess administrative, civil and criminal penalties for discharges of unauthorized pollutants into the water and impose substantial liability for the costs of removing spills from such waters. In addition, the CWA and analogous state laws require that individual permits or coverage under general permits be obtained by covered facilities for discharges of storm water runoff. Some states also maintain groundwater protection programs that require permits for discharges or operations that may impact groundwater. We believe that we are in substantial compliance with the CWA permitting requirements as well as the conditions imposed thereunder and that continued compliance with such existing permit conditions will not have a material effect on our results of operations.
The primary federal law related to oil spill liability is the Oil Pollution Act, or OPA, which amends and augments oil spill provisions of the CWA and imposes certain duties and liabilities on certain "responsible parties" related to the prevention of oil spills and damages resulting from such spills in or threatening United States waters or adjoining shorelines. Spill prevention, control and countermeasure requirements of federal laws and analogous state laws require us to maintain spill prevention control and countermeasure plans. These laws also require appropriate containment berms and similar structures to help prevent the contamination of regulated waters in the event of a hydrocarbon tank spill, rupture or leak. Regulations promulgated pursuant to OPA further require certain facilities to maintain oil spill prevention and oil spill contingency plans. A liable "responsible party" includes the owner or operator of a facility, vessel or pipeline that is a source of an oil discharge or that poses the substantial threat of discharge, or in the case of offshore facilities, the lessee or permittee of the area in which a discharging facility is located. OPA assigns joint and several liability, without regard to fault, to each liable party for oil removal costs and a variety of public and private damages. Although defenses exist to the liability imposed by OPA, they are limited. In the event of an oil discharge or substantial threat of discharge, we may be liable for costs and damages.

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Endangered Species
The Endangered Species Act, or ESA, restricts activities that may affect endangered or threatened species or their habitats. While some of our operations may be located in areas that are designated as habitats for endangered or threatened species, we believe that we are in substantial compliance with the ESA. However, the designation of previously unlisted endangered or threatened species could cause us to incur additional costs or become subject to operating restrictions or bans or limit future development in the affected areas.
National Environmental Policy Act
The National Environmental Policy Act, or NEPA, establishes a national environmental policy and goals for the protection, maintenance and enhancement of the environment and provides a process for implementing these goals within federal agencies. A major federal agency action having the potential to significantly impact the environment requires review under NEPA and, as a result, many activities requiring FERC or other federal approval must undergo a NEPA review. A NEPA review can create delays and increased costs that could materially adversely affect our operations.
Employee Safety
We are subject to the requirements of OSHA and comparable state statutes that regulate the protection of the health and safety of workers. In addition, the OSHA hazard communication standard requires that information be maintained about hazardous materials used or produced in operations and that this information be provided to employees, state and local government authorities and citizens. We believe that our operations are in substantial compliance with OSHA requirements, including general industry standards, record keeping requirements, and monitoring of occupational exposure to regulated substances.
Seasonality
Weather generally impacts natural gas demand for power generation and heating purposes, which in turn influences the value of transportation and storage. Price volatility also affects gas prices, which in turn influences drilling and production. Peak demand for natural gas typically occurs during the winter months, caused by heating demand. We do not expect our crude oil transportation segment to encounter market based seasonality. Nevertheless, because a high percentage of our natural gas transportation and storage and crude oil transportation revenues are derived from firm capacity reservation fees under long-term firm fee contracts, our revenues attributable to those segments are not generally seasonal in nature. We experience some seasonality in our processing segment, as volumes at our processing facilities are slightly higher in the summer months. We also experience some seasonality in our maintenance, repair, overhaul, integrity, and other projects, as warm weather months are most conducive to efficient execution of these activities.
Title to Properties and Rights-of-Way
Our real property falls into two categories: (i) parcels that we own in fee and (ii) parcels in which our interest derives from leases, easements, rights-of-way, permits or licenses from landowners or governmental authorities, permitting the use of such land for our operations. Portions of the land on which our pipelines and facilities are located are owned by us in fee title, and we believe that we have satisfactory title to these lands. The remainder of the land on which our pipelines and facilities are located are held by us pursuant primarily to leases, easements, rights-of-way, permits or licenses between us, as grantee, and a third party, as grantor. We believe that we have satisfactory title to all of our material parcels that we own in fee and the material parcels in which our interest derives from leases, easements, rights-of-way, permits and licenses, and we have no knowledge of any challenge that we expect will impact our title to such assets or their underlying fee title in any material respect.
Some of the leases, easements, rights-of-way, permits and licenses we acquire, including those we acquired in the IPO, require the consent of the grantor for the assignment/conveyance of such rights, which in certain instances is a governmental entity. The transferor, such as Tallgrass Development or its affiliates, may continue to hold record title to portions of certain assets until we make the appropriate filings in the jurisdictions in which such assets are located and obtain any consents and approvals that are not obtained prior to transfer. Such consents and approvals would include those required by federal and state agencies or political subdivisions. In some cases, Tallgrass Development may, where required consents or approvals have not been obtained, temporarily hold record title to property as nominee for our benefit and in other cases may, on the basis of expense and difficulty associated with the conveyance of title, cause its affiliates to retain title, as nominee for our benefit, until a future date. We anticipate that there will be no material change in the tax treatment of our common units resulting from Tallgrass Development holding the title to any part of such assets subject to future conveyance or as our nominee.

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Insurance
We generally share insurance coverage with Tallgrass Development and TEGP, for which we reimburse Tallgrass Development and its affiliates pursuant to the terms of the TEP Omnibus Agreement. The Tallgrass Development insurance program includes general and excess liability insurance, auto liability insurance, workers’ compensation insurance, property and director and officer liability insurance. All insurance coverage is in amounts which management believes are reasonable and appropriate.
Employees
We do not have any employees. We are managed and operated by the board of directors and executive officers of our general partner. All of our employees are employed by an affiliate of Tallgrass Energy Holdings and devote the portion of their time to our business and affairs that is reasonably required to manage and conduct our operations. Under the terms of the TEP Omnibus Agreement and our partnership agreement, we reimburse Tallgrass Development and our general partner, respectively, for the provision of various general and administrative services for our benefit and for direct expenses incurred by Tallgrass Development or our general partner on our behalf, including services performed and expenses incurred by our executive management personnel in connection with our business and affairs.
Available Information
We make certain filings with the SEC, including our Annual Report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments and exhibits to those reports. We make such filings available free of charge through our website, www.tallgrassenergy.com, as soon as reasonably practicable after they are filed with the SEC. The filings are also available through the SEC’s website, www.sec.gov, at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549 or by calling 1-800-SEC-0330. Our press releases and recent presentations are also available on our website.
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Limited partner interests are inherently different from shares of capital stock of a corporation, although many of the business risks to which we are subject are similar to those that would be faced by a corporation engaged in similar businesses. If any of the following risks were to occur, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected. In that case, we might not be able to pay quarterly distributions on our common units at the current distribution level, or pay any distribution at all, and the trading price of our common units could decline.
Risks Related to Our Business
We may not have sufficient cash from operations following the establishment of cash reserves and payment of fees and expenses, including cost reimbursements to our general partner and its affiliates, to enable us to pay the quarterly distribution at the current distribution level, or at all, to holders of our common units.
We may not have sufficient available cash from operating surplus each quarter to enable us to pay the quarterly distribution at the current distribution level, at the minimum quarterly distribution level, or at all. The amount of cash we can distribute on our units principally depends upon the amount of cash we generate from our operations, which will fluctuate from quarter to quarter based on, among other things:
the level of firm services we provide to customers pursuant to firm fee contracts and the volume of customer products we transport, store, process, gather, treat and dispose using our assets;
our ability to renew or replace expiring long-term firm fee contracts with other long-term firm fee contracts;
the creditworthiness of our customers, particularly customers who are subject to firm fee contracts;
our ability to complete and integrate acquisitions from Tallgrass Development or from third parties;
the level of production of crude oil, natural gas and other hydrocarbons and the resultant market prices of natural gas, NGLs, crude oil and other hydrocarbons;
regional, domestic and foreign supply and perceptions of supply of natural gas, crude oil and other hydrocarbons;
the level of demand and perceptions of demand in end-user markets we directly or indirectly serve;
actual and anticipated future prices of natural gas, crude oil and other commodities (and the volatility thereof);
applicable laws and regulations affecting our and our customers' business, including the market for natural gas, crude oil, other hydrocarbons and water, the rates we can charge on our assets, how we contract for services, our existing contracts, our operating costs or our operating flexibility;

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prevailing economic conditions;
changes in the fees we charge for our services, including firm services and interruptible services;
the effect of seasonal variations in temperature and climate on the amount of customer products we are able to transport, store, process, gather, treat and dispose using our assets;
the realized pricing impacts on revenues and expenses that are directly related to commodity prices;
the level of competition from other midstream energy companies in our geographic markets;
the level of our operating and maintenance costs;
damage to our assets and surrounding properties caused by earthquakes, floods, fires, severe weather, explosions and other natural disasters or acts of terrorism;
outages in our assets;
the relationship between natural gas and NGL prices and resulting effect on processing margins; and
leaks or accidental releases of hazardous materials into the environment, whether as a result of human error or otherwise.
In addition, the actual amount of cash we will have available for distribution will depend on other factors, including:
our ability to borrow funds and access capital markets;
the level, timing and characterization of capital expenditures we make;
the level of our general and administrative expenses, including reimbursements to our general partner and its affiliates, including Tallgrass Development, for services provided to us;
the cost of pursuing and completing acquisitions, if any;
our debt service requirements and other liabilities;
fluctuations in our working capital needs;
restrictions contained in our debt agreements;
the amount of cash reserves established by our general partner; and
other business risks affecting our cash levels.
If we are not able to renew or replace expiring customer contracts at favorable rates or on a long-term basis, our financial condition, results of operation, cash flows and ability to make cash distributions to our unitholders will be adversely affected.
We transport, store and process a substantial majority of our customers' products, including natural gas, crude oil and water, on our systems under long-term firm fee contracts with terms of various durations. For the year ended December 31, 2015, approximately 94% of our natural gas transportation and storage revenues were generated under firm fee transportation and storage contracts and approximately 94% of our crude oil transportation revenues were generated under firm fee transportation contracts. As of December 31, 2015, the weighted average remaining life of our long-term natural gas transportation contracts and natural gas storage contracts was approximately two and six years, respectively, the weighted average remaining life of our oil transportation contracts was approximately four years, and the weighted average remaining life of our natural gas processing contracts was approximately three years. As these contracts expire, we may be unable to obtain new contracts on terms similar to those of our existing contracts, or at all. If we are unable to promptly resell capacity from expiring contracts on equivalent terms, our revenues may decrease and our ability to make cash distributions to our unitholders may be materially impaired.

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For example, over the past several years, a number of our natural gas transportation and storage customers have opted not to renew their contracts for service on the TIGT System. We believe those non-renewals have been caused both by increased competition from large diameter long-haul pipeline systems that are more efficient and cost effective at transporting natural gas over long distances, as well as reduced drilling activity for dry gas in the Rocky Mountain region. These former customers are generally large producers that primarily used the TIGT System to access interstate pipelines for ultimate delivery to consuming markets outside our areas of operations, as opposed to our current customer base, which is primarily comprised of on-system regional customers, such as LDCs. The non-renewal of these transportation contracts has resulted in decreases in firm contracted capacity on the TIGT System and related decreases in total revenue. For example, our average firm contracted capacity decreased from 842 MMcf/d for the year ended December 31, 2010 to 621 MMcf/d for the year ended December 31, 2015 and transportation services revenue decreased from $143.4 million to $94.9 million over the same period, primarily due to the loss of revenue from the non-renewal of transportation contracts.
We also may be unable to maintain the long-term nature and economic structure of our current contract portfolio over time. Depending on prevailing market conditions at the time of a contract renewal, transportation, storage and processing customers with fee-based contracts may desire to enter into contracts under different fee arrangements, and our potential customers may be generally unwilling to enter into long-term contracts. In the current commodity environment, which has included significant price reduction and volatility in crude oil, natural gas and other hydrocarbons over the past 18 months, we expect customers will generally be less likely to enter into long-term firm fee contracts until prices recover and stability returns to the commodity markets. To the extent we are unable to renew or replace our existing contracts on terms that are favorable to us or successfully manage the long-term nature and economic structure of our contract profile over time, our revenues and cash flows could decline and our ability to make distributions to our unitholders could be materially and adversely affected. In addition, if an existing customer terminates or breaches its long-term firm transportation, storage or processing contract, we may be subject to a loss of revenue if we are unable to promptly resell the capacity to another customer on substantially equivalent terms.
Our ability to renew or replace our expiring contracts on terms similar to, or more attractive than, those of our existing contracts is uncertain and depends on a number of factors beyond our control, including:
the level of existing and new competition to provide competing services to our markets;
the macroeconomic factors affecting crude oil and natural gas gathering economics for our current and potential customers;
the balance of supply and demand for natural gas, crude oil and other hydrocarbons, on a short-term, seasonal and long-term basis, in the markets we serve;
the extent to which the current and potential customers in our markets are willing to contract on a long-term basis; and
the effects of federal, state or local laws or regulations on the contracting practices of our customers.
We are exposed to the creditworthiness and performance of our customers, suppliers and contract counterparties, and any material nonpayment or nonperformance by one or more of these parties could adversely affect our financial condition, cash flows, and operating results.
Although we attempt to assess the creditworthiness of our customers, suppliers and contract counterparties, there can be no assurance that our assessments will be accurate or that there will not be a rapid or unanticipated deterioration in their creditworthiness, which may have an adverse impact on our business, results of operations, financial condition and ability to make cash distributions to our unitholders. Our long-term firm fee contracts obligate our customers to pay demand charges regardless of whether they utilize our assets, except for certain circumstances outlined in applicable customer agreements. As a result, during the term of our long-term firm fee contracts, and absent an event of force majeure, our revenues will generally depend on our customers’ financial condition and their ability to pay rather than upon the amount of natural gas or crude oil transported. The recent decline in natural gas and crude oil prices has negatively impacted the financial condition of our customers and further declines, sustained lower prices, or continued volatility could impact their ability to meet their financial obligations to us. Further, our contract counterparties may not perform or adhere to our existing or future contractual arrangements. To the extent one or more of our contract counterparties is in financial distress or commences bankruptcy proceedings, contracts with these counterparties may be subject to renegotiation or rejection under applicable provisions of the United States Bankruptcy Code. Any material nonpayment or nonperformance by our contract counterparties due to inability or unwillingness to perform or adhere to contractual arrangements could have a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations, financial condition and ability to make cash distributions to our unitholders.

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The procedures and policies we use to manage our exposure to credit risk, such as credit analysis, credit monitoring and, in some cases, requiring credit support, cannot fully eliminate counterparty credit risks. In accordance with FERC regulations and our own internal credit policies, counterparties with investment grade credit ratings are deemed able to meet their financial obligations to us without requiring credit support in the form of a letter of credit or prepayment. With the recent decline in natural gas and crude oil prices and the corresponding deterioration of the financial condition of some of our customers, it is possible that some may lose their investment grade credit rating. If this were to occur, we would likely ask for credit support and the customer may be unwilling or unable to provide it due to liquidity constraints. To the extent our procedures and policies prove to be inadequate or we are unable to obtain credit support, our financial position and results of operations may be negatively impacted.
Some of our counterparties may be highly leveraged or have limited financial resources and are subject to their own operating and regulatory risks. Even if our credit review and analysis mechanisms work properly, we may experience financial losses in our dealings with such parties. As seen with the recent decline in crude oil prices, prices for crude oil and natural gas are subject to large fluctuations in response to changes in supply and demand, market uncertainty and a variety of other factors that are beyond our control. Such volatility in commodity prices might have an impact on many of our counterparties and their ability to borrow and obtain additional capital on attractive terms, which, in turn, could have a negative impact on their ability to meet their obligations to us and may also increase the magnitude of these obligations.
Any material nonpayment or nonperformance by our counterparties could require us to pursue substitute counterparties for the affected operations, reduce operations or provide alternative services. There can be no assurance that any such efforts would be successful or would provide similar financial and operational results.
We depend on certain key customers for a significant portion of our revenues and are exposed to credit risks of these customers. The loss of or material nonpayment or nonperformance by any of these key customers could adversely affect our cash flow and results of operations.
We rely on certain key customers for a portion of revenues. For example, for the year ended December 31, 2015, Continental Resources and Shell accounted for approximately 28% and 19% of our segment revenue in the Crude Oil Transportation & Logistics segment, respectively, and approximately 16% and 15% of our revenues on a consolidated basis, respectively. In addition, for the year ended December 31, 2015, 55% of our consolidated revenues were represented by the top ten customers on our Pony Express System.
We may be unable to negotiate extensions or replacements of contracts with key customers on favorable terms. In addition, some of these key customers may experience financial problems that could have a significant effect on their creditworthiness. Severe financial problems encountered by our customers could limit our ability to collect amounts owed to us, or to enforce performance of obligations under contractual arrangements. To the extent one or more of our key customers is in financial distress or commences bankruptcy proceedings, contracts with these customers may be subject to renegotiation or rejection under applicable provisions of the United States Bankruptcy Code. Additionally, many of our customers finance their activities through cash flow from operations, the incurrence of debt or the issuance of equity. The combination of reduction of cash flow resulting from declines in commodity prices, a reduction in borrowing bases under credit facilities and the lack of availability of debt or equity financing may result in a significant reduction of our customers’ liquidity and limit their ability to make payments or perform on their obligations to us. Furthermore, some of our customers may be highly leveraged and subject to their own operating and regulatory risks, which increases the risk that they may default on their obligations to us. The loss of all or even a portion of the contracted volumes of these key customers, as a result of competition, creditworthiness or otherwise, could have a material adverse effect on our business, cash flows, ability to make distributions to our unitholders, the price of our units, our results of operations and ability to conduct our business.
The revenue in our Processing and Logistics segment largely depends on the amount of natural gas that our customers actually deliver to our natural gas processing plants.
As of December 31, 2015, approximately 92% of our reserved capacity at our Casper and Douglas natural gas processing plants was subject to firm or volumetric fee contracts, with the majority of the fee revenue being based on the volumes actually processed (the remaining 8% was subject to commodity sensitive contracts such as percent of proceeds or keep whole processing contracts).  On these volumetric fee contracts, our revenue is largely tied to the amount of natural gas that our customers actually deliver our Casper and Douglas plants for processing.  Unlike many pipeline transportation customers, our natural gas processing customers are not generally subject to "take or pay" obligations.  Thus, if our natural gas processing customers do not produce natural gas and deliver that natural gas to our processing plants to be processed, revenue for our Processing and Logistics segment will decline.  As natural gas, crude oil or NGL prices decline, which has been the case since the latter half of 2014, our customers will likely make less money from the production of natural gas, crude oil or NGLs than it costs them to produce it.  If that happens, our customers may not continue to produce natural gas and our revenue will decline.  The decreased commodity prices in late 2015 and into early 2016 contributed to a significant drop in actual and anticipated volumes from several producers from which TMID receives natural gas for processing. If a gradual recovery of commodity

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prices and a corresponding increase in volumes over time to TMID does not occur, we could have an impairment of the goodwill at the TMID reporting unit, which is a component of our Processing & Logistics segment, and our revenue will decline. In addition, the fees our customers pay to reserve capacity at our processing plants may not deter those customers from processing their natural gas volumes at other facilities, with whom they may have had prior arrangements or otherwise.
We have only recently commenced operating our newly acquired water business services assets in Weld County, Colorado, and we may not achieve all the benefits anticipated.
On December 16, 2015, we purchased water business services assets located in Weld County, Colorado, including a gathering and disposal system for water removed from a well as a byproduct of exploration and production activities, which we generally refer to as produced water. Gathering and disposal of produced water is a new water business activity for us, as our water business operations were previously focused on the transportation of freshwater. Operating a produced water gathering and disposal system involves different risks and requires different operating strategies and managerial expertise than our current operations. In addition, gathering and disposing produced water is subject to more stringent laws and regulations than transporting freshwater, particularly those related to environmental matters. Failure to timely and successfully develop this new water business activity in conjunction with our existing operations could result in our failure to achieve the benefits anticipated and may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We may not be able to compete effectively in our midstream services activities and our business is subject to the risk of a capacity overbuild of midstream energy infrastructure in the areas where we operate.
We face competition in all aspects of our business and may not be able to compete effectively against our competitors. In general, competition comes from a wide variety of players in a wide variety of contexts, including new entrants and existing players and in connection with day-to-day business, expansion capital projects, acquisitions and joint venture activities. Some of our competitors have capital resources greater than ours and control greater supplies of crude oil, natural gas or NGLs.
Our ability to renew or replace our existing contracts at rates sufficient to maintain current revenues and current cash flows could be adversely affected by the activities of our competitors. In addition, some of our competitors have assets in closer proximity to hydrocarbon supplies and have available idle capacity in existing assets that would not require new capital investments for use. For example, several pipelines access many of the same basins as our natural gas pipeline systems and transport gas to customers in the Rocky Mountain and Midwest regions of the United States. Pony Express also competes with rail facilities, which can provide more delivery optionality to crude oil producers and marketers looking to capitalize on basis differentials between two primary crude oil benchmarks (West Texas Intermediate Crude and Brent Crude). Other crude oil pipeline projects have been announced recently that would compete directly with our Pony Express System. Furthermore, Tallgrass Development and its affiliates are not limited in their ability to compete with us.
Our competitors may expand or construct new midstream services assets that would create additional competition for the services we provide to our customers, or our customers may develop their own facilities in lieu of using ours. A significant driver of competition in some of the markets where we operate (including, for example, the Rocky Mountain region) has seen the rapid development of new midstream energy infrastructure capacity in recent years. As a result, we are exposed to the risk that the areas in which we operate become overbuilt, resulting in an excess of midstream energy infrastructure capacity. If we experience a significant capacity overbuild in one or more of the areas where we operate, it could have a significant adverse impact on our financial position, cash flows and ability to pay or increase distributions to our unitholders. For example, our competitors in these areas could substantially decrease the prices at which they offer their services, and we may be unable to compete effectively. This could materially impair our cash flows and ability to make distributions to our unitholders.
Further, natural gas as a fuel, and fuels derived from crude oil, compete with other forms of energy available to users, including electricity, coal and other liquid fuels. Increased demand for such forms of energy at the expense of natural gas or fuels derived from crude oil could lead to a reduction in demand for our services.
All of these competitive pressures could make it more difficult for us to renew our existing long-term firm fee contracts when they expire or to attract new customers as we seek to expand our business, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. In addition, competition could intensify the negative impact of factors that decrease demand for natural gas and crude oil in the markets we serve, such as adverse economic conditions, weather, higher fuel costs and taxes or other governmental or regulatory actions that directly or indirectly increase the cost or limit the use of natural gas or crude oil.
If we are unable to make acquisitions on economically acceptable terms from Tallgrass Development or third parties, our future growth will be limited, and the acquisitions we do make may reduce, rather than increase, our cash generated from operations on a per unit basis.
Our ability to grow depends, in part, on our ability to make acquisitions that increase our cash generated from operations on a per unit basis.

