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TABLE OF CONTENTS
INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Table of Contents

 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549



FORM 10-K

ý   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2015.

or

o

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
for the transition period from                        to                         .

Commission file number 333-172973



LOGO

NBTY, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

DELAWARE
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  11-2228617
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

2100 Smithtown Avenue
Ronkonkoma, New York

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

11779
(Zip Code)

(631) 567-9500
(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)



          Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None

          Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None



          Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

Yes o    No ý

          Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.

Yes ý    No o

          Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes o    No ý

          Note: The registrant was subject to the reporting requirements of Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act from June 16, 2011 through September 30, 2011. As of October 1, 2011, the registrant is a voluntary filer not subject to these filing requirements. However, the registrant has filed all reports required pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) as if the registrant was subject to such filing requirements since June 16, 2011.

          Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

Yes ý    No o

          Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ý

          Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large Accelerated Filer o   Accelerated filer o   Non-Accelerated Filer ý
(Do not check if a smaller
reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company o

          Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).

Yes o    No ý

          The aggregate market value of the common stock of the registrant held by non affiliates of the registrant as of March 31, 2015 was $0. The number of shares of common stock of the registrant outstanding at November 13, 2015 was 1,000.


DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE.

          None


Table of Contents


NBTY, INC.
ANNUAL REPORT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2015
TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
   
  Page
PART I

Item 1.

 

Business

 

1
Item 1A.   Risk Factors   17
Item 2.   Properties   41
Item 3.   Legal Proceedings   44
Item 4.   Mine Safety Disclosures   46

PART II

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

47
Item 6.   Selected Financial Data   48
Item 7.   Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations   49
Item 7A.   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk   77
Item 8.   Financial Statements and Supplementary Data   77
Item 9.   Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure   77
Item 9A.   Controls and Procedures   77
Item 9B.   Other Information   79

PART III

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

80
Item 11.   Executive Compensation   85
Item 12.   Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters   98
Item 13.   Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence   100
Item 14.   Principal Accounting Fees and Services   102

PART IV

Item 15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

104

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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

        This annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2015 (this "Report") contains "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the securities laws. You should not place undue reliance on these statements. Forward-looking statements include information concerning our liquidity and our possible or assumed future results of operations, including descriptions of our business strategies. These statements often include words such as "believe," "expect," "anticipate," "intend," "plan," "estimate," "seek," "will," "may," or similar expressions. These statements are based on certain assumptions that we have made in light of our experience in the industry as well as our perceptions of historical trends, current conditions, expected future developments and other factors we believe are appropriate in these circumstances. As you read and consider this Report, you should understand that these statements are not guarantees of performance or results. They involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Many factors could affect our actual financial results and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements. Some important factors include:

    consumer perception of our products due to adverse scientific research or findings, regulatory investigations, litigation, national media attention and other publicity regarding nutritional supplements;

    potential slow or negative growth in the vitamin, mineral and supplement market;

    increases in the cost of borrowings or unavailability of additional debt or equity capital, or both;

    volatile conditions in the capital, credit and commodities markets and in the overall economy;

    dependency on retail stores for sales;

    the loss of significant customers;

    compliance with new and existing federal, state, local or foreign legislation or regulation, or adverse determinations by regulators anywhere in the world (including the banning of products) and, in particular, Good Manufacturing Practices ("GMPs") in the United States, the Food Supplements Directive and Traditional Herbal Medicinal Products Directive (the "Herbal Products Directive") in Europe, the new Food Safety Law in China and greater enforcement by any such federal, state, local or foreign governmental entities;

    material product liability claims and product recalls;

    our inability to obtain or renew insurance, or to manage insurance costs;

    international market exposure and compliance with anti-corruption laws in the United States and foreign jurisdictions;

    difficulty entering new international markets;

    legal proceedings initiated by regulators in the United States or abroad, or lawsuits arising in the ordinary course of business;

    unavailability of, or our inability to consummate, advantageous acquisitions in the future, or our inability to integrate acquisitions into the mainstream of our business;

    loss of executive officers or other key personnel;

    loss of certain third-party suppliers and contract manufacturers;

    the availability and pricing of raw materials;

    disruptions in manufacturing operations that produce nutritional supplements and loss of manufacturing certifications;

    increased competition and failure to compete effectively;

    our inability to respond to changing consumer preferences;

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    interruption of business or negative impact on sales and earnings due to acts of God, acts of war, sabotage, terrorism, bio-terrorism, civil unrest or disruption of delivery service;

    work stoppages at our facilities;

    increased raw material, utility and fuel costs;

    fluctuations in foreign currencies, including the British pound sterling, the euro, the Canadian dollar and the Chinese renminbi;

    interruptions in information processing systems and management information technology, including system interruptions and security breaches;

    failure to maintain and/or upgrade our information technology systems;

    our inability to protect our intellectual property rights;

    our exposure to, and the expense of defending and resolving, product liability claims, intellectual property claims and other litigation;

    failure to maintain effective controls over financial reporting;

    other factors disclosed in this Report; and

    other factors beyond our control.

        In light of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions, the forward-looking statements contained in this Report might not prove accurate. You should not place undue reliance upon them. All forward-looking statements attributable to us, or persons acting on our behalf, are expressly qualified in their entirety by the foregoing cautionary statements. All such statements speak only as of the date of this Report, and we undertake no obligation to update or revise publicly any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


INDUSTRY AND MARKET DATA

        In this Report, we rely on and refer to information and statistics regarding our industry, products or market share. We obtained some of this information and statistics from third-party sources, such as independent trade associations, industry publications, government publications or reports by market research firms. Additionally, we have supplemented third-party information where necessary with management estimates, based on our review of internal surveys, information from our customers and suppliers, trade and business organizations and other contacts in the markets in which we operate, and our management's knowledge and experience. However, these estimates are subject to change and are uncertain due to limits on the availability and reliability of primary sources of information and the voluntary nature of the data gathering process. Although we believe that these independent sources and our management's estimates are reliable as of the date of this Report, we have not independently verified this information, and we cannot assure you of its accuracy or completeness. As a result, you should be aware that market share and industry data included in this Report, and estimates and beliefs based on that data, may not be reliable. We make no representation as to the accuracy or completeness of the information.


OTHER DATA

        Numerical figures included in this Report have been subject to rounding adjustments. Accordingly, numerical figures shown as totals in various tables may not be arithmetic aggregations of the figures that precede them.

        References in this Report to our fiscal year refer to the fiscal year ended September 30 in the specified year. For example, references to "fiscal 2015" refer to our fiscal year ended September 30, 2015.


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PART I

Item 1.    Business

        The following description of our business should be read in conjunction with the information included elsewhere in this Report. This description contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results could differ significantly from the results discussed in the forward-looking statements due to the factors set forth in "Forward-Looking Statements," "Risk Factors" and elsewhere in this Report. Unless the context otherwise requires, references in this Report to "we," "our," "us," or the "Company," refer to NBTY, Inc. together with its subsidiaries.

Our Company

        We are the leading vertically integrated manufacturer, marketer, distributor and retailer of high-quality vitamins, minerals, herbs, specialty supplements, and sports/active nutrition products ("VMHS") in the United States, with operations worldwide. Our products are marketed through four operating segments: Consumer Products Group, Holland & Barrett International, Puritan's Pride and Vitamin World. We currently market a broad portfolio of well-known brands, with a leading category position across several categories, channels and geographies. We also operate specialty retailers of health and wellness products, primarily focused on providing VMHS solutions to our end consumers. With our broad range of health and wellness products, we are able to offer our wholesale customers a "one-stop" source for a wide assortment of both branded and private label products across the value spectrum. Additionally, we have a significant presence across the major VMHS product categories and in multiple key distribution channels both domestically and globally. We utilize our direct-to-consumer channels to identify new consumer trends in health and wellness and leverage our flexible manufacturing capabilities and strong supplier relationships to bring new products to market quickly. Through our extensive manufacturing operations and significant economies of scale, we offer a wide array of attractively priced products to retailers and consumers. In addition, we enjoy long-standing relationships with several domestic retailers, including Wal-Mart, Costco, CVS, Walgreens, Kroger and Target. We believe our diversified product, channel and geographic revenue mix, strong key customer relationships and strong demand for VMHS products provide for a diversified, stable and profitable business with strong cash flows.

        NBTY, Inc. ("NBTY") was incorporated in New York in 1971 under the name Nature's Bounty, Inc. We changed our state of incorporation to Delaware in 1979 by merger. In 1995, we changed our name to NBTY, Inc. NBTY's principal executive offices are located at 2100 Smithtown Avenue, Ronkonkoma, New York 11779, our telephone number is (631) 567-9500, and our website is www.nbty.com. NBTY is a wholly owned subsidiary of Alphabet Holding Company, Inc. ("Holdings").

Carlyle Transaction

        On October 1, 2010, NBTY consummated a merger (the "Merger") with an affiliate of The Carlyle Group ("Carlyle"), under which the Carlyle affiliate acquired 100% of NBTY's equity. Carlyle financed the Merger with equity financing provided by an investment fund affiliated with Carlyle, proceeds from the sale of NBTY's 9% senior notes due 2018 (the "Notes"), cash on hand at NBTY and senior secured credit facilities initially consisting of (1) senior secured term loan facilities of $1.75 billion and (2) a senior secured revolving credit facility with commitments of $250 million (the "senior secured credit facilities"). NBTY refinanced its senior secured credit facilities on March 1, 2011, March 21, 2013 and November 20, 2014.

        See Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" for additional information.

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Operating Segments

        We market our products through a global omni-channel distribution platform, supported by our extensive manufacturing operations and supply chain.

        Consumer Products Group.    We are the leading manufacturer and marketer of VMHS products in the United States. We sell our products domestically in virtually all major mass merchandisers, club stores, drug store chains and supermarkets and to online retailers, independent pharmacies, health food stores, the military and other retailers. Our key brands include Nature's Bounty®, Sundown®, Pure Protein®, Solgar®, Body Fortress®, Osteo Bi-Flex®, MET-Rx®, Balance Bar® and Ester-C®. We also own other brands such as American Health®, Home Health® and SISU® which are primarily sold in health and natural food stores as well as wholesalers. We also have licensing relationships with Disney Consumer Products, Inc. and Marvel Characters, B.V. to manufacture VMHS products for children using their character images and licensed art work. We also sell our products internationally primarily through subsidiaries, distributors and key retailers. Our products are currently marketed and sold in approximately 100 countries, with Solgar® being our leading international consumer brand. Fiscal 2015 branded sales accounted for approximately 75% and private label sales accounted for approximately 25% of our Consumer Products Group sales.

        Holland & Barrett International.    Holland & Barrett International has retail operations in 12 countries around the world, with significant retail operations throughout Europe. We are the leading VMHS specialty retailer in the United Kingdom. As of September 30, 2015, this segment operated 843 Holland & Barrett stores (including 744 company-owned stores in the UK and Ireland; and franchised stores in the following countries: 33 in China, 28 in Singapore, 16 in the United Arab Emirates, 10 in Cyprus, five in Malta, four in Kuwait, two in Spain and one in Gibraltar). Holland & Barrett International also operated 161 De Tuinen stores (including cobranded stores) in the Netherlands (of which five were franchises), 18 Essenza stores in Belgium, and 49 GNC and MET-Rx branded stores (together, "GNC/MET-Rx") in the UK. Holland & Barrett International operates Holland & Barrett retail websites in the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands and Belgium, as well as retail websites for De Tuinen in the Netherlands and the GNC/MET-Rx brands in the UK. We are in the process of rebranding or cobranding our De Tuinen and Essenza stores to leverage consumer awareness of our Holland & Barrett brand. We are also in the process of rebranding our GNC brand stores to MET-Rx. Our Holland & Barrett, De Tuinen and Essenza stores sell a broad range of health and wellness products, primarily VMHS products, food products, such as fruits and nuts, and health and beauty products. Our GNC/MET-Rx branded stores specialize in vitamins, minerals and sports/active nutrition products targeting the more health conscious sports enthusiasts and price sensitive customers, and are a strong complement to the Holland & Barrett stores. We believe the breadth of our product offering, the superior customer service provided in our stores and the deep category and product knowledge of our well trained sales associates are key differentiators relative to our competitors.

        Puritan's Pride.    Through our internet platform and mail-order catalogs, we are a leader in the U.S. direct response VMHS industry, offering a full line of VMHS products and selected health and beauty products under our Puritan's Pride® brand, as well as third party products, at prices that are generally at a discount to similar products sold in retail stores. During fiscal 2015, our Puritan's Pride website, www.puritan.com, generated an average of approximately 1.6 million unique visitors per month. Puritan's Pride also sells its health and wellness products internationally through company operated websites or third party online distributors. As of September 30, 2015, Puritan's Pride operated six active websites in four languages. Puritan's Pride offers high-quality health and wellness products at low direct-from-manufacturer prices, as well as multi-buy promotions, creating a seamless shopping experience for customers. Our highly automated equipment enables us to process orders quickly, economically and efficiently. Internet orders accounted for approximately 75% of our total fiscal 2015 Puritan's Pride orders.

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        Vitamin World.    As of September 30, 2015, we operated 385 Vitamin World retail stores throughout the United States, including Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands, primarily in regional and outlet malls, as well as our Vitamin World website, www.vitaminworld.com. Each store carries a full line of VMHS store brand products as well as select health and beauty products, as well as third party products. Vitamin World stores serve as an effective channel to identify early health and wellness consumer and market trends, as well as to test new product introductions and ascertain product acceptance. We are able to provide insight into the marketplace to our domestic wholesale customers and can leverage our vertically integrated model to bring new products to the market in response to observed trends. We believe the direct-to-consumer channels also serve a key role in educating consumers on the VMHS category, including new health and wellness products and the latest clinical studies and research.

Operating Segment and Geographic Financial Information

        For a presentation of financial information for each of our operating segments, including financial information relating to the geographic areas in which we conduct our business, see Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Results of Operations," and Note 19 to the fiscal 2015 Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Report.

Our Industry

        VMHS, a key component of the overall health and wellness industry, is comprised of several distinct product sub-categories:

    Vitamins.  This sub-category includes single and multi-vitamin supplements. Products in the vitamin category include: vitamin C, B vitamins, vitamin A/beta carotene, vitamin E, niacin, folic acid, and multi-vitamin formulae.

    Minerals.  This sub-category includes single and multi-mineral supplements. Products in the mineral category include: calcium, magnesium, chromium, zinc, selenium, potassium, iron, manganese, other single minerals and multi-mineral formulae.

    Herbs & Botanicals.  Single herb or multi-herb supplements made primarily from plants or plant components. Products in this category include: echinacea, garlic, ginseng, and ginkgo biloba.

    Specialty Supplements.  This sub-category includes supplements falling outside other sub-categories, such as glucosamine, melatonin, probiotics, docasahexanenoic acid ("DHA"), fish oils, Co-enzyme Q10 ("Co-Q10"), amino acids and homeopathic remedies.

    Sports Nutrition.  Sports Nutrition products include powders, nutrition bars, tablets and drinks formulated to support physical performance, and include creatine, amino acids and protein formulae, among others.

    Active Nutrition.  This sub-category includes powders, nutrition bars and liquid nutritional products formulated to support an active lifestyle.

Our Strategy

        We continuously evaluate strategies to drive revenues and cash flows at each of our operating segments by building on our leading market positions and strong customer relationships.

Win With Our Leading Brands

        We have a very strong portfolio of brands that resonate across a diverse set of consumers. In the United States, several of our consumer product brands, including Nature's Bounty®, Body Fortress®,

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Pure Protein®, Osteo Bi-Flex®, and MET-Rx®, are among market leaders within their respective segments. In addition, Puritan's Pride® is a leader in the U.S. direct response VMHS industry and Vitamin World® is among the leading US VMHS specialty retailers. Our Solgar® brand has a strong and growing presence in the VMHS specialty retail segment both domestically and internationally and our Holland & Barrett® brand is a leader among European VMHS specialty retailers. In fiscal 2015, our top 10 brands (including our retail banners) contributed approximately 80% of our net sales and eight of those brands had sales in excess of $100 million. Our presence in multiple distribution channels and our leading market positions give us access to consumer insights and help us identify consumer health and wellness trends which we leverage to deliver new innovative products. We are investing in new product development capabilities that we expect will position us in the forefront of innovation within the health and wellness industry. We also have the manufacturing scale, expertise and supplier relationships to respond rapidly to and capitalize on consumer trends.

Increase Sales from Existing and New Customers

        We expect to continue to drive growth for our consumer products branded business through our increased focus on our top brands and continued expansion in various health and wellness categories, which we expect to result in incremental shelf space with existing customers and new customer additions. We expect that our focus on delivering tangible benefits to consumers through product innovation will not only benefit us but also benefit our customers. Our ability to supply both branded and private label products broadens and deepens our partnerships with key retail customers, providing us more opportunities for category leadership and growth. We view the private label business as an important and valuable service that we provide to key accounts.

Drive Growth and Profitability in Holland & Barrett International

        We expect to continue to drive growth in our Holland & Barrett International segment through continued investment in store renewal and expansion, same store growth through continuous enhancement of our product portfolio and increased focus on our omni-channel business. In addition, we expect to continue to enhance consumer loyalty by offering personalized loyalty programs with communications, offers, rewards, and clubs targeted to specific customer interests. We also plan to leverage consumer awareness of our Holland & Barrett® brand to drive growth beyond our core UK market and use our strong franchising model to further expand internationally.

Further Penetrate International Markets

        Our products are currently marketed and sold in approximately 100 countries. In fiscal 2015, $1.3 billion (or 40%) of our sales were to customers outside the United States. In addition to our strategy to drive growth and profitability in our Holland & Barrett International segment, we plan to capitalize on our marketing and distribution capabilities to drive incremental international sales of our consumer product brands in emerging markets, which are characterized by a rising middle class and a strong demand for high quality VMHS and other health and wellness products from U.S.-based manufacturers. In addition, we plan to further strengthen Solgar's position in the premium segment in Western European markets, where there is a demand for high-quality VMHS and other health and wellness products.

Drive Productivity through Operational Efficiencies

        We expect to continue to focus on improving efficiency across our operations to allow us to reduce costs in our manufacturing facilities as well as across our overhead cost areas. As part of our strategy to increase productivity and reduce cost in our manufacturing operations, we entered into certain asset purchase agreements with Nellson Nutraceutical, LLC ("Nellson") pursuant to which we agreed to sell certain assets associated with our nutritional bar and powder manufacturing operations. The closing of

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the sale of the assets related to the powder manufacturing operations occurred on June 26, 2015 and the sale of the assets related to the bar manufacturing operations is expected to be completed by the end of the first half of fiscal 2016. In connection with these transactions, we entered into supply agreements with Nellson, pursuant to which we will purchase from Nellson the nutritional bar and powder products we previously manufactured using the sold assets. In addition, we have launched an initiative to optimize our product portfolio, which we expect will enable further efficiencies across our manufacturing network. We are also introducing new initiatives that leverage automation, standardization and simplification and are expected to increase productivity across our operations.

Free Cash Flow Generation

        We expect our strong and stable cash flows to be driven by continued top-line growth and targeted initiatives for ongoing improvement in our manufacturing and supply chain operations, as well as improvements in working capital efficiency.

Disciplined Acquisition Strategy

        Since 1986, we have acquired and successfully integrated more than 30 companies, expanding our brands, geographic presence, distribution channels and product offerings. For example, as part of our expansion into new health and wellness categories, we entered into an agreement to acquire Dr. Organic®, a marketer of an extensive portfolio of organic-based personal care products. This transaction is subject to customary closing conditions, and is expected to close by the end of the first quarter of fiscal 2016. In the fragmented, global health and wellness industry, there remains a robust pool of acquisition opportunities across channels and geographies. We expect to continue to take a disciplined approach to acquisitions as these opportunities arise.

Employees

        As of September 30, 2015, we employed approximately 13,100 persons. In addition, we sell products through commissioned sales representative organizations. As of September 30, 2015, CAW Local 468, Retail Wholesale Canada Division, represented approximately 290 of our associates in Canada under a collective bargaining agreement. We believe we have strong employee and labor relations both domestically and internationally, and historically have not experienced work stoppages that materially adversely affected our operations.

Advertising

        For fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, we spent approximately $198 million, $203 million and $189 million, respectively, on advertising, promotions and catalogs, including print, media and cooperative advertising. We have established strategic partnerships with key marketing agencies that help us develop our advertising materials, which include print, radio, television and digital advertising.

Manufacturing, Distribution and Quality Control

        At September 30, 2015, we employed approximately 3,450 manufacturing, shipping and packaging associates. We manufacture domestically in Arizona, California, Florida, New Jersey, New York and Texas. In addition, at September 30, 2015, we manufactured internationally in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Burton, United Kingdom; and Zhongshan, China. We have technologically advanced manufacturing and production facilities, with total production capacity of approximately 63 billion tablets, capsules and softgels per year.

        All our domestic manufacturing operations are subject to GMPs, promulgated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ("FDA"), and other applicable regulatory standards. We believe our U.S. manufacturing processes comply with the GMPs for dietary supplements or foods, and our

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manufacturing and distribution facilities generally have sufficient capacity to meet our current business requirements and our currently anticipated sales. In certain instances, we outsource to third party manufacturers who we screen for compliance with the GMPs. We place special emphasis on quality control. We assign lot numbers to all raw materials and initially hold them in quarantine while our Quality Department evaluates them for compliance with established specifications. Once released, we retain samples and process the material according to approved formulae by blending, mixing and technically processing as necessary. We manufacture products in final delivery form as a capsule, tablet, powder, softgel, nutrition bar or liquid. After a product is manufactured, our laboratory analysts test its weight, purity, potency, disintegration and dissolution, if applicable. We hold the product in quarantine until we complete the quality evaluation and determine that the product meets all applicable specifications before packaging. When the manufactured product meets all specifications, our automated packaging equipment packages the product with at least one tamper-evident safety seal and affixes a label, an indelible lot number and, in most cases, the expiration or "best by" date. We use sophisticated computer-generated documentation for picking and packing for order fulfillment. We are subject to regulations and standards of a similar nature in Canada, China and the United Kingdom with respect to our manufacturing activities in those countries.