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The acquisition component of our strategy is based, in part, on our expectation of ongoing divestitures of midstream energy assets by industry participants, including Tallgrass Development. Other than Tallgrass Development’s obligation to offer us certain assets (if Tallgrass Development decides to sell such assets) pursuant to the right of first offer under the TEP Omnibus Agreement, we have no contractual arrangement with Tallgrass Development that would require it to provide us with an opportunity to acquire midstream assets that it may sell. Accordingly, while we believe Tallgrass Development will be incentivized pursuant to its economic relationship with us to offer us opportunities to purchase midstream assets, there can be no assurance that any such offer will be made, and there can be no assurance we will reach agreement on the terms with respect to any acquisition opportunities offered to us by Tallgrass Development. Furthermore, many factors could impair our access to future midstream assets, including a change in control of Tallgrass Development or a transfer of the IDRs by our general partner to a third party. A material decrease in divestitures of midstream energy assets from Tallgrass Development or otherwise would limit our opportunities for future acquisitions and could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and ability to make quarterly cash distributions to our unitholders.
Our future growth and ability to increase distributions will be limited if we are unable to make accretive acquisitions from Tallgrass Development or third parties because, among other reasons, (i) Tallgrass Development elects not to sell or contribute additional assets to us or to offer acquisition opportunities to us, (ii) we are unable to identify attractive third-party acquisition opportunities, (iii) we are unable to negotiate acceptable purchase contracts with Tallgrass Development or third parties, (iv) we are unable to obtain financing for these acquisitions on economically acceptable terms, (v) we are outbid by competitors or (vi) we are unable to obtain necessary governmental or third-party consents. Furthermore, even if we do make acquisitions that we believe will be accretive, these acquisitions may nevertheless result in a decrease in the cash generated from operations on a per unit basis.
Any acquisition involves potential risks, including, among other things:
mistaken assumptions about volumes, revenue and costs, including synergies and potential growth;
an inability to maintain or secure adequate customer commitments to use the acquired systems or facilities;
an inability to integrate successfully the assets or businesses we acquire;
the assumption of unknown liabilities for which we are not indemnified or for which our indemnity is inadequate;
the diversion of management’s and employees’ attention from other business concerns;
unforeseen difficulties operating in new geographic areas or business lines; and
a decrease in liquidity and increased leverage as a result of using significant amounts of available cash or debt to finance an acquisition.
If any acquisition eventually proves not to be accretive to our distributable cash flow per unit, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and ability to make quarterly cash distributions to our unitholders.
If we are unable to obtain needed capital or financing on satisfactory terms to fund expansions of our asset base, our ability to make quarterly cash distributions may be diminished or our financial leverage could increase.
In order to expand our asset base through acquisitions or capital projects, we may need to make expansion capital expenditures. If we do not make sufficient or effective expansion capital expenditures, we will be unable to expand our business operations and may be unable to maintain or raise the level of our quarterly cash distributions. We could be required to use cash from our operations or incur borrowings or sell additional common units or other limited partner interests in order to fund our expansion capital expenditures. Using cash from operations will reduce cash available for distribution to our common unitholders. Our ability to obtain bank financing or to access the capital markets for future equity or debt offerings may be limited by our financial condition at the time of any such financing or offering as well as the covenants in our debt agreements, general economic conditions and contingencies and uncertainties that are beyond our control. The recent downturn in the energy capital markets has negatively impacted the cost at which we can issue public debt and equity and has altered some of our financing plans. Even if we are successful in obtaining funds for expansion capital expenditures through equity or debt financings, the terms thereof could limit our ability to pay distributions to our common unitholders. In addition, incurring additional debt may significantly increase our interest expense and financial leverage, and issuing additional limited partner interests may result in significant common unitholder dilution and increase the aggregate amount of cash required to maintain the then-current distribution rate, which could materially decrease our ability to pay distributions at the then-current distribution rate.
We do not currently have any commitment with our general partner or other affiliates, including Tallgrass Development, to provide any direct or indirect financial assistance to us.

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Difficult conditions in the global capital markets, the credit markets and the economy in general could negatively affect our business and results of operations.
Our business may be negatively impacted by adverse economic conditions or future disruptions in the global financial markets. Included among these potential negative impacts are reduced energy demand and lower prices for our services and increased difficulty in collecting amounts owed to us by our customers which could reduce our access to credit markets, raise the cost of such access or require us to provide additional collateral to our counterparties. Our ability to access available capacity under our revolving credit facility could be impaired if one or more of our lenders fails to honor its contractual obligation to lend to us. If financing is not available when needed, or is available only on unfavorable terms, we may be unable to implement our business plans or otherwise take advantage of business opportunities or respond to competitive pressures. While the recent downturn in the energy capital markets has not changed our business plans, it has altered some of our financing strategies.
The amount of cash we have available for distribution to unitholders depends primarily on our cash flow rather than on our profitability, which may prevent us from making distributions, even during periods in which we record net income.
The amount of cash we have available for distribution depends primarily upon our cash flow and not solely on profitability, which will be affected by non-cash items. As a result, we may make cash distributions during periods when we record losses for financial accounting purposes and may not make cash distributions during periods when we record net earnings for financial accounting purposes.
We are exposed to direct commodity price risk with respect to some of our processing revenues, and our exposure to direct commodity price risk may increase in the future.
Our Processing & Logistics segment operates under three types of contracts, two of which directly expose our cash flows to increases and decreases in the price of natural gas and NGLs: percent of proceeds and keep whole processing contracts. As of December 31, 2015, approximately 8% of the reserved capacity in our Processing & Logistics segment was contracted under percent of proceeds or keep whole processing contracts. We do not currently hedge the commodity exposure inherent in these types of processing contracts, and as a result, our revenues and results of operations are impacted by fluctuations in the prices of natural gas and NGLs.
Percent of proceeds processing contracts generally provide upside in high commodity price environments, but result in lower margins in low commodity price environments. Under keep whole processing contracts, our revenues and our cash flows generally increase or decrease as the prices of natural gas and NGLs fluctuate. The relationship between natural gas prices and NGL prices may also affect our profitability. When natural gas prices are low relative to NGL prices, it is more profitable for us to process natural gas under keep whole arrangements. When natural gas prices are high relative to NGL prices, it is less profitable for us and our customers to process natural gas both because of the higher value of natural gas and the increased cost (principally that of natural gas as a feedstock and a fuel) of separating the mixed NGLs from the natural gas. As a result, we may experience periods in which higher natural gas prices relative to NGL prices reduce our processing margins or reduce the volume of natural gas processed at some of our plants. In addition, NGL prices have historically been related to the market price of oil and as a result any significant changes in oil prices could also indirectly impact our operations. Indirectly, reduced commodity prices impact us through reduced exploration and production activity, which results in fewer opportunities for new business to offset natural volume declines. NGL and natural gas prices are volatile and are impacted by changes in the supply and demand for NGLs and natural gas, as well as market uncertainty. In 2015 natural gas and oil prices declined substantially and these declines directly and indirectly resulted in lower processing volumes and realizations on our percent of proceeds and keep whole processing contracts.
If third-party pipelines or other facilities interconnected to our systems become partially or fully unavailable, or if the volumes we transport do not meet the quality requirements of such pipelines or facilities, our revenues and our ability to make distributions to our unitholders could be adversely affected.
Our assets typically connect to other pipelines or facilities owned, leased and/or operated by unaffiliated third parties, such as Phillips 66, Deeprock Development, LLC, Whiting, and others. For example, the Powder River pipeline, owned by Phillips 66, is currently the only pipeline outlet for the NGLs that we produce and thus a substantial majority of the NGLs we produce are sold to Phillips 66 at the tailgate of the Douglas plant. Accordingly, the failure to renew our agreement (which expires on December 31, 2016) with Phillips 66 without securing another outlet for the NGLs or any downtime on this pipeline as a result of maintenance or force majeure would adversely affect us.
As a further example, our Pony Express System connects to upstream joint tariff pipelines, including the Belle Fourche Pipeline owned by the True Companies (which also own and operate the Bridger Pipeline) and the Double H Pipeline owned by Kinder Morgan, Inc., which are responsible for delivering a substantial portion of the crude oil for transportation on the Pony Express System. In addition, nearly all of the crude oil we transport on the Pony Express System is either stored in crude oil tanks located on, or pumped over to downstream pipelines that interconnect through, the Deeprock Development terminal

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facility in Cushing, Oklahoma. The continuing operation of such third-party facilities and other midstream facilities is not within our control. These pipelines, plants and other midstream facilities may become unavailable to us for any number of reasons, including because of testing, turnarounds, line repair, reduced operating pressure, lack of operating capacity, regulatory requirements, curtailments of receipt or deliveries due to insufficient capacity or because of damage from weather events or other operational hazards. For example, the operations of the Bridger Pipeline’s Poplar System were down for approximately five months during the first half of 2015 due to a pipeline release. Bridger declared a force majeure as a result of this event and temporarily lacked the capacity to make up volumes on other lines that directly or indirectly deliver crude oil into designated origin points on the Pony Express System or the Belle Fourche Pipeline. The largest committed shipper on the Pony Express System also declared a force majeure as a result of this incident.
If the costs to us to access and transport on these third-party pipelines or any alternative pipelines significantly increase, our ability to make cash distributions to our unitholders could be reduced. If any such increase in costs occurred, if any of these pipelines or other midstream facilities become unable to receive, transport, store or process products from our assets, or if the volumes we transport or process do not meet the quality requirements of such pipelines or facilities, our revenues and our ability to make quarterly cash distributions to our unitholders could be adversely affected.
Our success depends on the supply and demand for natural gas and crude oil.
The success of our business is in many ways impacted by the supply and demand for natural gas and crude oil. For example, our business can be negatively impacted by sustained downturns in supply and demand for natural gas and crude oil in the markets that we serve, including reductions in our ability to renew contracts on favorable terms and to construct new infrastructure. Further, a portion of the demand for our water business services depends substantially on the level of expenditures by the oil and gas industry for the exploration, development and production of oil and natural gas reserves. These expenditures are generally dependent on the industry’s view of future oil and natural gas prices and are sensitive to the industry’s view of future economic growth and the resulting impact on demand for oil and natural gas. Declines, as well as anticipated declines, in oil and gas prices could also result in project modifications, delays or cancellations, general business disruptions, and delays in, or nonpayment of, amounts that are owed to us. These effects could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
One of the major factors that will impact natural gas demand will be the potential growth of the demand for natural gas in the power generation market, particularly driven by the speed and level of existing coal-fired power generation that is replaced with natural gas-fired power generation. One of the major factors impacting domestic natural gas and crude oil supplies has been the significant growth in unconventional sources such as shale plays and the continued progression of hydraulic fracturing technology. The supply and demand for natural gas and crude oil, and therefore the future rate of growth of our business, depends on these and many other factors outside of our control, including, but not limited to:
adverse changes in general global economic conditions;
adverse changes in domestic regulations;
technological advancements that may drive further increases in production and reduction in costs of developing natural gas shales;
the price and availability of other forms of energy;
prices for natural gas, crude oil and NGLs;
decisions of the members of Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, or OPEC, regarding price and production controls;
increased costs to explore for, develop, produce, gather, process and transport hydrocarbons or water;
weather conditions, seasonal trends and hurricane disruptions;
the nature and extent of, and changes in, governmental regulation, for example GHG legislation, taxation and hydraulic fracturing;
perceptions of customers on the availability and price volatility of our services and natural gas and crude oil prices, particularly customers’ perceptions on the volatility of natural gas and crude oil prices over the long-term;
capacity and transportation service into, or out of, our markets; and
petrochemical demand for NGLs.

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The oil and gas industry historically has experienced periodic downturns, and is currently experiencing a period of low commodity prices. In the fourth quarter of 2014 and subsequent to December 31, 2014, the prices of crude oil, natural gas and NGLs were extremely volatile and declined significantly. Downward pressure on commodity prices continued in 2015 and the early part of 2016 and may continue for the foreseeable future. A prolonged downturn in the oil and gas industry could result in a reduction in demand for our business and could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
Any significant decrease in available supplies of hydrocarbons in our areas of operation, or redirection of existing hydrocarbon supplies to other markets, could adversely affect our business and operating results. If recent lower commodity prices are prolonged beyond our contract lives, we will likely experience lower throughput volumes and reduced cash flows.
Our business is dependent on the continued availability of natural gas and crude oil production and reserves. Production from existing wells and natural gas and crude oil supply basins with access to our assets will naturally decline over time. The amount of natural gas and crude oil reserves underlying these wells may also be less than anticipated, and the rate at which production from these reserves declines may be greater than anticipated. Accordingly, to maintain or increase the contracted capacity and/or the volume of products utilizing our assets, our customers must continually obtain adequate supplies of natural gas and crude oil.
However, the development of additional natural gas and crude oil reserves requires significant capital expenditures by others for exploration and development drilling and the installation of production, storage, transportation and other facilities that permit natural gas and crude oil to be produced and products delivered to our facilities. In addition, low prices for natural gas and crude oil, regulatory limitations, including environmental regulations, or the lack of available capital for these projects could have a material adverse effect on the development and production of additional reserves, as well as storage, pipeline transportation, and import and export of natural gas and crude oil supplies. The current volatility and historically low prices for crude oil and refined products has led to a decline in drilling activity, production and refining of crude oil, and import levels in these areas. For example, in response to recent declines in crude oil prices, a number of producers in our areas of operation significantly reduced their capital budgets and drilling plans in 2015 and have announced further reductions in their capital budget and drilling plans for 2016. In addition, production may fluctuate for other reasons, including, for example, in the case of crude oil, the decisions made by the members of the OPEC regarding production controls. Furthermore, competition for natural gas and crude oil supplies to serve other markets could reduce the amount of natural gas and crude oil supply available for our customers. Accordingly, to maintain or increase the contracted capacity and/or the volume of products utilizing our assets, our customers must compete with others to obtain adequate supplies of natural gas and crude oil.
If new supplies of natural gas and crude oil are not obtained to replace the natural decline in volumes from existing supply basins, if natural gas and crude oil supplies are diverted to serve other markets, if environmental regulations restrict new natural gas and crude oil drilling or if OPEC does not agree to and maintain production controls, the overall demand for services on our systems will likely decline, which could have a material adverse effect on our ability to renew or replace our current customer contracts when they expire and on our business, financial condition, results of operations and ability to make quarterly cash distributions to our unitholders.
Our natural gas and crude oil operations are subject to extensive regulation by federal, state and local regulatory authorities. Changes or additional regulatory measures adopted by such authorities could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
We provide open-access interstate transportation service on our natural gas transportation systems pursuant to tariffs approved by the FERC. Our natural gas transportation and storage operations are regulated by the FERC, under the NGA, the NGPA, and EPAct 2005. The TIGT System and the Trailblazer Pipeline each operates under a tariff approved by the FERC that establishes rates and terms and conditions of service to our customers. The rates and terms of service on the Pony Express System are subject to regulation by the FERC under the ICA, and the Energy Policy Act of 1992. We provide interstate transportation service on the Pony Express System pursuant to tariffs on file with the FERC. Our NGL pipeline is leased to a third party who has obtained a temporary waiver for itself from the FERC from the tariff, filing and reporting requirements of the ICA.
Generally, the FERC’s authority over natural gas facilities extends to:
rates, operating terms and conditions of service;
the form of tariffs governing service;
the types of services we may offer to our customers;
the certification and construction of new, or the expansion of existing, facilities;
the acquisition, extension, disposition or abandonment of facilities;
customer creditworthiness and credit support requirements;

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the maintenance of accounts and records;
relationships among affiliated companies involved in certain aspects of the natural gas business;
depreciation and amortization policies; and
the initiation and discontinuation of services.
The FERC’s authority over crude oil pipelines is less broad, extending to:
rates, rules and regulations of service;
the form of tariffs governing rates and service;
the maintenance of accounts and records; and
depreciation and amortization policies.
Interstate natural gas pipelines subject to the jurisdiction of the FERC may not charge rates or impose terms and conditions of service that, upon review by the FERC, are found to be unjust, unreasonable, unduly discriminatory, or preferential. The maximum recourse rate that we may charge for our natural gas transportation and storage services is established through the FERC’s ratemaking process. The maximum applicable recourse rate and terms and conditions for service are set forth in our FERC-approved tariff.
Pursuant to the NGA, existing interstate natural gas transportation and storage rates and terms and conditions of service may be challenged by complaint and are subject to prospective change by the FERC. Additionally, rate increases and changes to terms and conditions of service proposed by a regulated interstate pipeline may be protested and such increases or changes can be delayed and may ultimately be rejected by the FERC. We currently hold authority from the FERC to charge and collect (i) "recourse rates" (i.e., the maximum cost-based rates an interstate natural gas pipeline may charge for its services under its tariff); (ii) "discount rates" (i.e., rates offered by the natural gas pipeline to shippers at discounts vis-à-vis the recourse rates and that fall within the cost-based maximum and minimum rate levels set forth in the natural gas pipeline’s tariff); and (iii) "negotiated rates" (i.e., rates negotiated and agreed to by the pipeline and the shipper for the contract term that may fall within or outside of the cost-based maximum and minimum rate levels set forth in the tariff, and which are individually filed with the FERC for review and acceptance). When capacity is available and offered for sale, the rates (which include reservation, commodity, surcharges, fuel and gas lost and unaccounted for) at which such capacity is sold are subject to regulatory approval and oversight. Regulators and customers on our natural gas pipeline systems have the right to protest or otherwise challenge the rates that we charge under a process prescribed by applicable regulations. The FERC may also initiate reviews of our rates. Customers on our natural gas pipeline systems may also dispute terms and conditions contained in our agreements, as well as the interpretation and application of our tariffs, among other things.
Rates for crude oil transportation service must be filed as a tariff with the FERC and are subject to applicable FERC regulation. The filed tariff rates include contract rates entered into with shippers willing to make long-term commitments to the pipeline to support new pipeline capacity. Contract rates generally are not subject to regulation or change by the FERC. Non-contract "walk-up" rates are available to uncommitted non-contract shippers and generally are subject to regulation and change by the FERC. Crude oil pipelines typically must reserve at least ten percent of their capacity for walk-up shippers. Contract tariff rates may be changed by Pony Express on an annual basis to reflect annual FERC index adjustments to the extent permitted by contract. Non-contract rates may be adjusted, positively or negatively, on an annual basis pursuant to a FERC indexing procedure. A crude oil pipeline may also file new tariff rates at any time, subject to contract restrictions and provisions, and FERC regulatory procedures. The filing of any indexed rate increase or other rate increase may be protested by parties having standing, subject to applicable regulatory and contract provisions, and thereby be subjected to cost-of-service review by the FERC to determine whether the proposed new rate is just and reasonable.

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Under the ICA, which applies to FERC-regulated interstate liquids pipelines such as the Pony Express System, parties having standing and not restricted by contract may protest newly filed rates and terms and conditions of service within a prescribed notice period. The FERC is authorized to suspend, subject to refund, the effectiveness of a protested rate for up to seven months while it determines if the protested rate is just and reasonable. Our rates may be reduced and we may be required to issue refunds as a result of settlement or by an order of the FERC following a hearing finding that a protested rate is unjust and unreasonable. Parties having standing and not restricted by contract may file a complaint at any time regarding existing rates and terms and conditions of service. If the complaint is not resolved by settlement, the FERC may conduct a hearing and order the crude oil pipeline to make reparations going back for up to two years prior to the date on which a complaint was filed if a rate is found to be unjust and unreasonable. We cannot guarantee that any new or existing local or joint tariff rate for service on the Pony Express System would not be rejected or modified by the FERC, or subjected to refunds or reparations. While the FERC regulates rates and terms and conditions of service for transportation of crude oil in interstate commerce by pipeline, state agencies may also regulate facilities (including construction, acquisition, disposition, financing, and abandonment), rates, and terms and conditions of service for crude oil pipeline transportation in intrastate commerce. Any successful challenge by a regulator or shipper in any of these matters could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
The Trailblazer Pipeline, one of our interstate natural gas pipelines, uses two types of fuel to power its compressors: (1) natural gas and (2) electric power. For the natural gas compression, customers are charged a gas retainage percentage as an in-kind reimbursement for fuel. For the electric compression, customers are charged a commodity rate for the electricity used at the pipeline’s stations. The volume of gas and cost of electric power are tracked and adjusted in annual periodic rate adjustment filings made pursuant to Trailblazer's tariff. Lost and unaccounted for gas is also tracked and adjusted in annual periodic rate adjustment filings. These costs were subject to the NGA Section 4 rate case initiated by the Trailblazer Pipeline and resolved by settlement as approved by the FERC in May 2014. On TIGT, our gas compressor fuel costs and the cost of FL&U gas, together referred to as Fuel Retention Factors, are currently recovered by retaining a fixed percentage of natural gas throughput on our transportation and storage facilities. These Fuel Retention Factors were the subject of a NGA Section 5 proceeding initiated by the FERC that we resolved with customers by a settlement approved by the FERC in September 2011. In its NGA Section 4 proceeding that was filed on October 30, 2015, TIGT proposed to replace its fixed FL&U charge with a FL&U tracker that would compensate TIGT for its actual FL&U expenses and adjust each year to reflect any previous period’s under/over collection and the forecasted FL&U expense for the upcoming period. TIGT also proposed to implement a separate power cost tracker to recover the actual power costs incurred by TIGT to power its compressors. These proposals were accepted by the FERC in its Suspension Order, subject to a five-month suspension period, to be effective May 1, 2016, subject to refund and the outcome of the hearing.
The FERC’s jurisdiction over natural gas facilities extends to the certification and construction of interstate transportation and storage facilities, including, but not limited to, acquisitions, facility maintenance, expansions, and abandonment of facilities and services. With some exceptions applicable to smaller projects, auxiliary facilities, and certain facility replacements, prior to commencing construction and/or operation of new or existing interstate natural gas transportation and storage facilities, an interstate pipeline must obtain a certificate authorizing the construction from, or file to amend its existing certificate with, the FERC. Typically, a significant expansion project requires review by a number of governmental agencies, including state and local agencies, whose cooperation is important in completing the regulatory process on schedule. Any delay or refusal by an agency to issue authorizations or permits as requested for one or more of these projects may mean that they will be constructed in a manner or with capital requirements that we did not anticipate or that we will not be able to pursue these projects. Such delay, modification or refusal could materially and negatively impact the additional revenues expected from these projects. The FERC does not regulate the construction, expansion, or abandonment of crude oil or NGL pipelines, whether interstate or intrastate, nor the initiation or discontinuation of services on those pipelines, provided that the action taken is not discriminatory or preferential among similarly situated shippers.

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The FERC has the authority to conduct audits of regulated entities to assess compliance with FERC regulations and policies. The FERC also conducts audits to verify that the websites of interstate natural gas pipelines accurately provide information on the operations and availability of services on the pipeline. FERC regulations also require entities providing interstate natural gas and crude oil transportation services to comply with uniform terms and conditions for service, as set forth in publicly available tariffs or, as it concerns natural gas facilities, agreements for transportation and storage services executed between interstate pipelines and their customers. Natural gas transportation service agreements are generally required to conform, in all material respects, with the standard form of service agreements set forth in the natural gas pipeline’s FERC-approved tariff. The pipeline and a customer may choose to enter into a non-conforming service agreement so long as this agreement is filed with, and accepted by, the FERC. In the event that the FERC finds that a natural gas transportation agreement, in whole or part, is materially non-conforming, the FERC could reject the agreement or require us to modify the agreement, or alternatively require us to modify our tariff so that the non-conforming provisions are generally available to all customers. Transportation agreements entered into with crude oil shippers are generally not subject to FERC regulation or required to be available for FERC or public review, but the rates and terms and services provided to similarly situated shippers may not be unduly discriminatory or preferential.
The FERC has promulgated rules and policies covering many aspects of our natural gas pipeline business, including regulations that require us to provide firm and interruptible transportation service on an open access basis that is not unduly discriminatory or preferential, provide internet access to current information about our available pipeline capacity and other relevant transmission information, and permit pipeline shippers to release contracted transportation and storage capacity to other shippers, thereby creating secondary markets for such services. FERC regulations also prevent interstate natural gas pipelines from sharing customer information with marketing affiliates, and restrict how interstate natural gas pipelines share transportation with marketing affiliates. FERC regulations require that certain transmission function personnel of interstate natural gas pipelines function independently of personnel engaged in natural gas marketing functions. Crude oil pipelines subject to the ICA must comply with FERC regulations that require the pipeline to act as a common carrier and not engage in undue discrimination or preferential treatment with respect to shippers.
FERC policies also govern how interstate natural gas pipelines respond to interconnection requests from third party facilities, including other pipelines. Generally, an interstate natural gas pipeline must grant an interconnection request upon the satisfaction of several conditions. As a consequence, an interstate natural gas pipeline faces the risk that an interconnecting third-party pipeline may pose a risk of additional competition to serve a particular market. Failure to comply with applicable provisions of the NGA, NGPA, EPAct 2005 and certain other laws, as well as with the regulations, rules, orders, restrictions and conditions associated with these laws, could result in the imposition of administrative and criminal remedies, including without limitation, revocation of certain authorities, disgorgement of ill-gotten gains, and civil penalties of up to $1.0 million per day, per violation. Violations of the ICA, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, or regulations and orders promulgated by the FERC are also subject to administrative and criminal penalties and remedies, including forfeiture and individual liability.
In addition, new laws or regulations or different interpretations of existing laws or regulations applicable to our pipeline systems or midstream facilities could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. For example, the FERC may not continue to pursue its approach of pro-competitive policies as it considers matters such as interstate pipeline rates and rules and policies that may affect rights of access to natural gas transportation capacity and transportation and storage facilities. We may face challenges to our rates or terms of service in the future. Any successful challenge could materially and adversely affect our future earnings and cash flows.
The rates and the terms and conditions of our regulated assets are subject to review and possible adjustment by federal and state regulators, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and ability to make quarterly cash distributions to our unitholders.
Our shippers or other interested stakeholders, such as state natural gas utility regulatory agencies, may challenge the rates or the terms and conditions of service applicable to our natural gas or crude oil pipeline tariffs, unless they have entered into agreements not to challenge such tariffs. The FERC has authority to investigate our rates and terms and conditions of service pursuant to NGA Section 5 for natural gas pipelines and the ICA for common carrier oil pipelines. Our crude oil contract shippers have generally agreed not to complain or protest rates unless they are in conflict with their contracts. FERC generally does not regulate crude oil transportation contracts, but contract rates must be filed with FERC and tariff rules and regulations generally apply to contract shippers. Our NGL pipeline is leased to a third party who obtained a temporary waiver for itself from the FERC from the tariff, filing and reporting requirements of the ICA, and during the term of the lease, we operate and maintain the pipeline at the lessee's discretion.

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With regard to our natural gas pipelines, Trailblazer initiated a rate proceeding with the FERC pursuant to Section 5 of the NGA on July 1, 2013 to implement a general rate increase to its recourse rates, initiate a rolled-in rate structure for expansion facilities certificated in 2001, and adopt miscellaneous other updates to its General Terms and Conditions in its tariff. On February 24, 2014, Trailblazer submitted to the FERC an uncontested offer of settlement and stipulation to resolve the proceeding by, among other things: (a) setting new maximum recourse rates based upon a "black box" cost of service of $21.1 million, (b) revising the charges and methods for recovery of fuel (natural gas and electric power used in providing service, including for operating compressors) costs such that the actual volumes of gas and cost of electric power, as well as FL&U gas, are tracked and adjusted in annual periodic rate filings made pursuant to Trailblazer's tariff (as opposed to recover), (c) providing for revenue sharing of certain interruptible and short-term firm service revenues with eligible maximum recourse rate firm service shippers, (d) establishing a rate moratorium until January 1, 2016, and (e) requiring a general rate case to be filed no later than January 1, 2019. The FERC accepted the settlement agreement by letter order on May 29, 2014. Per the terms of the settlement, Trailblazer is required to file a new general rate case by January 1, 2019, and no customer or participant who joined the settlement (defined in the settlement as a "Settling Party") was permitted to file to change the settlement rates before January 1, 2016.
On October 30, 2015, TIGT initiated a general NGA Section 4 rate proceeding with the FERC which, among other things, seeks a general system-wide increase in the maximum tariff rates for all firm and interruptible services offered by TIGT. TIGT also proposed certain changes to the transportation rate design of its system to replace the current rate zone structure with a single "postage stamp" rate. TIGT also proposed new incremental charges, including (i) a charge for deliveries made to points without certain electronic flow measurement equipment, and (ii) a CRM charge to completely or partially reimburse TIGT for certain expenses and costs it incurs to comply with anticipated new PHMSA and EPA regulations. TIGT also proposed to replace its fixed FL&U charge with a FL&U tracker that would compensate TIGT for its actual FL&U expenses and adjust each year to reflect the previous period’s under/over collection and the forecasted FL&U expense for the upcoming period. Finally, TIGT proposed certain revisions to its FERC Gas Tariff addressing a number of rate and non-rate matters. The filing was protested by a number of participants. In FERC’s November 30, 2015 Suspension Order, the FERC accepted and suspended the proposed rates and a majority of the proposed tariff records to be effective May 1, 2016, subject to refund, certain modifications of TIGT’s proposed CRM charge, and the outcome of an evidentiary hearing. The FERC also accepted two tariff records related to force majeure events and reservation charge crediting to be effective December 1, 2015, subject to certain modifications. Consistent with the Suspension Order, on December 21, 2015, TIGT made a compliance filing with the FERC addressing TIGT’s proposed CRM charge and the two tariff records related to force majeure events and reservation charge crediting. The FERC accepted TIGT’s compliance filing on February 1, 2016. Litigation addressing the proposed rates and tariff records set for hearing is on-going.
On our interstate crude oil pipeline system, the Pony Express System, shippers may generally challenge new or existing rates at any time unless they have contractually agreed not to. As a result of settlement or by order of the FERC following hearing, our rates may be reduced. If a shipper files a lawful complaint, and if the complaint is not resolved with that shipper, to the extent the FERC determines after hearing that we have collected payment on rates that were not just and reasonable, we may be required to pay reparations to that shipper for up to two years prior to the date on which a complaint was filed. Regardless of the prospective just and reasonable rate, reparations may not be required below the last rates determined by the FERC to be just and reasonable. In other words, crude oil pipelines are not required to make reparations that refund revenues collected pursuant to rates previously determined to be just and reasonable.
Successful challenges to rates charged on our natural gas and crude oil pipeline systems, or to the terms and conditions of service on those systems, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and ability to make quarterly cash distributions to our unitholders.
Constructing new assets subjects us to risks of project delays, cost overruns and lower-than-anticipated volumes of natural gas or crude oil once a project is completed. Our operating cash flows from our capital projects may not be immediate or meet our expectations.
One of the ways we may grow our business is by constructing additions or modifications to our existing facilities. We also may construct new facilities, either near our existing operations or in new areas. For example, in 2013 we completed an expansion of our Casper and Douglas plants to increase processing capacity and upgrade compression. Pony Express completed its approximately 698-mile crude oil pipeline commencing in Guernsey, Wyoming and terminating in Cushing, Oklahoma during 2014 and its approximately 66-mile lateral in Northeast Colorado in the first half of 2015. Construction projects require significant amounts of capital and involve numerous regulatory, environmental, political, legal and operational uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control. These projects also involve numerous economic uncertainties, including the impact of inflation on project costs and the availability of required resources.

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We may be unable to complete announced construction projects on schedule, at the budgeted cost, or at all, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. Moreover, we may not receive any material increase in operating cash flow from a project for some time. For instance, if we expand a pipeline or processing facility, the construction expenditures may occur over an extended period of time, yet we will not receive any material increases in cash flow until the project is completed and fully operational. In addition, our cash flow from a project may be delayed or may not meet our expectations. Our project specifications and expectations regarding project cost, timing, asset performance, investment returns and other matters usually rely in part on the expertise of third parties such as engineers, technical experts and construction contractors. These estimates may prove to be inaccurate because of numerous operational, technological, economic and other uncertainties.
We rely in part on estimates from producers regarding the timing and volume of anticipated natural gas and crude oil production. Production estimates are subject to numerous uncertainties, all of which are beyond our control. These estimates may prove to be inaccurate, and new facilities may not attract sufficient volumes to achieve our expected cash flow and investment return.
We are subject to numerous hazards and operational risks.
Our operations are subject to all the risks and hazards typically associated with transportation, storage, processing, gathering and disposing of hydrocarbons and water. These operating risks include, but are not limited to:
damage to pipelines, facilities, equipment and surrounding properties caused by hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, floods, fires or other adverse weather conditions and other natural disasters and acts of terrorism;
inadvertent damage from construction, vehicles, farm and utility equipment;
uncontrolled releases of crude oil, natural gas and other hydrocarbons or hazardous materials, including water from hydraulic fracturing;
leaks, migrations or losses of natural gas and crude oil as a result of the malfunction of equipment or facilities;
outages at our facilities;
ruptures, fires, leaks and explosions; and
other hazards that could also result in personal injury and loss of life, pollution and other environmental risks, and suspension of operations.
These risks could result in substantial losses due to personal injury and/or loss of life, severe damage to and destruction of property and equipment and pollution or other environmental damage. The location of our assets, including certain segments of our pipeline systems in or near populated areas, including residential areas, commercial business centers, industrial sites and other public gathering areas could increase the level of damages resulting from these risks. Despite the precautions we take, events could cause considerable harm to people or property, could result in loss of service available to customers, and could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations and ability to make distributions to unitholders. In addition, maintenance, repair and remediation activities could result in service interruptions on segments of our systems or alter the operational profile of our systems. Potential impacts arising from these service interruptions or operational profile changes on segments of our systems could include, among others, limitations on our ability to satisfy customer requirements, obligations to provide reservation charge credits to customers in times of constrained capacity, and solicitation of existing customers by others for potential new projects that would compete directly with existing services.
We could be required by regulatory authorities to test or undertake modifications to our systems, operations or both that could result in a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations. For example, we received a Corrective Action Order from PHMSA on June 19, 2013 directing us to take certain investigative, testing and corrective measures with regard to the segment of the TIGT pipeline in Goshen County that failed on June 13, 2013. In August 2015, PHMSA informed us that TIGT had fully complied with the terms of the Corrective Action Order related to that incident and stated that no further action is contemplated. However, such actions, including those required by PHMSA, could materially and adversely impact our ability to meet contractual obligations and retain customers, with a resulting material adverse impact on our business and results of operations, and could also limit or prevent our ability to make quarterly cash distributions to our unitholders. Some or all of our costs arising from these operational risks may not be recoverable under insurance, contractual indemnification or increases in rates charged to our customers.

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Our insurance coverage may not be adequate.
We are not insured or fully insured against all risks that could affect our business, including losses from environmental accidents. For example, we do not maintain business interruption insurance in the type and amount to cover all possible losses. In addition, we do not carry insurance for certain environmental exposures, including but not limited to potential environmental fines and penalties, certain business interruptions, named windstorm or hurricane exposures and, in limited circumstances, certain political risk exposures. Further, in the event there is a total or partial loss of one or more of our insured assets, any insurance proceeds that we may receive in respect thereof may be insufficient to effect a restoration of such asset to the condition that existed prior to such loss. In addition, we are either not insured or not fully insured with respect to the legal proceedings described in Note 17Legal and Environmental Matters to the consolidated financial statements and may, depending upon the circumstances, need to pay self-insured retention amounts prior to having losses covered by the insurance providers. The occurrence of any operating risks not fully covered by insurance could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
Furthermore, we may not be able to maintain or obtain insurance of the type and amount we desire at reasonable rates, and we have elected and may elect in the future to self-insure a portion of our risks of loss. As a result of market conditions, premiums and deductibles for certain types of insurance policies may substantially increase, and in some instances, certain types of insurance could become unavailable or available only for reduced amounts of coverage. Any insurance coverage we do obtain may contain large deductibles or fail to cover certain hazards or cover all potential losses.
Our pipeline integrity program may impose significant costs and liabilities on us, while increased regulatory requirements relating to the integrity of our pipeline systems may require us to make additional capital and operating expenditures to comply with such requirements.
We are subject to extensive laws and regulations related to pipeline integrity. There are, for example, federal requirements set by PHMSA for owners and operators of pipelines in the areas of pipeline design, construction, and testing, the qualification of personnel and the development of operations and emergency response plans. The rules require pipeline operators to develop integrity management programs to comprehensively evaluate their pipelines and take measures to protect pipeline segments located in what the rules refer to as HCAs.
Our pipeline operations are subject to pipeline safety regulations administered by PHMSA. These regulations, among other things, include requirements to monitor and maintain the integrity of our pipeline systems and determine the pressures at which our pipeline systems can operate. The Pipeline Safety Act of 2011 enacted January 3, 2012, amends the Pipeline Safety Improvement Act of 2002 in a number of significant ways, including:
reauthorizing funding for federal pipeline safety programs, increasing penalties for safety violations and establishing additional safety requirements for newly constructed pipelines;
requiring PHMSA to adopt appropriate regulations within two years and requiring the use of automatic or remote- controlled shutoff valves on new or rebuilt pipeline facilities;
requiring operators of pipelines to verify MAOP and report exceedances within five days; and
requiring studies of certain safety issues that could result in the adoption of new regulatory requirements for new and existing pipelines, including changes to integrity management requirements for HCAs, and expansion of those requirements to areas outside of HCAs.
In August 2012, PHMSA published rules to update pipeline safety regulations to reflect provisions included in the Pipeline Safety Act of 2011, including increasing maximum civil penalties from $0.1 million to $0.2 million per violation per day of violation and from $1.0 million to $2.0 million as a maximum amount for a related series of violations as well as changing PHMSA’s enforcement process.
The ultimate costs of compliance with the integrity management rules are difficult to predict. Changes such as advances of in-line inspection tools, identification of additional threats to a pipeline’s integrity and changes to the amount of pipe determined to be located in HCAs or expansion of integrity management requirements to areas outside of HCAs can have a significant impact on the costs to perform integrity testing and repairs. Trailblazer recently conducted smart tool surveys and preliminary analysis on segments of its natural gas pipeline to evaluate the growth rate of corrosion downstream of compressor stations. Trailblazer currently believes that approximately 25 - 35 miles of pipe will likely need to be repaired or replaced in order for the pipeline to operate at its MAOP of 1,000 pounds per square inch. Such repair or replacement will likely occur over a period of years, depending upon final assessment of corrosion growth rates and the remediation and repair plan implemented by Trailblazer. Trailblazer is currently operating at less than its current MAOP, public notice of which was first provided in June 2014. The current pressure reduction is not expected to prevent Trailblazer from fulfilling its firm service obligations at existing subscription levels and to date it has not had a material adverse financial impact on us.

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During 2015, Trailblazer completed 32 excavation digs at an aggregate cost of approximately $1.3 million based on preliminary analysis of the smart tool surveys performed in 2014. Segments of the Trailblazer Pipeline that require full replacement are currently expected to cost in the range of approximately $2.2 million to $2.7 million per mile. Repair costs on sections of the pipeline that do not require full replacement are expected to be less on a per mile basis. Trailblazer is continuing to develop a remediation and repair plan, which involves, among other things, finalizing cost recovery options, establishing project scope and timing and setting an overall project budget. In 2016, Trailblazer intends to replace approximately 8 miles of pipe at an estimated cost of $21.5 million. Trailblazer is currently exploring all possible cost recovery options. It may not ultimately be able to recover any or all of such out of pocket costs unless and until Trailblazer recovers them through a general rate increase or other FERC-approved recovery mechanism, or through negotiated rate agreements with its customers.
In connection with our acquisition of the Trailblazer Pipeline, Tallgrass Development agreed to contractually indemnify TEP for any out of pocket costs incurred between April 1, 2014 and April 1, 2017 related to repairing or remediating the Trailblazer Pipeline, to the extent that such actions are necessitated by external corrosion caused by the pipeline’s disbonded Hi-Melt CTE coating. The contractual indemnity provided by Tallgrass Development is currently capped at $20 million and is subject to an annual $1.5 million deductible. We will continue pipeline integrity testing programs to assess and maintain the integrity of our existing and future pipelines as required by the U.S. Department of Transportation regulations. The results of these tests could cause us to incur significant and unanticipated capital and operating expenditures for repairs or upgrades deemed necessary to ensure the continued safe and reliable operation of our pipelines, which expenditures could be material.
Additionally, we had several minor incidents in 2014 and 2015 on the Pony Express System that we reported to PHMSA during final commissioning and since the line has been placed into commercial service. In each of these cases, which released between 0.5 and 300 bbls of crude oil, the remediation activities have been completed without material cost to the Pony Express System, and the matters have been closed by the applicable agencies. In late 2015, anomalies were detected on the portion of the Pony Express System’s pipeline that was converted from gas service.  These anomalies were reported to PHMSA on December 2, 2015. Pony Express is continuing to evaluate and remediate these issues on the converted pipeline section of the Pony Express System. Tallgrass Development has agreed to contractually indemnify us for out of pocket costs incurred to repair, replace or remediate anomalies in any part of the Pony Express System’s pipeline that was converted from gas service to the extent such anomalies are identified by in-line inspection tools during the period from January 1, 2015 until January 1, 2019. The contractual indemnity provided by Tallgrass Development is capped at $11 million and is subject to an annual $1 million deductible.
The Pony Express System is a newly commissioned crude oil pipeline and these integrity issues may continue for the foreseeable future. There can be no assurance as to the amount or timing of future expenditures required to remediate or resolve these issues, and actual future expenditures may be different from the amounts we currently anticipate. These integrity issues could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations and prospects.
Further, additional laws, regulations and policies that may be enacted or adopted in the future or a new interpretation of existing laws and regulations could significantly increase the amount of these expenditures. For example, PHMSA issued an Advisory Bulletin in May 2012 which advised pipeline operators that they must have records to document the MAOP for each section of their pipeline and that the records must be traceable, verifiable and complete. Locating such records and, in the absence of any such records, verifying maximum pressures through physical testing (including hydrotesting) or modifying or replacing facilities to meet the demands of verifiable pressures, could significantly increase our costs. TIGT continues to investigate and, when necessary, report to PHMSA the miles of pipeline for which it has incomplete records for MAOP. We are currently undertaking an extensive internal record review in view of the anticipated PHMSA annual reporting requirements. Additionally, failure to locate such records or verify maximum pressures could require us to operate at reduced pressures, which would reduce available capacity on our natural gas pipeline systems. These specific requirements do not currently apply to crude oil pipelines, but forthcoming regulations implementing the Pipeline Safety Act of 2011 likely will expand the scope of regulation applicable to crude oil pipelines. There can be no assurance as to the amount or timing of future expenditures required to comply with pipeline integrity regulation, and actual future expenditures may be different from the amounts we currently anticipate. In addition, we may be subject to enforcement actions and penalties for failure to comply with pipeline regulations. Revised or additional regulations that result in increased compliance costs or additional operating restrictions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations and prospects. In addition, we may be subject to enforcement actions and penalties for failure to comply with pipeline regulations.
Climate change regulation at the federal, state or regional levels could result in increased operating and capital costs for us and reduced demand for our services.
The United States Congress has from time to time considered adopting legislation to reduce emissions of GHGs, and there has been a wide-ranging policy debate, both nationally and internationally, regarding the impact of these gases and possible means for their regulation. In addition, efforts have been made and continue to be made in the international community toward the adoption of international treaties or protocols that would address global climate change issues. In 2015, the United States participated in the United Nations Conference on Climate Change, which led to the creation of the Paris Agreement. The Paris Agreement will be open for signing on April 22, 2016 and will require countries to review and "represent a progression" in their intended nationally

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determined contributions, which set GHG emission reduction goals, every five years beginning in 2020. Following a finding by the EPA that certain GHGs represent an endangerment to human health, the EPA adopted two sets of rules regulating GHG emissions under the CAA, one that requires a reduction in emissions of GHGs from motor vehicles and another that regulates emissions of GHGs from certain large stationary sources. The EPA has also expanded its existing GHG emissions reporting requirements to include upstream petroleum and natural gas systems that emit 25,000 metric tons or more of CO2 equivalent per year. Some of our facilities are required to report under this rule, and operational and/or regulatory changes could require additional facilities to comply with GHG emissions reporting requirements. Furthermore, in August 2015, the EPA proposed changes to its regulations imposing more stringent controls on methane and volatile organic compounds emissions from oil and gas development, production, and transportation operations. A final rule is expected in 2016. The Administration has also announced that other federal agencies, including the BLM, the PHMSA, and the U.S. Department of Energy will impose new or more stringent regulations on the oil and gas sector that are designed to reduce methane emissions. In addition, almost half of the states have already taken legal measures to reduce emissions of GHGs, primarily through the planned development of GHG emission inventories and/or regional GHG cap and trade programs. Most of these cap and trade programs work by requiring either major sources of emissions, such as electric power plants, or major producers of fuels, to acquire and surrender emission allowances with the number of allowances available for purchase reduced each year until the overall GHG emission reduction goal is achieved.
The adoption of legislation or regulations imposing reporting or permitting obligations on, or limiting emissions of GHGs from, our equipment and operations could require us to incur additional costs to reduce emissions of GHGs associated with our operations, could adversely affect our operations in the absence of any permits that may be required to regulate emission of GHGs, or could adversely affect demand for the crude oil and natural gas we gather, process, or otherwise handle. For instance, the EPA and BLM’s recently proposed rules could result in the direct regulation of GHGs associated with our operations. We are not able at this time to estimate such increased costs; however, they could be significant. While we may be able to recover some or all of such increased costs in the rates charged by our processing facilities, such recovery of costs is uncertain and may depend on the terms of our contracts with our customers.
If new laws or regulations that significantly restrict GHGs are adopted, such laws could also make it more difficult or costly for our customers to operate, which could reduce our customers’ production and therefore the demand for our services. While we are not able at this time to estimate such additional costs, as is the case with similarly situated entities in the industry, they could be significant for us. For instance, increasing regulatory pressures as a result of the EPA’s "Clean Power Plan" rule or other initiatives could impact our customers’ operations and, therefore, the overall demand for our services. Restrictions on GHG emissions could also reduce the volume of natural gas that our customers produce, and could thereby adversely affect our revenues and results of operations. Compliance with such rules could also generally result in additional costs, including increased capital expenditures and operating costs, for us and our customers, which could ultimately decrease end-user demand for our services and could have a material adverse effect on our business. In addition, to the extent financial markets view climate change and GHG emissions as a financial risk, this could materially and adversely impact our cost of and access to capital. Legislation or regulations that may be adopted to address climate change, or incentives to conserve energy or use alternative energy sources, could also affect the markets for our services by making natural gas and crude oil products less desirable than competing sources of energy.
Our operations are subject to governmental laws and regulations relating to the protection of the environment, which may expose us to significant costs, liabilities and expenditures that could exceed our current expectations.
Substantial costs, liabilities, delays and other significant issues related to environmental laws and regulations are inherent in our crude oil transportation, natural gas transportation, storage and processing, NGL transportation and water business services, and as a result, we may be required to make substantial expenditures that could exceed current expectations. Our operations are subject to extensive federal, state, and local laws and regulations governing health and safety aspects of our operations, environmental protection, including the discharge of materials into the environment, and the security of chemical and industrial facilities. These laws include, but are not limited to, the following:
CAA and analogous state and local laws, which impose obligations related to air emissions;
CWA and analogous state and local laws, which regulate discharge of pollutants (Section 402) or fill material (Section 404) from our facilities to state and federal waters, including wetlands;
CERCLA and analogous state and local laws, which regulate the cleanup of hazardous substances that may have been released at properties currently or previously owned or operated by us or locations to which we have sent wastes for disposal;
RCRA and analogous state and local laws, which impose requirements for the handling and discharge of hazardous and nonhazardous solid waste from our facilities;