        In the United States and Canada, we have received recognition from many prestigious private organizations, including U.S. Pharmacopeia GMP Certification (as part of their Dietary Supplement Verification Program). Additionally, we have been recognized in the United Kingdom with MHRA Importation License and Wholesale Dealers License, as well as the BRC Global Standard for Food Safety and the certificate of conformity of the Organic Food Federation.

        Our manufacturing operations are designed to allow low-cost production of a wide variety of products of different quantities, physical sizes and packaging formats, while maintaining a high level of customer service and quality. Flexible production line changeover capabilities and reduced cycle times allow us to respond quickly to changes in manufacturing schedules and customer demands.

        We have inventory control systems at our facilities that track each manufacturing and packaging component as we receive it from our supply sources through manufacturing and shipment of each product to customers. To facilitate this tracking, most products we sell are bar coded. Our inventory control systems report shipping, sales and, in most cases, individual SKU level inventory information. We manage the retail sales process by monitoring customer sales and inventory levels by product category. We believe our distribution capabilities increase our flexibility in responding to our customers' delivery requirements. Our purchasing and merchandising staff regularly reviews and analyzes information from our U.S. point-of-sale computer system and makes merchandise allocation and markdown decisions based on this information. We use an automated reorder system in the United States to maintain in-stock positions on key items. These systems give us the information we need to determine the proper timing and quantity of reorders.

        Our financial reporting systems provide us with detailed financial reporting to support our operating decisions and cost control efforts. These systems provide functions such as payment scheduling, application of payment receipts, general ledger interface, vendor tracking and flexible reporting options.

Competition; Customers

        The market for nutritional supplement products is highly competitive. Our direct competition consists of publicly and privately owned companies, which tend to be highly fragmented in terms of both geographic market coverage and product categories. Competition is based primarily on quality and assortment of products, customer service (including timely deliveries), marketing support, availability of new products and price. Given our significant scale and broad scope relative to our competition, strong

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innovation capabilities, high-quality manufacturing and vertical integration, we believe that we are well positioned to capitalize on the industry's favorable long term secular trends and gain share.

        There are numerous companies in the VMHS industry with which we compete that sell products to retailers, including mass merchandisers, convenience stores, drug store chains, club stores, independent drug stores, supermarkets and health food stores.

        During fiscal 2015 and 2014, Wal-Mart, individually, accounted for 18% and 19% of our Consumer Products Group segment's net sales, respectively, and 11% and 11% of our consolidated net sales, respectively. As of September 30, 2015, Wal-Mart, individually, accounted for 11% of our Consumer Products Group segment's gross accounts receivable. We sell products to Wal-Mart under individual purchase orders placed by Wal-Mart under Wal-Mart's standard terms and conditions of sale. These terms and conditions include insurance requirements; representations by us with respect to the quality of our products and our manufacturing process; our obligations to comply with law; and indemnifications by us if we breach our representations or obligations. There is no commitment from Wal-Mart to purchase from us, or from us to sell to Wal-Mart, any minimum amount of product. The loss of Wal-Mart, or any other major customer, would have a material adverse effect on us if we were unable to replace that customer. See "Item 1A. Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Our Business—One of our customers accounted for 11% of our consolidated net sales during fiscal 2015, and the loss of this customer, or any of our other major customers, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations."

Government Regulation

    United States

        The processing, formulation, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, advertising, distribution and sale of our products are subject to regulation by federal agencies, including the FDA, the United States Federal Trade Commission ("FTC"), the U.S. Customs and Border Protection ("CBP"), the U.S. Postal Service ("USPS"), the Consumer Product Safety Commission ("CPSC"), the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety & Health Administration ("OSHA") and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ("EPA"). These activities also are subject to regulation by various agencies of the states, localities and foreign countries in which we sell our products. In particular, the FDA, under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the "FDCA"), regulates the biennial registration, formulation, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, distribution and sale of foods, including dietary supplements, vitamins, minerals and herbs and cosmetics. The FTC regulates the advertising of these products, and the USPS regulates advertising claims with respect to such products sold by mail order. The National Advertising Division ("NAD") of the Council of Better Business Bureaus oversees an industry-sponsored self-regulatory system that permits competitors to resolve disputes over advertising claims, applying FTC guides and rules and prior NAD decisions. The NAD may refer matters to the FTC and/or other agencies for further action, if the advertiser does not participate in the NAD system or implement the NAD's recommendations.

        The FDCA has been amended several times with respect to dietary supplements, in particular by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 ("DSHEA"). DSHEA establishes a framework governing the composition and labeling of dietary supplements. With respect to composition, DSHEA defines "dietary supplements" as vitamins, minerals, herbs, other botanicals, amino acids and other dietary substances for human use to supplement the diet, as well as concentrates, constituents, extracts or combinations of such dietary ingredients. Generally, under DSHEA, dietary ingredients that were marketed in the United States before October 15, 1994 may be used in dietary supplements without notifying the FDA. However, a "new" dietary ingredient (a dietary ingredient that was not marketed in the United States before October 15, 1994) must be the subject of a new dietary ingredient notification submitted to the FDA unless the ingredient has been "present in

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the food supply as an article used for food" without being "chemically altered." A new dietary ingredient notification must provide the FDA with evidence of a "history of use or other evidence of safety" establishing that use of the dietary ingredient "will reasonably be expected to be safe." A new dietary ingredient notification must be submitted to the FDA at least 75 days before the initial marketing of the new dietary ingredient. There can be no assurance that the FDA will accept the evidence of safety for any new dietary ingredients that we may want to market, and the FDA's refusal to accept such evidence could prevent the marketing of such dietary ingredients. The FDA has published guidance for the industry to attempt to clarify the FDA's interpretation of the new dietary ingredient notification requirements, and this guidance raises new challenges to the development of new dietary ingredients. In addition, increased FDA enforcement could lead the FDA to challenge dietary ingredients already on the market as "illegal" under the FDCA because of the failure to submit a new dietary ingredient notification.

        The FDA generally prohibits the use in labeling for a dietary supplement of any "disease claim," correlating use of the product with a decreased risk of disease, unless the claim is specifically pre-approved or authorized by the FDA. DSHEA permits "statements of nutritional support" to be included in labeling for dietary supplements without FDA pre-approval. Such statements may describe how a particular dietary ingredient affects the structure, function or general well-being of the body, or the mechanism of action by which a dietary ingredient may affect body structure, function or well-being (but may not state that a dietary supplement will diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent a disease). FDA deems internet materials as labeling in most cases, so our internet materials must comply with FDA requirements and could be the subject of regulatory action if the FDA, or the FTC reviewing the materials as advertising, considers the materials false or misleading. A company that uses a statement of nutritional support in labeling must possess evidence substantiating that the statement is truthful and not misleading. FTC has in recent years imposed extremely stringent, claim-specific substantiation standards on certain dietary supplement manufacturers, to settle charges that they deceptively advertised their supplements' efficacy. When such a claim is made on labels, we must disclose on the label that the FDA has not "evaluated" the statement, disclose that the product is not intended for use for a disease, and notify the FDA about our use of the statement within 30 days of marketing the product. However, there can be no assurance that the FDA will not determine that a particular statement of nutritional support that we want to use is an "unauthorized health or disease claim" or an unauthorized version of a "health claim." Such a determination might prevent us from using the claim.

        In addition, DSHEA provides that certain so-called "third-party literature," such as a reprint of a peer-reviewed scientific publication linking a particular dietary ingredient with health benefits, may be used "in connection with the sale of a dietary supplement to consumers" without the literature being subject to regulation as labeling. Such literature must not be, among other things, false or misleading; the literature may not promote a particular manufacturer or brand of dietary supplement; and the literature must present a balanced view of the available scientific information on the subject matter. There can be no assurance, however, that all third-party literature that we would like to disseminate in connection with our products will satisfy these requirements, and failure to satisfy all requirements could prevent use of the literature or subject the product involved to regulation as an unapproved drug.

        As authorized by DSHEA, the FDA adopted GMPs specifically for dietary supplements, which became effective in June 2008. These GMP regulations are more detailed than the GMPs that previously applied to dietary supplements and require, among other things, dietary supplements to be prepared, packaged and held in compliance with specific rules, and require quality control provisions similar to those in the GMP regulations for drugs. We believe our manufacturing and distribution practices comply with these new rules.

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        We also must comply with the Dietary Supplement and Nonprescription Drug Consumer Protection Act (the "AER Act"), which became effective in December 2007. The AER Act amended the FDCA to require that manufacturers, packers, and distributors of dietary supplements report serious adverse events (as defined in the AER Act) to the FDA within specific time periods. We believe we are in compliance with the AER Act.

        The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act ("FSMA"), signed into law by President Obama on January 4, 2011, is considered one of the most significant changes to the FDCA with respect to strengthening the U.S. food safety system. It enables the FDA to focus more on preventing food safety problems rather than relying primarily on reacting to problems after they occur. The law also provides the FDA with new enforcement authorities designed to achieve higher rates of compliance with prevention- and risk-based food safety standards and to better respond to and contain problems when they do occur. The law also gives the FDA important new tools to hold imported foods to the same standards as domestic foods and directs the FDA to build an integrated national food safety system in partnership with state and local authorities. The law has led to increased FDA food inspections and questions at customs regarding imported goods.

        The FDA has broad authority to enforce the provisions of the FDCA applicable to foods, dietary supplements and cosmetics, including powers to issue a public "warning letter" to a company, to publicize information about illegal products, to request a voluntary recall of illegal products from the market, and to request the Department of Justice to initiate a seizure action, an injunction action, or a criminal prosecution in the U.S. courts.

        The FTC exercises jurisdiction over the advertising of foods, dietary supplements and cosmetics. In recent years, the FTC has instituted numerous enforcement actions against dietary supplement companies for failure to adequately substantiate claims made in advertising, or for the use of false or misleading advertising claims. These enforcement actions have often resulted in consent decrees requiring higher levels of substantiation for certain health claims and the payment of civil penalties, restitution, or both, by the companies involved. From time to time, the FTC also issues general guidance on various advertising practices that are also applicable to our industry, such as the guidance concerning the use of endorsements and testimonials in advertising and the guidance for mobile and other online advertisers. Failure to comply with such guidance may result in FTC enforcement actions. We currently are subject to FTC consent decrees resulting from past advertising claims for certain of our products. As a result, we are required to maintain compliance with these decrees and are subject to an injunction and substantial civil monetary penalties if we should fail to comply. We are also subject to consent judgments under the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 ("Proposition 65"). Further, the USPS has issued cease and desist orders against certain mail order advertising claims made by dietary supplement manufacturers, including us, and we are required to maintain compliance with the orders applicable to us, subject to civil monetary penalties for any noncompliance. Violations of these orders could result in substantial monetary penalties. These civil penalty actions could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

        We also are subject to regulation under various state and local laws that include provisions governing, among other things, the registration, formulation, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, advertising and distribution of foods, dietary supplements and cosmetics.

        In addition, from time to time in the future, we may become subject to additional laws or regulations administered by the FDA or by other federal, state, local or foreign regulatory authorities, to the repeal of laws or regulations that we consider favorable, such as DSHEA, or to more stringent interpretations of current laws or regulations. We believe that the dietary supplement industry is likely to face a more aggressive enforcement environment in the future even in the absence of new regulation. We cannot predict the nature of future laws, regulations, repeals or interpretations, and we

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cannot predict what effect additional governmental regulation, when and if it occurs, would have on our business in the future. Such developments, however, could require reformulation of certain products to meet new standards, recalls or discontinuance of certain products not able to be reformulated, additional record-keeping requirements, increased documentation of the properties of certain products, additional or different labeling, additional scientific substantiation, additional personnel, or other new requirements. Any such development could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

    European Union

        In the European Union ("EU"), the EU Commission is responsible for developing legislation to regulate foodstuffs and medicines. Although the government of each member state may implement legislation governing these products, national legislation must be compatible with, and cannot be more restrictive than, European requirements. Each member state is responsible for its enforcement of the provisions of European and national legislation.

        In July 2002, the EU published in its Official Journal the final text of a Supplements Directive, which became effective in the EU at that time and which sets out a process and timetable by which the member states must bring their domestic legislation in line with its provisions. The Supplements Directive seeks to harmonize the regulation of the composition, labeling and marketing of food supplements (at this stage only vitamins and minerals) throughout the EU. It does this by specifying what nutrients and nutrient sources may be used (and by interpretation the rest which may not), and the labeling and other information which must be provided on packaging. In addition, the Supplements Directive is intended to regulate the levels at which these nutrients may be present in a supplement. These maximum permitted levels are still to be announced.

        By harmonizing member state legislation, the Supplements Directive should provide opportunities for businesses to market one product or a range of products to a larger number of potential customers without having to reformulate or repackage it. This development may lead to some liberalizing of the more restrictive regimes in Europe, providing new business opportunities. Conversely, however, it may limit the range of nutrients and nutrient sources substantially, and eventually the potencies at which some nutrients may be marketed by us in the more liberal countries in Europe, such as the United Kingdom, which may lead to some reformulation costs and loss of some specialty products.

        In April 2004, the EU published the Herbal Products Directive which requires traditional herbal medicines to be registered in each member state in which they are intended to be marketed. A registration requires a product be manufactured to pharmaceutical GMP standards; however, generally, there is no need to demonstrate efficacy, provided that the product is safe, is manufactured to high standards, and has a history of supply on the market for 30 years, 15 years of which must be in the EU. The Herbal Products Directive is intended to provide a safe harbor in EU law for a number of categories of herbal remedies, which may otherwise be found to fall outside EU law. However, it does not provide a mechanism for new product development, and would entail some compliance costs in registering the many herbal products already on the market. Full compliance was required by April 2011.

        In December 2006, the EU published the Nutrition and Health Claim Regulation to apply from July 1, 2007. This regulation controls nutrition and health claims by means of lists of authorized claims that can be made in advertising, labeling and presentation of all foods, including food supplements, together with the criteria a product must meet to use them. Since December 14, 2012, except in respect of botanical products which will be considered separately, only permitted lists of health claims produced by the European Food Safety Authority and approved by the EU Commission can be used.

        Additional European legislation is being developed to regulate sports nutrition products, including the composition of such products. In particular, such legislation could restrict the type of nutrients we

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may use in our products. Legislation introducing maximum permitted levels for nutrients in fortified foods is also under discussion together with legislation introducing a positive list for enzymes. These proposals, if implemented, could require us to reformulate our existing products. Also, proposals to amend medicine legislation will impact traditional herbal medicines and introduce new requirements, such as Braille labeling, which may lead to higher associated costs.

    United Kingdom

        In the United Kingdom, the two main pieces of legislation that affect the operations of our Holland & Barrett and GNC / MET-Rx branded stores are the Medicines Act 1968, which regulates the licensing and sale of medicines, and the Food Safety Act 1990, which provides for the safety of food products. A large volume of secondary legislation in the form of Statutory Instruments adds detail to the main provisions of these Acts, governing composition, packaging, labeling and advertising of products.

        In the United Kingdom regulatory system, a product intended to be taken orally will fall within either the category of food or the category of medicine. There is currently no special category of dietary supplement as provided for in the United States by DSHEA. Some products which are intended to be applied externally, for example creams and ointments, may be classified as medicines and others as cosmetics.

        The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency ("MHRA"), an executive agency of the Department of Health, has responsibility for the implementation and enforcement of the Medicines Act 1968 and the Herbal Products Directive, and is the licensing authority for medicinal products. The MHRA directly employs enforcement officers from a wide range of backgrounds, including the police, and with a wide range of skills, including information technology. However, the MHRA still relies heavily on competitor complaints to identify non-compliant products. The MHRA decides whether a product is a medicine or not and, if so, considers whether it can be licensed. It determines the status of a product by considering whether it is medicinal by "presentation" or by "function."

        The FSA deals with legislation, policy and oversight of food products, with enforcement action in most situations being handled by local authority Trading Standards Officers. The large number of local authorities in the United Kingdom can lead to an inconsistent approach to enforcement. Unlike the MHRA, local authorities regularly purchase products and analyze them to identify issues of non-compliance. Most vitamin and mineral supplements, and some products with herbal ingredients, are considered to be food supplements and fall under general food law which requires them to be safe. Despite the differences in approaches in identifying non-compliant products, both the MHRA and local authorities can, and do, prosecute where issues of non-compliance are identified.

    Ireland

        The legislative and regulatory situation in the Republic of Ireland is similar, but not identical, to that in the United Kingdom. The Health Products Regulatory Authority has a similar role to that of the U.K.'s MHRA and the Food Safety Authority of Ireland is analogous to the U.K.'s FSA. Ireland has brought its domestic legislation into line with the provisions of the Supplements Directive and the Herbal Products Directive. Thus, the market prospects for Ireland, in general, are similar to those outlined in the United Kingdom.

    Netherlands

        The regulatory environment in the Netherlands is similar to the United Kingdom in terms of availability of products. The Netherlands currently has the same liberal market, with no restrictions on potency of nutrients. Licensed herbal medicines are available. However, some herbal medicines are sold freely as in the United Kingdom without the need to be licensed, based on the claims made for them.

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The Netherlands is also more liberal regarding certain substances, for which unlicensed sales are allowed. The government department dealing with this sector is the Ministry for Health, Welfare and Sport.

        Responsibility for food safety falls to the Inspectorate for Health Protection and Veterinary Public Health (Voedsel en Warenautoriteit), which deals with all nutritional products. The Medicines Evaluation Board (College ter Beoordeling van Geneesmiddelen), which is the equivalent of the U.K.'s MHRA, is charged with responsibility for the safety of medicines which are regulated under the Supply of Medicines Act.

        The overall market prospects for the Netherlands, in general, are similar to those outlined for the United Kingdom above. Traditional herbal medicinal products that are currently on sale in the Netherlands fall within the scope of the Herbal Products Directive.

    Canada

        Natural health products ("NHPs"), prescription drugs, and non-prescription drugs are all classified and regulated under the federal Food and Drugs Act (Canada) (the "Canadian FDA").

        The product safety, quality, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, storage, importation, advertising, distribution, sale and clinical trials of NHPs, drugs, cosmetics and foods are subject to regulation primarily under the Canadian FDA and associated regulations, including the Food and Drug Regulations, Cosmetic Regulations and the Natural Health Products Regulations, and related Health Canada guidance documents and policies (collectively, the "Canadian Regulations"). In addition, drugs and NHPs are regulated under the federal Controlled Drugs and Substances Act if the product is considered a "controlled substance" or a "precursor," as defined in that statute or in related regulatory provisions.

        Health Canada is primarily responsible for administering the Canadian FDA and the Canadian Regulations.

        The Canadian FDA and Canadian Regulations also set out requirements for establishment and site licenses, market authorization for drugs and NHP licenses. Each NHP must have a product license or a Homeopathic Medicine Number ("DIN-HM") issued by Health Canada before it can be sold in Canada. Health Canada assigns a natural health product number ("NPN") to each NHP once Health Canada issues the license for that NHP. The Canadian Regulations require that all drugs and NHPs be manufactured, packaged, labeled, imported, distributed and stored under Canadian GMPs or the equivalent thereto, and that all premises used for manufacturing, packaging, labeling and importing drugs and NHPs have a site license (NHPs) or establishment license (drugs), which requires GMP compliance. The Canadian Regulations also set out requirements for labeling, packaging, clinical trials and adverse reaction reporting.

        The Canadian FDA and Canadian Regulations, among other things, govern the manufacture, formulation, packaging, labeling, advertising and sale of NHPs and drugs, and regulate what may be represented on labels and in promotional materials regarding the claimed properties of products. The Canadian Regulations also require NHPs and drugs sold in Canada to affix a label showing specified information, such as the proper and common name of the medicinal and non- medicinal ingredients and their source, the name and address of the manufacturer/product license holder, its lot number, adequate directions for use, a quantitative list of its medical ingredients and its expiration date. In addition, the Canadian Regulations require labeling to bear evidence of the marketing authorization as evidenced by the designation drug identification number ("DIN"), DIN-HM or NPN, followed by an eight-digit number assigned to the product and issued by Health Canada.

        Health Canada can perform routine and unannounced inspections of companies in the industry to ensure compliance with the Canadian Regulations. In June 2015, Health Canada completed an

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inspection of Good Manufacturing Practices of the OTC drug operations of our Canadian subsidiary and identified certain deficiencies. See "Item 1A. Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Our Business—We may be exposed to legal proceedings initiated by regulators in the United States or abroad that could increase our costs and adversely affect our reputation, revenues and operating income" for additional information. The overall risk factors and market prospects for Canada, in general, are similar to those in the United States, as outlined above. Health Canada can suspend or revoke licenses for lack of compliance. In addition, if Health Canada perceives a product to present an unacceptable level of risk, it can also impose fines and jail terms. The advertising of drugs and NHPs in Canada also is regulated under the misleading advertising and deceptive marketing practices of the Competition Act (Canada), a federal statute. The labeling of products also may be regulated under the federal Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act (Canada) and also under certain provincial statutes. Both the Competition Act and the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act (except in respect of food products) are administered by the federal Competition Bureau. See "Item 1A. Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Our Business—Complying with new and existing government regulation, both in the United States and abroad, could increase our costs significantly, reduce our growth prospects and adversely affect our financial results," for additional information.