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OSHA and analogous state and local laws, which establishes workplace standards for the protection of the health and safety of employees, including the implementation of hazard communications programs designed to inform employees about hazardous substances in the workplace, potential harmful effects of these substances, and appropriate control measures;
NEPA and analogous state and local laws, which requires federal agencies to evaluate major agency actions having the potential to significantly impact the environment and which may require the preparation of Environmental Assessments and more detailed Environmental Impact Statements that may be made available for public review and comment;
The Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and analogous state and local laws, which implements various treaties and conventions between the United States and certain other nations for the protection of migratory birds and, pursuant to which the taking, killing or possessing of migratory birds is unlawful without a permit, thereby potentially requiring the implementation of operating restrictions or a temporary, seasonal, or permanent ban in affected areas;
ESA and analogous state and local laws, which seek to ensure that activities do not jeopardize endangered or threatened animals, fish and plant species, nor destroy or modify the critical habitat of such species;
Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and analogous state and local laws, which prohibits anyone, without a permit issued by the Secretary of the Interior, from "taking" bald or golden eagles, including their parts, nests, or eggs, and defines "take" as "pursue, shoot, shoot at, poison, wound, kill, capture, trap, collect, molest or disturb;"
OPA and analogous state and local laws, which imposes liability for discharges of oil into waters of the United States and requires facilities which could be reasonably expected to discharge oil into waters of the United States to maintain and implement appropriate spill contingency plans; and
National Historic Preservation Act and analogous state and local laws, which is intended to preserve and protect historical and archeological sites.
Various governmental authorities, including but not limited to the EPA, the U.S. Department of the Interior, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and analogous federal, state and local agencies have the power to enforce compliance with these and other similar laws and regulations and the permits and related plans issued under them, oftentimes requiring difficult and costly actions. Failure to comply with these and other similar laws, regulations, permits, plans and agreements may result in the assessment of administrative, civil and criminal penalties, the imposition of remedial obligations, the imposition of stricter conditions on or revocation of permits, the issuance of injunctions limiting or preventing some or all of our operations, and delays in granting permits.
There is inherent risk of the incurrence of environmental costs and liabilities in our business, some of which may be material, due to our handling of the products we transport, process and store, air emissions related to our operations, historical industry operations, and waste disposal practices, such as the prior use of flow meters and manometers containing mercury. These activities are subject to stringent and complex federal, state and local laws and regulations governing environmental protection, including the discharge of materials into the environment and the protection of plants, wildlife, and natural and cultural resources. These laws and regulations can restrict or impact our business activities in many ways, such as restricting the way we handle or dispose of wastes or requiring remedial action to mitigate pollution conditions that may be caused by our operations or that are attributable to former operators. Joint and several, strict liability may be incurred without regard to fault under certain environmental laws and regulations, including but not limited to CERCLA, RCRA and analogous state laws, for the remediation of contaminated areas and in connection with spills or releases of materials associated with oil, natural gas and wastes on, under, or from our properties and facilities, many of which have been used for midstream activities for a number of years, oftentimes by third parties not under our control. We are generally responsible for all liabilities associated with the environmental condition of our facilities and assets, whether acquired or developed, regardless of when the liabilities arose and whether they are known or unknown. In connection with certain acquisitions and divestitures, we could acquire, or be required to provide indemnification against, environmental liabilities that could expose us to material losses, which may not be covered by insurance. In addition, the steps we could be required to take to bring certain facilities into compliance could be prohibitively expensive, and we might be required to shut down, divest or alter the operation of those facilities, which might cause us to incur losses. We are currently conducting remediation at several sites to address contamination. For 2014, we spent approximately $270,000, for 2015 we spent approximately $497,000 and for 2016 we have budgeted approximately $1.3 million for these ongoing environmental remediation projects.

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Private parties, including but not limited to the owners of properties through which our pipelines pass and facilities where our wastes are taken for reclamation or disposal, may have the right to pursue legal actions to enforce compliance as well as to seek damages for non-compliance with environmental laws, regulations and permits issued thereunder, or for personal injury or property damage arising from our operations. Some sites at which we operate are located near current or former third-party hydrocarbon storage, processing, operations or other facilities, and there is a risk that contamination has migrated from those sites to ours that could result in remedial action. In addition, increasingly strict laws, regulations and enforcement policies could materially increase our compliance costs and the cost of any remediation that may become necessary. Our insurance does not cover all environmental risks and costs and may not provide sufficient coverage if an environmental claim is made against us.
In June 2013, the EPA extended its National Enforcement Initiatives, enforcement priorities list, including an initiative related to Energy Extraction Activities, for 2014 through 2016. We cannot predict what the results of the current initiative or any future initiative will be, or whether federal, state or local laws or regulations will be enacted in this area. If new regulations are imposed related to oil and gas extraction, the volumes of products, including hydrocarbons and water, that we transport, store, gather, dispose and/or process could decline and our results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.
Our business may be materially and adversely affected by changed regulations and increased costs due to stricter pollution control requirements or liabilities resulting from non-compliance with required operating or other regulatory permits or plans developed thereunder. Also, we might not be able to obtain or maintain from time to time all required environmental regulatory approvals for our operations, or may have to implement contingencies or conditions in order to obtain such approvals. If there is a delay in obtaining any required environmental regulatory approvals, or if we fail to obtain and comply with them, the operation, maintenance or construction of our facilities could be prevented or become subject to additional costs, resulting in potentially material adverse consequences to our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. For instance, on November 25, 2014, the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality issued a Notice of Violation for violations of Part 60 Subpart OOOO related to the Casper Gas Plant Depropanizer project. TMID had discussed the issues in a meeting with WDEQ in Cheyenne on November 17, 2014 and submitted a disclosure on November 20, 2014 detailing the regulatory issues and potential violations. The project triggered a modification of the CAA’s NSPS Subpart OOOO for the entire plant. The project equipment as well as plant equipment subjected to Subpart OOOO was not monitored timely, and initial notification was not made timely. Settlement negotiations with WDEQ are currently ongoing. Costs associated with penalties and to comply with the terms of any consent decree or settlement, as well as with Subpart OOOO, could be material.
We are also generally responsible for all liabilities associated with the environmental condition of our facilities and assets, whether acquired or developed, regardless of when the liabilities arose and whether they are known or unknown. In connection with certain acquisitions and divestitures, such as our recent acquisition in December 2015 of a fresh water delivery and storage system, a produced water gathering and disposal system and multiple produced water disposal wells from Whiting, we could acquire, or be required to provide indemnification against, environmental liabilities that could expose us to material losses, which may not be covered by insurance. In addition, the steps we could be required to take to bring certain facilities into compliance could be prohibitively expensive, and we might be required to shut down, divest or alter the operation of those facilities, which might cause us to incur losses. As another example, the Casper Gas Plant is part of the Mystery Bridge Road/U.S. Highway 20 Superfund Site also known as Casper Mystery Bridge Superfund Site. Remediation work at the Casper Gas Plant has been completed, and we have requested that the portion of the site attributable to us be delisted from the National Priorities List. As another example, in August 2011, the EPA and the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality conducted an inspection of the Leak Detection and Repair Program, or LDAR, at the Casper Plant in Wyoming. In September 2011, TMID received a letter from the EPA alleging violations of the Standards of Performance of Equipment Leaks for Onshore Natural Gas Processing Plant requirements under the CAA. TMID received a letter from the EPA concerning settlement of this matter in April 2013 and received additional settlement communications from the EPA and Department of Justice beginning in July 2014. In July 2014, the EPA provided TMID with a draft Consent Decree that has been the basis for subsequent settlement negotiations. Subsequently, the EPA indicated that it intends to join TIGT as a defendant in this matter based on TIGT’s ownership of the compressor station located adjacent to the Casper Gas Plant in order to address alleged LDAR issues at the compressor station. Most recently, the parties held a settlement meeting in August 2015. Following the settlement meeting, negotiations are continuing and the parties have entered into tolling agreements that have tolled the statute of limitations until April 29, 2016. We are not currently able to estimate the costs that may be associated with a settlement or other resolution of this matter, which could be substantial.
We have agreed to a number of conditions in our environmental permits and associated plans, approvals and authorizations that require the implementation of environmental habitat restoration, enhancement and other mitigation measures that involve, among other things, ongoing maintenance and monitoring. Governmental authorities may require, and community groups and private persons may seek to require, additional mitigation measures in the future to further protect ecologically sensitive areas where we currently operate, and would operate if our facilities are extended or expanded, or if we construct new facilities, and we are unable to predict the effect that any such measures would have on our business, financial position, results of operations or prospects.

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Also, on June 29, 2015, the EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, or Corps, issued a final rule to clarify the term "waters of the United States" as it pertains to federal jurisdiction under the CWA. Many interested parties believe that the rule expands federal jurisdiction under the CWA. Although it is unclear how the Corps and the EPA will implement this rule, the rule may require additional Corps or the EPA authorizations or involvement in our future operations, for instance, if we extend our pipelines into or across areas (such as certain ditches) newly considered "waters of the United States" under the final rule.
The trend in environmental regulation is to place more restrictions and limitations on activities that may affect the environment. There can be no assurance as to the amount or timing of future expenditures for environmental compliance or remediation, and actual future expenditures may be materially different from the amounts we currently anticipate. Revised or additional regulations that result in increased compliance costs or additional operating restrictions, particularly if those costs are not fully recoverable from our customers, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations and prospects.
Increased regulation of hydraulic fracturing and other oil and natural gas processing operations could affect our operations and result in reductions or delays in production by our customers, which could have a material adverse impact on our revenues.
A sizeable portion of our customers’ production comes from hydraulically fractured wells. Hydraulic fracturing is an important and common practice that is used to stimulate production of hydrocarbons from tight formations. The process typically involves the injection of water, sand and a small percentage of chemicals under pressure into the formation to fracture the surrounding rock and stimulate production. The process is regulated by state agencies, typically the state’s oil and gas commission. A number of federal agencies, including the EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy, are analyzing, or have been requested to review, a variety of environmental issues associated with hydraulic fracturing. For example, on May 19, 2014, the EPA published an advance notice of rulemaking under the Toxic Substances Control Act, to gather information regarding the potential regulation of chemical substances and mixtures used in oil and gas exploration and production. In August 2015, the EPA proposed updates to new source performance standard requirements that would impose more stringent controls on methane and volatile organic compounds emissions from oil and gas development and production operations, including hydraulic fracturing and other well completion activity. The EPA has also issued a proposed rule that would prevent the discharge of hydraulic fracturing wastewater into publicly owned sewage treatment plants. Also, effective June 24, 2015, the BLM adopted rules regarding well stimulation, chemical disclosures, water management, and other requirements for hydraulic fracturing on federal and Indian lands. The BLM also proposed new rules in January 2016 to reduce venting, flaring, and leaks during oil and natural gas production activities on onshore federal and Indian leases.
Congress from time to time has considered the adoption of legislation to provide for federal regulation of hydraulic fracturing under the SDWA and to require disclosure of the chemicals used in the hydraulic fracturing process. In addition, some states, including those in which we operate, have adopted, and other states are considering adopting, regulations that could impose more stringent disclosure and/or well construction requirements on hydraulic fracturing operations. Local government also may seek to adopt ordinances within their jurisdictions regulating the time, place and manner of drilling activities in general or hydraulic fracturing activities in particular, in some cases banning hydraulic fracturing entirely. Other governmental agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy and the EPA, have evaluated or are evaluating various other aspects of hydraulic fracturing such as the potential environmental effects of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water and groundwater.
If new laws or regulations that significantly restrict hydraulic fracturing are adopted, such laws could make it more difficult or significantly more costly for our customers to perform fracturing to stimulate production from tight formations. Restrictions on hydraulic fracturing could also reduce the volume of crude oil, natural gas or other hydrocarbons that our customers produce, and could thereby adversely affect our revenues and results of operations. Compliance with such rules could also generally result in additional costs, including increased capital expenditures and operating costs, for us and our customers, which could ultimately decrease end-user demand for our services and could have a material adverse effect on our business.
Our produced water disposal operations may be subject to additional regulation and liability or claims of environmental damages.
We operate produced water disposal wells and locations, which have received the necessary governmental permits for drilling a disposal well. These wells are regulated under the federal SDWA as Class II wells and under state laws. State laws and regulations that govern these operations can be more stringent than the SDWA. In addition, the possibility exists that stricter laws, regulations or enforcement policies could significantly increase our compliance costs and the cost of any remediation that may become necessary. We may also incur material environmental costs and liabilities. Furthermore, our insurance may not provide sufficient coverage in the event an environmental claim is made against us. In addition, although the disposal wells have received certain governmental regulatory licenses, permits or approvals, this does not shield us from potential claims from third parties claiming contamination of their water supply or other environmental damages. Remediation of environmental contamination or damages can be extremely costly and such costs, if we are found liable, may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Produced water injection well operations and hydraulic fracturing may cause induced seismicity.
State and federal regulatory agencies recently have focused on a possible connection between the hydraulic fracturing related activities and the increased occurrence of seismic activity. When caused by human activity, such events are called induced seismicity. In a few instances, operators of produced water injection wells in the vicinity of seismic events have been ordered to reduce produced water injection volumes or suspend operations. Some state regulatory agencies, including those in Colorado and Texas, have modified their regulations to account for induced seismicity. Regulatory agencies at all levels are continuing to study the possible linkage between oil and gas activity and induced seismicity. In 2015, the United States Geological Study identified eight states, including Colorado and Texas, with areas of increased rates of induced seismicity that could be attributed to fluid injection or oil and gas extraction. In addition, a number of lawsuits have been filed, most recently in Oklahoma, alleging that produced water disposal well operations have caused damage to neighboring properties or otherwise violated state and federal rules regulating waste disposal. These developments could result in additional regulation and restrictions on the use of produced water injection wells and hydraulic fracturing. Such regulations and restrictions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We are exposed to costs associated with lost and unaccounted for volumes.
A certain amount of natural gas and crude oil may be lost or unaccounted for in normal operations in connection with their transportation across a pipeline system. Under our tariffs and contractual arrangements with our customers we are entitled to retain a specified volume of natural gas and crude oil in order to compensate us for such lost and unaccounted for volumes, as well as the natural gas used to run our natural gas compressor stations, which we refer to collectively as fuel usage. Our pipeline tariffs, other than the Trailblazer Pipeline's, do not currently contain fuel usage true-up mechanisms. TIGT has proposed to replace its fixed FL&U charge with a FL&U tracker that would compensate TIGT for its actual FL&U expenses and adjust each year to reflect the previous period’s under/over collection and the forecasted FL&U expense for the upcoming period.  The FERC accepted such proposal to be effective upon motion May 1, 2016, subject to refund. The proposal may be ultimately rejected or modified by the FERC. The use of fuel (natural gas, electric and lost and unaccounted for gas) trackers on the Trailblazer Pipeline, while minimizing risk over time, nevertheless leaves the Trailblazer Pipeline exposed to the possibility of under- or over-collections on an annual basis. While the TIGT fuel tracker mirrors the Trailblazer tracker in requiring an annual redetermination, the TIGT proposal also allows for TIGT to re-determine the fuel reimbursement percentages and lost and unaccounted for ("L&U") reimbursement percentages on a monthly basis based on updated gas fuel and/or receipt quantities. This ability would act to further minimize TIGT’s exposure to the possibility of under- or over-collections on an annual basis. The level of lost and unaccounted for volumes, and natural gas fuel usage, on our pipeline systems may exceed the natural gas and crude oil volumes retained from our customers as compensation for our lost and unaccounted for volumes, and fuel usage, pursuant to our tariffs and contractual agreements, and it may be necessary to purchase natural gas or crude oil in the market to make up for the difference, which exposes us to commodity price risk. Future exposure to the volatility of natural gas and crude oil prices as a result of lost and unaccounted for volume imbalances could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and ability to make quarterly cash distributions to our unitholders.
We have certain long-term fixed priced natural gas and crude oil transportation contracts that cannot be adjusted even if our costs increase, and we have certain crude oil transportation contracts that contain favored nation provisions that could require rate decreases if other similarly situated shippers are paying lower rates. As a result, our costs could exceed our revenues.
Approximately two-thirds of our contracted natural gas transportation firm capacity is provided under long-term, fixed price "negotiated or discount rate" contracts that are not subject to adjustment, even if our cost to perform such services exceeds the revenues received from such contracts, and, as a result, our costs could exceed our revenues received under such contracts. It is possible that costs to perform services under our "negotiated or discount rate" contracts will exceed the negotiated or discounted rates. It is also possible with respect to discounted rates that if our filed "recourse rates" should ever be reduced below applicable discounted rates, we would only be allowed by the FERC to charge the lower recourse rates, since FERC policy does not allow discount rates to be charged to the extent that they exceed applicable recourse rates. If these events were to occur, it could decrease the cash flow realized by our assets and, therefore, the cash we have available for distributions to our unitholders. Under FERC policy, a regulated service provider and a customer may mutually agree to sign a contract for service at a "negotiated rate," which is generally fixed between the natural gas pipeline and the shipper for the contract term and does not necessarily vary with changes in the level of cost-based "recourse rates," provided that the affected customer is willing to agree to such rates and that the FERC has accepted the negotiated rate agreement. These "negotiated or discount rate" contracts are not generally subject to adjustment for increased costs which could be caused by inflation or other factors relating to the specific facilities being used to perform the services. Any shortfall of revenue, representing the difference between "recourse rates" (if higher) and negotiated or discounted rates, under current FERC policy, may be recoverable from other shippers in certain circumstances. For example, the FERC may recognize this shortfall in the determination of prospective rates in a future rate case. However, if the FERC were to disallow the recovery of such costs from other customers, it could decrease the cash flow realized by our assets and, therefore, the cash we have available for distributions to our unitholders.

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Approximately 90% of the Pony Express System's current available capacity is provided to committed shippers under long-term "Throughput and Deficiency Agreements" or "TDAs". Rates under the TDAs are typically subject to change only per contract terms and conditions, including Pony Express’s right to file changes to contract rates to reflect annual index percentage adjustments published by the FERC. We generally cannot file for rate increases with respect to committed shippers who have signed TDAs, other than to reflect annual index adjustments or to recover compliance costs imposed by governmental actions. Some of the TDAs also contain favored nations provisions which could result in lower rates being charged to certain committed shippers to ensure that the rates such shippers are paying are no greater than ninety to one hundred percent of the rates being charged to other similarly situated shippers for similar service at similar volumes and terms.
The TDAs for the Pony Express System and some of our service agreements with respect to our water business services contain provisions that can reduce the cash flow stability that the agreements were designed to achieve.
The TDAs for the Pony Express System and some of our service agreements with respect to our water services business are firm fee contracts with minimum volume commitments that are designed to generate stable cash flows and minimize direct commodity price risk. Under these minimum volume commitments, our customers agree to ship a minimum volume of crude oil or to have a minimum volume of water serviced, as the case may be, over certain periods during the term of the applicable agreement.
If a customer's actual throughput volumes or volumes serviced are less than its minimum volume commitment for the applicable period, it must make a deficiency payment at the end of the applicable period based upon the difference between the minimum volume commitment and the actual amounts serviced. A customer may apply any deficiency payments it makes as a credit against payment for volumes transported or serviced by us in excess of its minimum volume commitment in future periods. Upon termination of the Pony Express TDAs, customers may continue to use any remaining deficiency credits against any volumes serviced by us even though such customers may no longer have a minimum volume commitment.
To the extent that a customer's actual throughput volumes or volumes serviced are above its minimum volume commitment for the applicable period, the customer may use the excess volumes to credit against future deficiency payments in subsequent periods. Some or all of these provisions can apply in combination with one another. As a result, in the future we may not receive any cash payments for volumes shipped or serviced by us, and we may not receive deficiency payments as a result of excess volumes shipped in prior periods. This would result in reduced revenue and cash flows to us.
Any significant and prolonged change in or stabilization of natural gas prices could have a negative impact on our natural gas storage business.
Historically, natural gas prices have been seasonal and volatile, which has enhanced demand for our storage services. The natural gas storage business has benefited from significant price fluctuations resulting from seasonal price sensitivity, which impacts the level of demand for our services and the rates we are able to charge for such services. On a system-wide basis, natural gas is typically injected into storage between April and October when natural gas prices are generally lower and withdrawn during the winter months of November through March when natural gas prices are typically higher. However, the market for natural gas may not continue to experience volatility and seasonal price sensitivity in the future at the levels previously seen. If volatility and seasonality in the natural gas industry decrease, because of increased production capacity or otherwise, then demand for our storage services and the prices that we will be able to charge for those services may decline.
In addition to volatility and seasonality, an extended period of high natural gas prices would increase the cost of acquiring base gas and likely place upward pressure on the costs of associated storage expansion activities. Alternatively, an extended period of low seasonal volatility in natural gas prices could adversely impact storage values for some period of time until market conditions adjust. These commodity price impacts could have a negative impact on our business, financial condition, results of operations and ability to make distributions.
Certain portions of our transportation, storage and processing facilities have been in service for several decades. There could be unknown events or conditions or increased maintenance or repair expenses and downtime associated with our facilities that could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
Significant portions of our transportation, storage and processing systems have been in service for several decades. The age and condition of our facilities could result in increased maintenance or repair expenditures, and any downtime associated with increased maintenance and repair activities could materially reduce our revenue. Any significant increase in maintenance and repair expenditures or loss of revenue due to the age or condition of our facilities could adversely affect our business and results of operations and our ability to make cash distributions to our unitholders.
Our revolving credit facility could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and ability to make quarterly cash distributions to our unitholders.
Our revolving credit facility limits our ability to, among other things:
incur or guarantee additional debt;

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redeem or repurchase units or make distributions under certain circumstances;
make certain investments and acquisitions;
incur certain liens or permit them to exist;
enter into certain types of transactions with affiliates;
merge or consolidate with another company; and
transfer, sell or otherwise dispose of assets.
Our revolving credit facility also contains covenants requiring us to maintain certain financial ratios. Our ability to meet those financial ratios and tests can be affected by events beyond our control, and we cannot assure you that we will meet those ratios and tests.
Further, our obligations under the revolving credit facility are (i) guaranteed by us and each of our existing and subsequently acquired or organized direct or indirect wholly-owned domestic subsidiaries, subject to our ability to designate certain subsidiaries as "Unrestricted Subsidiaries," and (ii) secured by a first priority lien on substantially all of the present and after acquired property owned by us and each guarantor (other than real property interests related to our pipelines).
The provisions of our revolving credit facility may affect our ability to obtain future financing and pursue attractive business opportunities and our flexibility in planning for, and reacting to, changes in business conditions. In addition, a failure to comply with the provisions of our revolving credit facility, including a failure to meet the required financial ratios and tests, could result in a default or an event of default that could enable our lenders to restrict or prohibit our ability to make quarterly distributions and declare the outstanding principal of that debt, together with accrued and unpaid interest, to be immediately due and payable. If the payment of our debt is accelerated and we are unable to repay the debt in full, our lenders could foreclose on the assets pledged by us and the guarantors under the revolving credit facility. In that case, our assets may be insufficient to repay such debt in full, and our unitholders could experience a partial or total loss of their investment.
Tallgrass Equity’s ownership in our IDRs, our common units and our general partner interest, are pledged under Tallgrass Equity’s revolving credit facility.
Tallgrass Equity’s direct ownership of 20,000,000 of our common units and its direct ownership of our general partner (which owns our IDRs and general partner interest), are pledged as security under Tallgrass Equity’s revolving credit facility. Tallgrass Equity’s revolving credit facility contains customary and other events of default. Upon an event of default, the lenders under Tallgrass Equity’s revolving credit facility could foreclose on Tallgrass Equity's ownership interest in TEP GP and the 20,000,000 of our common units owned by Tallgrass Equity. This could ultimately result in a change in control of TEP GP, which would constitute an immediate event of default under our credit facility. This would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our future debt levels may limit our flexibility to obtain financing and to pursue other business opportunities.
Our level of debt could have important consequences to us, including the following:
our ability to obtain additional financing, if necessary, for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions or other purposes may be impaired or such financing may not be available on favorable terms;
our funds available for operations, future business opportunities and distributions to unitholders will be reduced by that portion of our cash flow required to make interest payments on our debt;
we may be more vulnerable to competitive pressures or a downturn in our business or the economy generally; and
our flexibility in responding to changing business and economic conditions may be limited.
Our ability to service our debt depends upon, among other things, our future financial and operating performance, which will be affected by prevailing economic conditions and financial, business, regulatory and other factors, some of which are beyond our control. If our operating results are not sufficient to service our current or future indebtedness, we will be forced to take actions such as reducing distributions, reducing or delaying our business activities, acquisitions, investments or capital expenditures, selling assets or seeking additional equity capital. Taking any of these actions is likely to reduce the value of your investment. Plus, we may not be able to effect any of these actions on satisfactory terms or at all.