    China

        In China, the packaging, labeling, importation, advertising, distribution and sale of our products are primarily subject to the Food Safety Law, as well as other various laws, administrative regulations, rules, orders and policies issued by the national and local government agencies regarding food regulation (collectively "PRC Food Regulations").

        On October 1, 2015, an amendment to the China Food Safety Law became effective (the "Food Safety Law Amendment"). The Food Safety Law Amendment established a dual "registration" and "notification" system for health foods depending on the type of product sold. Health food products that contain new health food ingredients or are imported into China for the first time are subject to registration with the China Food and Drug Administration ("CFDA"). All other health food products are subject to a notification process with the provincial-level food and drug regulatory authorities. The CFDA has also released draft administrative regulations regarding the registration and notification of health food products and the type of ingredients and function claims that can be used in such products. The CFDA new administrative regulations are expected to become effective by the end of calendar 2015.

        Currently, the National Health and Family Planning Commission ("NHFPC"), the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine ("AQSIQ"), the CFDA, the State Administration for Industry and Commerce ("SAIC") and their local counterparts have the power and responsibility for the implementation and enforcement of the PRC Food Regulations. In particular, the NHFPC is responsible for enacting food safety standards, publishing food safety information and coordinating with other agencies to handle major food safety incidents. The AQSIQ (mostly through its local counterparts) is responsible for inspection and regulation of the imported food as well as quality inspection and control. The SAIC (mostly through its local counterparts) is responsible for regulating the advertising of food. The CFDA (together with its local counterparts) is responsible for examination and approval of the registration, labeling, advertising and supervision of health foods (including imported health foods).

        The AQSIQ, the SAIC, the CFDA and their local counterparts can perform routine and unannounced inspections of importers and distributors in the food industry to ensure compliance with the PRC Food Regulations. In recent years, these government agencies have jointly taken numerous inspection and enforcement actions to deal with non-compliance in the food market and promote sound development of food industry in China. The enforcement actions have often resulted in

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correction orders, monetary penalties, revocation of business licenses or approval certificates, or suspension of import decisions imposed by such agencies for non-compliance.

        Since 2014, in anticipation of the enactment of the Food Safety Law Amendment, the CFDA, AQSIQ, their local counterparts and certain ports of entry strengthened overall administration on dietary supplement products and their interpretation of the original Food Safety Law. The CFDA took the position that many dietary supplements should not have been sold as general foods under the original Food Safety Law and commenced actions against manufacturers and marketers of dietary supplements. The CFDA has also initiated an investigation primarily focused on our categorization of prior sales of certain of our products in China as general foods.

        The Food Safety Law Amendment and related administrative regulations have provided more clarity around the regulatory regime governing health food products and provide for a dual registration and notification based system, which is intended to create a more streamlined and simplified process compared to the registration system that was previously in place with respect to certain dietary supplements. Even though the Food Safety Law Amendment is intended to simplify the regulatory regime and registration/notification procedures for certain products going forward, certain of our products containing higher potencies or otherwise sensitive ingredients require reformulation, relabeling or discontinuance, which will adversely affect our Chinese operations.

Environmental Regulation

        Our facilities and operations, in common with those of similar industries making similar products, are subject to many federal, state, provincial and local requirements, rules and regulations relating to the protection of the environment and of human health and safety, including those regulating the discharge of materials into the environment. We continually examine ways to reduce our emissions, minimize waste and limit our exposure to any liabilities, as well as decrease costs related to environmental compliance. Costs to comply with current and anticipated environmental requirements, rules and regulations and any estimated capital expenditures for environmental control facilities are not anticipated to be material when compared with overall costs and capital expenditures. Accordingly, we do not anticipate that such costs will have a material effect on our financial position, results of operations, cash flows or competitive position.

International Operations

        We market nutritional supplement products through subsidiaries, distributors, retailers and e-commerce in approximately 100 countries throughout Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Central America, North America, South America, Asia, the Caribbean islands and the Pacific Rim countries.

        We conduct our international operations to conform to local variations, economic realities, market customs, consumer habits and regulatory environments. We modify our products (including labeling of such products) and our distribution and marketing programs in response to local and foreign legal requirements and customer preferences.

        Our international operations are subject to many of the same risks our domestic operations face. These include competition and the strength of the relevant economy. In addition, international operations are subject to certain risks inherent in conducting business abroad, including foreign regulatory restrictions, fluctuations in monetary exchange rates, import-export controls and the economic and political policies of foreign governments. Government regulations in foreign countries may prevent or delay the introduction, or require the reformulation, of certain of our products. Compliance with such foreign governmental regulations is generally the responsibility of our distributors in those countries. These distributors are independent contractors whom we do not control. The importance of these risks increases as our international operations grow and expand. Foreign currency fluctuations, and, more particularly, changes in the value of the British pound sterling, the

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euro, the Canadian dollar and the Chinese renminbi as compared to the U.S. dollar, affect virtually all our international operations.

        See Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations," for additional information regarding the geographic areas in which we conduct our business and the effect of foreign currency exchange rates on our operations.

Trademarks and Patents

    General

        We own trademarks registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (the "PTO") and many foreign jurisdictions for our Nature's Bounty®, Holland & Barrett®, Puritan's Pride®, Vitamin World®, Sundown®, Pure Protein®, Solgar®, Body Fortress®, Osteo Bi-Flex®, MET-Rx®, Balance Bar®, American Health®, and Ester-C® , trademarks, among others, and with the appropriate European authorities for our Holland & Barrett®, De Tuinen, and Essenza® trademarks, among others. We have an exclusive license to use the GNC mark in the United Kingdom. Our policy is to pursue registrations for all trademarks associated with our key products. U.S. registered trademarks have a perpetual life, as do trademarks in most other jurisdictions, as long as they are renewed on a timely basis and used properly as trademarks, subject to the rights of third parties to seek cancellation of the trademarks. We regard our trademarks and other proprietary rights as valuable assets and believe they have significant value in marketing our products.

        We have developed many brand names, trademarks and other intellectual property for products in all areas. We consider the overall protection of our patent, trademark, license and other intellectual property rights to be paramount. As such, we vigorously protect these rights against infringement. We have approximately 2,450 trademark registrations and applications with the PTO or foreign trademark offices.

        We hold approximately 50 patents and patent applications in the United States and in certain other countries, most of which relate to Ester-C®. U.S. patents for Ester-C® expire June 2019. Most foreign patents for Ester-C® products expire between February 2019 and June 2021, with a large number of foreign patents expiring in 2019.

    Canada

        We have registered the Vita Health®, Nature's Bounty®, MET-Rx® and SISU® trademarks in Canada.

    United Kingdom/Ireland

        We have registered the Holland & Barrett® trademark in the United Kingdom and in the EU, and have rights to use other names essential to the Holland & Barrett business. Holland & Barrett International Limited uses GNC trademarks under an exclusive license in the United Kingdom. We also own Solgar® trademarks in the United Kingdom and in the EU.

    Benelux

        We have registered the De Tuinen® trademark in the Benelux Office for Intellectual Property. The De Tuinen® and Essenza® trademarks are also registered as Community Trademarks, which are in force throughout the EU.

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    China

        We own trademark applications and registrations for most of our material trademarks, which are filed with the Chinese Trademark Office. We also own patents for Ester-C® compositions, issued by the Chinese Patent Office.

Raw Materials

        In fiscal 2015, we spent approximately $643 million on raw materials (approximately $573 million domestically), excluding packaging and similar product materials. The principal raw materials required in our operations are vitamins, minerals, herbs and gelatin. We believe that there are adequate sources of supply for all our principal raw materials, and in general we maintain two to three suppliers for many of our raw materials. From time to time, weather or unpredictable fluctuations in the supply and demand may affect price, quantity, availability or selection of raw materials. We believe that our strong relationships with our suppliers yield high quality, competitive pricing and overall good service to our customers. Although we cannot be sure that our sources of supply for our principal raw materials will be adequate in all circumstances, we believe that we can develop alternate sources in a timely and cost effective manner if our current sources become inadequate. During fiscal 2015, no one raw material supplier accounted for more than 10% of our raw material purchases. Due to availability of numerous alternative raw material suppliers, we do not believe that the loss of any single raw material supplier would have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial condition or results of operations.

        For a description of the impact of seasonality on our financial performance, please see Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Seasonality."

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Item 1A.    Risk Factors

        Please carefully consider the following risk factors, which could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, operating results and cash flows. The risk factors described below are not the only ones we face. Risks and uncertainties not known to us currently, or that may appear immaterial, also may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results and cash flows.

Risks Relating to Our Business

Unfavorable publicity or consumer perception of our products and any similar products distributed by other companies could have a material adverse effect on our business.

        We believe the nutritional supplement market is highly dependent upon consumer perception regarding the safety, efficacy and quality of nutritional supplements generally, as well as of products distributed specifically by us. Consumer perception of our products can be significantly influenced by scientific research or findings, regulatory investigations, litigation, national media attention and other publicity regarding the consumption of nutritional supplements. There can be no assurance that future scientific research, findings, regulatory proceedings, litigation, media attention or other research findings or publicity will be favorable to the nutritional supplement market or any particular product, or consistent with earlier publicity. Future research reports, findings, regulatory proceedings, litigation, media attention or other publicity that are perceived as less favorable than, or that question, earlier research reports, findings or publicity could have a material adverse effect on the demand for our products and our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. Our dependence upon consumer perceptions means that adverse scientific research reports, findings, regulatory proceedings, litigation, media attention or other publicity, whether or not accurate or with merit, could have a material adverse effect on us, the demand for our products, and our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. Further, adverse publicity reports or other media attention regarding the safety, efficacy and quality of nutritional supplements in general, or our products specifically, or associating the consumption of nutritional supplements with illness, could have such a material adverse effect. Such adverse publicity reports or other media attention could arise even if the adverse effects associated with such products resulted from consumers' failure to consume such products appropriately or as directed.

Our success is linked to the size and growth rate of the vitamin, mineral and supplement market and an adverse change in the size or growth rate of that market could have a material adverse effect on us.

        An adverse change in size or growth rate of the vitamin, mineral and supplement market could have a material adverse effect on us. Underlying market conditions are subject to change based on economic conditions, consumer preferences and other factors that are beyond our control, including media attention and scientific research, which may be positive or negative.

Our ability to obtain additional capital on commercially reasonable terms may be limited or non-existent.

        Although we believe our cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments, as well as future cash from operations and availability under NBTY's revolving credit facility, provide adequate resources to fund ongoing operating requirements for the foreseeable future, we may need to seek additional financing to compete effectively.

        If we are unable to obtain capital or obtain capital on commercially reasonable terms, it could:

    reduce funds available to us for purposes such as working capital, capital expenditures, research and development, strategic acquisitions and other general corporate purposes;

    restrict our ability to introduce new services or products or exploit business opportunities;

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    increase our vulnerability to economic downturns and competitive pressures in the markets in which we operate; and

    place us at a competitive disadvantage.

Difficult and volatile conditions in the capital, credit and commodities markets and in the overall economy could materially adversely affect our financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

        Our financial position, results of operations and cash flows could be materially adversely affected by difficult conditions and volatility in the capital, credit and commodities markets and in the overall economy. Difficult conditions in these markets and the overall economy affect our business in a number of ways. For example:

    under difficult market conditions there can be no assurance that borrowings under our revolving credit facility would be available or sufficient, and in such a case, we may not be able to successfully obtain additional financing on reasonable terms, or at all;

    in order to respond to market conditions, we may need to seek waivers of various provisions in NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, and we might not be able to obtain such waivers on reasonable terms, if at all; and

    market conditions could result in our key customers experiencing financial difficulties and/or electing to limit spending because many consumers consider the purchase of our products discretionary, which in turn could result in decreased sales and earnings for us.

Because a substantial majority of our Consumer Products Group sales are to or through retail stores, we are dependent to a large degree upon the success of this channel as well as the success of specific retailers in the channel.

        Approximately 60% of our sales for fiscal 2015 were in the United States. In this market, we sell our Consumer Products Group products primarily to or through our retail stores and third-party retail stores. Because of this, we are dependent to a large degree upon the growth and success of that channel as well as the growth and success of specific retailers in the channel, which are outside our control. There can be no assurance that the retail channel will be able to grow as it faces price and service pressure from other channels.

One of our customers accounted for 11% of our consolidated net sales during fiscal 2015 and the loss of this customer, or any of our other major customers, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

        During fiscal 2015 and 2014, Wal-Mart, individually, accounted for 18% and 19% of our Consumer Products Group segment's net sales, respectively, and 11% and 11% of our consolidated net sales, respectively. As of the end of fiscal 2015, Wal-Mart, individually, accounted for 11% of our Consumer Products Group segment's total gross accounts receivable. Additionally, for fiscal 2015, our other top three Consumer Products Group customers collectively accounted for approximately 31%, of our Consumer Products Group segment's net sales and 18% of our consolidated net sales. We do not have a long-term contract with Wal-Mart or any other major customer, and the loss of this customer or any other major customer could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. In addition, our results of operations and ability to service our debt obligations would be impacted negatively to the extent Wal-Mart is unable to make payments to us, or does not make timely payments on outstanding accounts receivables.

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Complying with new and existing government regulation, both in the United States and abroad, could increase our costs significantly, reduce our growth prospects and adversely affect our financial results.

        The processing, formulation, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, advertising, distribution and sale of our products are subject to regulation by several U.S. federal agencies, including the FDA, the FTC, the CBP, the USPS, the CPSC, the Department of Agriculture, OSHA and the EPA, as well as various state, local and international laws and agencies of the localities in which our products are sold, including Health Canada and the Competition Bureau in Canada, the Food Standards Agency ("FSA") and the Department of Health in the United Kingdom and similar regulators in Ireland, the Netherlands, the EU and China. Government regulations may prevent or delay the introduction, or require the reformulation or relabeling, of our products. Some agencies, such as the FDA, could require us to remove a particular product from the market, delay or prevent the import of raw materials for the manufacture of our products, or otherwise disrupt the marketing of our products. Any such government actions would result in additional costs to us, including lost revenues from any additional products that we are required to remove from the market, which could be material. Any such government actions also could lead to liability, substantial costs and reduced growth prospects. In addition, complying with the AER Act, GMPs and other legislation may impose additional costs on us, which could become significant. Moreover, there can be no assurance that new laws or regulations imposing more stringent regulatory requirements on the dietary supplement industry will not be enacted or issued or that certain agencies will not enforce the existing laws or regulations more strictly. We currently are subject to FTC consent decrees and a USPS consent order, prohibiting certain advertising claims for certain of our products. We also are subject to consent judgments under Proposition 65. A determination that we have violated these obligations could result in substantial monetary penalties, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. In addition, we could incur costs as a result of violations of or liabilities hereunder, environmental laws and regulations, or to maintain compliance with such environmental laws, regulations or permit requirements.

        Additional or more stringent regulations and enforcement of dietary supplements and other products have been considered from time to time in the United States and globally. These developments could require reformulation of certain products to meet new standards, recalls or discontinuance of certain products not able to be reformulated, additional record-keeping requirements, increased documentation of the properties of certain products, additional or different labeling, additional scientific substantiation, adverse event reporting or other new requirements. These developments also could increase our costs significantly. In the United Kingdom, an application for judicial review was submitted to the High Court of Justice in 2013 on behalf of a holder of an EU-wide medicinal license for certain glucosamine products. The application sought an order that the MHRA should remove food supplement ("FS") status for all glucosamine products or, alternatively, remove the FS status of glucosamine-based products having dosages at levels equal to or above the licensed equivalents. The MHRA robustly defended the case and the application was rejected by the High Court in June 2014—as was a subsequent application to the High Court for leave to appeal. However, the applicant subsequently obtained leave to appeal by applying to the Court of Appeal itself. The appeal is due to be heard in May 2016 and, if ultimately successful, there may be a material negative impact on the sales of numerous glucosamine-based products currently being sold by our stores in the United Kingdom.

        In Europe, we anticipate the enactment of legislation that could significantly impact the formulation and marketing of our products. For example, in accordance with the Supplements Directive, maximum permitted content levels for vitamin and mineral supplements are expected to be enacted but have not yet been announced. European legislation regulating food supplements other than vitamins and minerals also is expected to be introduced. The introduction of this anticipated legislation

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could require us to reformulate our existing products to meet the new standards and, in some cases, may lead to some products being discontinued.

        The Nutrition and Health Claims Regulation implemented in July 2007 controls the types of claims that can be made for foodstuffs (including supplements) in Europe, and the criteria a product must meet for the claims to be made. Except in relation to botanical products, after December 14, 2012, only certain permitted health claims can be made for foodstuffs, and this may impact our sales of those products in Europe.

        In addition, the General Product Safety Directive governing product safety came into force in Europe at the beginning of 2004. This legislation requires manufacturers to notify regulators as soon as they know that a product is unsafe and gives regulators in each EU member state the power to order a product recall and, if necessary, instigate the product recall themselves. A recall of any of our products in Europe could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

        In China, the Food Safety Law Amendment is effective as of October 1, 2015. This legislation requires all imported food to comply with applicable national food safety standards and subjects it to inspection by the AQSIQ. Where there are no national food safety standards for some imported food, the NHFPC approval must be obtained before applying for the inspection; otherwise the food in question cannot be imported into China.

        Under the Food Safety Law Amendment, the CFDA released draft administrative regulations regarding the registration and notification of health food products and the type of ingredients and function claims that can be used in such products. The introduction of these administrative regulations are expected to require us to reformulate our existing products to meet the new standards, file registrations or notifications, or discontinue certain products.

        The Food Safety Law Amendment also requires overseas food manufacturers to register with AQSIQ or its local counterparts, which must establish records of the credit standing of importers, exporters and manufacturers of imported goods. The imported foods, importers, exporters or manufacturers with unsatisfactory records are subject to stricter inspection or even suspension of their import business. Any restriction or suspension of import of any of our products into China could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

        The Food Safety Law Amendment provides for strict regulation and supervision over food claimed to have particular effects on human health, namely health food. To the extent AQSIQ or CFDA determines some of our products fall into this category, the manufacture, exportation, importation and sale of such products could be subject to the new registration and notification based registration requirements, and stricter inspection by CFDA and AQSIQ. We are in the process of applying for registration of certain of our products as health food to meet applicable requirements for manufacture and export of such products, however, the timing and successful completion of such registrations are uncertain due to the shifting landscape for registration of such products in China, as further explained immediately below.

        AQSIQ promulgated the Imported and Exported Food Safety Regulatory Measures on July 22, 2011, which provide for detailed safety and inspection requirements applicable to imported and exported food. These regulations became effective on March 1, 2012 and require us to go through complicated procedures for importing and exporting our products into and from China.

        Since 2014, in anticipation of the enactment of the Food Safety Law Amendment, the CFDA, AQSIQ, their local counterparts and certain ports of entry strengthened overall administration on dietary supplement products and their interpretation of the original Food Safety Law. The CFDA took the position that many dietary supplements should not have been sold as general foods under the original Food Safety Law and commenced actions against manufacturers and marketers of dietary

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supplements. The CFDA has also initiated an investigation primarily focused on our categorization of prior sales of certain of our products in China as general foods.

        The Food Safety Law Amendment and related administrative regulations have provided more clarity around the regulatory regime governing "health food" products and provide for a dual registration and notification based system, which is intended to create a more streamlined and simplified process compared to the registration system that was previously in place with respect to certain dietary supplements. Even though the Food Safety Law Amendment is intended to simplify the regulatory regime and registration/notification procedures for certain products going forward, certain of our products containing higher potencies or otherwise sensitive ingredients require reformulation, relabeling or discontinuance, which will have a material adverse effect on our business operations in China. In addition, the CFDA and AQSIQ may continue to take actions that can, together with the current CFDA investigation, adversely impact our ability to import products into China and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

        See "Item 1. Business—Government Regulation" for more information about the regulatory environment in which we conduct our business.

We may incur material product liability claims, which could increase our costs and adversely affect our reputation, revenues and operating income.

        As a retailer, marketer and manufacturer of products designed for human and animal consumption, we are subject to product liability claims if the use of our products is alleged to have resulted in injury. Our products consist of vitamins, minerals, herbs and other ingredients that are classified as foods, dietary supplements, or NHPs, and, in most cases, are not necessarily subject to pre-market regulatory approval in the United States. One of our Canadian subsidiaries also manufactures and sells non-prescription medications such as headache and cold remedies and contract manufactures some prescription medications. Some of our products contain innovative ingredients that do not have long histories of human consumption. Previously unknown adverse reactions resulting from human consumption of these ingredients could occur. In addition, some of the products we sell are produced by third-party manufacturers. As a marketer of products manufactured by third parties, we also may be liable for various product liability claims for products we do not manufacture. We have been in the past, and may be in the future, subject to various product liability claims, including, among others, that our products include inadequate instructions for use or inadequate warnings concerning possible side effects and interactions with other substances. A product liability claim against us could result in increased costs and could adversely affect our reputation with our customers, which, in turn, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. See Item 3, "Legal Proceedings," for additional information.

If we experience product recalls, we may incur significant and unexpected costs, and our business reputation could be adversely affected.

        We may be exposed to product recalls and adverse public relations if our products are mislabeled or alleged to cause injury or illness, or if we are alleged to have violated governmental regulations. A product recall could result in substantial and unexpected expenditures, which would reduce operating profit and cash flow. In addition, a product recall may require significant management attention. Product recalls may hurt the value of our brands and lead to decreased demand for our products. Product recalls also may lead to increased scrutiny by federal, state or international regulatory agencies of our operations and increased litigation and could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. See "—Complying with new and existing government regulation, both in the United States and abroad, could increase our costs significantly, reduce our growth prospects and adversely affect our financial results" and other risks summarized in this Report.