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Increases in interest rates could adversely impact demand for our storage capacity, our unit price, our ability to issue equity or incur debt for acquisitions or other purposes and our ability to make cash distributions at our intended levels.
There is a financing cost for our customers to store natural gas in our storage facilities. That financing cost is impacted by the cost of capital or interest rate incurred by the customer in addition to the commodity cost of the natural gas in inventory. Absent other factors, a higher financing cost adversely impacts the economics of storing natural gas for future sale. As a result, a significant increase in interest rates could adversely affect the demand for our storage capacity independent of other market factors.
The interest rate on borrowings under our revolving credit facility float based upon one or more of the prime rate, the U.S. federal funds rate or LIBOR. As a result, those borrowings, as well as borrowings under possible future credit facilities or debt offerings, could be higher than current levels, causing our financing costs to increase accordingly. We do not currently hedge the interest rate risk on borrowings under our revolving credit facility.
As with other yield-oriented securities, our unit price is impacted by the level of our cash distributions and implied distribution yield. The distribution yield is often used by investors to compare and rank yield-oriented securities for investment decision-making purposes. Therefore, changes in interest rates, either positive or negative, may affect the yield requirements of investors who invest in our units, and a rising interest rate environment could have an adverse impact on our unit price, our ability to issue equity or incur debt for acquisitions or other purposes and our ability to make cash distributions at our intended levels.
The lack of diversification of our assets and geographic locations could adversely affect our ability to make distributions to our common unitholders.
We rely on revenues generated from our assets, which are primarily located in the Rocky Mountain and Midwest regions of the United States. Revenues on our assets primarily depend on exploration and production activities of our customers located in these regions. Due to our lack of diversification in assets and geographic location, an adverse development in these businesses or our customers' areas of operations, including adverse developments due to catastrophic events, weather, regulatory action and decreases in supply or demand for hydrocarbons, could have a significantly greater impact on our results of operations and cash available for distribution to our common unitholders than if we maintained more diverse assets and locations. For example, our water business services is concentrated in a limited number of assets and primarily consists of our water business operations in Weld County, Colorado. Thus, the growth and profitability of our water business services will be especially vulnerable to conditions and fluctuations in the local Weld County economy and subject to changes in local government regulations and priorities.
We do not own most of the land on which our assets are located, which could disrupt our operations and subject us to increased costs.
We do not own in fee but rather have leases, easements, rights-of-way, permits and licenses for most of the land on which our assets are located, and we are therefore subject to the possibility of more onerous terms and/or increased costs to retain necessary land use if we do not have valid interests in the land, if such interests in the land lapse or terminate or if our facilities are not properly located within the boundaries of such interests in the land. For example, the West Frenchie Draw treating facility is located on land leased from the Wyoming Board of Land Commissioners pursuant to a contract that can be terminated at any time. Although many of these rights are perpetual in nature, we occasionally obtain the right to construct and operate pipelines on other owners’ land for a specific period of time. If we were to be unsuccessful in renegotiating our leases, easements, rights-of-way, permits and licenses, we might incur increased costs to maintain our assets, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and ability to make distributions to our unitholders. In addition, we are subject to the possibility of increased costs under our rental agreements with landowners, primarily through rental increases and renewals of expired agreements.
Some leases, easements, rights-of-way, permits and licenses for our assets are shared with other pipeline systems and other assets owned by third parties. We or owners of the other pipeline systems or assets may not have commenced or concluded eminent domain proceedings for some rights-of-way. In some instances, lands over which leases, easements, rights-of-way, permits and licenses have been obtained are subject to prior liens which have not been subordinated to the grants to us.
Our interstate natural gas pipeline systems have federal eminent domain authority. Whether we have the power of eminent domain for the Pony Express crude oil pipeline varies from state to state, depending upon the laws of the particular state. Regardless, we must compensate landowners for the use of their property, which may include any loss of value to the remainder of their property not being used by us, which are sometimes referred to as "severance damages." Severance damages are often difficult to quantify and their amount can be significant. In eminent domain actions, such compensation may be determined by a court. Our inability to exercise the power of eminent domain could negatively affect our business if we were to lose the right to use or occupy the property on which our crude oil or natural gas pipeline systems are located.

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Our operations are dependent on our rights and ability to receive or renew the required permits and other approvals from governmental authorities and other third parties.
Performance of our operations requires that we obtain and maintain numerous environmental and land use permits and other approvals authorizing our business activities. A decision by a governmental authority or other third party to deny, delay or restrictively condition the issuance of a new or renewed permit or other approval, or to revoke or substantially modify an existing permit or other approval, could have a material adverse effect on our ability to initiate or continue operations at the affected location or facility. Expansion of our existing operations is also predicated on securing the necessary environmental or land use permits and other approvals, which we may not receive in a timely manner or at all.
In order to obtain permits and renewals of permits and other approvals in the future, we may be required to prepare and present data to governmental authorities pertaining to the potential adverse impact that any proposed activities may have on the environment, individually or in the aggregate, including on public and Indian lands. Certain approval procedures may require preparation of archaeological surveys, endangered species studies and other studies to assess the environmental impact of new sites or the expansion of existing sites. Compliance with these regulatory requirements is expensive and significantly lengthens the time needed to develop a site or pipeline alignment. Also, obtaining or renewing required permits or other approvals is sometimes delayed or prevented due to community opposition and other factors beyond our control. The denial of a permit or other approval essential to our operations or the imposition of restrictive conditions with which it is not practicable or feasible to comply could impair or prevent our ability to develop or expand a property or right-of-way. Significant opposition to a permit or other approval by neighboring property owners, members of the public or non-governmental organizations, or other third parties or delay in the environmental review and permitting process also could impair or delay our ability to develop or expand a property or right-of-way. New legal requirements, including those related to the protection of the environment, could be adopted at the federal, state and local levels that could materially adversely affect our operations, our cost structure or our customers’ ability to use our services. Such current or future regulations could have a material adverse effect on our business and we may not be able to obtain or renew permits or other approvals in the future.
A shortage of skilled labor in the midstream industry could reduce labor productivity and increase costs, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
The transportation, storage and processing of natural gas, the transportation of crude oil and water, and the fractionation of NGLs requires skilled laborers in multiple disciplines such as equipment operators, mechanics and engineers, among others. If we experience shortages of skilled labor in the future, our labor and overall productivity or costs could be materially and adversely affected. If our labor prices increase or if we experience materially increased health and benefit costs for employees, our results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.
If we fail to develop or maintain an effective system of internal controls, we may not be able to report our financial results accurately or prevent fraud, which would likely have a negative impact on the market price of our common units.
Upon the completion of our IPO, we became subject to the public reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports, prevent fraud and to operate successfully as a publicly traded partnership. Our efforts to develop and maintain our internal controls may not be successful, and we may be unable to maintain effective controls over our financial processes and reporting in the future or to comply with our obligations under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which we refer to as Section 404. For example, Section 404 requires us, among other things, to annually review and report on, and our independent registered public accounting firm to attest to, the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting. Any failure to develop, implement or maintain effective internal controls or to improve our internal controls could harm our operating results or cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations. Given the difficulties inherent in the design and operation of internal controls over financial reporting, we can provide no assurance as to our, or our independent registered public accounting firm's, conclusions about the effectiveness of our internal controls, and we may incur significant costs in our efforts to comply with Section 404. Ineffective internal controls will subject us to regulatory scrutiny and a loss of confidence in our reported financial information, which could have an adverse effect on our business and would likely have a negative effect on the trading price of our common units.
The outcome of future rate cases will determine the amount of income taxes that we will be allowed to recover.
In May 2005, the FERC issued a statement of general policy permitting a pipeline to include in its cost-of-service computations an income tax allowance provided that an entity or individual has an actual or potential income tax liability on income from the pipeline’s public utility assets. The extent to which owners of pipelines have such actual or potential income tax liability will be reviewed by the FERC on a case-by-case basis in rate cases where the amounts of the allowances will be established. An adverse determination by the FERC with respect to this issue could have a material adverse effect on our revenues, earnings and cash flows.

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New technology, including those involving recycling of produced water or the replacement of water in fracturing fluid, may adversely affect our future results of operations and financial condition.
The produced water disposal industry is subject to the introduction of new waste treatment and disposal techniques and services using new technologies including those involving recycling of produced water, some of which may be subject to patent protection. As competitors and others use or develop new technologies or technologies comparable to our water business services in the future, we may lose market share or be placed at a competitive disadvantage. For example, some companies have successfully used propane as the fracturing fluid instead of water. Further, we may face competitive pressure to implement or acquire certain new technologies at a substantial cost. Some of our competitors may have greater financial, technical and personnel resources than we do, which may allow them to gain technological advantages or implement new technologies before we can. Additionally, we may be unable to implement new technologies or products at all, on a timely basis or at an acceptable cost. New technology could also make it easier for our customers to vertically integrate their operations or reduce the amount of waste produced in oil and natural gas drilling and production activities, thereby reducing or eliminating the need for third-party disposal. Limits on our ability to effectively use or implement new technologies in our water business services may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our business could be negatively impacted by security threats, including cyber security threats, and related disruptions.
We rely on our information technology infrastructure to process, transmit and store electronic information, including information we use to safely operate our assets. We may face cyber security and other security threats to our information technology infrastructure, which could include threats to our operational and safety systems that operate our pipelines, plants and assets. We could face unlawful attempts to gain access to our information technology infrastructure, including coordinated attacks from hackers, whether state-sponsored groups, "hacktivists," or private individuals. The age, operating systems or condition of our current information technology infrastructure and software assets and our ability to maintain and upgrade such assets could affect our ability to resist cyber security threats. We could also face attempts to gain access to information related to our assets through attempts to obtain unauthorized access by targeting acts of deception against individuals with legitimate access to physical locations or information, otherwise known as "social engineering."
Our information technology infrastructure is critical to the efficient operation of our business and essential to our ability to perform day-to-day operations. Breaches in our information technology infrastructure or physical facilities, or other disruptions, could result in damage to our assets, service interruptions, safety incidents, damage to the environment, potential liability or the loss of contracts, and have a material adverse effect on our operations, financial position, results of operations and prospects.
If we are unable to protect our information and telecommunication systems against disruptions or failures, our operations could be disrupted.
We rely extensively on computer systems to process transactions, maintain information and manage our business. Disruptions in the availability of our computer systems could impact our ability to service our customers and adversely affect our sales and results of operations. We are dependent on internal and third-party information technology networks and systems, including the Internet and wireless communications, to process, transmit and store electronic information. Our computer systems are subject to damage or interruption due to system replacements, implementations and conversions, power outages, computer or telecommunication failures, computer viruses, security breaches, catastrophic events such as fires, tornadoes, snowstorms and floods and usage errors by our employees. If our computer systems are damaged or cease to function properly, we may have to make a significant investment to fix or replace them, and we may have interruptions in our ability to service our customers. Although we attempt to eliminate or reduce these risks by using redundant systems, this disruption caused by the unavailability of our computer systems could nevertheless significantly disrupt our operations or may result in financial damage or loss due to, among other things, lost or misappropriated information.
Risks Inherent in an Investment in Us
Our general partner and its affiliates, including Tallgrass Equity, TEGP and Tallgrass Energy Holdings, have conflicts of interest with us and limited duties to us and our unitholders, and they may favor their own interests to the detriment of us and our other common unitholders.
Tallgrass Equity owns our general partner and appoints all of the officers and directors of our general partner. TEGP owns a 30.35% membership interest in, and is the managing member of, Tallgrass Equity. TEGP Management is TEGP's general partner. Tallgrass Energy Holdings is the sole member of TEGP Management and is also the general partner of Tallgrass Development.

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All of our current officers and a majority of the current directors of our general partner are also officers and/or directors of Tallgrass Equity, TEGP Management and Tallgrass Energy Holdings. Certain of our directors are also officers or principals of Kelso or EMG, whose affiliated entities, along with certain members of our management, own and control Tallgrass Energy Holdings. Although our general partner has a duty to manage us in a manner that is beneficial to us and our unitholders, the officers and directors of our general partner have a fiduciary duty to manage our general partner in a manner that is in the best interests of its owner, Tallgrass Equity. Conflicts of interest will arise between our general partner and its direct and indirect owners, on the one hand, and us and our unitholders, on the other hand. In resolving these conflicts of interest, our general partner may favor its own interests and the interests of its direct and indirect owners over our interests and the interests of our unitholders. These conflicts include the following situations, among others:
Neither our partnership agreement nor any other agreement requires Tallgrass Energy Holdings, TEGP Management, Tallgrass Equity or their respective direct and indirect owners to pursue a business strategy that favors us, and the officers and directors of Tallgrass Energy Holdings, TEGP Management and Tallgrass Equity may have a fiduciary duty to make these decisions in the best interests of Tallgrass Energy Holdings, TEGP Management and Tallgrass Equity and their respective direct and indirect owners, respectively, which may be contrary to our interests. Tallgrass Energy Holdings, TEGP Management or Tallgrass Equity may choose to shift the focus of their investment and growth to areas not served by our assets.
Tallgrass Energy Holdings, TEGP Management, Tallgrass Equity, their respective direct and indirect owners, and their respective affiliates are not limited in their ability to compete with us and, other than Tallgrass Development’s obligation to offer us certain assets (if Tallgrass Development decides to sell such assets) pursuant to the right of first offer under the TEP Omnibus Agreement, may offer business opportunities or sell midstream assets to third parties without first offering us the right to bid for them.
Our general partner is allowed to take into account the interests of parties other than us, such as Tallgrass Energy Holdings, its direct and indirect owners, and their respective affiliates in resolving conflicts of interest and exercising certain rights under our partnership agreement, which has the effect of limiting its duty to our unitholders.
All of the current officers and a majority of the current directors of our general partner are also officers and/or directors of Tallgrass Energy Holdings and will owe fiduciary duties to Tallgrass Energy Holdings and Tallgrass Development. Accordingly, these officers will devote significant time to the business of Tallgrass Development.
Our partnership agreement replaces the fiduciary duties that would otherwise be owed by our general partner with contractual standards governing its duties, limits our general partner’s liabilities and restricts the remedies available to our unitholders for actions that, without such limitations, might constitute breaches of fiduciary duty.
Except in limited circumstances, our general partner has the power and authority to conduct our business without unitholder approval.
Disputes may arise under our commercial agreements with Tallgrass Development and its affiliates.
Our general partner determines the amount and timing of asset purchases and sales, borrowings, issuance of additional partnership securities and the creation, reduction or increase of reserves, each of which can affect the amount of cash available for distribution to our unitholders.
Our general partner determines the amount and timing of any capital expenditures and whether a capital expenditure is classified as a maintenance capital expenditure, which reduces operating surplus, or an expansion or investment capital expenditure, which does not reduce operating surplus. This determination can affect the amount of cash that is distributed to our unitholders.
Our general partner determines which costs incurred by it are reimbursable by us.
Our general partner may cause us to borrow funds in order to permit the payment of cash distributions, even if the purpose or effect of the borrowing is to make incentive distributions.
Our partnership agreement permits us to classify up to $40 million as operating surplus, even if it is generated from asset sales, non-working capital borrowings or other sources that would otherwise constitute capital surplus. This cash may be used to fund distributions on our general partner units or to our general partner in respect of the IDRs.
Our partnership agreement does not restrict our general partner from causing us to pay it or its affiliates for any services rendered to us or entering into additional contractual arrangements with any of these entities on our behalf.
Our general partner may limit its liability regarding our contractual and other obligations.
Our general partner may exercise its right to call and purchase all of the common units not owned by it and its affiliates if they own more than 80% of the common units.

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Our general partner controls the enforcement of the obligations that it and its affiliates owe to us, including Tallgrass Development’s and its affiliates’ obligations under the TEP Omnibus Agreement and their commercial agreements with us.
Our general partner decides whether to retain separate counsel, accountants or others to perform services for us.
Our general partner may transfer its IDRs without unitholder approval.
Our general partner may elect to cause us to issue common units to it in connection with a resetting of the target distribution levels related to our general partner’s IDRs without the approval of the conflicts committee of the board of directors of our general partner or our unitholders. This election may result in lower distributions to our common unitholders in certain situations.
Affiliates of our general partner are not limited in their ability to compete with us and have limited obligations to offer us the opportunity to acquire additional assets or businesses, which could limit our ability to grow and could adversely affect our results of operations and cash available for distribution to our unitholders.
Affiliates of our general partner, including Kelso, EMG, Tallgrass Equity and its affiliates and Tallgrass Energy Holdings and its affiliates, including Tallgrass Development, are not prohibited from owning assets or engaging in businesses that compete directly or indirectly with us. In addition, in the future, affiliates of our general partner and the entities owned or controlled by affiliates of our general partner, including Tallgrass Development, may acquire, construct or dispose of additional midstream or other assets and may be presented with new business opportunities, without any obligation to offer us the opportunity to purchase or construct such assets or to engage in such business opportunities, other than Tallgrass Development’s obligation to offer us certain assets (if Tallgrass Development decides to sell such assets) pursuant to the right of first offer under the TEP Omnibus Agreement. While affiliates of our general partner may offer us the opportunity to buy these or other additional assets, these affiliates of our general partner, including Tallgrass Development, are not contractually obligated to do so, other than as described above, and we are unable to predict whether or when such opportunities may arise.
Pursuant to the terms of our partnership agreement, the doctrine of corporate opportunity, or any analogous doctrine, does not apply to our general partner, its executive officers and directors or any of its affiliates, including Tallgrass Development. Any such person or entity that becomes aware of a potential transaction, agreement, arrangement or other matter that may be an opportunity for us will not have any duty to communicate or offer such opportunity to us. Any such person or entity will not be liable to us or to any limited partner for breach of any fiduciary duty or other duty by reason of the fact that such person or entity pursues or acquires such opportunity for itself, directs such opportunity to another person or entity or does not communicate such opportunity or information to us. This may create actual and potential conflicts of interest between us and affiliates of our general partner, including Tallgrass Development, and result in less than favorable treatment of us and our common unitholders.
Reimbursements due to our general partner and its affiliates for services provided to us or on our behalf will reduce cash available for distribution to our common unitholders. The amount and timing of such reimbursements will be determined by our general partner.
Under our partnership agreement and the TEP Omnibus Agreement, we will reimburse our general partner and Tallgrass Energy Holdings and its affiliates for certain expenses incurred on our behalf, including administrative costs, such as compensation expense for those persons who provide services necessary to run our business, and insurance expenses. Our partnership agreement and the TEP Omnibus Agreement each provide that our general partner will determine in good faith the expenses that are allocable to us. The reimbursement of expenses and payment of fees, if any, to our general partner and Tallgrass Energy Holdings and its affiliates will reduce the amount of available cash to pay cash distributions to our common unitholders.
Our partnership agreement requires that we distribute our available cash, which could limit our ability to grow and make acquisitions.
Our partnership agreement requires us to distribute our available cash to our unitholders. Accordingly, we will rely primarily upon external financing sources, including commercial bank borrowings and the issuance of debt and equity securities, to fund our acquisitions and expansion capital expenditures. As a result, to the extent we are unable to finance growth externally, our cash distribution policy will significantly impair our ability to grow.