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Insurance coverage, even where available, may not be sufficient to cover losses we may incur.

        Our business exposes us to the risk of liabilities arising from our operations. For example, we may be liable for claims brought by users of our products or by employees, customers or other third parties for personal injury or property damage occurring in the course of our operations. We seek to minimize these risks through various insurance contracts from third-party insurance carriers. However, our insurance coverage is subject to large individual claim deductibles, individual claim and aggregate policy limits, and other terms and conditions. We retain an insurance risk for the deductible portion of each claim and for any gaps in insurance coverage. We do not view insurance, by itself, as a material mitigant to these business risks.

        We cannot assure that our insurance will be sufficient to cover our losses. Any losses that insurance does not substantially cover could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

The insurance industry has become more selective in offering some types of coverage and we may not be able to obtain insurance coverage in the future.

        The insurance industry has become more selective in offering some types of insurance, such as product liability, product recall, property and directors' and officers' liability insurance. Our current insurance program is consistent with both our past level of coverage and our risk management policies. However, we cannot assure that we will be able to obtain comparable insurance coverage on favorable terms, or at all, in the future.

International markets expose us to certain risks.

        As of September 30, 2015, we operated 1,071 retail stores outside of the United States through our Holland & Barrett International segment, including 104 franchised stores. In addition, our Consumer Products Group segment had significant sales outside of the United States. For fiscal 2015, international sales represented approximately 40% of our net sales. These international operations expose us to certain risks, including:

    local economic conditions;

    inflation;

    changes in or interpretations of foreign regulations that may limit our ability to sell certain products or repatriate profits or capital to the United States;

    exposure to currency fluctuations;

    potential imposition of trade or foreign exchange restrictions or increased tariffs;

    changes and limits in export and import controls;

    difficulty in collecting international accounts receivable;

    difficulty in staffing, developing and managing foreign operations;

    potentially longer payment cycles;

    difficulties in enforcement of contractual obligations and intellectual property rights;

    renegotiation or modification of various agreements;

    national and regional labor strikes;

    increased costs in maintaining international manufacturing and marketing efforts;

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    quarantines for products or ingredients, or restricted mobility of key personnel due to disease outbreaks;

    government regulations and laws;

    geographic time zone, language and cultural differences between personnel in different areas of the world;

    political instability;

    trademarks availability and registration issues;

    changes in exchange rates;

    changes in taxation; and

    wars and other hostilities.

As we continue to expand our international operations, these and other risks associated with international operations are likely to increase. These risks, if they occur, could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

Our international operations require us to comply with anti-corruption laws and regulations of the U.S. government and various international jurisdictions in which we do business.

        Doing business on a worldwide basis requires us and our subsidiaries to comply with the laws and regulations of the U.S. government and various international jurisdictions, and our failure to successfully comply with these rules and regulations may expose us to liabilities. These laws and regulations apply to companies, individual directors, officers, employees and agents, and may restrict our operations, trade practices, investment decisions and partnering activities. In particular, our international operations are subject to U.S. and foreign anti-corruption laws and regulations, such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act ("FCPA") and the U.K. Bribery Act ("UKBA"). The FCPA prohibits us from providing anything of value to foreign officials for the purposes of influencing official decisions or obtaining or retaining business or otherwise obtaining favorable treatment, and requires us to maintain adequate record- keeping and internal accounting practices to accurately reflect our transactions. As part of our business, we may deal with state-owned business enterprises, the employees and representatives of which may be considered foreign officials for purposes of the FCPA and UKBA. In addition, some of the international locations in which we operate lack a developed legal system and have elevated levels of corruption. As a result of the above activities, we are exposed to the risk of violating anti-corruption laws. Violations of these legal requirements are punishable by criminal fines and imprisonment, civil penalties, disgorgement of profits, injunctions, debarment from government contracts as well as other remedial measures. We have established policies and procedures designed to assist us and our personnel in complying with applicable U.S. and international laws and regulations. However, there can be no assurance that our policies and procedures will effectively prevent us from violating these regulations in every transaction in which we may engage, and such a violation could adversely affect our reputation, business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may not be successful in expanding globally.

        We may experience difficulty entering new international markets due to regulatory barriers, the necessity of adapting to new regulatory systems, and problems related to entering new markets with different cultural bases and political systems. These difficulties may prevent, or significantly increase the cost of, our international expansion.

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We may be exposed to legal proceedings initiated by regulators in the United States or abroad that could increase our costs and adversely affect our reputation, revenues and operating income.

        In all jurisdictions in which we operate, non-compliance with relevant legislation can result in regulators bringing administrative, civil or, in some cases, criminal proceedings. In the United States, the FTC has brought and considered bringing actions against us in the past. In China, regulators have strengthened administration of regulations on dietary supplements products in conjunction with the Food Safety Law Amendment becoming effective on October 1, 2015 and the CFDA has initiated an investigation primarily focused on our categorization of prior sales of certain of our products in China as general foods. In the United Kingdom, it is common for regulators to prosecute retailers and manufacturers for non-compliance with legislation governing foodstuffs and medicines. In the United States, we are undergoing an audit of our compliance of unclaimed or abandoned property (escheat) laws currently for nineteen states for the years 1986 through the present. On February 2, 2015, the State of New York Office of the Attorney General (the "NY AG") sent letters to several major retailers demanding that they cease and desist selling their store brands for specific manufacturing lots of a select number of popular herbal supplements that the NY AG alleges were inaccurately labeled and also began an investigation concerning the authenticity and purity of herbal supplements and associated marketing. Because we manufacture certain of these private label products, we have been subject to the NY AG's investigation as well as numerous private legal actions filed in various jurisdictions against us since the investigation. On September 9, 2015, the NY AG sent letters to fourteen separate companies, including NBTY, concerning an additional herbal product. The investigations or the related legal actions seek some combination of monetary damages, injunctive relief and specific performance. Until the investigation and the related legal actions are resolved, no final determination can be made as to the ultimate outcome of the litigation or the amount of liability on the part of NBTY. In June 2015, Health Canada completed an inspection of Good Manufacturing Practices of the OTC drug operations of our Canadian subsidiary, Vita Health. In connection with such inspection, Health Canada identified certain deficiencies primarily around electronic data management procedures in Vita Health's quality control laboratory pertaining to OTC drugs. On July 24, 2015, we submitted a remediation plan to Health Canada as Vita Health's formal response to these inspection findings which was accepted by Health Canada with respect to Vita Health's OTC operations. Vita Health also submitted a formal response to these inspection findings with respect to its Natural Health Products (NHPs) operations at the end of fiscal 2015 and expects a response from Health Canada by the end of calendar 2015. If these deficiencies are not addressed in a manner acceptable to Health Canada, additional actions may be taken by Health Canada, including, without limitation, shortened inspection cycles, additional reporting requirements or the suspension or revocation of Vita Health's OTC and/or NHP site licenses. Our failure to comply with applicable legislation could occur from time to time, and prosecution for any such violations could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. See "Item 1. Business—Government Regulation" for additional information.

We may not be successful in our future acquisition endeavors, if any, which may have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

        Historically, we have engaged in substantial acquisition activity. We may be unable to identify suitable targets, opportunistic or otherwise, for acquisition in the future. If we identify a suitable acquisition candidate, our ability to successfully implement the acquisition will depend on a variety of factors, including our ability to obtain financing on acceptable terms and to comply with the restrictions contained in our debt agreements. Historical instability in the financial markets indicates that obtaining future financing to fund acquisitions may present significant challenges. If we need to obtain our lenders' consent to an acquisition, they may condition their consent on our compliance with additional restrictive covenants that may limit our operating flexibility. Acquisitions involve risks, including:

    significant expenditures of cash;

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    the risk that acquired businesses may not perform in accordance with expectations;

    risks associated with integrating the operations, financial reporting, disparate technologies and personnel of acquired companies;

    managing geographically dispersed operations;

    diversion of management's attention from other business concerns;

    the inherent risks in entering markets or lines of business in which we have either limited or no direct experience;

    the potential loss of key employees, customers and strategic partners of acquired companies;

    incurrence of liabilities and claims arising out of acquired businesses;

    inability to obtain financing; and

    incurrence of indebtedness or issuance of additional stock.

        We may not integrate any businesses or technologies we acquire in the future successfully and may not achieve anticipated operating efficiencies and effective coordination of sales and marketing as well as revenue and cost benefits. Acquisitions may be expensive, time consuming and may strain our resources. Acquisitions may impact our results of operations negatively as a result of, among other things, the incurrence of debt.

We are dependent on our executive officers and other key personnel, and we may not be able to pursue our current business strategy effectively if we lose them.

        Our continued success will depend largely on the efforts and abilities of our executive officers and certain other key employees. For additional information about these individuals, see Item 10, "Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance" elsewhere in this Report. Our ability to manage our operations and meet our business objectives could be affected adversely if, for any reason, we are unable to recruit and retain executive talent.

We are dependent on certain third-party suppliers and contract manufacturers.

        We purchase certain important ingredients and raw materials from third-party suppliers and, in certain cases, we engage contract manfuacturers to supply us with finished products such as our protein bars and powders. The principal raw materials required in our operations are vitamins, minerals, herbs, gelatin and packaging components. We purchase the majority of our vitamins, minerals and herbal raw materials from manufacturers and distributors globally. Real or perceived quality control problems with raw materials outsourced from certain regions or finished products manufactured by contract manufacturers could negatively impact consumer confidence in our products, or expose us to liability. In addition, disruption in the operations of any such supplier or manufacturer or material increases in the price of raw materials, for any reason, such as changes in economic and political conditions, tariffs, trade disputes, regulatory requirements, import restrictions, loss of certifications, power interruptions, fires, hurricanes, drought or other climate-related events, war or other events, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. Also, currency fluctuations, including the decline in the value of the U.S. dollar, could result in higher costs for raw materials purchased abroad. In addition, we rely on outside printing services and availability of paper stock in our printed catalog operations.

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We rely on our manufacturing operations to produce the vast majority of the nutritional supplements that we sell, and disruptions in our manufacturing system or losses of manufacturing certifications could affect our results of operations adversely.

        We currently operate manufacturing facilities in Arizona, California, Florida, New Jersey, New York and Texas in the United States, and in Canada, the United Kingdom and China. All our domestic and foreign operations manufacturing products for sale to the United States are subject to GMPs promulgated by the FDA and other applicable regulatory standards, including in the areas of environmental protection and worker health and safety. We are subject to similar regulations and standards in Canada, the United Kingdom and China. Any significant disruption in our operations at any of these facilities, including any disruption due to any regulatory requirement, could affect our ability to respond quickly to changes in consumer demand and could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. Additionally, we may be exposed to risks relating to the transfer of work between facilities or risks associated with opening new facilities or closing existing facilities that may cause a disruption in our operations. There have been a number of well-publicized incidents of tainted food and drugs manufactured in foreign countries such as China in the past few years. Although we have implemented GMPs in our facilities, there can be no assurance that products manufactured in our plants around the world, will not be contaminated or otherwise fail to meet our quality standards. Any such contamination or other quality failures could result in costly recalls, litigation, regulatory actions or damage to our reputation, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

We operate in a highly competitive industry, and our failure to compete effectively could affect our market share, financial condition and growth prospects adversely.

        The VMHS industry is a large and growing industry and is highly fragmented in terms of both geographical market coverage and product categories. The market for vitamins and other nutritional supplements is highly competitive in all our channels of distribution. We compete with companies that may have broader product lines or larger sales volumes, or both, than we do, and our products compete with nationally advertised brand name products. Several of the national brand companies have resources greater than ours. Numerous companies compete with us in the development, manufacture and marketing of vitamins and nutritional supplements worldwide. In addition, our retail stores compete with specialty vitamin stores, health food stores and other retail stores worldwide. With respect to mail order sales, we compete with a large number of smaller mail order and internet companies, some of which manufacture their own products and some of which sell products manufactured by others. The market is highly sensitive to the introduction of new products, which may rapidly capture a significant share of the market. We also may face competition from low-cost entrants to the industry, including from international markets. Increased competition from companies that distribute through the wholesale channel, especially the private label market, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows as these competitors may have greater financial and other resources available to them and possess extensive manufacturing, distribution and marketing capabilities far greater than ours.

        We may not be able to compete effectively in some or all our markets, and our attempt to do so may require us to reduce our prices, which may result in lower margins. Failure to compete effectively could have a material adverse effect on our market share, business, results of operations, financial condition, cash flows and growth prospects. See "Item 1. Business—Competition; Customers."

Our failure to appropriately respond to changing consumer preferences and demand for new products and services could harm our customer relationships and product sales significantly.

        The nutritional supplement industry is characterized by rapid and frequent changes in demand for products and new product introductions. Our failure to accurately predict these trends could negatively

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impact consumer opinion of us as a source for the latest products, which, in turn, could harm our customer relationships and cause decreases in our net sales. The success of our new product offerings depends upon a number of factors, including our ability to:

    accurately anticipate customer needs;

    innovate and develop new products;

    successfully commercialize new products in a timely manner;

    price our products competitively;

    manufacture and deliver our products in sufficient volumes and in a timely manner; and

    differentiate our product offerings from those of our competitors.

        In addition, we are subject to the risk of a potential shift in customer demand towards more private label products, which could have an adverse effect on our profitability. If any new products fail to gain market acceptance, are restricted by regulatory requirements or have quality problems, this would harm our results of operations. If we do not introduce new products or make enhancements to meet the changing needs of our customers in a timely manner, some of our products could be rendered obsolete, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

We are subject to acts of God, war, sabotage and terrorism risk.

        Acts of God, war, sabotage and terrorist attacks or any similar risk may affect our operations in unpredictable ways, including disruptions of the shopping and commercial behavior of our customers, changes in the insurance markets and disruptions of fuel supplies and markets.

We may be subject to work stoppages at our facilities, which could negatively impact the profitability of our business.

        As of September 30, 2015, we had approximately 13,100 employees. As of September 30, 2015, CAW Local 468, Retail Wholesale Canada Division represented approximately 290 of our employees in Canada under a collective bargaining agreement. If our employees were to engage in a strike, work stoppage or other slowdown in the future, we could experience a significant disruption of our operations, which could interfere with our ability to deliver products on a timely basis and could have other negative effects, such as decreased productivity and increased labor costs. Any interruption in the delivery of our products could reduce demand for our products and could have a material adverse effect on us.

We may be affected adversely by increased raw material, utility and fuel costs.

        Inflation and other factors affect the cost of raw materials, goods and services we use. Increased raw material and other costs may adversely affect our results of operations to the extent we are unable to pass these costs through to our customers or to benefit from offsetting cost reductions in the manufacture and distribution of our products. Furthermore, increases in fuel costs may affect our results of operations adversely in that consumer traffic to our retail locations may be reduced and the costs of our sales may increase as we incur fuel costs in connection with our manufacturing operations and the transportation of goods from our warehouse and distribution facilities to stores or direct response/e-commerce customers. Also, high oil costs can affect the cost of our raw materials and components and the competitive environment in which we operate may limit our ability to recover higher costs resulting from rising fuel prices.

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Our profits may be affected negatively by currency exchange rate fluctuations.

        Our assets, earnings and cash flows are influenced by currency fluctuations due to the geographic diversity of our sales and the countries in which we operate. These fluctuations may have a significant impact on our financial results. For fiscal 2015, 36% of our sales were denominated in a currency other than the U.S. dollar, and as of fiscal 2015, 29% of our assets and 7% of our total liabilities were denominated in a currency other than the U.S. dollar. We have entered into various cross currency swap transactions. See "Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk."

Our success is dependent on the accuracy, reliability, and proper use of sophisticated and dependable information processing systems and management information technology and any interruption in these systems could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

        Our success is dependent on the accuracy, reliability, and proper use of sophisticated and dependable information processing systems and management information technology. Our information technology systems are designed and selected to facilitate order entry and customer billing, maintain customer records, accurately track purchases and incentive payments, manage accounting, finance and manufacturing operations, generate reports, and provide customer service and technical support. Any interruption in these systems or any interruption associated with the transition of these systems to a new information technology platform could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

System interruptions or security breaches may affect sales.

        Customer access to, and ability to use, our websites affects our Puritan's Pride sales, in addition to online sales within our Holland & Barrett International and Vitamin World segments. If we are unable to maintain and continually enhance the efficiency of our systems, we could experience system interruptions or delays that could affect our operating results negatively. In addition, we could be liable for breaches of security on our websites, loss or misuse of our customers' personal information or payment data. Although we have developed systems and processes that are designed to protect consumer information and prevent fraudulent credit card transactions and other security breaches, failure to prevent or mitigate such fraud or breaches may negatively affect our operating results.

We must successfully maintain and/or upgrade our information technology systems, and our failure to do so could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

        We rely on various information technology systems to manage our operations. Recently we have implemented, and we continue to implement, modifications and upgrades to such systems and acquired new systems with new functionality. These types of activities subject us to inherent costs and risks associated with replacing and changing these systems, including impairment of our ability to fulfill customer orders, potential disruption of our internal control structure, substantial capital expenditures, additional administration and operating expenses, retention of sufficiently skilled personnel to implement and operate the new systems, demands on management time and other risks and costs of delays or difficulties in transitioning to or integrating new systems into our current systems. These implementations, modifications and upgrades may not result in productivity improvements at a level that outweighs the costs of implementation, or at all. In addition, the difficulties with implementing new technology systems may cause disruptions in our business operations and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Our inability to protect our intellectual property rights could adversely affect our business.

        Despite our efforts, we may not be able to determine the extent of unauthorized use of our trademarks and patents. In any case, such efforts are difficult, expensive, and time-consuming, and

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there can be no assurance that infringing goods could not be manufactured without our knowledge and consent. Many of our products are not subject to patent protection, and thus they can be legally reverse-engineered by competitors. Moreover, even with respect to some of our products that are covered by patents, such as Ester-C® products, there are numerous similar yet non-infringing supplement products in the marketplace, and this negatively affects sales we might otherwise make. Our patents, or certain claims made in such patents, could be found to be invalid or unenforceable. From time to time we face opposition to our applications to register trademarks, and we may not ultimately be successful in our attempts to register certain trademarks. Further, there can be no assurance that in those foreign jurisdictions in which we conduct business the trademark and patent protection available to us will be as extensive as the protection available to us in the United States.

Intellectual property litigation and infringement claims against us could cause us to incur significant expenses or prevent us from manufacturing, selling or marketing our products, which could adversely affect our revenues and market share.

        We may be subject to intellectual property litigation and infringement claims, which could cause us to incur significant expenses or prevent us from manufacturing, selling or marketing our products in various jurisdictions. Claims of intellectual property infringement also may require us to enter into costly royalty or license agreements. However, we may be unable to obtain royalty or license agreements on terms acceptable to us or at all. Claims that our technology or products infringe on intellectual property rights of others could be costly to defend or settle, could cause reputational injury and would divert the attention of management and key personnel, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

We are party to a number of lawsuits that arise in the ordinary course of business and may become party to others in the future.

        We are party to a number of lawsuits (including product liability, false advertising, and intellectual property claims) that arise in the ordinary course of business and may become party to others in the future. The possibility of such litigation, and its timing, is in large part outside our control. It is possible that future litigation could arise, or developments could occur in existing litigation, that could have material adverse effects on us.

Failure to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting could have a material adverse effect on our business and operating results.

        Effective internal control over financial reporting is necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports, our business and operating results could be harmed. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as well as related rules and regulations implemented by the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC"), have required changes in the corporate governance practices and financial reporting standards for public companies. These laws, rules and regulations, including compliance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, have increased our legal and financial compliance costs and made many activities more time-consuming and more burdensome. The costs of compliance with these laws, rules and regulations may adversely affect our financial results. Moreover, we run the risk of non-compliance, which could adversely affect our financial condition or results of operations.

        In the past we have discovered, and in the future we may discover, areas of our internal control over financial reporting that need improvement. As a result of the identification of two material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting and the determination to restate the previously-issued financial statements for the quarter and nine months ended June 30, 2015, management re-evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our internal control over financial reporting and has concluded that we did not maintain effective controls for that period.

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Specifically, effective controls were not maintained with respect to the accounting for property and equipment in connection with a triggering event and with respect to the evaluation of out-of-period adjustments. Although we believe that we are taking appropriate action to remediate the material weaknesses and have devoted significant resources to remediate any deficiencies we discovered and to improve our internal control over financial reporting, if we are unable to effectively remediate these material weaknesses or are otherwise unable to maintain adequate controls over our financial processes and reporting in the future, we may not be able to prepare reliable financial statements, which could harm our operating results or cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations. Ineffective internal control over financial reporting could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information. We cannot assure you that additional material weaknesses in our internal controls over financial reporting will not be identified or that we will not need to restate our financial statements and reevaluate the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting in the future.

Risks Relating to Our Indebtedness

Our substantial indebtedness could adversely affect our ability to raise additional capital to fund our operations, limit our ability to react to changes in the economy or our industry, expose us to interest rate risk to the extent of our variable rate debt and prevent us from meeting our obligations under the Notes and the $1.0 billion aggregate principal amount of 7.75%/8.50% Contingent Cash Pay Senior Notes due 2017 issued by Holdings (the "Holdco Notes").

        We have a significant amount of indebtedness. At September 30, 2015, we had $2,205 million of indebtedness on a consolidated basis (including $1,508 million of borrowings under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, $650 million in aggregate principal amount of Notes, and $47 million of other indebtedness), of which $1,508 million was secured indebtedness. As of September 30, 2015, after adjusting for outstanding letters of credit, NBTY also had an additional $169 million available under the revolving portion of NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, as amended. In addition, as of September 30, 2015, Holdings had indebtedness of $1,000 million. While NBTY has no direct obligation under the Holdco Notes, NBTY is the sole source of cash generation for Holdings. The Holdco Notes do not appear on NBTY's balance sheet and the related interest expense is not included in NBTY's income statement.