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In addition, because we intend to distribute our available cash, our growth may not be as fast as that of businesses that reinvest their available cash to expand ongoing operations. To the extent we issue additional units in connection with any acquisitions or expansion capital expenditures, the payment of distributions on those additional units may increase the risk that we will be unable to maintain or increase our per unit distribution level. There are no limitations in our partnership agreement on our ability to issue additional units, including units ranking senior to the common units. The incurrence of additional commercial borrowings or other debt to finance our growth strategy would result in increased interest expense, which in turn may impact the available cash that we have to distribute to our unitholders.
While our partnership agreement requires us to distribute our available cash, our partnership agreement, including provisions requiring us to make cash distributions contained therein, may be amended.
While our partnership agreement requires us to distribute our available cash, our partnership agreement, including provisions requiring us to make cash distributions therein, may be amended. Our partnership agreement can be amended with the consent of our general partner and the approval of a majority of the outstanding common units (including common units held by our general partner and its affiliates, including Tallgrass Development and Tallgrass Equity). Tallgrass Development and Tallgrass Equity currently own approximately 19.2% and 29.8% of our outstanding common units, respectively.
The NYSE does not require a publicly traded partnership like us to comply with certain of its corporate governance requirements.
Our common units are listed on the New York Stock Exchange, or NYSE. Unlike most corporations, we are not required by NYSE rules to have, and we do not intend to have, a majority of independent directors on our general partner’s board of directors or a compensation committee or a nominating and corporate governance committee. Additionally, any future issuance of additional common units or other securities, including to affiliates, will not be subject to the NYSE’s shareholder approval rules. Accordingly, unitholders will not have the same protections afforded to certain corporations that are subject to all of the NYSE corporate governance requirements.
If you are not an eligible taxable holder, you will not be entitled to allocations of income or loss or distributions or voting rights on your common units and your common units will be subject to redemption.
In order to avoid any material adverse effect on the maximum applicable rates that can be charged to customers by our subsidiaries on assets that are subject to rate regulation by the FERC or an analogous regulatory body, we have adopted certain requirements regarding those investors who may own our common units. Eligible holders are individuals or entities subject to United States federal income taxation on the income generated by us or entities not subject to United States federal income taxation on the income generated by us, so long as all of the entity’s owners are subject to such taxation. If a holder of our common units (other than affiliates of our general partner) is not a person who fits the requirements to be an eligible taxable holder, such holder will not receive allocations of income or loss or distributions or voting rights on its units and will run the risk of having its units redeemed by us at the market price calculated in accordance with our partnership agreement as of the date of redemption. The redemption price will be paid in cash or by delivery of a promissory note, as determined by our general partner.
Our partnership agreement replaces our general partner’s fiduciary duties to holders of our common units with contractual standards governing its duties.
Our partnership agreement contains provisions that eliminate the fiduciary standards to which our general partner would otherwise be held by state fiduciary duty law and replaces those duties with several different contractual standards. For example, our partnership agreement permits our general partner to make a number of decisions in its individual capacity, as opposed to in its capacity as our general partner, free of any duties to us and our unitholders other than the implied contractual covenant of good faith and fair dealing (which provides that a court will enforce the reasonable expectations of the partners where the language in the partnership agreement does not provide for a clear course of action). This provision entitles our general partner to consider only the interests and factors that it desires and relieves it of any duty or obligation to give any consideration to any interest of, or factors affecting, us, our affiliates or our limited partners. Examples of decisions that our general partner may make in its individual capacity include:
how to allocate business opportunities among us and its affiliates;
whether to exercise its limited call right;
whether to seek approval of the resolution of a conflict of interest by the conflicts committee of the board of directors of our general partner;
how to exercise its voting rights with respect to the units it owns;
whether to elect to reset target distribution levels;
whether to transfer the IDRs or any units it owns to a third party; and

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whether or not to consent to any merger, consolidation or conversion of the partnership or amendment to the partnership agreement.
In addition, our partnership agreement provides that any construction or interpretation of our partnership agreement and any action taken pursuant thereto or any determination, in each case, made by our general partner in good faith, shall be conclusive and binding on all unitholders.
Our partnership agreement restricts the remedies available to holders of our common units for actions taken by our general partner that might otherwise constitute breaches of fiduciary duty.
Our partnership agreement contains provisions that restrict the remedies available to unitholders for actions taken by our general partner that might otherwise constitute breaches of fiduciary duty under state fiduciary duty law. For example, our partnership agreement provides that:
whenever our general partner, the board of directors of our general partner or any committee thereof (including the conflicts committee) makes a determination or takes, or declines to take, any other action in their respective capacities, our general partner, the board of directors of our general partner and any committee thereof (including the conflicts committee), as applicable, is required to make such determination, or take or decline to take such other action, in good faith, meaning that it subjectively believed that the decision was in the best interests of our partnership, and, except as specifically provided by our partnership agreement, will not be subject to any other or different standard imposed by our partnership agreement, Delaware law, or any other law, rule or regulation, or at equity;
our general partner will not have any liability to us or our unitholders for decisions made in its capacity as a general partner so long as such decisions are made in good faith;
our general partner and its officers and directors will not be liable for monetary damages to us or our limited partners resulting from any act or omission unless there has been a final and non-appealable judgment entered by a court of competent jurisdiction determining that our general partner or its officers and directors, as the case may be, acted in bad faith or engaged in fraud or willful misconduct or, in the case of a criminal matter, acted with knowledge that the conduct was criminal; and
our general partner will not be in breach of its obligations under the partnership agreement (including any duties to us or our unitholders) if a transaction with an affiliate or the resolution of a conflict of interest is:
*
approved by the conflicts committee of the board of directors of our general partner, although our general partner is not obligated to seek such approval;
*
approved by the vote of a majority of the outstanding common units, excluding any common units owned by our general partner and its affiliates;
*
determined by the board of directors of our general partner to be on terms no less favorable to us than those generally being provided to or available from unrelated third parties; or
*
determined by the board of directors of our general partner to be fair and reasonable to us, taking into account the totality of the relationships among the parties involved, including other transactions that may be particularly favorable or advantageous to us.
In connection with a situation involving a transaction with an affiliate or a conflict of interest, any determination by our general partner or the conflicts committee must be made in good faith. If an affiliate transaction or the resolution of a conflict of interest is not approved by our common unitholders or the conflicts committee and the board of directors of our general partner determines that the resolution or course of action taken with respect to the affiliate transaction or conflict of interest satisfies either of the standards set forth in the last two bullets above, then it will be presumed that, in making its decision, the board of directors acted in good faith, and in any proceeding brought by or on behalf of any limited partner or the partnership challenging such determination, the person bringing or prosecuting such proceeding will have the burden of overcoming such presumption.

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Holders of our common units have limited voting rights and are not entitled to select our general partner or elect members of its board of directors.
Unlike the holders of common stock in a corporation, unitholders have only limited voting rights on matters affecting our business and, therefore, limited ability to influence management’s decisions regarding our business. Unitholders have no right on an annual or ongoing basis to select our general partner or elect its board of directors. Rather, the board of directors of our general partner, including the independent directors, is appointed by Tallgrass Equity, as a result of it owning our general partner, and not by our unitholders. Tallgrass Energy Holdings effectively controls our business and affairs through the exercise of its rights as the party that controls Tallgrass Equity. Furthermore, if the unitholders are dissatisfied with the performance of our general partner, they have little ability to remove our general partner. As a result of these limitations, the price at which the common units trade could be diminished because of the absence or reduction of a takeover premium in the trading price. Our partnership agreement also contains provisions limiting the ability of unitholders to call meetings or to acquire information about our operations, as well as other provisions limiting the unitholders’ ability to influence the manner or direction of management.
Even if holders of our common units are dissatisfied, they cannot currently remove our general partner without its consent.
Unitholders are currently unable to remove our general partner without its consent because our general partner and its affiliates own sufficient units to be able to prevent its removal. The vote of the holders of at least 66 2/3% of all outstanding common units is required to remove our general partner. Tallgrass Development and Tallgrass Equity currently own approximately 19.2% and 29.8% of our outstanding common units, respectively. This gives our affiliates the ability to prevent the involuntary removal of our general partner. Cause is narrowly defined to mean that a court of competent jurisdiction has entered a final, non-appealable judgment finding our general partner liable for actual fraud or willful misconduct in its capacity as our general partner and does not include most cases of charges of poor management of the business.
Our partnership agreement restricts the voting rights of unitholders owning 20% or more of our common units.
Unitholders’ voting rights are further restricted by a provision of our partnership agreement providing that any units held by a person that owns 20% or more of any class of units then outstanding, other than our general partner, its affiliates, their transferees, persons who acquired such units with the prior approval of the board of directors of our general partner and transferees of any of the foregoing, provided such transferee is an affiliate of the transferor, cannot vote on any matter.
Our general partner interest or the control of our general partner may be transferred to a third party without unitholder consent.
Our general partner may transfer its general partner interest to a third party without the consent of the unitholders. Furthermore, our partnership agreement does not restrict the ability of Tallgrass Energy Holdings to transfer all or a portion of its ownership interest in our general partner to a third party. For example, on May 12, 2015, Tallgrass Energy Holdings completed the initial public offering of TEGP that indirectly owns all of our incentive distribution rights, our general partner interest, and a certain number of our common units. Under this new structure, Tallgrass Energy Holdings continues to indirectly control our general partner, but, if, in the future, Tallgrass Energy Holdings no longer controls, directly or indirectly, our general partner, then a third party with a controlling interest in our general partner would be in a position to replace the board of directors and officers of our general partner with its own designees and thereby exert significant control over the decisions made by the board of directors and officers. This effectively permits a "change of control" without the vote or consent of the unitholders.
The IDRs of our general partner may be transferred to a third party without unitholder consent.
Our general partner may transfer its IDRs to a third party at any time without the consent of our unitholders. If our general partner transfers its IDRs to a third party but retains its general partner interest, our general partner may not have the same incentive to grow our partnership and increase quarterly distributions to unitholders over time as it would if it had retained ownership of its IDRs. For example, a transfer of IDRs by our general partner could reduce the likelihood of Tallgrass Development selling or contributing additional midstream assets to us, as Tallgrass Development would have less of an economic incentive to grow our business, which in turn would impact our ability to grow our asset base.
We may issue additional units without unitholder approval, which could negatively impact unitholders’ existing ownership interests.
Our partnership agreement does not limit the number of additional limited partner interests, including limited partner interests that rank senior to the common units, that we may issue at any time without the approval of our unitholders. The issuance by us of additional common units or other equity securities of equal or senior rank could have the following effects:
our existing unitholders’ proportionate ownership interest in us will decrease;

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the amount of cash available for distribution on each unit may decrease;
because the amount payable to holders of IDRs is based on a percentage of the total cash available for distribution, the distributions to holders of IDRs will increase even if the per unit distribution on common units remains the same;
the ratio of taxable income to distributions may increase;
the relative voting strength of each previously outstanding unit may be diminished; and
the market price of the common units may decline.
Further, the recent downturn in the global capital markets has limited the availability of capital through traditional issuances of common units. It may be necessary for us to issue preferred units, convertible units, or other securities that rank senior to the common units in order to raise capital, which could further magnify the dilutive and other negative effects on unitholders’ existing ownership interests.
Affiliates of our general partner, including Tallgrass Development, may sell units in the public or private markets, and such sales could have an adverse impact on the trading price of the common units.
Tallgrass Development currently hold 12,873,480 common units and Tallgrass Equity, which owns our general partner, currently holds 20,000,000 common units. In addition, we have agreed to provide our general partner and its affiliates with certain registration rights. The sale of these units in the public or private markets could have an adverse impact on the price of the common units or on any trading market that may develop. For additional information, see Note 11Partnership Equity and Distributions to our Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8.—Financial Statements and Supplementary Data in this Form 10-K.
Our general partner may limit its liability regarding our obligations.
Our general partner may limit its liability under contractual arrangements so that the counterparties to such arrangements have recourse only against our assets, and not against our general partner or its assets. Our general partner may therefore cause us to incur indebtedness or other obligations that are nonrecourse to our general partner. Our partnership agreement permits our general partner to limit its liability, even if we could have obtained more favorable terms without the limitation on liability. In addition, we are obligated to reimburse or indemnify our general partner to the extent that it incurs obligations on our behalf. Any such reimbursement or indemnification payments would reduce the amount of cash otherwise available for distribution to our unitholders.
Our general partner has a limited call right that may require unitholders to sell units at an undesirable time or price.
If at any time our general partner and its affiliates own more than 80% of the common units, our general partner will have the right, which it may assign to any of its affiliates or to us, but not the obligation, to acquire all, but not less than all, of the common units held by unaffiliated persons at a price that is not less than their then-current market price, as calculated pursuant to the terms of our partnership agreement. As a result, unitholders may be required to sell common units at an undesirable time or price and may not receive any return on investment.
Unitholders may also incur a tax liability upon a sale of your units. Tallgrass Development and Tallgrass Equity, each an affiliate of our general partner, currently own approximately 19.2% and 29.8% of our outstanding common units, respectively.
Our general partner, or any transferee holding a majority of the IDRs, may elect to cause us to issue common units to it in connection with a resetting of the minimum quarterly distribution and the target distribution levels related to the IDRs, without the approval of the conflicts committee of our general partner or our unitholders. This election may result in lower distributions to our common unitholders in certain situations.
The holder or holders of a majority of the IDRs, which is currently our general partner, have the right, at any time when there are no subordinated units outstanding and the holders have received incentive distributions at the highest level to which they are entitled (48%) for each of the prior four consecutive fiscal quarters (and the amount of each such distribution did not exceed adjusted operating surplus for each such quarter), to reset the minimum quarterly distribution and the initial target distribution levels at higher levels based on our cash distribution at the time of the exercise of the reset election. Following a reset election, the minimum quarterly distribution will be reset to an amount equal to the average cash distribution per unit for the two fiscal quarters immediately preceding the reset election (such amount is referred to as the "reset minimum quarterly distribution"), and the target distribution levels will be reset to correspondingly higher levels based on percentage increases above the reset minimum quarterly distribution. We have been paying quarterly cash distributions at the highest distribution level (48%) since our distribution with respect to the fourth quarter of 2014. Our general partner has the right to transfer the IDRs at any time, in whole or in part, and any transferee holding a majority of the IDRs shall have the same rights as our general partner with respect to resetting target distributions.

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In the event of a reset of the minimum quarterly distribution and the target distribution levels, the holders of the IDRs will be entitled to receive, in the aggregate, the number of common units equal to that number of common units which would have entitled the holders to an average aggregate quarterly cash distribution in the prior two quarters equal to the average of the distributions on the IDRs in the prior two quarters. Our general partner will also be issued the number of general partner units necessary to maintain its general partner interest in us that existed immediately prior to the reset election. We anticipate that our general partner would exercise this reset right in order to facilitate acquisitions or internal growth projects that would not otherwise be sufficiently accretive to cash distributions per common unit. It is possible, however, that our general partner or a transferee could exercise this reset election at a time when it is experiencing, or expects to experience, declines in the cash distributions it receives related to its IDRs and may therefore desire to be issued common units rather than retain the right to receive incentive distribution payments based on target distribution levels that are less certain to be achieved in the then current business environment. This risk could be elevated if our IDRs have been transferred to a third party. As a result, a reset election may cause our common unitholders to experience dilution in the amount of cash distributions that they would have otherwise received had we not issued common units to our general partner in connection with resetting the target distribution levels.
Your liability may not be limited if a court finds that unitholder action constitutes control of our business.
A general partner of a partnership generally has unlimited liability for the obligations of the partnership, except for those contractual obligations of the partnership that are expressly made without recourse to the general partner. Our partnership is organized under Delaware law, and we conduct business in a number of other states. The limitations on the liability of holders of limited partner interests for the obligations of a limited partnership have not been clearly established in some of the other states in which we do business. You could be liable for any and all of our obligations as if you were a general partner if a court or government agency were to determine that:
we were conducting business in a state but had not complied with that particular state’s partnership statute; or
your right to act with other unitholders to remove or replace our general partner, to approve some amendments to our partnership agreement or to take other actions under our partnership agreement constitute "control" of our business.
Unitholders may have liability to repay distributions that were wrongfully distributed to them.
Under certain circumstances, unitholders may have to repay amounts wrongfully returned or distributed to them. Under Section 17-607 of the Delaware Revised Uniform Limited Partnership Act, we may not make a distribution if the distribution would cause our liabilities to exceed the fair value of our assets. Delaware law provides that for a period of three years from the date of an impermissible distribution, limited partners who received the distribution and who knew at the time of the distribution that it violated Delaware law will be liable to the limited partnership for the distribution amount. Transferees of common units are liable both for the obligations of the transferor to make contributions to the partnership that were known to the transferee at the time of transfer and for those obligations that were unknown if the liabilities could have been determined from the partnership agreement. Neither liabilities to partners on account of their partnership interest nor liabilities that are non-recourse to the partnership are counted for purposes of determining whether a distribution is permitted.
Tax Risks to Common Unitholders
Our tax treatment depends on our status as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes, as well as our not being subject to a material amount of entity-level taxation by individual states.  If the Internal Revenue Service treats us as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes or we become subject to material additional amounts of entity-level taxation for state tax purposes, then our cash available for distribution to our unitholders would be substantially reduced.
The anticipated after-tax economic benefit of an investment in the common units depends in part on our being treated as a partnership for federal income tax purposes. We have not requested, and except as described below, do not plan to request, a ruling from the Internal Revenue Service, or IRS, on this or any other tax matter affecting us.
Despite the fact that we are a limited partnership under Delaware law, it is possible in certain circumstances for a publicly traded partnership such as ours to be treated as a corporation rather than a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes.  Although we do not believe based upon our current operations that we are so treated, a change in our business or a change in current law could cause us to be treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes or otherwise subject us to taxation as an entity. For example, we would be treated as a corporation if less than 90% of our gross income for any taxable year consists of "qualifying income" within the meaning of Section 7704 of the Internal Revenue Code.

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If we were treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we would pay U.S. federal income tax on our taxable income at the corporate tax rate, which is currently a maximum of 35%, and would likely pay state and local income tax at varying rates. Our distributions would generally be taxed again as corporate dividends (to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits), and no income, gains, losses, deductions, or credits would flow through to you. Because a tax would be imposed upon us as a corporation, our cash available for distribution to you would be substantially reduced. Therefore, if we were treated as a corporation for federal income tax purposes there would be a material reduction in the anticipated cash flow and after-tax return to our unitholders, likely causing a substantial reduction in the value of our common units.
At the state level, because of widespread state budget deficits, several states are evaluating ways to subject partnerships to entity-level taxation through the imposition of state income, franchise and other forms of taxation.  Imposition of such a tax on us by any state will reduce the cash available for distributions to our unitholders.
Our partnership agreement provides that, if a law is enacted or existing law is modified or interpreted in a manner that subjects us to taxation as a corporation or otherwise subjects us to entity-level taxation for federal, state or local income tax purposes, the minimum quarterly distribution amount and the target distribution amounts may be adjusted to reflect the impact of that law on us.
The tax treatment of publicly traded partnerships or an investment in our common units could be subject to potential legislative, judicial or administrative changes and differing interpretations of applicable law, possibly on a retroactive basis.
The present federal income tax treatment of publicly traded partnerships, including us, or an investment in our common units may be modified by legislative, judicial or administrative changes or interpretations of applicable law at any time. For example, from time to time, the President or members of the U.S. Congress propose and consider substantive changes to the existing federal income tax laws that affect publicly traded partnerships. One such recent legislative proposal would have eliminated, and the President proposed in his recently issued budget proposal to eliminate, the qualifying income exception upon which we rely for our treatment as a partnership for federal income tax purposes. We are unable to predict whether any of these changes or any other proposals will be reintroduced or will ultimately be enacted or whether judicial or administrative interpretations of applicable law will change. Any such changes could negatively impact the value of an investment in our common units. Any modification to the U.S. federal income tax laws may be applied retroactively and could make it more difficult or impossible to meet the exception for certain publicly traded partnerships to be treated as partnerships for U.S. federal income tax purposes.
Our unitholders’ share of our income will be taxable to them for federal income tax purposes even if they do not receive any cash distributions from us.
A unitholder will be treated as a partner to whom we will allocate taxable income which could be different in amount than the cash we distribute. A unitholder's allocable share of our taxable income will be taxable to the unitholder, which may require the payment of federal income taxes and, in some cases, state and local income taxes even if no cash distributions are received from us. Our unitholders may not receive cash distributions from us equal to their share of our taxable income or even equal to the actual tax liability that results from that income.
If the IRS contests the federal income tax positions we take, the market for our common units may be adversely impacted and the cost of any IRS contest will reduce our cash available for distribution to our unitholders.
We have not requested a ruling from the IRS with respect to our treatment as a partnership for federal income tax purposes or any other matter affecting us. The IRS may adopt positions that differ from the positions we take, and the IRS’s positions may ultimately be sustained. It may be necessary to resort to administrative or court proceedings to sustain some or all of the positions we take. A court may not agree with some or all of the positions we take. Any contest with the IRS, and the outcome of any IRS contest, may have a materially adverse impact on the market for our common units and the price at which they trade. In addition, our costs of any contest with the IRS will be borne indirectly by our unitholders and our general partner because the costs will reduce our cash available for distribution.
Tax gain or loss on the disposition of our common units could be more or less than expected.
If you sell your common units, you will recognize a gain or loss for federal income tax purposes equal to the difference between the amount realized and your tax basis in those common units. Because distributions in excess of your allocable share of our net taxable income decrease your tax basis in your common units, some, or all of any of such prior excess distributions with respect to the common units you sell will, in effect, become taxable income to you if you sell such common units at a price greater than your tax basis in those common units, even if the price you receive is less than your original cost. Furthermore, a substantial portion of the amount realized on any sale or other disposition of your common units, whether or not representing gain, may be taxed as ordinary income due to potential recapture items, including depreciation recapture. In addition, because the amount realized includes a unitholder's share of our nonrecourse liabilities, if you sell your common units, you may incur a tax liability in excess of the amount of cash you receive from the sale.

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Tax-exempt entities and non-U.S. persons face unique tax issues from owning our common units that may result in adverse tax consequences to them.
Investment in common units by tax-exempt entities, such as employee benefit plans and individual retirement accounts (known as IRAs), and non-U.S. persons raises issues unique to them. For example, virtually all of our income allocated to organizations that are exempt from federal income tax, including IRAs and other retirement plans, will be unrelated business taxable income and will be taxable to them. Distributions to non-U.S. persons will generally be reduced by withholding taxes at the highest applicable effective tax rate, and non-U.S. persons will be required to file U.S. federal income tax returns and pay tax on their share of our taxable income. If you are a tax-exempt entity or a non-U.S. person, you should consult a tax advisor before investing in our common units.
We will treat each purchaser of common units as having the same tax benefits without regard to the actual common units purchased. The IRS may challenge this treatment, which could adversely affect the value of the common units.
Because we cannot match transferors and transferees of common units and because of other reasons, we will adopt depreciation and amortization positions that may not conform to all aspects of existing Treasury Regulations. A successful IRS challenge to those positions could adversely affect the amount of tax benefits available to you. A successful IRS challenge also could affect the timing of these tax benefits or the amount of gain from your sale of common units and could have a negative impact on the value of our common units or result in audit adjustments to your tax returns.
We prorate our items of income, gain, loss and deduction for federal income tax purposes between transferors and transferees of our units each month based upon the ownership of our units on the first day of each month, instead of on the basis of the date a particular unit is transferred. The IRS may challenge this treatment, which could change the allocation of items of income, gain, loss and deduction among our unitholders.
We prorate our items of income, gain, loss and deduction for federal income tax purposes between transferors and transferees of our units each month based upon the ownership of our units on the first day of each month, instead of on the basis of the date a particular unit is transferred. The use of this proration method may not be permitted under existing Treasury Regulations, and although the U.S. Treasury Department recently adopted final Treasury Regulations allowing a similar monthly simplifying convention for taxable years beginning on or after August 3, 2015, such regulations do not specifically authorize the use of the proration method we have adopted. If the IRS were to challenge this method or new Treasury regulations were issued, we may be required to change the allocation of items of income, gain, loss and deduction among our unitholders.
A unitholder whose common units are loaned to a "short seller" to cover a short sale of common units may be considered as having disposed of those common units. If so, the unitholder would no longer be treated for federal income tax purposes as a partner with respect to those common units during the period of the loan and may recognize gain or loss from the disposition.
Because a unitholder whose common units are loaned to a "short seller" to cover a short sale of common units may be considered as having disposed of the loaned common units, the unitholder may no longer be treated for federal income tax purposes as a partner with respect to those common units during the period of the loan to the short seller and may recognize gain or loss from such disposition. Moreover, during the period of the loan to the short seller, any of our income, gain, loss or deduction with respect to those common units may not be reportable by the unitholder and any cash distributions received by the unitholder as to those common units could be fully taxable as ordinary income. Our unitholders desiring to assure their status as partners and avoid the risk of gain recognition from a loan to a short seller should consult a tax advisor to discuss whether it is advisable to modify any applicable brokerage account agreements to prohibit their brokers from loaning their common units.
We have adopted certain valuation methodologies in determining a unitholder’s allocations of income, gain, loss and deduction. The IRS may challenge these methodologies or the resulting allocations, and such a challenge could adversely affect the value of our common units.
In determining the items of income, gain, loss and deduction allocable to our unitholders, we must routinely determine the fair market value of our assets. Although we may from time to time consult with professional appraisers regarding valuation matters, we make many fair market value estimates using a methodology based on the market value of our common units as a means to measure the fair market value of our assets. The IRS may challenge these valuation methods and the resulting allocations of income, gain, loss and deduction.
A successful IRS challenge to these methods or allocations could adversely affect the timing or amount of taxable income or loss being allocated to our unitholders. It also could affect the amount of gain from our unitholders’ sale of common units and could have a negative impact on the value of the common units or result in audit adjustments to our unitholders’ tax returns without the benefit of additional deductions.

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The sale or exchange of 50% or more of our capital and profits interests during any twelve-month period will result in the termination of our partnership for federal income tax purposes.
We will be considered to have technically terminated our partnership for federal income tax purposes if there is a sale or exchange of 50% or more of the total interests in our capital and profits within a twelve-month period. Tallgrass Development and its direct and indirect owners own a substantial interest in our capital and profits. Therefore, a transfer by them of all or a portion of their interests in us could result in a termination of our partnership for federal income tax purposes. For purposes of determining whether the 50% threshold has been met, multiple sales of the same interest will be counted only once. Our technical termination would, among other things, result in the closing of our taxable year for all unitholders, which would result in us filing two tax returns (and our unitholders could receive two Schedules K-1 if relief was not available, as described below) for one fiscal year if the termination occurs on a day other than December 31 and could result in a deferral of depreciation deductions allowable in computing our taxable income. In the case of a unitholder reporting on a taxable year other than a fiscal year ending December 31, the closing of our taxable year may also result in more than twelve months of our taxable income or loss being includable in the unitholder's taxable income for the year of termination. Our termination currently would not affect our classification as a partnership for federal income tax purposes, but instead we would be treated as a new partnership for tax purposes. If treated as a new partnership, we must make new tax elections and could be subject to penalties if we are unable to determine that a termination occurred. The IRS has announced a publicly traded partnership technical termination relief program whereby, if a publicly traded partnership that technically terminated requests publicly traded partnership technical termination relief and such relief is granted by the IRS, among other things, the partnership will only have to provide one Schedule K-1 to unitholders for the year notwithstanding two partnership tax years.
As a result of investing in our common units you will likely become subject to state and local taxes and return filing requirements in jurisdictions where we operate or own or acquire properties.
In addition to federal income taxes, our unitholders will likely be subject to other taxes, including state and local taxes, unincorporated business taxes and estate, inheritance or intangible taxes that are imposed by the various jurisdictions in which we conduct business or own property now or in the future, even if they do not live in any of those jurisdictions. Our unitholders will likely be required to file state and local income tax returns and pay state and local income taxes in some or all of these various jurisdictions. Further, our unitholders may be subject to penalties for failure to comply with those requirements. We currently own property or conduct business in a number of states, most of which currently impose a personal income tax on individuals. Most of these states also impose an income tax on corporations and other entities. As we make acquisitions or expand our business, we may own property or conduct business in additional states that impose a personal income tax. It is your responsibility to file all federal, state and local tax returns.
Compliance with and changes in tax laws could adversely affect our performance.
We are subject to extensive tax laws and regulations, including federal and state income taxes and transactional taxes such as excise, sales/use, payroll, franchise and ad valorem taxes. New tax laws and regulations and changes in existing tax laws and regulations are continuously being enacted that could result in increased tax expenditures in the future. Many of these tax liabilities are subject to audits by the respective taxing authority. These audits may result in additional tax payments, as well as interest and penalties.
We have a subsidiary that is treated as a corporation for federal income tax purposes and subject to corporate level income taxes and may conduct additional activities in taxable corporate subsidiaries in the future.
Even though we (as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes) are not subject to U.S. federal income tax, we have a subsidiary that is organized as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Although this subsidiary has not previously generated any material income, we may elect to conduct additional activities in one or more subsidiaries treated as corporations for U.S. federal income tax purposes in the future that could generate material income. For example, it is unclear whether and to what extent our share of water business services income from Water Solutions will be treated as qualifying income. The IRS recently issued proposed regulations providing that income from water delivery services is not qualifying income unless the partnership providing those services also collects, and cleans, recycles or otherwise disposes of the water after use in accordance with applicable law. While we have not requested a ruling from the IRS that income from Water Solutions, or a portion of such income, is qualifying income, we may request such a ruling in the future. If the treatment of water services income in the proposed regulations is adopted as final regulations or if the IRS is unwilling or unable to provide a favorable ruling in a timely manner, and if it becomes necessary in order to preserve our status as a partnership, we may elect to conduct all or portions of our Water Solutions business in a taxable corporate subsidiary (see "Risk Factors - Our tax treatment depends on our status as a partnership for federal income tax purposes. If the IRS were to treat us as a corporation for federal income tax purposes, which would subject us to entity-level taxation, then our cash available for distribution to our unitholders would be substantially reduced.").

53





The taxable income, if any, of a subsidiary that is treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, is subject to corporate-level U.S. federal income taxes, which may reduce the cash available for distribution to us and, in turn, to our unitholders. If the IRS or other state or local jurisdictions were to successfully assert that this corporation has more tax liability than we anticipate or legislation was enacted that increased the corporate tax rate, the cash available for distribution could be further reduced. The income tax return filing positions taken by corporate subsidiaries could require significant judgment, use of estimates, and the interpretation and application of complex tax laws. Significant judgment could also be required in assessing the timing and amounts of deductible and taxable items. Despite our belief that the income tax return positions taken by our corporate subsidiaries would be fully supportable, certain positions may be successfully challenged by the IRS, state or local jurisdictions.
If the IRS makes audit adjustments to our income tax returns for tax years beginning after 2017, it may collect any resulting taxes (including any applicable penalties and interest) directly from us, in which case our cash available for distribution to our unitholders might be substantially reduced.
Pursuant to the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015, if the IRS makes audit adjustments to our income tax returns for tax years beginning after 2017, it may collect any resulting taxes (including any applicable penalties and interest) directly from us. We will generally have the ability to shift any such tax liability to our general partner and our unitholders in accordance with their interests in us during the year under audit, but there can be no assurance that we will be able to (or will choose to) do so under all circumstances. If we are required to make payments of taxes, penalties and interest resulting from audit adjustments, our cash available for distribution to our unitholders might be substantially reduced.
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
None.
Item 2. Properties
A description of our properties is contained in Item 1.—Business, "Our Assets" of this Annual Report.
Our principal executive offices are located at 4200 W. 115th Street, Suite 350, Leawood, KS 66211 and our telephone number is 913-928-6060.
We own two office buildings in Lakewood, Colorado, with a portion being leased to a third party pursuant to a lease with an initial term through 2020. In addition, we lease our principal executive offices in Leawood, Kansas. Tallgrass Development pays a proportionate share of the costs to occupy the building to us pursuant to the TEP Omnibus Agreement.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
See Note 17Legal and Environmental Matters to the consolidated financial statements included in Part II—Item 8.—Financial Statements and Supplementary Data of this Annual Report, which is incorporated by reference into this Part I—Item 3 of this Annual Report.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Not applicable.

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PART II
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Market Information
Our common units have been listed on the New York Stock Exchange ("NYSE") under the symbol "TEP" since the completion of our IPO on May 17, 2013. The following table sets forth the high and low sales prices of the common units, as reported by the NYSE, as well as the amount of cash distributions per unit declared for the periods indicated:
Quarter Ended
 
High
 
Low
 
Distribution per Common Unit
 
December 31, 2015
 
$
47.63

 
$
33.40

 
$
0.6400

 
September 30, 2015
 
49.09

 
35.02

 
0.6000

 
June 30, 2015
 
52.13

 
47.21

 
0.5800

 
March 31, 2015
 
53.70

 
40.00

 
0.5200

 
December 31, 2014
 
45.49

 
33.83

 
0.4850

 
September 30, 2014
 
47.04

 
37.90

 
0.4100

 
June 30, 2014
 
40.22

 
34.50

 
0.3800

 
March 31, 2014
 
36.49

 
25.25

 
0.3250

 
December 31, 2013
 
27.74

 
23.00

 
0.3150

 
September 30, 2013
 
24.00

 
21.12

 
0.2975

 
June 30, 2013
 
22.91

 
20.53

 
0.1422

(1) 
March 31, 2013
 
N/A

 
N/A

 
N/A

 
(1) 
The distribution declared in the second quarter of 2013 was prorated for the period from May 17, 2013 to June 30, 2013.
Holders
As of February 17, 2016, there were 63 unitholders of record of our common units. This number does not include unitholders whose units are held in trust by other entities. The actual number of beneficial unitholders is greater than the number of holders of record. In addition, as of February 17, 2016, our general partner owned all 834,391 of our general partner units.
Equity Compensation Plan
See Item 12.—Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters for information regarding our Equity Compensation Plan.
Distributions of Available Cash
General. Our partnership agreement requires that, within 45 days after the end of each quarter, we distribute our available cash to unitholders of record on the applicable record date, as determined by our general partner.
Definition of Available Cash. The term "available cash" generally means, for any quarter, all cash and cash equivalents on hand at the end of that quarter:
less, the amount of cash reserves established by our general partner to:
provide for proper conduct of business;
comply with applicable law or regulation, any of our debt instruments or other agreements; or
provide funds for distributions to unitholders and to our general partner for any one or more of the next four quarters;
plus, if our general partner so determines, all or any portion of the cash on hand on the date of distribution of available cash for the quarter, including cash on hand resulting from working capital borrowings made subsequent to the end of such quarter.

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Minimum Quarterly Distribution. We intend to make cash distributions to the holders of common units on a quarterly basis in an amount equal to at least the minimum quarterly distribution, or MQD, of $0.2875 per unit or $1.15 per unit on an annualized basis, to the extent we have sufficient cash from our operations after establishment of cash reserves and payment of fees and expenses, including payments to our general partner and its affiliates. However, there is no guarantee that we will pay the MQD on the units in any quarter. Even if our cash distribution policy is not modified or revoked, the amount of distributions paid under our policy and the decision to make any distribution is determined by our general partner, taking into consideration the terms of our partnership agreement. Our general partner has broad discretion to establish cash reserves that it determines are necessary or appropriate to properly conduct our business. These can include cash reserves for future capital and maintenance expenditures, reserves to stabilize distributions of cash to our unitholders, reserves to reduce debt or, as necessary, reserves to comply with the terms of any of our agreements or obligations. We will be prohibited from making any distributions to unitholders if it would cause an event of default or if an event of default exists under our credit agreement.
General Partner Interest. Our general partner is currently entitled to approximately 1.23% of all quarterly distributions that we make prior to our liquidation based on its ownership of the general partner interest. As of February 17, 2016 our general partner interest is represented by 834,391 general partner units. Our general partner has the right, but not the obligation, to contribute a proportional amount of capital to us to maintain its general partner interest, up to 2%. The general partner’s proportionate interest in our quarterly distributions will be reduced if we issue additional units in the future and our general partner does not contribute a proportional amount of capital to us to maintain its general partner interest.
Incentive Distribution Rights. As quarterly distributions exceed the MQD and other higher target distribution levels, our general partner, as the holder of the IDRs, becomes entitled to increasing percentages (13%, 23% and 48%) of the distributions after the MQD. Such higher target distribution levels have been achieved and we have been distributing 48% on the IDRs since our distribution with respect to the fourth quarter of 2014. For additional information, see Note 11 Partnership Equity and Distributions to our Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8.—Financial Statements and Supplementary Data in this Form 10-K.
Conversion of Subordinated Units. Under the terms of our partnership agreement and upon the payment of our quarterly cash distribution to unitholders on February 13, 2015, our subordination period ended. As a result, our 16,200,000 subordinated units held by TD converted into common units on a one for one basis on February 17, 2015. The conversion of the subordinated units did not impact the aggregate amount of cash distributions paid.

56





Performance Graph
The following performance graph compares the performance of our common units with the NYSE Composite Index Total Return and the Alerian Total Return MLP Index during the period beginning on May 14, 2013, and ending on December 31, 2015. The graph assumes a $100 investment in our common units and in each of the indices at the beginning of the period and a reinvestment of distributions/dividends paid on such investments throughout the period.
Recent Sales of Unregistered Equity Securities
None.
Repurchase of Equity by Tallgrass Energy Partners, LP or Affiliated Purchasers
None.

57





Item 6. Selected Financial Data
The historical financial statements included in this Annual Report reflect the combined results of operations of TIGT and TMID, which we refer to collectively as "our Predecessor." As discussed further in Note 2Summary of Significant Accounting Policies to the accompanying consolidated financial statements, the financial statements of our Predecessor for historical periods beginning after November 13, 2012 have been recast to reflect the operations of Trailblazer, which was acquired on April 1, 2014, and Pony Express, of which TEP acquired a controlling 33.3% membership interest effective September 1, 2014.
In connection with our initial public offering on May 17, 2013, TD contributed to us its equity interests in our Predecessor. The term "TEP Pre-Predecessor" refers to the Tallgrass Energy Partners Pre-Predecessor, which represents the combined results of operations of TIGT and TMID that were owned by Kinder Morgan Energy Partners, LP ("TEP Pre-Predecessor Parent") prior to November 13, 2012, at which date TEP Pre-Predecessor Parent sold those assets, among others, to TD. Financial information for the TEP Pre-Predecessor has not been recast to reflect the operations of Trailblazer and Pony Express. The following discussion analyzes the financial condition and results of operations of our Predecessor. In certain circumstances and for ease of reading we discuss the financial results of the Predecessor as being "our" financial results during historic periods, although TIGT and TMID were owned by TD from November 13, 2012 until May 17, 2013, Trailblazer was owned by TD from November 13, 2012 to March 31, 2014, and Pony Express was wholly-owned by TD from November 13, 2012 to August 31, 2014. As used in this Annual Report, unless the context otherwise requires, "we," "us," our," the "Partnership," "TEP" and similar terms refer to Tallgrass Energy Partners, LP, together with its consolidated subsidiaries.
The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes thereto included elsewhere in this Annual Report. A reference to a "Note" herein refers to the accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements contained in Item 8.—Financial Statements. In addition, please read "Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements" and "Risk Factors" for information regarding certain risks inherent in our business.
The following table shows selected historical financial and operating data of TEP for the periods and as of the dates indicated. The selected historical financial data for the period from November 13, 2012 to December 31, 2012 and the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 are derived from the audited financial statements of TEP as recast for the acquisitions of Trailblazer and our initial 33.3% membership interest in Pony Express.
We derived the information in the following table from, and that information should be read together with and is qualified in its entirety by reference to, the consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

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Our operating results incorporate a number of significant estimates and uncertainties. Such matters could cause the data included herein to not be indicative of our future financial condition or results of operations. A discussion of our critical accounting estimates is included in "Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in Item 7.
 
TEP
 
 
TEP Pre-Predecessor
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
Period from November 13 to December 31, 2012
 
 
Period from January 1 to November 12, 2012
 
Year Ended December 31, 2011
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
 
 
 
 
(in thousands, except per unit amounts)
 
 
(in thousands, except per unit amounts)
Statement of operations data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenue
$
536,197

 
$
371,556

 
$
290,526

 
$
38,572

 
 
$
220,292

 
$
307,043

Operating income
$
197,915

 
$
53,413

 
$
33,999

 
$
69

 
 
$
50,113

 
$
75,499

Net income (loss)
$
184,814

 
$
59,329

 
$
7,624

 
$
(2,618
)
 
 
$
51,496

 
$
77,507

Net income (loss) attributable to partners
$
160,546

 
$
70,681

 
$
9,747

 
$
(2,366
)
 
 
$
51,496

 
$
77,507

Net income allocable to limited partners
$
114,068

 
$
61,774

 
$
6,991

(1) 
N/A

 
 
N/A

 
N/A

Net income per limited partner unit - basic
$
1.95

 
$
1.39

 
$
0.17

(1) 
N/A

 
 
N/A

 
N/A

Net income per limited partner unit - diluted
$
1.91

 
$
1.36

 
$
0.17

(1) 
N/A

 
 
N/A

 
N/A

Balance sheet data (at end of period):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Property, plant and equipment, net
$
2,025,018

 
$
1,853,081

 
$
1,116,806

 
$
726,754

 
 
$
717,486

 
$
719,009

Total assets
$
2,562,074

 
$
2,457,197

 
$
1,631,413

 
$
1,238,598

 
 
$
767,681

 
$
772,896

Long-term debt
$
753,000

 
$
559,000

 
$
135,000

 
$

 
 
$

 
$

Long-term debt allocated from TD
$

 
$

 
$

 
$
390,491

 
 
$

 
$

Other:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Distributions declared per common unit
$
2.3400

 
$
1.6000

 
$
0.7547

 
N/A

 
 
N/A

 
N/A

(1) 
The net income allocated to the limited partners was based upon the number of days between the closing of the IPO on May 17, 2013 to December 31, 2013.
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Historical periods have been recast to reflect the operations of Trailblazer, which was acquired on April 1, 2014, and Pony Express, of which TEP acquired a controlling 33.3% membership interest effective September 1, 2014. TEP's subsequent acquisition of an additional 33.3% membership interest in Pony Express on March 1, 2015 represents an acquisition of noncontrolling interests. As a result, financial information for periods prior to that transaction have not been recast to reflect the additional 33.3% membership interest. In certain circumstances and for ease of reading we discuss the financial results of these entities prior to their respective acquisitions as being "our" financial results during historic periods, although Trailblazer was owned by TD from November 13, 2012 to March 31, 2014, and Pony Express was wholly-owned by TD from November 13, 2012 to August 31, 2014.
The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes thereto included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

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Overview
We are a publicly traded, growth-oriented limited partnership formed to own, operate, acquire and develop midstream energy assets in North America. We currently provide crude oil transportation to customers in Wyoming, Colorado, and the surrounding regions through Pony Express, which owns the Pony Express System, a crude oil pipeline commencing in Guernsey, Wyoming and terminating in Cushing, Oklahoma that includes a lateral in Northeast Colorado that commences in Weld County, Colorado, and interconnects with the pipeline just east of Sterling, Colorado. We provide natural gas transportation and storage services for customers in the Rocky Mountain and Midwest regions of the United States through the TIGT System, a FERC-regulated natural gas transportation and storage system located in Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska and Wyoming, and the Trailblazer Pipeline, a FERC-regulated natural gas pipeline system extending from the Colorado and Wyoming border to Beatrice, Nebraska. We also provide services for customers at our Midstream Facilities located in Wyoming, and NGL transportation services in Northeast Colorado. We perform water business services in Colorado and Texas through Water Solutions. Our operations are strategically located in and provide services to certain key United States hydrocarbon basins, including the Denver-Julesburg, Powder River, Wind River, Permian and Hugoton-Anadarko Basins and the Niobrara, Mississippi Lime, Eagle Ford and Bakken shale formations.
We intend to continue to leverage our relationship with TD and utilize the significant experience of our management team to execute our growth strategy of acquiring midstream assets from TD and third parties, increasing utilization of our existing assets and expanding our systems through construction of additional assets. Our reportable business segments are:
Crude Oil Transportation & Logistics—the ownership and operation of a crude oil pipeline system;
Natural Gas Transportation & Logistics—the ownership and operation of FERC-regulated interstate natural gas pipelines and integrated natural gas storage facilities; and
Processing & Logistics—the ownership and operation of natural gas processing, treating and fractionation facilities, the provision of water business services primarily to the oil and gas exploration and production industry and the transportation of NGLs.
Summary of Results for the Year Ended December 31, 2015
During 2015, we completed a follow-on public offering of 11,200,000 common units and the acquisitions of an additional 33.3% membership interest in Pony Express and a 100% membership interest in Western, which owns water business services assets located in Weld County, Colorado. In addition, Pony Express placed into commercial service its lateral in Northeast Colorado during the second quarter of 2015.
Net income attributable to partners for the year ended December 31, 2015 was $160.5 million, with Adjusted EBITDA and Distributable Cash Flow (each as defined below under "Non-GAAP Financial Measures") of $252.3 million and $220.5 million, respectively, compared to net income attributable to partners for the year ended December 31, 2014 of $70.7 million, with Adjusted EBITDA and Distributable Cash Flow of $109.9 million and $96.1 million, respectively. The increase in net income, Adjusted EBITDA, and Distributable Cash Flow was largely driven by the ramping up of commercial operations at Pony Express and the lateral in Northeast Colorado and our acquisition of an additional 33.3% membership interest in Pony Express on March 1, 2015, as discussed further under "Results of Operations" below.
Recent Developments
Distribution Declared
On January 4, 2016, the Board of Directors of our general partner declared a cash distribution for the quarter ended December 31, 2015 of $0.64 per common unit. The distribution was paid on February 12, 2016, to unitholders of record on January 29, 2016.
Acquisition of an Additional 31.3% of Pony Express
Effective January 1, 2016, TEP acquired an additional 31.3% membership interest in Pony Express in exchange for cash consideration of $475 million and 6,518,000 TEP common units (valued at approximately $268.6 million based on the December 31, 2015 closing price of TEP’s common units) issued to TD for total consideration of approximately $743.6 million. The transaction increases TEP’s aggregate membership interest in Pony Express to 98.0%. As part of the transaction, TD granted TEP an 18 month call option to repurchase the newly issued 6,518,000 common units at a price of $42.50.