        Our substantial indebtedness could have important consequences. For example, it could:

    make it more difficult for NBTY to satisfy its obligations with respect to the Notes or Holdings to satisfy its obligations with respect to the Holdco Notes;

    require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to payments on our indebtedness, thereby reducing the availability of our cash flow to fund acquisitions, working capital, capital expenditures, research and development efforts and other general corporate purposes;

    increase our vulnerability to and limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the industries in which we operate;

    restrict us from making strategic acquisitions or cause us to make non-strategic divestitures;

    expose us to the risk of increased interest rates as borrowings under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities will be subject to variable rates of interest;

    expose us to additional risks related to currency exchange rates and repatriation of funds;

    place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that have less debt; and

    limit our ability to obtain additional debt or equity financing for working capital, capital expenditures, business development, debt service requirements, acquisitions and general corporate or other purposes.

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        In addition, the agreements governing NBTY's senior secured credit facilities and the indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes contain affirmative and negative covenants that limit our ability to engage in activities that may be in our long-term best interests. Our failure to comply with those covenants could result in an event of default which, if not cured or waived, could result in the acceleration of all of our debts.

Restrictive covenants in the indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes and the credit agreement governing NBTY's senior secured credit facilities may restrict our ability to pursue our business strategies.

        The indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes and the credit agreement governing NBTY's senior secured credit facilities limit our ability, and the terms of any future indebtedness may limit our ability, among other things, to:

    incur or guarantee additional indebtedness;

    make certain investments;

    pay dividends or make distributions on our capital stock;

    sell assets, including capital stock of restricted subsidiaries;

    agree to payment restrictions affecting our restricted subsidiaries;

    consolidate, merge, sell or otherwise dispose of all or substantially all our assets;

    enter into transactions with our affiliates;

    incur liens; and

    designate any of our subsidiaries as unrestricted subsidiaries.

        The restrictions contained in the indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes and the credit agreement governing NBTY's senior secured credit facilities also could limit our ability to plan for, or react to, market conditions, meet capital needs or make acquisitions or otherwise restrict our activities or business plans.

        A breach of any of these restrictive covenants (to the extent applicable at such time), or our inability to comply with the required financial ratios, could result in a default under the credit agreement governing NBTY's senior secured credit facilities. If a default occurs, the lenders under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities may elect to:

    declare all borrowings outstanding, together with accrued interest and other fees, to be immediately due and payable; or

    prevent us from making payments on the Notes,

either of which would result in an event of default under the indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes. An event of default under either or both of these indentures or the senior secured credit facilities would permit some of our lenders to declare all amounts borrowed from them to be due and payable. The lenders also have the right in these circumstances to terminate any commitments they have to provide further borrowings. An event of default under either of these indentures or the senior secured credit facilities would likely result in a cross default under either or both of the other instruments. If we are unable to repay outstanding borrowings when due, the lenders under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities also have the right to proceed against the collateral, including our available cash, granted to them to secure the indebtedness. If the indebtedness under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, the Holdco Notes and/or the Notes were to be accelerated, we can give no assurance that our assets would be sufficient to repay in full that indebtedness and our other indebtedness, including the Notes and the Holdco Notes.

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Despite current indebtedness levels and restrictive covenants, Holdings, NBTY and their subsidiaries may incur additional indebtedness in the future. This could further exacerbate the risks associated with our substantial financial leverage.

        The terms of the indenture governing the Notes, the credit agreement governing NBTY's senior secured credit facilities and the indenture governing the Holdco Notes permit us to incur a substantial amount of additional debt, including secured debt. Any additional borrowings under the senior secured credit facilities, and any other secured debt, would be effectively senior to the Holdco Notes, the Notes and any guarantees thereof to the extent of the value of the collateral securing such indebtedness. If we incur any additional indebtedness that ranks equally with the Holdco Notes and the Notes, subject to collateral arrangements, the holders of that debt will be entitled to share ratably with noteholders in any proceeds distributed in connection with any insolvency, liquidation, reorganization, dissolution or other winding up of our company. This could reduce the amount of proceeds available to be paid to noteholders. These restrictions also will not prevent us from incurring obligations that do not constitute indebtedness. In addition, as of September 30, 2015, after adjusting for outstanding letters of credit, NBTY had an additional $169 million of unused commitments under the revolving portion of NBTY's senior secured credit facilities. Additionally, NBTY's senior secured credit facilities may be increased by up to $500 million (of which no more than $100 million may be under NBTY's revolving credit facility), subject to certain conditions. All of those borrowings would be secured indebtedness. If new debt is added to our and our subsidiaries' current debt levels, the risks that we now face as a result of our leverage would intensify.

To service our indebtedness, we will require a significant amount of cash and our ability to generate cash depends on many factors beyond our control.

        Our ability to make cash payments on and to refinance our indebtedness, including the Holdco Notes and the Notes, and to fund planned capital expenditures, will depend on our ability to generate significant operating cash flow in the future. This, to a significant extent, is subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory and other factors that are beyond our control.

        Our business may not generate sufficient cash flow from operations and future borrowings may not be available under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities in an amount sufficient to enable us to pay our indebtedness, including the Notes and the Holdco Notes, or to fund our other liquidity needs. In such circumstances, we may need to refinance all or a portion of our indebtedness, including the Notes and the Holdco Notes, on or before maturity. We may not be able to refinance any of our indebtedness on commercially reasonable terms, or at all. If we cannot service our indebtedness, we may need to take actions such as selling assets, seeking additional equity or reducing or delaying capital expenditures, strategic acquisitions, investments and alliances. Such actions, if necessary, may not be effected on commercially reasonable terms or at all. The indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes and the credit agreement governing NBTY's senior secured credit facilities restrict our ability to sell assets and use the proceeds from such sales.

        If we are unable to generate sufficient cash flow or are otherwise unable to obtain funds necessary to meet required payments of principal, premium, if any, and interest on our indebtedness, or if we otherwise fail to comply with the various covenants in the instruments governing our indebtedness (including covenants in NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, the indenture governing the Notes and the indenture governing the Holdco Notes), Holdco could be required to pay interest-in-kind and/or we could be in default under the terms of the agreements governing such indebtedness. In the event of such default, the holders of such indebtedness could elect to declare all the funds borrowed thereunder to be due and payable, together with accrued and unpaid interest, the lenders under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities could elect to terminate their commitments thereunder, cease making further loans and institute foreclosure proceedings against our assets, and we could be forced into bankruptcy or liquidation. If our operating performance declines, we may need to obtain waivers in the future from

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the required lenders under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities to avoid being in default. If we breach our covenants under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities and seek a waiver, we may not be able to obtain a waiver from the required lenders. If this occurs, we would be in default under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, the lenders could exercise their rights, as described above, and we could be forced into bankruptcy or liquidation.

We are dependent upon our lenders for financing to execute our business strategy and meet our liquidity needs. If our lenders are unable to fund borrowings under their credit commitments or we are unable to borrow, it could negatively impact our business.

        In volatile credit markets, there is a risk that any lenders, even those with strong balance sheets and sound lending practices, could fail or refuse to honor their legal commitments and obligations under existing credit commitments, including but not limited to: extending credit up to the maximum permitted by NBTY's senior secured credit facilities and otherwise accessing capital and/or honoring loan commitments. If our lenders are unable to fund borrowings under their credit commitments, or we are unable to borrow, it could be difficult in this environment to replace NBTY's senior secured credit facilities on similar terms.

Our variable rate indebtedness subjects us to interest rate risk, which could cause our debt service obligations to increase significantly.

        Borrowings under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities are at variable rates of interest and expose us to interest rate risk. Interest rates are currently at historically low levels. If interest rates increase, our debt service obligations on the variable rate indebtedness will increase even though the amount borrowed remained the same, and our net income and cash flows, including cash available for servicing our indebtedness, will correspondingly decrease. Assuming all revolving loans are fully drawn and the interest rates are above the interest rate floor set forth in NBTY's credit agreement, each quarter point change in interest rates would result in a $4.2 million change in annual interest expense on our indebtedness under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities. However, we may maintain interest rate swaps with respect to any of our variable rate indebtedness, and any swaps we enter into may not fully mitigate our interest rate risk.

Risks Relating to the Notes and the Holdco Notes

The right of holders of the Notes and the Holdco Notes to receive payments on the Notes and the Holdco Notes is effectively subordinated to the rights of our existing and future secured creditors. Further, the guarantees of the Notes and the Holdco Notes, if any, are effectively subordinated to all our guarantors' existing and future secured indebtedness.

        The Notes and the Holdco Notes are general unsecured obligations. Holders of our secured indebtedness and the secured indebtedness of the guarantors of the Notes will have claims that are prior to the claims of holders of the Notes and the Holdco Notes to the extent of the value of the assets securing that other indebtedness. Notably, Holdings, NBTY and certain of its subsidiaries, including the guarantors of the Notes, are parties to the senior secured credit facilities, which are secured by liens on substantially all our assets and the assets of such guarantors. The Notes and Holdco Notes are effectively subordinated to all our secured indebtedness to the extent of the value of the collateral securing such indebtedness. In the event of any distribution or payment of our assets in any foreclosure, dissolution, winding-up, liquidation, reorganization, or other bankruptcy proceeding, holders of secured indebtedness will have a prior claim to those of our assets that constitute their collateral. Holders of the Notes and the Holdco Notes participate ratably with all holders of our unsecured indebtedness that is deemed to be of the same class as the Notes and the Holdco Notes, and potentially with all our other general creditors, based upon the respective amounts owed to each holder or creditor, in our remaining assets. In any of the foregoing events, we cannot assure holders of the

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Notes and the Holdco Notes that there will be sufficient assets to pay amounts due on the Notes or the Holdco Notes. As a result, holders of the Notes or the Holdco Notes may receive less, ratably, than holders of secured indebtedness.

        As of September 30, 2015, the aggregate amount of our secured indebtedness was approximately $1,508 million. As of September 30, 2015, we had $169 million of unused commitments available for additional borrowing under the revolving portion of NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, as amended. We are permitted to incur substantial additional indebtedness, including secured debt, in the future under the terms of the indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes.

The trading prices of the Notes and the Holdco Notes may be volatile and can be affected by many factors, including our credit rating.

        The trading price of the Notes and the Holdco Notes could be subject to significant fluctuation in response to, among other factors, changes in our operating results, interest rates, the market for non-investment grade securities, general economic conditions and securities analysts' recommendations, if any, regarding our securities.

        Credit rating agencies continually revise their ratings for companies they follow, including us. Any ratings downgrade could adversely affect the trading price of the Notes and the Holdco Notes, or the trading market for the Notes and the Holdco Notes, to the extent a trading market for such securities develops. The condition of the financial and credit markets and prevailing interest rates have fluctuated in the past and are likely to fluctuate in the future and any fluctuation may impact the trading price of the Notes and the Holdco Notes.

We may not be able to satisfy our obligations to holders of the Notes or the Holdco Notes upon a change of control.

        Upon the occurrence of a "change of control," as defined in the indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes, each noteholder will have the right to require us to purchase the Notes and the Holdco Notes at a price equal to 101% of the principal amount, together with any accrued and unpaid interest. Our failure to purchase, or give notice of purchase of, the Notes or the Holdco Notes would be a default under the indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes, which would in turn be a default under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities and the indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes. In addition, a change of control may constitute an event of default under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities and the indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes. A default under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities and the indentures governing the Notes and Holdco Notes could result in an event of default under the indentures if the lenders accelerate the debt under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities or the holders accelerate the debt under the indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes.

        If a change of control occurs, we may not have enough assets to satisfy all obligations under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, the indenture related to the Notes and the indenture related to the Holdco Notes. Upon the occurrence of a change of control we could seek to refinance the indebtedness under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, the indenture governing the Notes and the indenture governing the Holdco Notes or obtain a waiver from the lenders and holders of the Notes or the Holdco Notes. We can give no assurance, however, that we would be able to obtain a waiver or refinance our indebtedness on commercially reasonable terms, if at all. No assurances can be given that any court would enforce the change of control provisions in the indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes as written for the benefit of the holders, or as to how these change of control provisions would be impacted were we to become a debtor in a bankruptcy case.

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Holders of the Notes or the Holdco Notes may not be able to determine when a change of control giving rise to their right to have the Notes or the Holdco Notes repurchased has occurred following a sale of "substantially all" of our assets.

        The definition of change of control in the indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes includes a phrase relating to the sale of "all or substantially all" of our assets. There is no precise established definition of the phrase "substantially all" under applicable law. Accordingly, the ability of a holder of the Notes or the Holdco Notes to require us to repurchase the Notes or Holdco Notes, respectively, as a result of a sale of less than all our assets to another person may be uncertain.

Certain private equity investment funds affiliated with Carlyle own substantially all the equity of Holdings, and their interests may not be aligned with those of the holders of the Notes and the Holdco Notes.

        Carlyle owns substantially all the fully diluted equity of Holdings, and, therefore, has the power to control our affairs and policies. Carlyle also controls, to a large degree, the election of directors, the appointment of management, the entry into mergers, sales of substantially all our assets and other extraordinary transactions. The directors so elected have authority, subject to the terms of our debt, to issue additional stock, implement stock repurchase programs, declare dividends and make other decisions. Carlyle's interests could conflict with the interests of the holders of the Notes and the Holdco Notes. For example, if we encounter financial difficulties or are unable to pay our debts as they mature, the interests of Carlyle and certain of its affiliates and co-investors, as equity holders, might conflict with the interests of the holders of the Notes and the Holdco Notes. Carlyle also may have an interest in pursuing acquisitions, divestitures, financings or other transactions that, in their judgment, could enhance their equity investments, even though such transactions might involve risks to our noteholders. Additionally, Carlyle is in the business of making investments in companies, and from time to time in the future may acquire interests in businesses that directly or indirectly compete with certain portions of our business, or are suppliers or customers of ours.

        Investment funds advised by entities affiliated with Carlyle and affiliates of Carlyle may buy or sell the Notes and the Holdco Notes in open market transactions at any time.

If a bankruptcy petition were filed by or against us, noteholders may receive a lesser amount for their claim than they paid for the Notes and the Holdco Notes.

        If a bankruptcy petition were filed by or against us under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, a noteholder's claim for the principal amount of the Notes or the Holdco Notes may be limited to an amount equal to the sum of:

    the lesser of (x) the original issue price for such notes and (y) the principal amount of such notes; and

    any amount of interest that does not constitute "unmatured interest" for purposes of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

        Accordingly, under these circumstances, a noteholder may receive a lesser amount than it paid for such notes, even if sufficient funds are available.

Risks Relating to Ownership of the Notes

Claims of noteholders will be effectively subordinated to claims of creditors of all of NBTY's non-guarantor subsidiaries.

        The Notes are guaranteed on a senior basis by NBTY's current and future domestic subsidiaries that are guarantors of NBTY's senior secured credit facilities. However, the historical consolidated financial statements included in this Report include all our domestic and foreign subsidiaries. NBTY's

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foreign subsidiaries, which do not guarantee the Notes, held approximately $1.5 billion, or 30%, of our total assets and $0.3 billion, or 10%, of NBTY's total liabilities as of September 30, 2015 and accounted for approximately $1.2 billion, or 36%, of NBTY's net sales, for fiscal 2015 (all amounts presented exclude intercompany balances). In addition, NBTY has the ability to designate certain of its subsidiaries as unrestricted subsidiaries under the terms of the indenture governing the Notes, and any subsidiary so designated will not be a guarantor of the Notes.

        NBTY's non-guarantor subsidiaries are separate and distinct legal entities and have no obligation, contingent or otherwise, to pay any amounts due under the Notes, or to make any funds available therefor, whether by dividends, loans, distributions or other payments. Any right that NBTY or its subsidiary guarantors have to receive any assets of any of its non-guarantor subsidiaries upon the liquidation or reorganization of those subsidiaries, and the consequent rights of noteholders to realize proceeds from the sale of any of those subsidiaries' assets, will be effectively subordinated to the claims of those subsidiaries' creditors, including trade creditors and holders of debt of that subsidiary.

NBTY is a holding company with no operations and may not have access to sufficient cash to make payments on its credit obligations.

        NBTY is a holding company and has limited direct operations. NBTY's most significant assets are the equity interests it holds in its subsidiaries. As a result, it is dependent upon dividends and other payments from its subsidiaries to generate the funds necessary to meet its outstanding debt service and other obligations and such dividends may be restricted by law or the instruments governing its indebtedness, including the indenture governing the Notes, the credit agreement governing its senior secured credit facilities or other agreements of its subsidiaries. NBTY's subsidiaries may not generate sufficient cash from operations to enable it to make principal and interest payments on its indebtedness, including the Notes. In addition, its subsidiaries are separate and distinct legal entities and, except for its existing and future subsidiaries that will be the guarantors of the Notes, any payments on dividends, distributions, loans or advances to NBTY by its subsidiaries could be subject to legal and contractual restrictions on dividends. In addition, payments to NBTY by its subsidiaries will be contingent upon its subsidiaries' earnings. Additionally, NBTY may be limited in its ability to cause its existing and any future joint ventures to distribute their earnings to it. Subject to certain qualifications, its subsidiaries are permitted under the terms of its indebtedness, including the indenture governing the Notes, to incur additional indebtedness that may restrict payments from those subsidiaries to it. NBTY can give no assurance that agreements governing the current and future indebtedness of its subsidiaries will permit those subsidiaries to provide it with sufficient cash to fund payments of principal premiums, if any, and interest on the Notes when due. In addition, any guarantee of the Notes will be subordinated to any senior secured indebtedness of a subsidiary guarantor to the extent of the assets securing such indebtedness.

Federal and state statutes may allow courts, under specific circumstances, to void the Notes and/or the guarantees of the Notes and require noteholders to return payments received on the Notes.

        Under federal bankruptcy law and comparable provisions of state fraudulent transfer laws, the Notes or the guarantees thereof could be deemed a fraudulent transfer if NBTY or any of the guarantors of the Notes, as applicable, received less than a reasonably equivalent value in exchange for either issuing the Notes or giving the guarantee and:

    NBTY or any such guarantors, as applicable, was insolvent on the date that it issued the Notes or gave the guarantee or became insolvent as a result of issuing the Notes or giving the guarantee; or

    the issuance of the Notes or the giving of such guarantee left NBTY or any of such guarantors, as applicable, with an unreasonably small amount of capital to carry on the business; or

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    NBTY or any of such guarantors intended to incur, or believed that NBTY or such guarantor would incur, debts that would be beyond NBTY's or such guarantor's ability to pay as those debts matured.

        The Notes and/or a guarantee thereof could also be deemed a fraudulent transfer if it was given with actual intent to hinder, delay or defraud any entity to which NBTY or any such guarantor was or became, on or after the date of issuance of the Notes or the giving of the guarantee, as applicable, indebted.

        The measures of insolvency for purposes of the foregoing considerations will vary depending upon the law applied in any proceeding with respect to the foregoing. Generally, however, NBTY or any such guarantor would be considered insolvent if:

    the sum of its debts, including contingent liabilities, is greater than all its assets, at a fair valuation; or

    the present fair saleable value of its assets is less than the amount that would be required to pay its probable liability on its existing debts, including contingent liabilities, as they become absolute and mature; or

    it could not pay its debts as they become due.

        We cannot predict:

    what standard a court would apply to determine whether NBTY or any such guarantor was insolvent as of the date it issued the Notes or its guarantee, as applicable, or whether, regardless of the method of valuation, a court would determine that NBTY or such guarantor was insolvent on that date; or

    whether a court would determine that the payments under the Notes or such guarantee constituted fraudulent transfers or conveyances on other grounds.

        The indenture governing the Notes contains a "savings clause" intended to limit each subsidiary guarantor's liability under its guarantee to the maximum amount that it could incur without causing the guarantee to be a fraudulent transfer under applicable law. There can be no assurance that this provision will be upheld as intended.

        If a guarantee is deemed to be a fraudulent transfer, it could be voided altogether, or it could be subordinated to all other debts of such guarantor. In that case, any payment by such guarantor under its guarantee could be required to be returned to the guarantor or to a fund for the benefit of the creditors of the guarantor. If a guarantee is voided or held unenforceable for any other reason, holders of the Notes would cease to have a claim against the subsidiary based on the guarantee and would be creditors only of NBTY and any guarantor whose guarantee was not similarly voided or otherwise held unenforceable.

        If a court were to find that the issuance of the Notes or the incurrence of a guarantee was a fraudulent transfer or conveyance, the court could void the payment obligations under the Notes or that guarantee, could subordinate the Notes or that guarantee to presently existing and future indebtedness of ours or of the related guarantor or could require the holders of the Notes to repay any amounts received with respect to that guarantee. In the event of a finding that a fraudulent transfer or conveyance occurred, holders of the Notes may not receive any repayment on the Notes. Further, the avoidance of the Notes could result in an event of default with respect to our and our subsidiaries' other debt that could result in acceleration of that debt.

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The lenders under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities have the discretion to release the guarantors under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities in a variety of circumstances, which will cause those guarantors to be released from their guarantees of the Notes.

        While any obligations under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities remain outstanding, any guarantee of the Notes may be released without action by, or consent of, any holder of the Notes or the trustee under the indenture governing the Notes, at the discretion of lenders under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, if such guarantor is no longer a guarantor of obligations under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities or any other indebtedness. The lenders under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities will have the discretion to release the guarantees under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities in a variety of circumstances. A noteholder will not have a claim as a creditor against any subsidiary that is no longer a guarantor of the Notes, and the indebtedness and other liabilities, including trade payables, whether secured or unsecured, of those subsidiaries will effectively be senior to claims of noteholders.