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Revolving Credit Facility
In connection with the acquisition of an additional 31.3% membership interest in Pony Express as discussed above, TEP exercised its option to increase the commitment under its existing revolving credit facility from $1.1 billion to $1.5 billion effective January 4, 2016. As of January 31, 2016, TEP had approximately $1.2 billion of outstanding borrowings under its revolving credit facility.
Tallgrass Development Purchase Program
On February 17, 2016, TEP and TEGP announced that the Board of Directors of Tallgrass Energy Holdings, the sole member of TEGP’s general partner and the general partner of TD, has authorized an equity purchase program under which TD may initially purchase up to an aggregate of $100 million of the outstanding Class A shares of TEGP or the outstanding common units of TEP. TD may purchase Class A shares or Common Units from time to time on the open market or in negotiated purchases. The timing and amounts of any such purchases will be subject to market conditions and other factors, and will be in accordance with applicable securities laws and other legal requirements. The purchase plan does not obligate TD to acquire any specific number of Class A shares or Common Units and may be discontinued at any time.
Factors and Trends Impacting Our Business
We expect to continue to be affected by certain key factors and trends described below. Our expectations are based on assumptions made by us and information currently available to us. To the extent our underlying assumptions about, or interpretations of, available information prove to be incorrect, our actual results may vary materially from our expected results. See also Item 1A.Risk Factors.
Long Term U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Prospects
Crude oil, natural gas and products derived from both continue to be critical components of energy supply and demand in the United States. Although crude oil and natural gas prices have declined significantly in the latter part of 2014 and throughout 2015 and early 2016, and may experience further declines or remain at or near current levels for the foreseeable future, we nevertheless believe that the long-term prospects for continued crude oil and natural gas production increases are favorable.
We believe long-term growth will be driven, in part, by a combination of increased domestic demand resulting from population and economic growth, higher industrial consumption in the U.S., and a desire to reduce domestic reliance on imports. One example is that we expect natural gas to gradually displace coal-fired electricity generation due to the low prices of natural gas and stricter environmental regulations on the mining and burning of coal. We expect productivity of oil and natural gas wells to continue increasing over the long-term in some basins across the United States because of the increasing precision and efficiency of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing in oil and natural gas extraction. We also believe there is a substantial inventory of drilled but uncompleted wells in the basins we serve, including the Bakken shale, that is likely to be completed and turned into production once commodity prices recover and volatility decreases.
Current Commodity Environment
Starting in 2014, the prices of crude oil, natural gas, and NGLs were extremely volatile and declined significantly. Downward pressure on commodity prices continued in 2015 and the early part of 2016 and may continue for the foreseeable future. This could impact our business in several ways.
Demand for our services depends, in part, on the development of additional natural gas and crude oil reserves by third parties. This requires significant capital expenditures by others to install facilities that extract natural gas and crude oil. However, low commodity prices result in a lack of available capital for these types of expenditures. To the extent our customers cannot finance these activities, we also expect they will be less likely to enter into demand based, long-term firm fee contracts until commodity prices recover and pricing stability returns to the commodity markets. The recent commodity price declines may also negatively impact the financial condition of our customers and could impact their ability to meet their financial obligations to us.
Additionally, lower commodity prices generally lead to reduced utilization of our assets. For example, reduced utilization could result in increased deficiency balances held by customers of our Pony Express System. For additional information, see “Risk FactorsThe TDAs for the Pony Express System and some of our service agreements with respect to our water business services contain provisions that can reduce the cash flow stability that the agreements were designed to achieve. In addition, declining drilling activity by producers and other factors within the region served by our Midstream Facilities has led to an average quarterly decrease in our natural gas processing inlet volumes at our natural gas processing and treating plants of 11% over the year ended December 31, 2015. We expect further volumetric decreases in 2016. As a result, management identified a potential impairment trigger with respect to the goodwill allocated to the TMID reporting unit. As discussed further under "Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates" below, we tested the goodwill for impairment as of December 31, 2015 and noted that no impairment exists at this time.

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Growth Associated with Acquisitions and Expansion Projects
Growth associated with acquisitions
We believe that we are well-positioned to grow through accretive acquisitions. We intend to pursue acquisition opportunities from third parties as they become available and expect to continue to acquire assets from TD’s portfolio of midstream assets, which include TD’s 50% interest in, and operation of, the REX Pipeline, and 100% ownership interest in Terminals. We expect TD to retain its 2% ownership interest in Pony Express for the foreseeable future. Pursuant to the TEP Omnibus Agreement, TD granted us the right of first offer to acquire each of the remaining Retained Assets if TD decides to sell those assets. Terminals is not a Retained Asset. Other than its obligations under the TEP Omnibus Agreement, TD is under no obligation to offer to sell us additional assets or to pursue acquisitions jointly with us, and we are under no obligation to buy any assets from TD or pursue any such joint acquisitions. However, given the significant economic interest in us held by TD and its affiliates, we believe TD will be incentivized to offer us the opportunity to acquire its assets as each matures into an operating profile more conducive to our principal business objective of increasing the quarterly cash distributions that we pay to our unitholders over time while ensuring the ongoing stability of our business.
Growth associated with expansion projects
We also believe that we are well positioned to increase volumes to our systems through cost-effective capacity expansions and other methods for improving efficiency, such as the use of drag reducing agents in our crude oil pipelines. For example, in 2014, Pony Express completed the conversion and construction of its approximately 698-mile crude oil pipeline commencing in Guernsey, Wyoming, and terminating in Cushing, Oklahoma. In 2015, Pony Express completed the construction of an approximately 66-mile lateral in Northeast Colorado commencing in Weld County, Colorado, and interconnecting with the pipeline just east of Sterling, Colorado.
Energy Capital Markets and Interest Rates
During the second half of 2015 the energy credit markets experienced a material increase in the yields for long term debt, causing an issuance of senior unsecured notes to be a less attractive financing option. At the same time, the downturn in commodity prices has also generally limited the availability of capital through traditional public issuances of common units. While this downturn has not changed our business plans, including our continued intent to grow through acquisitions and expansion projects, it has altered some of our financing strategies.
In addition, the Federal Reserve increased short-term interest rates which marginally impacted the rates on our floating rate revolving credit facility. If the economy continues to strengthen, it is likely that monetary policy will continue to tighten, resulting in higher interest rates to counter possible inflation. If this occurs, interest rates on our floating rate credit facilities and future offerings in the debt capital markets could be at higher rates, causing our financing costs to increase accordingly. For additional information, please read Item 7A.—Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.
How We Evaluate Our Operations
We evaluate our results using, among other measures, contract profile and volumes, operating costs and expenses, Adjusted EBITDA and Distributable Cash Flow. Adjusted EBITDA and Distributable Cash Flow are non-GAAP measures and are defined below.
Contract Profile and Volumes
Our results are driven primarily by the volume of crude oil transportation capacity, natural gas transportation and storage capacity, NGL transportation capacity, and water transportation, gathering and disposal capacity under firm contracts, as well as the volume of natural gas that we process and the fees assessed for such services.
Operating Costs and Expenses
The primary components of our operating costs and expenses that we evaluate include cost of sales, cost of transportation services, operations and maintenance and general and administrative costs. Our operating expenses are driven primarily by expenses related to the operation, maintenance and growth of our asset base.
Adjusted EBITDA and Distributable Cash Flow
Adjusted EBITDA and Distributable Cash Flow are non-GAAP supplemental financial measures that management and external users of our consolidated financial statements, such as industry analysts, investors, lenders and rating agencies, may use to assess:
our operating performance as compared to other publicly traded partnerships in the midstream energy industry, without regard to historical cost basis or, in the case of Adjusted EBITDA, financing methods;
the ability of our assets to generate sufficient cash flow to make distributions to our unitholders;

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our ability to incur and service debt and fund capital expenditures; and
the viability of acquisitions and other capital expenditure projects and the returns on investment of various expansion and growth opportunities.
We believe that the presentation of Adjusted EBITDA and Distributable Cash Flow provides useful information to investors in assessing our financial condition and results of operations. Adjusted EBITDA and Distributable Cash Flow should not be considered alternatives to net income, operating income, net cash provided by operating activities or any other measure of financial performance or liquidity presented in accordance with GAAP, nor should Adjusted EBITDA and Distributable Cash Flow be considered alternatives to available cash, operating surplus, distributions of available cash from operating surplus or other definitions in our partnership agreement. Adjusted EBITDA and Distributable Cash Flow have important limitations as analytical tools because they exclude some but not all items that affect net income and net cash provided by operating activities. Additionally, because Adjusted EBITDA and Distributable Cash Flow may be defined differently by other companies in our industry, our definition of Adjusted EBITDA and Distributable Cash Flow may not be comparable to similarly titled measures of other companies, thereby diminishing their utility.
Non-GAAP Financial Measures
We generally define Adjusted EBITDA as net income excluding the impact of interest, income taxes, depreciation and amortization, non-cash income or loss related to derivative instruments, non-cash long-term compensation expense, impairment losses, gains or losses on asset or business disposals or acquisitions, gains or losses on the repurchase, redemption or early retirement of debt, and earnings from unconsolidated investments, but including the impact of distributions from unconsolidated investments. We also use Distributable Cash Flow, which we generally define as Adjusted EBITDA, plus preferred distributions received from Pony Express in excess of its distributable cash flow attributable to our net interest and adjusted for deficiency payments received from or utilized by Pony Express shippers, less cash interest expense, maintenance capital expenditures, distributions to noncontrolling interests in excess of earnings allocated to noncontrolling interests, and cash reserves permitted by our partnership agreement, to analyze our performance. Maintenance capital expenditures are cash expenditures incurred (including expenditures for the construction or development of new capital assets) that we expect to maintain our long-term operating income or operating capacity. These expenditures typically include certain system integrity, compliance and safety improvements.
TEP received a minimum quarterly preference payment from Pony Express of $36.65 million through the quarter ended December 31, 2015 (prorated to approximately $23.5 million for the quarter ended March 31, 2015). To the extent that Pony Express did not have sufficient Distributable Cash Flow to cover this preference payment, TD, as the noncontrolling interest owner, was required to contribute cash to Pony Express to fund the excess preference payment. The cash received by Pony Express from TD to fund the minimum quarterly preference payment in excess of distributable cash flow from Pony Express was considered Distributable Cash Flow at TEP. Effective January 1, 2016, TEP no longer receives a minimum quarterly preference payment from Pony Express. Pony Express collects deficiency payments for barrels committed by the customer to be transported in a month but not physically received for transport or delivered to the customers' agreed upon destination point. These deficiency payments are recorded as a deferred liability until the barrels are physically transported and delivered by TEP. As discussed further in Note 2Summary of Significant Accounting Policies, earnings at Pony Express are allocated between TEP and noncontrolling interests in accordance with a substantive profit sharing arrangement rather than pro rata by ownership. Distributions made by Pony Express to its noncontrolling interests reduce the Distributable Cash Flow available to TEP.
Distributable Cash Flow and Adjusted EBITDA are not presentations made in accordance with GAAP. The following table presents a reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA to net income and net cash provided by operating activities and a reconciliation of Distributable Cash Flow to net cash provided by operating activities, the most directly comparable GAAP financial measures, for each of the periods indicated:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
(in thousands)
Reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA to Net Income
 
 
 
 
 
Net income attributable to partners
$
160,546

 
$
70,681

 
$
9,747

Add:
 
 
 
 
 
Interest expense, net of noncontrolling interest
15,517

 
7,648

 
11,035

Depreciation and amortization expense, net of noncontrolling interest
75,529

 
45,389

 
37,898

Loss on extinguishment of debt
226

 

 
17,526

Non-cash (gain) loss related to derivative instruments

 
(184
)
 
386

Non-cash compensation expense
5,103

 
5,136

 
1,798

Non-cash loss from asset sales
4,795

 

 

Distributions from unconsolidated investment

 
1,464

 

Less:
 
 
 
 
 
Non-cash loss allocated to noncontrolling interest
(9,377
)
 
(10,151
)
 

Gain on remeasurement of unconsolidated investment

 
(9,388
)
 

Equity in earnings of unconsolidated investment

 
(717
)
 

Adjusted EBITDA
$
252,339

 
$
109,878

 
$
78,390

Reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA and Distributable Cash Flow to Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities
 
 
 
 
 
Net cash provided by operating activities
$
289,296

 
$
79,444

 
$
82,482

Add:
 
 
 
 
 
Interest expense, net of noncontrolling interest
15,517

 
7,648

 
11,035

Other, including changes in operating working capital
(52,474
)
 
22,786

 
(15,127
)
Adjusted EBITDA
$
252,339

 
$
109,878

 
$
78,390

Add:
 
 
 
 
 
Pony Express preferred distributions in excess of distributable cash flow attributable to Pony Express

 
5,429

 

Pony Express deficiency payments received, net
16,511

 
5,378

 

Less:
 
 
 
 
 
Cash interest cost
(13,746
)
 
(6,266
)
 
(3,555
)
Maintenance capital expenditures
(12,123
)
 
(9,913
)
 
(15,951
)
Distributions to noncontrolling interest in excess of earnings
(22,479
)
 
(5,361
)
 

Cash flow attributable to predecessor operations

 
(3,086
)
 
3,367

Distributable Cash Flow
$
220,502

 
$
96,059

 
$
62,251

The following table presents a reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA by segment to segment operating income, the most directly comparable GAAP financial measure, for each of the periods indicated:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
(in thousands)
Reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA to Operating Income in the Crude Oil Transportation & Logistics Segment (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Operating income (loss)
$
159,467

 
$
3,601

 
$
(3,156
)
Add:
 
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization expense, net of noncontrolling interest
39,359

 
10,553

 
1,009

Adjusted EBITDA attributable to noncontrolling interests
(24,245
)
 
11,708

 
2,104

Less:
 
 
 
 
 
Non-cash loss allocated to noncontrolling interest
(9,377
)
 
(10,151
)
 

Segment Adjusted EBITDA
$
165,204

 
$
15,711

 
$
(43
)
Reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA to Operating Income in the Natural Gas Transportation & Logistics Segment (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Operating income
$
41,802

 
$
40,887

 
$
24,040

Add:
 
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization expense
22,927

 
23,788

 
30,169

Non-cash (gain) loss related to derivative instruments

 
(184
)
 
386

Other income
2,639

 
3,102

 
2,226

Segment Adjusted EBITDA
$
67,368

 
$
67,593

 
$
56,821

Reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA to Operating Income in the Processing & Logistics Segment (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Operating income
$
4,728

 
$
20,577

 
$
16,472

Add:
 
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization expense, net of noncontrolling interest
13,243

 
11,048

 
6,720

Non-cash loss from asset sales
4,795

 

 

Distributions from unconsolidated investment

 
1,464

 

Adjusted EBITDA attributable to noncontrolling interests
(20
)
 

 

Segment Adjusted EBITDA
$
22,746

 
$
33,089

 
$
23,192

Total Segment Adjusted EBITDA
$
255,318

 
$
116,393

 
$
79,970

Corporate general and administrative costs
(2,979
)
 
(2,500
)
 
(1,580
)
Elimination of intersegment activity

 
(4,015
)
 

Total Adjusted EBITDA
$
252,339

 
$
109,878

 
$
78,390

(1) 
Segment results as presented represent total operating income and Adjusted EBITDA, including intersegment activity, for the Crude Oil Transportation & Logistics, Natural Gas Transportation & Logistics, and Processing & Logistics segments. For reconciliations to the consolidated financial data, see Note 18Reporting Segments to the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

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Results of Operations
The following provides a summary of our consolidated results of operations for the periods indicated:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
(in thousands, except operating data)
Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
Crude oil transportation services
$
300,436

 
$
28,343

 
$

Natural gas transportation services
119,895

 
126,733

 
120,025

Sales of natural gas, NGLs, and crude oil
82,133

 
181,249

 
155,700

Processing and other revenues
33,733

 
35,231

 
14,801

Total Revenues
536,197

 
371,556

 
290,526

Operating Costs and Expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of sales (exclusive of depreciation and amortization shown below)
75,285

 
167,545

 
131,095

Cost of transportation services (exclusive of depreciation and amortization shown below)
53,597

 
24,109

 
15,059

Operations and maintenance
49,138

 
39,577

 
35,404

Depreciation and amortization
83,476

 
47,048

 
39,917

General and administrative
50,195

 
33,160

 
27,651

Taxes, other than income taxes
21,796

 
6,704

 
7,401

Loss on sale of assets
4,795

 

 

Total Operating Costs and Expenses
338,282

 
318,143

 
256,527

Operating Income
197,915

 
53,413

 
33,999

Other (Expense) Income:
 
 
 
 
 
Interest expense, net
(15,514
)
 
(7,292
)
 
(11,054
)
Gain on remeasurement of unconsolidated investment

 
9,388

 

Loss on extinguishment of debt
(226
)
 

 
(17,526
)
Equity in earnings of unconsolidated investment

 
717

 

Other income, net
2,639

 
3,103

 
2,205

Total Other (Expense) Income
(13,101
)
 
5,916

 
(26,375
)
Net income
184,814

 
59,329

 
7,624

Net (income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interests
(24,268
)
 
11,352

 
2,123

Net income attributable to partners
160,546

 
70,681

 
9,747

Other Financial Data (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Adjusted EBITDA
$
252,339

 
$
109,878

 
$
78,390

Operating Data:
 
 
 
 
 
Crude oil transportation average throughput (Bbls/d) (2)
236,256

 
85,229

 
N/A

Gas transportation firm contracted capacity (MMcf/d)
1,517

 
1,537

 
1,411

Natural gas processing inlet volumes (MMcf/d)
122

 
152

 
133

(1) 
For more information regarding Adjusted EBITDA and a reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA to its most directly comparable GAAP measure, please see "Non-GAAP Financial Measures" above.
(2) 
Approximate average daily throughput for the year ended December 31, 2014 is reflective of the volumetric ramp up due to commercial in-service of the Pony Express System beginning in October 2014, including the lateral in Northeast Colorado in the second quarter of 2015, and delays in the construction and expansion efforts of third-party pipelines with which Pony Express shares joint tariffs.

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Year Ended December 31, 2015 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2014
Revenues. Total revenues were $536.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2015, compared to $371.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, which represents an increase of $164.6 million, or 44%, in total revenues. The overall increase in revenues was primarily driven by increased revenue of $275.9 million in the Crude Oil Transportation & Logistics segment, partially offset by decreases in revenues of $102.7 million and $8.4 million in the Processing & Logistics and Natural Gas Transportation & Logistics segments, respectively, as discussed further below.
Operating costs and expenses. Operating costs and expenses were $338.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2015 compared to $318.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, which represents an increase of $20.1 million, or 6%. The overall increase in operating costs and expenses is primarily driven by increased operating costs and expenses of $120.0 million in the Crude Oil Transportation & Logistics segment, partially offset by decreases in operating costs and expenses of $86.8 million and $9.3 million in the Processing & Logistics and Natural Gas Transportation & Logistics segments, respectively, as discussed further below.
Interest expense, net. Interest expense of $15.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2015 was primarily composed of interest and fees associated with TEP’s revolving credit facility, partially offset by interest income of $0.4 million on the cash balance swept to TD under the Pony Express cash management agreement. Interest expense of $7.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 was primarily composed of interest and fees associated with TEP’s revolving credit facility, partially offset by interest income of $1.5 million on the cash balance swept to TD under the Pony Express cash management agreement. The increase in interest and fees associated with TEP's revolving credit facility in 2015 was driven by increased borrowings throughout 2014 and 2015 to fund the acquisitions of Trailblazer and our 66.7% membership interest in Pony Express.
Gain on remeasurement of unconsolidated investment. Gain on remeasurement of unconsolidated investment of $9.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 was related to the remeasurement to fair value of our original 50% equity investment in Grasslands Water Services I, LLC ("GWSI") in connection with TEP's consolidation of the Water Solutions business on May 13, 2014.
Loss on extinguishment of debt. Loss on extinguishment of debt of $0.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2015 represents the loss associated with the write off of deferred financing costs associated with the reassignment of a single lender's commitment under our revolving credit facility.
Equity in earnings of unconsolidated investment. Equity in earnings of unconsolidated investment of $0.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 was related to our investment in GWSI prior to TEP's consolidation of the Water Solutions business on May 13, 2014.
Other income, net. Other income, net typically includes rental income, income earned from certain customers related to the capital costs we incurred to connect these customers to our system, and the allowance for funds used during construction at our regulated entities. Other income for the year ended December 31, 2015 was $2.6 million compared to $3.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2014.
Net (income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interests. Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests of $24.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2015 primarily reflects the net income allocated to TD's 66.7% noncontrolling interest in Pony Express for the period from January 1, 2015 to February 28, 2015 and TD's 33.3% noncontrolling interest for the period from March 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015. Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interest of $11.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 primarily reflects TD's 66.7% noncontrolling interest in Pony Express.
Year Ended December 31, 2014 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2013
Revenues. Total revenues were $371.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, compared to $290.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, which represents an increase of $81.0 million, or 28%, in total revenues. The overall increase in revenues is primarily driven by increased revenues of $43.8 million in the Processing & Logistics segment and $12.2 million in the Natural Gas Transportation & Logistics segment. Additionally, there were revenues of $28.3 million in the Crude Oil Transportation & Logistics segment for the year ended December 31, 2014, but no revenues in that segment for the year ended December 31, 2013 as Pony Express had not yet commenced commercial operations.
Operating costs and expenses. Operating costs and expenses were $318.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 compared to $256.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, which represents an increase of $61.6 million, or 24%. The overall increase in operating costs and expenses is primarily driven by increased operating costs and expenses of $39.7 million in the Processing & Logistics segment and increased operating costs and expenses of $21.6 million in the Crude Oil & Logistics segment due to the start of commercial operations at the mainline portion of the Pony Express System in October 2014. The increased costs in the Processing & Logistics and Crude Oil & Logistics segments were partially offset by decreased costs of $4.6 million in the Natural Gas Transportation & Logistics segment.

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Interest expense, net. Interest expense of $7.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 was primarily composed of interest and fees associated with TEP’s revolving credit facility, partially offset by interest income of $1.5 million on the cash balance swept to TD under the Pony Express cash management agreement. Interest expense of $11.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 primarily represents the interest expense related to the $400 million term loan allocated from TD, which was legally assumed by TEP and repaid upon closing of the IPO on May 17, 2013, as well as interest and fees associated with TEP's revolving credit facility.
Gain on remeasurement of unconsolidated investment. Gain on remeasurement of unconsolidated investment of $9.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 was related to the remeasurement to fair value of our original 50% equity investment in Grasslands Water Services I, LLC ("GWSI") in connection with TEP's consolidation of the Water Solutions business on May 13, 2014.
Loss on extinguishment of debt. Loss on extinguishment of debt of $17.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 represents the loss associated with the write off of deferred financing costs and unamortized discounts associated with the repayment of debt allocated from TD.
Equity in earnings of unconsolidated investment. Equity in earnings of unconsolidated investment of $0.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 was related to our investment in GWSI prior to TEP's consolidation of the Water Solutions business on May 13, 2014.
Other income, net. Other income, net typically includes rental income, income earned from certain customers related to the capital costs we incurred to connect these customers to our system, and the allowance for funds used during construction at our regulated entities. Other income for the year ended December 31, 2014 was $3.1 million compared to $2.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2013.
Net (income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interests. Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interests of $11.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 primarily reflects TD's 66.7% noncontrolling interest of Pony Express. Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interest of $2.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 primarily reflects TD's 66.7% noncontrolling interest in the amortization of oil conversion use rights at Pony Express prior to commencement of commercial operations.
The following provides a summary of our Crude Oil Transportation & Logistics segment results of operations for the periods indicated:
 
Year Ended December 31,
Segment Financial Data - Crude Oil Transportation & Logistics (1)
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
(in thousands)
Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
Crude Oil transportation services
$
300,436

 
$
28,343

 
$

Sales of natural gas, NGLs, and crude oil
3,791

 

 

Total revenues
304,227