Risks Relating to Ownership of the Holdco Notes

Holdings is a holding company and relies on dividends, loans and other payments and distributions from its subsidiaries to meet its debt service and other obligations.

        Holdings is a holding company with no business operations, revenues, expenses, liabilities other than the $1.0 billion aggregate principal amount of Holdco Notes or assets other than the capital stock of NBTY. Because Holdings' assets consist of the equity interests it holds in NBTY, Holdings is dependent upon dividends and other payments from NBTY to generate the funds necessary to meet its outstanding debt service and other obligations and such dividends may be restricted by law or the instruments governing certain indebtedness, including the indenture governing the Notes, the credit agreement governing NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, the indenture governing the Holdco Notes or other agreements of its subsidiaries. The earnings of Holdings' subsidiaries will depend substantially on their respective financial and operating results, which will be affected by prevailing economic and competitive conditions and by financial, business and other factors beyond Holdings' and its subsidiaries' control. Holdings' subsidiaries may not generate sufficient cash from operations to enable Holdings to make principal and interest payments on its indebtedness, including the Holdco Notes, or to fund Holdings' and its subsidiaries' other cash obligations.

        NBTY's ability to pay dividends or make other distributions to Holdings ("restricted payment capacity") is limited under certain covenants in the credit agreement governing NBTY's senior secured credit facilities and the indenture governing the Notes. For example, under the indenture governing the Notes, NBTY is permitted to pay dividends or make other distributions to Holdings if the total amount thereof does not exceed a formula based on the sum of (a) 50% of NBTY's consolidated net income for periods beginning with its fiscal quarter commencing October 1, 2010 and (b) the amount of certain cash proceeds and the fair market value of certain property received by or contributed to NBTY. Similarly, under the credit agreement governing NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, NBTY is permitted to pay dividends and make other distributions (or to make loans or advances in lieu thereof) to Holdings but the total amount is limited and such payments are subject to certain terms and conditions. Pursuant to the credit agreement governing NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, NBTY is permitted to pay dividends or make other distributions (or to make loans or advances in lieu thereof) to Holdings pursuant to the Notes formula payment of dividends, subject to certain terms and conditions.

        As of September 30, 2015, prior to giving effect to the November 2015 interest payment of $39 million, NBTY had approximately $321 million of restricted payments capacity under its senior secured credit facilities and approximately $286 million of restricted payments capacity under the indenture governing the Notes.

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        Holdings' subsidiaries are permitted, under the terms of their existing indebtedness, to incur additional indebtedness that may restrict payments from those subsidiaries to Holdings. The indenture governing the Holdco Notes may also permit these subsidiaries to incur additional indebtedness even if Holdings would not be able to incur additional indebtedness. Agreements governing current and future indebtedness of Holdings' subsidiaries may not permit those subsidiaries to provide Holdings with sufficient cash to fund payments on the Holdco Notes when due.

        Holdings' subsidiaries are separate and distinct legal entities and will have no obligation, contingent or otherwise, to pay amounts due under the Holdco Notes or to make any funds available to pay those amounts whether by dividend, distribution, loan or other payment.

Claims of holders of Holdco Notes will be effectively subordinated to claims of creditors of all of Holdings' subsidiaries.

        The Holdco Notes will not be guaranteed by any of Holdings' subsidiaries. However, the historical consolidated financial statements included in this Report include all of Holdings' subsidiaries. Holdings had $1.0 billion of liabilities as of September 30, 2015 and Holdings' subsidiaries held almost all of its assets and accounted for all of its net sales as of and for the year ended September 30, 2015.

        Holdings' subsidiaries are separate and distinct legal entities and have no obligation, contingent or otherwise, to pay any amounts due pursuant to the Holdco Notes, or to make any funds available therefor, whether by dividends, loans, distributions or other payments. Any right that Holdings has to receive any assets of any of its subsidiaries upon the liquidation or reorganization of such subsidiaries, and the consequent rights of holders of Holdco Notes to realize proceeds from the sale of any of such subsidiaries' assets, will be structurally subordinated to the claims of Holdings' subsidiaries' creditors, including trade creditors and holders of debt of that subsidiary.

If certain conditions for the payment of cash interest are not met, interest on the Holdco Notes may be payment in kind ("PIK") interest.

        Holdings is required to pay interest on the Holdco Notes entirely in cash unless certain conditions exist, in which case Holdings will be entitled to pay PIK interest. The terms of the Holdco Notes do not restrict Holdings' ability to use its dividend payment capacity for such alternative uses. In addition, the credit agreement governing NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, the indenture governing the Notes and the indenture governing the Holdco Notes allow NBTY and its subsidiaries to utilize amounts that would otherwise be available to pay cash dividends to Holdings for purposes such as making restricted investments, capital expenditures and prepaying subordinated indebtedness and, subject to certain limitations, making cash dividends to and other payments in respect of equityholders, and such uses would reduce the amounts available to pay dividends to Holdings in order to pay cash interest on the Holdco Notes. The indenture governing the Holdco Notes does not restrict Holdings' ability to use its dividends payment capacity for such alternative uses. As a result, there can be no assurance that Holdings will be required (or able) to make cash interest payments on the Holdco Notes. The payment of interest through PIK interest will increase the amount of Holdings' indebtedness and would exacerbate the risks associated with such a high level of indebtedness.

Federal and state statutes may allow courts, under specific circumstances, to void the Holdco Notes and require holders to return payments received from Holdings.

        Under federal bankruptcy law and comparable provisions of state fraudulent transfer laws, issuance of notes could be deemed a fraudulent transfer if Holdings received less than a reasonably equivalent value in exchange for issuing the Holdco Notes and

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    Holdings was insolvent on the date that it issued the Holdco Notes or became insolvent as a result of issuing the Holdco Notes, or

    Holdings was engaged in business or a transaction, or was about to engage in business or a transaction, for which property remaining with Holdings was an unreasonably small capital, or

    Holdings intended to incur, or believed that it would incur, debts that would be beyond its ability to pay as those debts matured.

        The measures of insolvency for purposes of the foregoing considerations will vary depending upon the law applied in any proceeding with respect to the foregoing. Generally, however, an entity would be considered insolvent if:

    the sum of its debts, including contingent liabilities, is greater than all its assets, at a fair valuation, or

    the present fair saleable value of its assets is less than the amount that would be required to pay its probable liability on its existing debts, including contingent liabilities, as they become absolute and mature, or

    it could not pay its debts as they become due.

        We cannot predict:

    what standard a court would apply in order to determine whether Holdings was insolvent as of the date Holdings issued the Holdco Notes or whether, regardless of the method of valuation, a court would determine that Holdings was insolvent on that date; or

    whether a court would determine that the payments under the Holdco Notes constituted fraudulent transfers or conveyances on other grounds.

        If issuance of the Holdco Notes is deemed to be a fraudulent transfer, it could be voided altogether, or it could be subordinated to all other debts of Holdings. In the event of a finding that a fraudulent transfer or conveyance occurred, holders of the Holdco Notes may not receive any repayment on the Holdco Notes. Further, the voidance of the Holdco Notes could result in an event of default with respect to Holdings and its subsidiaries' other debt that could result in acceleration of that debt.

        Finally, as a court of equity, the bankruptcy court may subordinate the claims in respect of the Holdco Notes to other claims against Holdings under the principle of equitable subordination if the court determines that (1) the holder of Holdco Notes engaged in some type of inequitable conduct, (2) the inequitable conduct resulted in injury to Holdings' other creditors or conferred an unfair advantage upon the holders of Holdco Notes and (3) equitable subordination is not inconsistent with the provisions of the bankruptcy code.

The Holdco Notes were issued with original issue discount for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

        Because no portion of the stated interest on the Holdco Notes is unconditionally payable in cash at least annually, interest payments on the notes are not treated as qualified stated interest for U.S. federal income tax purposes. As a result, the Holdco Notes were issued with original issue discount for U.S. federal income tax purposes ("OID") in an amount equal to the excess of the total payments of principal and interest on the Holdco Notes over their issue price. A holder subject to U.S. federal income taxation, whether on the cash or accrual method for U.S. federal income tax purposes, generally will be required to include the OID in gross income (as ordinary interest income) as the OID accrues (on a constant yield to maturity basis), regardless of whether such holder receives any cash payment attributable to such income at such time.

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Item 2.    Properties

        United States.    As of September 30, 2015, we owned a total of approximately 2.29 million square feet, and lease approximately 955,000 square feet, of administrative, manufacturing, warehouse and distribution space in various locations in the United States and its territories. In addition, as of September 30, 2015, we operated 385 Vitamin World retail locations in 43 states in the United States, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Generally, we lease retail properties for five to ten years at varying annual base rents and percentage rents. The Vitamin World retail stores are, on average, approximately 1,253 square feet.

        UK/Ireland.    As of September 30, 2015, Holland & Barrett leased a 270,000 square foot administrative and distribution facility and a 133,220 square foot manufacturing facility in Burton, United Kingdom. Holland & Barrett owns a 30,000 square foot administrative facility in Nuneaton, United Kingdom. Solgar leased 50,000 square feet of administrative and distribution space in Tring, United Kingdom. As of September 30, 2015, we leased all but one of our 793 Holland & Barrett and GNC / MET-Rx branded stores for varying terms, at varying annual base rents. Fifty-one Holland & Barrett stores and two GNC/MET-Rx branded stores are subject to percentage rents. As of September 30, 2015, Holland & Barrett stores have an average size of approximately 1,040 square feet and the GNC/MET-Rx branded stores have an average of approximately 828 square feet.

        Benelux.    As of September 30, 2015, we leased a 64,600 square foot administrative and distribution facility and an additional 12,755 square foot administrative and distribution facility in Beverwijk, Netherlands. At September 30, 2015, we leased locations for 179 retail stores on varying terms at varying annual base rents in the Netherlands and Belgium. Of these, 174 are operated as company stores and five are sub-leased to, and operated by, franchisees. None of our retail stores in the Netherlands and Belgium are subject to percentage rents. Our stores in the Netherlands and Belgium are an average of approximately 1,450 square feet and 1,640 square feet, respectively.

        Canada.    As of September 30, 2015, Vita Health owned a 185,000 square foot manufacturing, packaging, distribution and administration building in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Vita Health also leased a 52,000 square foot distribution facility in Winnipeg, Manitoba. SISU leases a 19,200 square foot administrative, distribution and warehouse facility in Burnaby, British Columbia.

        China.    As of September 30, 2015, our subsidiary, Ultimate Biopharma (Zhongshan) Corporation ("Ultimate") owned in Zhongshan, China: a 50,000 square foot facility for manufacturing softgel capsules and for administrative offices, a 75,000 square foot warehouse facility with some manufacturing and packaging capabilities and 18.5 acres of vacant land adjacent to the manufacturing facility. In addition, Ultimate leased 11,300 square feet of dormitory space in Zhongshan City. Also, one of our subsidiaries leased 106,294 square feet of warehouse space in Beijing.

        The following is a listing, as of September 30, 2015, of all material properties that we own or lease (excluding retail locations, de minimis locations with less than 4,000 square feet and temporary storage facilities leased for less than six months). We are required to pay real estate taxes and maintenance costs relating to most of our leased properties. All our segments benefit from the use of our material properties.

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Owned Properties

Location
  Type of Facility   Approximate
Square Feet
 

United States:

           

Prescott, AZ

  Manufacturing     65,000  

Boca Raton, FL(1)

  Administration     58,000  

Boca Raton, FL

  Manufacturing     84,000  

Boca Raton, FL

  Distribution     100,000  

Deerfield Beach, FL

  Packaging     157,000  

Pompano Beach, FL

  Warehousing     62,000  

Bayport, NY

  Storage     12,000  

Bayport, NY

  Manufacturing     161,500  

Bohemia, NY

  Administration, Manufacturing & Packaging     169,000  

Bohemia, NY

  Manufacturing     80,000  

Bohemia, NY

  Manufacturing & Packaging     75,000  

Bohemia, NY

  IT     42,000  

Holbrook, NY

  Administration & Distribution     230,000  

Holbrook, NY

  Packaging & Engineering     108,000  

N. Amityville, NY(2)

  Manufacturing     48,300  

N. Amityville, NY(2)

  Manufacturing     66,000  

Ronkonkoma, NY

  Administration     110,000  

Wilson, NC(3)

  Manufacturing     125,000  

Hazleton, PA

  Distribution     413,600  

San Antonio, TX

  Manufacturing     122,600  

Canada:

           

Winnipeg, Manitoba

  Manufacturing, Packaging, Distribution & Administration     185,000  

China:

           

Zhongshan

  Manufacturing & Packaging     50,000  

Zhongshan

  Warehousing with some manufacturing & packaging capabilities     75,000  

United Kingdom:

           

Nuneaton

  Administration     30,000  

          Total approximate square feet owned     2,629,000  

(1)
We currently lease several small offices in this building on a short-term basis to unaffiliated tenants.

(2)
Operations are expected to cease at these facilities upon completion of the sale of our bar manufacturing assets to Nellson, which is expected to take place by the end of the first half of fiscal 2016.

(3)
Operations have ceased at this facility.

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Leased Properties

Location
  Type of Facility   Approximate
Square Feet
 

United States:

           

Prescott, AZ

  Warehousing (term–2020)     29,000  

Bentonville, AR

  Sales Office (term–2017)     4,900  

Garden Grove, CA

  Manufacturing & Packaging (term–December 2016)     140,000  

Santa Fe Springs, CA

  Distribution & Administration (term–December 2016)     82,000  

Naples, FL(1)

  Manufacturing (term–February 2016)     18,000  

Sparks, NV

  Distribution (term–September 2016)     201,300  

Sparks, NV

  Warehouse (term–September 2016)     47,200  

Leonia, NJ

  Administration & Manufacturing (term–July 2016)     49,600  

Leonia, NJ

  Manufacturing & Warehousing (term–July 2016)     18,500  

Lyndhurst, NJ

  Warehousing (term–2019)     57,200  

Ridgefield Park, NJ

  Administration (term 2020)     11,400  

Bohemia, NY

  Administration & Warehousing (term–2020)     110,000  

Ronkonkoma, NY

  Warehousing (term–November 2017)     90,500  

Ronkonkoma, NY

  Warehousing (term–September 2024)     75,000  

Holbrook, NY

  Warehouse/Storage (term–February 2016)     17,000  

Canada

           

Burnaby, British Columbia

  Administration, Warehousing & Distribution (term–2017)     19,200  

Winnipeg, Manitoba

  Warehousing & Administration (term–2017)     52,000  

China:

           

Beijing

  Offices (term–May 2016)     9,700  

Beijing

  Warehousing (term–August 2016)     106,300  

Zhongshan City

  Dormitory (term–January 2016)     11,300  

United Kingdom:

           

Burton(2)

  Offices & Warehouse (term–2023)     43,300  

Burton(3)

  Administration & Distribution (term–2045)     270,000  

Burton(3)

  Manufacturing (term–2045)     133,200  

Tring

  Administration & Warehousing (term–2017)     25,000  

Tring

  Warehousing, Distribution & Offices (term–2017)     25,000  

London

  Administration (term–December 2016)     12,300  

Netherlands:

           

Beverwijk

  Administration & Distribution (term–2020)     64,600  

Beverwijk

  Administration & Distribution (term–2020)     12,755  

New Zealand:

           

Auckland

  Offices & Warehousing (term–May 2016)     4,800  

South Africa:

           

Randburg

  Offices & Warehousing (term–June 2016)     13,800  

Spain:

           

Madrid

  Administration & Distribution (term–2019)     16,400  

          Total approximate square feet leased     1,771,255  

  Total approximate square feet owned and leased     4,400,255  

(1)
As of October 15, 2015, possession of this facility has been returned to the landlord.

(2)
This facility is currently sublet to an unaffiliated tenant. The lease has an option to terminate in December 2018.

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(3)
These properties were previously owned by Holland & Barrett. As a result of a sale/leaseback agreement which was completed in July 2015, these properties are now leased by Holland & Barrett under a long-term lease.

Warehousing and Distribution

        As of September 30, 2015, we had approximately 2.4 million square feet dedicated primarily to warehousing and distribution. This figure includes our facilities in Long Island, New York; Santa Fe Springs, California; Lyndhurst and Leonia, New Jersey; Boca Raton and Pompano Beach, Florida; Sparks, Nevada; Hazleton, Pennsylvania; Prescott, Arizona; Burton and Tring, United Kingdom; Winnipeg, Manitoba and Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada; Madrid, Spain; Randburg, South Africa; Auckland, New Zealand; Beverwijk, Netherlands and Beijing and Zhongshan City, China.

        We currently distribute our products to our customers from distribution centers through contract and common carriers globally. In addition, we ship products overseas in pallet amounts and by container loads. We also operate additional distribution centers in Burton and Tring, United Kingdom; Madrid, Spain; Auckland, New Zealand; Randburg, South Africa, Beverwijk, Netherlands; Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada; and Beijing, China. Deliveries are made directly to our retail stores either through company owned trucks or through third parties.

        The direct response and e-commerce orders for our Puritan's Pride and Vitamin World segments are handled by our domestic distribution center that is integrated with our order entry systems. Once a customer's telephone, mail or internet order is completed, our computer system forwards the order to our distribution center, where all necessary distribution and shipping documents are printed to facilitate processing. Then, the orders are prepared, picked, packed and shipped continually throughout the business day. We operate a proprietary, automated picking and packing system for frequently shipped items. We are capable of fulfilling 20,000 direct response and e-commerce orders daily. A system of conveyors automatically routes boxes carrying merchandise throughout our primary Long Island distribution center for fulfillment of orders. Completed orders are bar-coded and scanned and the merchandise and ship date are verified and entered automatically into the customer order file for access by sales associates before shipment.

        All our properties are covered by all-risk and liability insurance, in amounts and on terms that we believe are customary for our industry.

        We believe that these properties, taken as a whole, are generally well- maintained, and are adequate for current and reasonably foreseeable business needs. We also believe that substantially all our properties are being utilized to a significant degree.

Item 3.    Legal Proceedings

Herbal Dietary Supplements

        In February 2015, the NY AG began an investigation concerning the authenticity and purity of herbal supplements and associated marketing. As part of this investigation, the NY AG is reviewing the sufficiency of the measures that several manufacturers and retailers, including NBTY, are taking to independently assess the validity of their representations and advertising in connection with the sale of herbal supplements. On September 9, 2015, the Attorney General sent letters to fourteen separate companies, including NBTY, concerning an additional herbal product. NBTY has fully cooperated with the NY AG; however until these investigations are concluded, no final determination can be made as to its ultimate outcome or the amount of liability, if any, on the part of NBTY.

        Following the NY AG investigation, starting in February 2015, numerous putative class actions were filed in various jurisdictions against NBTY, certain of its customers and/or other companies as to which there may be a duty to defend and indemnify, challenging the authenticity and purity of herbal

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supplements and associated marketing, under various states' consumer protection statutes. Motions for transfer and consolidation of all of the federal actions as multidistrict litigation into a single district before a single judge were granted on June 9, 2015, and the cases are consolidated before Judge John W. Darrah of the United States District Court, North District of Illinois—Eastern Division (the "MDL Case"). Three class actions against one of our customers to which we may have a duty to indemnify have not been transferred and consolidated with the MDL Case, and are at the initial stages of litigation. At this time, no determination can be made as to the ultimate outcome of the investigation and related litigation or the amount of liability, if any, on the part of NBTY.

Glucosamine-Based Dietary Supplements

        Beginning in June 2011, certain putative class actions have been filed in various jurisdictions against NBTY, its subsidiary Rexall Sundown, Inc. ("Rexall"), and/or other companies as to which there may be a duty to defend and indemnify, challenging the marketing of glucosamine-based dietary supplements, under various states' consumer protection statutes. The lawsuits against NBTY and its subsidiaries are: Cardenas v. NBTY, Inc. and Rexall Sundown, Inc. (filed June 14, 2011) in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California, on behalf of a putative class of California consumers seeking unspecified compensatory damages based on theories of restitution and disgorgement, plus punitive damages and injunctive relief; Jennings v. Rexall Sundown, Inc. (filed August 22, 2011) in the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts, on behalf of a putative class of Massachusetts consumers seeking unspecified trebled compensatory damages; and Nunez v. NBTY, Inc. et al. (filed March 1, 2013) in the United States District Court for the Southern District of California (the "Nunez Case"), on behalf of a putative class of California consumers seeking unspecified compensatory damages based on theories of restitution and disgorgement, plus injunctive relief, as well as other cases in California and Illinois against certain Consumer Products Group customers as to which we may have certain indemnification obligations.

        In March 2013, NBTY agreed upon a proposed settlement with the plaintiffs, which included all cases and resolved all pending claims without any admission of or concession of liability by NBTY, and which provided for a release of all claims in return for payments to the class, together with attorneys' fees, and notice and administrative costs. Fairness Hearings took place on October 4, 2013 and November 20, 2013. On January 3, 2014, the court issued an opinion and order approving the settlement as modified (the "Order"). The final judgment was issued on January 22, 2014 (the "Judgment"). Certain objectors filed a notice of appeal of the Order and the Judgment on January 29, 2014 and the plaintiffs filed a notice of appeal on February 3, 2014. In fiscal 2013, NBTY recorded a provision of $12 million reflecting its best estimate of exposure for payments to the class together with attorney's fees and notice and administrative costs in connection with this class action settlement. As a result of the court's approval of the settlement and the closure of the claims period, NBTY reduced its estimate of exposure to $6.1 million. This reduction in the estimated exposure was reflected in the Company's first quarter results for fiscal 2014.

        On November 19, 2014, the appellate court issued a decision granting the objectors' appeal. The appellate court reversed and remanded the matter to the district court for further proceedings consistent with the appellate court's decision. In April 2015, NBTY agreed upon a revised proposed settlement with certain plaintiffs which includes all cases and resolves all pending claims without any admission of or concession of liability by NBTY. The parties have signed settlement documentation providing for a release of all claims in return for payments to the class, together with attorneys' fees, and notice and administrative costs estimated to be in the amount of $9 million, which resulted in an additional charge of $4.3 million in the second quarter results for fiscal 2015. On May 14, 2015, the settlement was submitted to the court for preliminary approval and a preliminary conference was held before the court on July 22, 2015. Until the cases are resolved, no final determination can be made as to the ultimate outcome of the litigation or the amount of liability on the part of NBTY.

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Telephone Consumer Protection Act Claim

        NBTY, and certain of its subsidiaries, are defendants in a class-action lawsuit, captioned John H. Lary Jr. v. Rexall Sundown, Inc.; Rexall Sundown 3001, LLC; Rexall, Inc.; NBTY, Inc.; Corporate Mailings, Inc. d/b/a CCG Marketing Solutions ("CCG") and John Does 1-10 (originally filed October 22, 2013), brought in the United States District Court, Eastern District of New York. The plaintiff alleges that the defendants faxed advertisements to plaintiff and others without invitation or permission, in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act ("TCPA").

        On May 2, 2014, NBTY and its named subsidiary defendants cross-claimed against CCG, who was a third party vendor engaged by NBTY, and CCG cross-claimed against NBTY and named subsidiary defendants on June 13, 2014. CCG brought a third party complaint against an unrelated entity, Healthcare Data Experts, LLC, on June 27, 2014. On July 21, 2014, CCG filed a motion to dismiss the amended complaint and on February 11, 2015 the court issued an Order and Opinion dismissing the class-action. On February 27, 2015, the plaintiff filed an appeal to the court's dismissal of the action and that appeal is pending. The court has scheduled oral arguments for December 10, 2015.

        At this time, no determination can be made as to the ultimate outcome of the litigation or the amount of liability on the part of NBTY.

Claims in the Ordinary Course

        In addition to the foregoing, other regulatory inquiries, audits, investigations, claims, suits and complaints (including false advertising, product liability, escheat laws, intellectual property and Proposition 65 claims) arise from time to time in the ordinary course of our business. We currently believe that such other inquiries, claims, suits and complaints would not have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial statements, if adversely determined against us.

        Over the past several years, we have been served with various false advertising putative class action cases in various U.S. jurisdictions, as have various other companies in the industry. Over the past few years, the number of these cases has increased, such that at any given time we are defending several suits concerning a variety of products. These cases challenge the marketing of the subject dietary supplements under various states' consumer protection statutes and generally seek unspecified compensatory damages based on theories of restitution and disgorgement, plus punitive damages and injunctive relief. Until these cases are resolved, no determination can be made as to the ultimate outcome of the litigation or the amount of liability on our part.

Item 4.    Mine Safety Disclosures

        Not applicable.

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PART II

Item 5.    Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Market for Common Stock

        As of the date of this Report, we are a wholly owned subsidiary of Holdings, which is in turn a wholly owned subsidiary of certain investment funds affiliated with Carlyle, and there is no public market for our common stock.

Dividend Policy

        In each of November 2014 and May 2015, NBTY paid a cash dividend of approximately $38.8 million, to Holdings, in order for Holdings to make an interest payment on the Holdco Notes. Future determination as to the payment of cash or stock dividends will depend upon our results of operations, financial condition, capital requirements, restrictions contained in NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, limitations contained in the indentures governing the Notes and the Holdco Notes, and such other factors as our Board considers appropriate.

        The senior secured credit facilities prohibit our paying dividends or making any other distributions to our stockholder, subject to some exceptions. The indentures under which the Notes and the Holdco Notes were issued similarly prohibit paying dividends or making any other distributions to stockholders, subject to some exceptions. NBTY's senior secured credit facilities and the indenture governing the Notes permit the payment of interest on the Holdco Notes via dividends from NBTY to Holdings, provided that certain conditions are satisfied.

        For additional information regarding these lending arrangements and securities (including payment of interest under the Holdco Notes), see Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources," and Note 9 to the consolidated financial statements in this Report.

        For information regarding securities authorized for issuance under our equity compensation plans as of September 30, 2015, see Item 12, "Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters" in this Report.

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Item 6.    Selected Financial Data

 
  Fiscal Years Ended September 30,  
 
  2015   2014   2013   2012   2011  
 
  (In thousands)
 

Selected Income Statement Data:

                               

Net sales

  $ 3,226,124   $ 3,205,778   $ 3,163,041   $ 2,999,733   $ 2,864,427  

Costs and expenses:

                               

Cost of sales

    1,746,462     1,740,417     1,700,909     1,608,436     1,641,887  

Advertising, promotion and catalog

    198,203     202,754     189,485     164,298     152,021  

Selling, general and administrative

    978,265     952,533     910,187     832,629     788,719  

Merger expenses

                    44,479  

Facility restructuring charges

    29,493         32,695          

Goodwill and intangible asset impairment charges

    55,000     207,334              

Income from operations

    218,701     102,740     329,765     394,370     237,321  

Interest expense

    (132,930 )   (136,038 )   (147,100 )   (158,584 )   (195,566 )

Miscellaneous, net

    1,734     (709 )   1,693     (1,003 )   1,933  

Income (loss) from continuing operations before income taxes

    87,505     (34,007 )   184,358     234,783     43,688  

Provision for income taxes on continuing operations

    13,087     10,145     54,878     65,264     10,989  

Income (loss) on continuing operations

    74,418     (44,152 )   129,480     169,519     32,699  

(Loss) from discontinued operations, net of income taxes

                (23,048 )   (2,780 )

Net income (loss)

  $ 74,418   $ (44,152 ) $ 129,480   $ 146,471   $ 29,919  

Selected Balance Sheet Data:

          (As Revised)     (As Revised)     (As Revised)     (As Revised)  

Working Capital

  $ 895,755   $ 813,932   $ 719,068   $ 874,508   $ 891,582  

Total assets

    4,868,409     4,823,409     5,002,587     4,988,461     5,009,170  

Long-term debt, net of current portion

    2,129,158     2,099,487     2,083,389     2,084,427     2,274,988  

Total stockholder's equity

    1,431,746     1,513,380     1,629,126     1,709,519     1,541,182  

        This "Item 6, Selected Financial Data" has been amended and revised to give effect to the revision of our consolidated financial statements for the Company's financial position as of September 30, 2014, 2013, 2012 and 2011 as it relates to the correction of our accounting policies related to on-hand labels and prepaid rent. A more complete discussion of this revision can be found in Note 2—"Summary of Significant Accounting Policies" to the consolidated financial statements contained in Part II, Item 8 herein.

        The Company adopted new accounting guidance whereby deferred financing costs associated with long-term debt should be presented as a reduction of a Long-term debt, rather than as an asset as previously required. This change resulted in a reduction of Long-term debt for all periods presented; see Note 9—"Long-Term Debt" contained in the consolidated financial statements contained in Part II, Item 8 herein.

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ITEM 7.    MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

        The statements in the following discussion and analysis regarding industry outlook, our expectations regarding the performance of our business and the forward-looking statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to, the risks and uncertainties described in this Report under the heading Forward Looking Statements" and "Risk Factors." Our actual results may differ materially from those contained in or implied by any forward-looking statements. You should read the following discussion together with the consolidated financial statements, including the related notes, contained elsewhere herein. All references to years, unless otherwise noted, refer to our fiscal years, which end on September 30. All dollar values in this section, unless otherwise noted, are denoted in thousands. Numerical figures have been subject to rounding adjustments. Accordingly, numerical figures shown as totals in various tables may not be arithmetic aggregations of the figures that precede them.

Carlyle Transaction

        On October 1, 2010, NBTY consummated the Merger with an affiliate of Carlyle under which the Carlyle affiliate acquired 100% of NBTY for a net purchase price of $3,635,949. The purchase price was funded through the net proceeds of our $1,750,000 senior secured credit facilities, the issuance of $650,000 principal amount of notes and a cash equity contribution of $1,550,000 from an affiliate of Carlyle. We also refer to the Merger as the "Acquisition" and together with the financing as the "Transactions".

        As a result of the Merger and the application of acquisition accounting, our assets and liabilities have been adjusted to their fair values as of October 1, 2010, the closing date of the Transactions. Additionally, the excess of the total purchase price over the fair value of our assets and liabilities at closing was allocated to goodwill.

Goodwill and Other Intangible Asset Impairment Charges

        The Puritan's Pride and Vitamin World segments have seen increased competition as well as increased use of promotions in order to maintain sales levels.

        During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2015, the Vitamin World segment recorded an impairment charge of $55,000, on its indefinite-lived tradenames. This was in connection with our annual impairment assessment and the completion of a strategic planning process relating to the rates of growth of sales, profit and cash flow and expectations for future performance.

        During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014, the Puritan's Pride and Vitamin World segments recorded an impairment charge of $61,590 and $25,744, respectively, related to the impairment of goodwill. This was in connection with our annual impairment assessment and the completion of a strategic planning process relating to the rates of growth of sales, profit and cash flow and expectations for future performance. In addition, as a part of this process, we recorded an impairment charge of $110,000 and $10,000 on the indefinite lived tradenames of the Puritan's Pride and Vitamin World segments, respectively.

Sale of Nutritional Bar Assets and Powder Facility

        In March 2015, NBTY and Nellson Nutraceutical, LLC ("Nellson") entered into (i) a bar asset purchase agreement, (the "Bar APA") and (ii) a powder asset purchase agreement (the "Powder APA" and, together with the Bar APA, the "APAs"), pursuant to which NBTY agreed to sell certain production assets, raw materials, packaging, labeling, in process products, component inventories and contracts (the "Transferred Assets") associated with NBTY's nutritional bar and powder manufacturing operations (the "Divested Manufacturing Operations").

        The closing of the sale pursuant to the Powder APA occurred on June 26, 2015. The sales price for the production assets and transferred contracts was $4,228, subject to post-closing adjustments. The

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sales price for the raw materials, packaging, labels, work-in-process and component inventories was $16,722 net of post-closing adjustments.

        The sale pursuant to the Bar APA is expected to be completed by the end of the first half of fiscal 2016, and is subject to customary closing conditions. The aggregate sales price for the production assets to be sold pursuant to the Bar APA is approximately $12,000, which resulted in accelerated depreciation as described below. The sales price for the raw materials, packaging, labels, work-in-process and component inventories to be transferred pursuant to the Bar APA will be equal to NBTY's book value for such assets, as estimated by NBTY prior to the closing of the transactions, and subject to post-closing adjustments.

        As a result of these arrangements, we will incur cumulative net charges of approximately $34,000 before tax over the period in which these transactions are completed, of which non-cash charges will consist primarily of accelerated depreciation and a write-off of Goodwill of approximately $28,000; costs related to workforce reductions will be approximately $2,500 and other costs will be approximately $5,192, partially offset by a gain of $1,692 of the sale of a contract. All costs associated with the Divested Manufacturing Operations will be reflected in Corporate / Manufacturing.

        Charges related to these divestitures of $29,493 for the year ended September 30, 2015 were $20,203 for accelerated depreciation, $5,541 for a write-off of goodwill associated with the fair value of the business related to the powder facility, $2,510 for severance and employee related costs and $2,931 of other costs, partially offset by a gain on a transferred contract of $1,692.

        In connection with the sale of the Divested Manufacturing Operations, NBTY has entered into long-term supply agreements with Nellson, pursuant to which NBTY will purchase from Nellson the nutritional bar and powder products we formerly manufactured for a period of ten years.

Plan of Restructuring

        On March 12, 2013, NBTY initiated a restructuring plan to streamline its operations and improve the profitability and return on invested capital of its manufacturing/packaging and distribution facilities. The restructuring involved the sale or closure of seven of NBTY's manufacturing/packaging and distribution facilities. The restructuring plan commenced in the second quarter of fiscal 2013 and was completed in fiscal 2014. The restructuring resulted in cumulative charges of $32,695 before tax over that period, of which non-cash charges consisted primarily of accelerated depreciation of approximately $12,588.

Consent Solicitation and Debt Offering

        On December 2, 2013, Holdings launched a consent solicitation (the "Consent Solicitation") of consents from holders of Holdings' $550,000 in aggregate principal amount of 7.75%/8.50% contingent cash pay senior notes due 2017 that were originally issued on October 17, 2012 (the "original Holdco Notes"). The purpose of the Consent Solicitation was to amend the restricted payment covenant in the indenture governing the Holdco Notes. Holdings sought consent to add a new "basket" in the restricted payment covenant (Section 3.4 of the indenture governing the Holdco Notes) for a dividend or distribution to Holdings' shareholders up to the net proceeds of the offering of Holdings' additional 7.75%/8.50% contingent cash pay senior notes in an aggregate principal amount of $450,000 due 2017 (the "additional Holdco Notes" and, together with the original Holdco Notes, the "Holdco Notes") less the amount available as of September 30, 2013 for restricted payments under the "builder" basket in Section 3.4(a)(C) of the indenture governing the Holdco Notes (the "Proposed Amendments").

        On December 10, 2013, the requisite holders of the existing Holdco Notes consented to the Proposed Amendments and Holdings entered into a supplemental indenture (the "First Supplemental Indenture") to the indenture governing the Holdco Notes. The First Supplemental Indenture became operative upon the payment of the consent fee (the "consent fee") by Holdings to the paying agent on behalf of the holders of the existing Holdco Notes, which was paid concurrently with the closing of the offering of the additional Holdco Notes.

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        On December 12, 2013, Holdings issued the additional Holdco Notes in an aggregate principal amount of $450,000. The $450,000 of additional Holdco Notes and the $550,000 of original Holdco Notes have identical terms and are treated as a single class for all purposes under the indenture governing the Holdco Notes. The proceeds from the offering of the $450,000 additional Holdco Notes were used to pay transaction fees and expenses, including the consent fee of $18,560, and a $445,537 dividend to Holdings' shareholders in December 2013.

Refinancing

        On March 21, 2013, NBTY, Holdings, Barclays Bank PLC, as administrative agent, and several other lenders entered into the Third Amendment and Second Refinancing Agreement amending the credit agreement governing NBTY's senior secured credit facilities (the "Second Refinancing") pursuant to which NBTY repriced its term loan B-1 under its credit agreement. Under the terms of the Second Refinancing, the $1,750,000 term loan B-1 was replaced with a new $1,507,500 (the current principal amount outstanding) term loan B-2. Borrowings under term loan B-2 bear interest at a floating rate which can be, at NBTY's option, either (i) Eurodollar (LIBOR) rate plus an applicable margin, or (ii) base rate plus an applicable margin, in each case, subject to a Eurodollar (LIBOR) rate floor of 1.00% or a base rate floor of 2.00%, as applicable. The applicable margin for term loan B-2 is 2.50% per annum for Eurodollar (LIBOR) loans and 1.50% per annum for base rate loans. Substantially all other terms are consistent with the original term loan B-1, including the maturity dates. As a result of the Second Refinancing, $4,232 of previously capitalized deferred financing costs, as well as $1,151 of the call premium on term loan B-1, were expensed. In addition, costs incurred and recorded as deferred financing costs were approximately $15,190, including $13,924 of the call premium paid on term loan B-1, and will be amortized using the effective interest method.

        On November 20, 2014, NBTY amended its senior secured revolving credit facility, extending its maturity to September 2017 and reducing the commitment from $200,000 to $175,000. In connection with this amendment, deferred financing costs of $611 were incurred and are being amortized over the remaining period and $359 of previously capitalized financing costs were written off.

Acquisition of Dr. Organic Limited

        In August 2015, NBTY (2015) Limited, a private limited company incorporated in England and Wales and an indirect subsidiary of Alphabet Holding Company, Inc. ("NBTY (2015)"), and Holland & Barrett Group Limited, a company incorporated in England and Wales and an indirect subsidiary of Alphabet Holding Company, Inc. ("H&B"), entered into an agreement to purchase Dr. Organic Limited (the "Share Purchase Agreement") pursuant to which NBTY (2015) agreed to acquire all of the ordinary shares in Dr. Organic Limited, a manufacturer, marketer and distributor of a broad line of naturally-inspired personal care products.

        The purchase price for the ordinary shares of Dr. Organic Limited is approximately £53,000 (approximately $85,000), payable in (i) cash of £33,000 (approximately $51,000) (the "cash consideration"), (ii) loan notes in an aggregate principal amount of approximately £20,000 (approximately $31,000) (the "completion loan notes") to be issued by NBTY (2015) to the sellers, which mature 18 months after issuance and are redeemable at any time after six months at the option of the holders, (iii) 399,000 class B ordinary shares, par value £0.01 (the "rollover shares"), to be issued by NBTY (2015) to the sellers and (iv) 100,000 class C ordinary shares, par value £0.01, to be issued by NBTY (2015) to certain of the sellers at a premium of £0.04 each (which will be redeemed by NBTY (2015) for £0.05 each 18 months after issuance), each payable or issued on the closing date of the acquisition. Holders of the rollover shares may require us to repurchase them for an amount based on the future earnings of Dr. Organic Limited and its subsidiaries (the "repurchase amount"), which amount is payable, at the election of holders, in cash or through the issuance of loan notes by NBTY (2015) with terms similar to the completion loan notes. To the extent the holders do not exercise their put right, we will have the right to call the rollover shares at the repurchase amount.

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        The completion of the transaction is subject to certain closing conditions, including regulatory clearance in the United Kingdom. The closing of the Dr. Organic Limited acquisition is expected to occur during the second half of calendar 2015.

Revision

        This "Item 7, Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" has been amended and revised to give effect to the revision of our consolidated financial statements for the Company's financial position as of September 30, 2014 and 2013 as it relates to the correction of accounting policies related to on-hand labels and prepaid rent. A more complete discussion of this revision can be found in Note 2—"Summary of Significant Accounting Policies" to the consolidated financial statements contained in Part II, Item 8 herein.

Executive Summary

        We are the leading vertically integrated manufacturer, marketer, distributor and retailer of high-quality VMHS products in the United States, with operations worldwide. We currently market a broad portfolio of well-known brands and third party label products. Our key consumer product brands include Nature's Bounty®, Sundown®, Pure Protein®, Solgar®, Body Fortress®, Osteo Bi Flex®, MET Rx®, Balance Bar® and Ester C®. We also operate specialty retailers of health and wellness products, primarily focused on providing VMHS solutions to our end consumers. Our specialty retailer businesses primarily operate under the Holland & Barrett®, Puritan's Pride® and Vitamin World® banners.

        During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2015, we changed the names of our four segments to more accurately portray the brands and markets in which we do business. There were no other changes in the presentation of our segments. The changes to the names are as follows:

New Segment Name   Previous Segment Name
Consumer Products Group   Wholesale
Holland & Barrett International   European Retail
Puritan's Pride   Direct Response/E-Commerce
Vitamin World   North American Retail
    Consumer Products Group—This segment sells products worldwide under various brand names and third-party private labels. Our products are sold to the major mass merchandisers, club stores, drug store chains and supermarkets, as well as to online retailers, independent pharmacies, health food stores, the military and other retailers.

    Holland & Barrett International—This segment operates 843 Holland & Barrett stores (including 744 company-owned stores in the UK and Ireland; and franchised stores in the following countries: 33 in China, 28 in Singapore, 16 in United Arab Emirates, 10 in Cyprus, five in Malta, four in Kuwait, two in Spain and one in Gibraltar). Holland & Barrett International also operated 161 De Tuinen stores (including cobranded stores) in the Netherlands (of which five were franchises), 18 Essenza stores in Belgium, and 49 GNC/MET-Rx stores in the UK. Holland & Barrett International operates Holland & Barrett retail websites in the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands and Belgium, as well as retail websites for De Tuinen in the Netherlands and the GNC/MET-Rx brands in the UK. The revenue generated by this segment consists of sales of its branded products and third-party products as well as franchise fees. We are in the process of rebranding or cobranding our De Tuinen and Essenza stores to leverage consumer awareness of our Holland & Barrett brand. We are also in the process of rebranding our GNC brand stores to MET-Rx.

    Puritan's Pride—This segment generates revenue through the sale of its branded products and third-party products primarily through the internet and mail order catalogs under the Puritan's Pride tradename. Catalogs are strategically mailed to customers who order by mail, internet, or phone.

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    Vitamin World—This segment generates revenue through its 385 owned and operated Vitamin World stores selling proprietary brand and third-party products, as well as internet-based sales from www.vitaminworld.com.

        Operating data for each of the four distribution channels does not include the impact of any intercompany transfer pricing mark-up, corporate general and administrative expenses, interest expense and other miscellaneous income/expense items. Corporate general and administrative expenses include, but are not limited to, human resources, legal, finance and various other corporate- level activity related expenses. We attribute such unallocated expenses to Corporate/Manufacturing.

        We have continued to grow through our marketing practices and through a series of strategic acquisitions. Since 1986, we have acquired and successfully integrated approximately 30 companies or businesses engaged in the manufacturing, retail and direct response sale of nutritional supplements, including:

    Fiscal 1997: Holland & Barrett;

    Fiscal 1998: Nutrition Headquarters Group;

    Fiscal 2000: Nutrition Warehouse Group;

    Fiscal 2001: Global Health Sciences, NatureSmart and Nature's Way;

    Fiscal 2002: Healthcentral.com, Knox NutraJoint®, and Synergy Plus® product lines/operations;

    Fiscal 2003: Rexall Sundown Inc., Health and Diet Group Ltd. ("GNC (UK)"), FSC Wholesale, and the De Tuinen chain of retail stores;

    Fiscal 2005: Le Naturiste Jean-Marc Brunet, SISU, Inc. ("SISU") and Solgar Vitamin and Herb ("Solgar"), formerly a division of Wyeth Consumer Healthcare;

    Fiscal 2007: The Ester-C Company (formerly Zila Nutraceuticals, Inc.);

    Fiscal 2008: Doctor's Trust , Leiner and Julian Graves;

    Fiscal 2010: Ultimate Biopharma (Zongshen) Corporation;

    Fiscal 2011: Vitarich Laboratories, Inc. and Sun Valley Natural Products, LLC; and

    Fiscal 2013: Balance Bar Company and Essenza N.V.

Critical Accounting Estimates and Policies

        The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the dates of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods. These judgments can be subjective and complex, and consequently actual results could differ materially from those estimates and assumptions. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. As with any set of assumptions and estimates, there is a range of reasonably likely amounts that may be reported.

        The following critical accounting policies have been identified as those that affect the more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of the consolidated financial statements.

Revenue Recognition

        We recognize product revenue when title and risk of loss have transferred to the customer, there is persuasive evidence of an arrangement to deliver a product, delivery has occurred, the sales price is fixed or determinable and collectability is reasonably assured. The delivery terms for most sales within the Consumer Products Group and Puritan's Pride segments are F.O.B. destination. Generally, title and risk of loss transfer to the customer at the time the product is received by the customer. With respect

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to our retail store operations, we recognize revenue upon sale of products to customers. Net sales represent gross sales invoiced to customers, less certain related charges for discounts, returns, and other promotional program incentive allowances.

Allowance for Sales Returns

        Estimates for sales returns are based on a variety of factors, including actual return experience of specific products or similar products. We are able to make reasonable and reliable estimates of product returns based on our 40-year history in this business. We also review our estimates for product returns based on expected return data communicated to us by customers. Additionally, we monitor the levels of inventory at some of our largest customers to avoid excessive customer stocking of merchandise. Allowances for returns of new products are estimated by reviewing data of any prior relevant new product introduction return information. We also monitor the buying patterns of the end-users of our products based on sales data received by our retail outlets in North America and Europe. Historically, the difference in the amount of actual sales returns compared to our estimate for sales returns has not been significant.

Promotional Program Incentive Allowance

        We estimate our allowance for promotional program incentives based on specific outstanding marketing programs and historical experience. The allowance for sales incentives offered to customers is based on various contractual terms or other arrangements agreed to in advance with certain customers. Generally, customers earn such incentives as they achieve sales volumes. We accrue these incentives as a reduction to sales either at the time of sale or over the period of time in which they are earned, depending on the nature of the program. Historically, we have not experienced material adjustments to the estimate of our promotional program incentive allowance and we do not expect that there will be a material change in the future estimates and assumptions we use.

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

        We perform on-going credit evaluations of our customers and adjust credit limits based upon payment history and the customers' current creditworthiness, as determined by our review of current credit information. We estimate bad debt expense based upon historical experience as well as customer collection issues to adjust the carrying amount of the related receivable to its estimated realizable value. While such bad debt expense has historically been within expectations and allowances established, we cannot guarantee that we will continue to experience the same credit loss rates that we had in the past. If the financial condition of one or more of our customers were to deteriorate, additional bad debt expense may be required.

Inventories

        Inventories are stated at the lower of cost (first-in first-out method) or market. The cost elements of inventories include materials, labor and overhead. In evaluating whether inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market, we consider such factors as the amount of inventory on hand, estimated time required to sell such inventory, remaining shelf life and current and expected market conditions, including levels of competition. Based on this evaluation, we record an adjustment to cost of goods sold to reduce inventories to net realizable value. These adjustments are estimates, which could vary significantly, either favorably or unfavorably, from actual requirements if future economic conditions, customer demand or competition differ from expectations.

Long-Lived Assets

        We evaluate the need for an impairment charge relating to long-lived assets whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. We consider the following to be some examples of important indicators that may trigger an impairment review: (i) a history of cash flow losses at retail stores; (ii) significant changes in the manner or use of

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the acquired assets in our overall business strategy; (iii) significant negative industry or economic trends; (iv) increased competitive pressures; and (v) regulatory changes.

Goodwill and Intangible Assets

        Goodwill is tested for impairment using a two-step process. In the first step, the fair value of a reporting unit is compared to its carrying value. If the fair value of a reporting unit exceeds the carrying value of the net assets assigned to a reporting unit, goodwill is not considered impaired and no further testing is required. If the carrying amount of the reporting unit exceeds its fair value, a second step is performed to determine whether there is a goodwill impairment, and if so, the amount of the impairment. This step revalues all assets and liabilities of the reporting unit to their current fair value and then compares the implied fair value of the reporting unit's goodwill to the carrying amount of that goodwill. If the carrying amount of the reporting unit's goodwill exceeds the implied fair value of the goodwill, an impairment is recognized in an amount equal to the excess. Application of the goodwill impairment test requires judgment, including the identification of reporting units, assignment of assets and liabilities to reporting units, assignment of goodwill to reporting units, and determination of the fair value of each reporting unit. We use a combination of the income and market approaches, weighted equally, to estimate the fair value of our reporting units.

        The fair value of our indefinite-lived trademarks is generally determined based on the relief from royalty method under the income approach, which requires us to estimate a reasonable royalty rate, identify relevant projected revenues and expenses, and select an appropriate discount rate. The evaluation of indefinite-lived intangible assets for impairment requires management to use significant judgments and estimates including, but not limited to, projected future net sales, operating results, and cash flow of our business.

        We base our fair value estimates on assumptions we believe to be reasonable, but such assumptions are subject to inherent uncertainties. If actual external conditions or future operating results differ from our judgments, this may result in an impairment of our goodwill and/or intangible assets. An impairment charge would reduce operating income in the period it was determined that the charge was needed.

        On a quarterly basis, we monitor the key drivers of fair value to detect events or other changes that would warrant an interim impairment test of our goodwill and indefinite-lived intangibles. The key assumptions that drive the cash flows of our reporting units and intangible assets are estimated revenue growth rates and levels of profitability. Terminal value growth rate assumptions, weighted average cost of capital rates ("WACC") as well as royalty rates are used in conjunction with these key assumptions in order to derive the estimated fair value. These assumptions are subject to uncertainty, including our ability to grow revenue and improve or maintain profitability levels. Relatively small declines in the future performance and cash flows of a reporting unit or asset group or small changes in other key assumptions may result in the recognition of significant asset impairment charges. For example, keeping all other variables constant, an increase in the WACC applied of 50 basis points or a 140 basis point decrease in the terminal year level of profitability would require that we perform the second step of the goodwill impairment test for the Puritan's Pride reporting unit. The estimates used for our future cash flows and discount rates represent management's best estimates, which we believe to be reasonable, but future declines in business performance may impair the recoverability of our goodwill and intangible asset balances. Currently the estimated fair value of the Puritan's Pride reporting unit exceeds its carrying value by approximately 3% and the carrying value of the goodwill that is within the Puritan's Pride reporting unit is $450,625.

        The Company has also concluded that it is reasonably likely that certain other intangible assets may become impaired in future periods. The term "reasonably likely" refers to an occurrence that is more than remote but less than probable in the judgment of management. These intangible assets include the Puritan's Pride tradename which has an indefinite life and a carrying value of $160,000 as well as finite-lived intangible assets relating to a customer list and tradename for Balance Bar that have a net cumulative carrying value of $48,810 as of September 30, 2015.

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        As of September 30, 2015, the Puritan's Pride tradename had a fair value that equaled the carrying value. However, because some of the inherent assumptions and estimates used in determining fair value of these intangible assets are outside the control of management, such as discount rates, WACC as well as royalty rates, changes in these underlying assumptions can also adversely impact the fair value. The amount of any impairment is dependent on all these factors, which cannot be predicted with certainty. For example, holding all other assumptions constant at the test date, a 50 basis point increase in the WAAC would result in an impairment of $10,000 or a 50 basis point decrease in the royalty rate would result in an impairment of $20,000, associated with this tradename.

        As of September 30, 2015, the undiscounted cash flow analysis prepared by management for the Balance Bar intangible assets did not reveal an impairment. However, some of the inherent assumptions are determined by management, the most significant assumption is the revenue growth rate. The analysis performed at the test date used a compound annual growth rate ("CAGR") of 2.7%, which management believes to be reasonable based on the current sales volume and future projected performance of this brand. Holding all other assumptions constant at the test date, a 20 basis point decrease in the CAGR would require a fair value analysis to be performed to calculate the value of the impairment to be recorded.

Income Taxes

        We record the estimated future tax effects of temporary differences between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and amounts reported in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets, as well as tax credit carrybacks and carryforwards. We periodically review the recoverability of deferred tax assets recorded on the balance sheet and provide valuation allowances as we deem necessary to reduce such deferred tax assets to the amount that will, more likely than not, be realized. We make judgments as to the interpretation of the tax laws that might be challenged upon an audit and cause changes to previous estimates of tax liability. In addition, we operate within multiple taxing jurisdictions and are subject to audit in these jurisdictions. In our opinion, adequate provisions for income taxes have been made for all years. If actual taxable income by tax jurisdiction varies from estimates, additional allowances or reversals of reserves may be necessary.

        NBTY Inc. and its subsidiaries are included in the consolidated United States federal and certain state corporate income tax returns of Holdings. NBTY calculates the provision for income taxes by using a "separate return" method. Under this method, we are assumed to file separate returns with the tax authorities, thereby reporting our taxable income or loss and paying the applicable tax to or receiving the appropriate refund from Holdings. Our current provision is the amount of tax payable or refundable on the basis of hypothetical, current-year separate returns. We provide deferred taxes on temporary differences and on any carryforwards that we could claim on our hypothetical returns and assess the need for a valuation allowance on the basis of our projected separate return results. Any difference between the tax provision (or benefit) allocated to us under the separate return method and payments to be made to (or received from) Holdings for tax expense are recorded as either payable or receivable. Accordingly, our tax liability under the separate return method represents the amount payable in excess of Holdings consolidated obligation that is expected to be paid in the future to the extent permitted by our credit agreement.

Accruals for Litigation and Other Contingencies

        We are subject to legal proceedings, lawsuits and other claims related to various matters. We are required to assess the likelihood of any adverse judgments or outcomes to these matters as well as potential ranges of probable losses. We determine the amount of reserves needed, if any, for each individual issue based on our knowledge and experience and discussions with legal counsel. These reserves may change in the future due to new developments in each matter (including the enactment of new laws), the ultimate resolution of each matter or changes in approach, such as a change in settlement strategy. In some instances, we may be unable to make a reasonable estimate of the liabilities that may result from the final resolution of certain contingencies disclosed and accordingly, no reserve is recorded until such time that a reasonable estimate may be made.

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Recent Accounting Developments

        In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued guidance on revenue from contracts with customers that will supersede virtually all existing revenue recognition guidance, including industry-specific guidance, and is designed to create greater comparability for financial statement users across industries and jurisdictions. The underlying principle is that an entity will recognize revenue to depict the transfer of goods or services to customers at an amount that the entity expects to be entitled to in exchange for those goods or services. The guidance provides a five-step analysis of transactions to determine when and how revenue is recognized. The guidance also requires enhanced disclosures regarding the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from an entity's contracts with customers. The guidance would have been effective for us beginning October 1, 2017, however in July 2015, the FASB decided to defer the effective date of the new standard by one year. Early adoption would be permitted for us beginning October 1, 2017. The guidance permits the use of either a retrospective or cumulative effect transition method. We have not yet selected a transition method and are currently evaluating the impact of the amended guidance on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

        In January 2015, the FASB issued guidance which eliminates from GAAP the concept of extraordinary items. The guidance is effective for us beginning October 1, 2016, and early adoption is permitted, provided that adoption is applied from the beginning of the fiscal year of adoption. This guidance may be applied prospectively or retrospectively to all prior periods presented in the financial statements. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have an impact on our consolidated financial statements.

        In February 2015, the FASB issued guidance that amends the current consolidation guidance. The amendments affect both the variable interest entity and voting interest entity consolidation models. The new guidance is effective for us beginning October 1, 2016, with early adoption permitted. This new guidance is not expected to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

        In April 2015, the FASB issued guidance which changes the presentation of debt issuance costs. Under the new guidance, debt issuance costs are presented as a reduction of the carrying amount of the related liability, rather than as an asset. This guidance was further clarified in August 2015 whereby the FASB explicitly stated that deferred financing costs related to line-of-credit arrangements could be deferred and treated as an asset and subsequently amortized ratably over the term of the line-of-credit. The guidance is effective for us beginning October 1, 2016, and early adoption is permitted. This guidance has been early adopted and applied retrospectively to the prior period presented in the consolidated financial statements. See Note 9 "Long-Term Debt."

        In July 2015, the FASB issued guidance which applies to inventory for which cost is determined by methods other than the last-in first-out and the retail inventory method. Under the new guidance, an entity should measure inventory that is within scope at the lower of cost and net realizable value, which is the estimated selling prices in the ordinary course of business, less reasonably predictable costs of completion, disposal and transportation. This guidance is effective for us beginning October 1, 2017, and should be applied prospectively with early adoption permitted. We are currently evaluating the impact of adopting this guidance on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

        In September 2015, the FASB issued guidance which requires the acquiring company in a business combination to recognize adjustments to provisional amounts that are identified during the measurement period in the reporting period in which the adjustment amounts are determined. The amendments in this guidance require that the acquiring company record, in the same period's financial statements, the effect on earnings of changes in depreciation, amortization, or other income effects, if any, as a result of a change to the provisional amounts, calculated as if the accounting had been completed at the acquisition date. This guidance is effective for us beginning October 1, 2016 and for

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interim periods therein. We are currently evaluating the impact of adopting this guidance on our consolidated financial statements.

Results of Operations

        The following table sets forth for the periods indicated, the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss). Items are expressed as a percentage of total net sales. Percentages may not sum to 100% due to rounding.

 
  Fiscal year
ended September 30,
 
 
  2015   2014   2013  

Net sales

    100.0 %   100.0 %   100.0 %

Costs and expenses:

                   

Cost of sales

    54.1 %   54.3 %   53.8 %

Advertising, promotion and catalog

    6.1 %   6.3 %   6.0 %

Selling, general and administrative

    30.3 %   29.7 %   28.8 %

Goodwill and intangible asset impairment charges

    1.7 %   6.5 %   0.0 %

Facility restructuring charges

    0.9 %   0.0 %   1.0 %

    93.2 %   96.8 %   89.6 %

Income from operations

    6.8 %   3.2 %   10.4 %

Other income (expense):

                   

Interest

    (4.1 )%   (4.2 )%   (4.7 )%

Miscellaneous, net

    0.1 %   (0.0 )%   0.1 %

    (4.1 )%   (4.3 )%   (4.6 )%

Income (loss) before income taxes

    2.7 %   (1.1 )%   5.8 %

Provision for income taxes

    0.4 %   0.3 %   1.7 %

Net income (loss)

    2.3 %   (1.4 )%   4.1 %

Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2015 Compared to Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2014

    Net Sales

        Net sales by segment were as follows:

 
  Net Sales by Segment
Fiscal year ended September 30,
   
   
 
 
  2015   2014    
   
 
Segment
  Net Sales   % of total   Net Sales   % of total   $ change   % change  

Consumer Products Group

  $ 1,883,164     58.4 % $ 1,879,481     58.6 % $ 3,683     0.2 %

Holland & Barrett International

    885,872     27.5 %   850,797     26.5 %   35,075     4.1 %

Puritan's Pride

    248,982     7.7 %   250,224     7.8 %   (1,242 )   (0.5 )%

Vitamin World

    208,106     6.5 %   225,276     7.0 %   (17,170 )   (7.6 )%

Net sales

  $ 3,226,124     100.0 % $ 3,205,778     100.0 % $ 20,346     0.6 %

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Consumer Products Group

        Net sales for the Consumer Products Group were $1,883,164 for fiscal 2015 as compared to $1,879,481for fiscal 2014. The increase of $3,683 or 0.2% was primarily attributable to the following:

    $68,709 from increased sales of domestic branded products, primarily driven by increases in the Nature's Bounty® and Pure Protein® branded products, partially offset by decreases in the joint care category.

    $4,709 from increased sales of branded and private label sales to international customers.

    $(69,735) from decreased sales of domestic private label products, primarily driven by decreased SKUs to existing customers and pricing pressure,

        We continue to adjust shelf space allocation between Consumer Products Group brands to provide the best overall product mix that is preferred by the end consumer and respond to changing market conditions. These efforts have helped to strengthen the Consumer Products Group's position in the mass market. The Consumer Products Group continues to leverage valuable consumer sales information obtained from our Vitamin World and Puritan's Pride operations to provide our mass-market customers with data and analyses to drive mass market sales.

        We use targeted promotions to grow overall sales. Promotional programs and rebates were $392,868, or 17.0% of sales for fiscal 2015 as compared to $371,344, or 16.2% of sales for fiscal 2014. This increase is a result of the increase in the percentage of branded net sales which are more promotionally driven.

        Product returns represented $36,813, or 1.6% of sales for fiscal 2015 as compared to $37,520, or 1.6% of sales for fiscal 2014. The product returns for fiscal 2015 and fiscal 2014 were mainly attributable to returns in the ordinary course of business. We expect returns relating to normal operations to trend between 1% to 2% of the Consumer Products Group's sales in future years.

        One customer, Wal-Mart, represented 18% and 19% of the Consumer Products Group's net sales for fiscal 2015 and 2014, respectively. It also represented 11% of consolidated net sales for each of fiscal 2015 and 2014. The loss of this customer, or any of our other major customers, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations if we were unable to replace that customer. See "Item 1A. Risk Factors-Risks Relating to Our Business—One of our customers accounted for 11% of our consolidated net sales during fiscal 2015 and the loss of this customer, or any other of our other major customers, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations."

    Holland & Barrett International

        Net sales for Holland & Barrett International increased $35,075, or 4.1%, to $885,872 in fiscal 2015 from $850,797 for fiscal 2014. For fiscal 2015 same store sales in U.S. dollars increased 0.3%, or $2,471, as compared to fiscal 2014 (same store sales include online sales). In local currency, net sales increased 13.8% while same store sales increased 9.5% as compared to fiscal 2014. The average exchange rate of the British pound sterling to the U.S. dollar weakened 6.7% and the euro to the US dollar weakened 15.3% as compared to the prior comparable period.

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        The following is a summary of Holland & Barrett International store activity:

 
  Fiscal
2015
  Fiscal
2014
 

Holland & Barrett International stores:

             

Company-owned stores

             

Open at beginning of the period

    927     901  

Opened during the period

    51     39  

Closed during the period

    (11 )   (13 )

Open at end of the period

    967     927  

Franchised stores

   
 
   
 
 

Open at beginning of the period

    89     79  

Opened during the period

    27     17  

Closed during the period

    (12 )   (7 )

Open at end of the period

    104     89  

Total company-owned and franchised stores

   
 
   
 
 

Open at beginning of the period

    1,016     980  

Opened during the period

    78     56  

Closed during the period

    (23 )   (20 )

Open at end of the period

    1,071     1,016  

    Puritan's Pride

        Net Sales for Puritan's Pride decreased $1,242, or 0.5%, to $248,982 in fiscal 2015 from $250,224 in fiscal 2014. The total number of orders increased 4% and the average order size declined 6% for fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014. Internet orders comprised 75% of this segment's net sales for fiscal 2015 as compared to 72% for fiscal 2014.

        This segment continues to vary its promotional strategy throughout the fiscal year, utilizing highly promotional catalogs which are not offered in every quarter.

    Vitamin World

        Net sales for Vitamin World decreased $17,170 or 7.6%, to $208,106 in fiscal 2015 from $225,276 in fiscal 2014. Same store sales (including online sales) decreased 5% due to a decline in sales of weight loss products as well as overall declines in mall traffic.

        The following is a summary of Vitamin World store activity:

 
  Fiscal
2015
  Fiscal
2014
 

Vitamin World stores:

             

Open at beginning of the period

    414     421  

Opened during the period

    9     18  

Closed during the period

    (38 )   (25 )

Open at end of the period

    385     414  

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    Cost of Sales

        Cost of sales was as follows:

 
  Fiscal year ended
September 30,
   
   
 
 
  2015   2014   $ Change   % Change  

Cost of Sales

  $ 1,746,462   $ 1,740,417   $ 6,045     0.3 %

Percentage of net sales

    54.1 %   54.3 %            

        Cost of sales as a percentage of net sales declined slightly, as higher margins in our Consumer Products Group, due to lower materials costs, supply chain efficiencies and the higher proportion of branded product sales, were offset by lower margins earned in our retail businesses due to increased promotional activity.

    Advertising, Promotion and Catalog Expenses

        Total advertising, promotion and catalog expenses were as follows:

 
  Fiscal year ended
September 30,
   
   
 
 
  2015   2014   $ Change   % Change  

Advertising, promotion and catalog

  $ 198,203   $ 202,754   $ (4,551 )   –2.2 %

Percentage of net sales

    6.1 %   6.3 %            

        Advertising promotion and catalog expense as a percentage of net sales has remained relatively consistent. The slight decrease in advertising, promotion and catalog expense is primarily due to decreases in our Consumer Products Group, as certain media promotions in the prior fiscal year were not repeated in the current fiscal year, partially offset by increases in Holland & Barrett International related to the promotion of new stores and the continued expansion of the brand.

    Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

        Selling, general and administrative expenses ("SG&A") were as follows:

 
  Fiscal year ended
September 30,
   
   
 
 
  2015   2014   $ Change   % Change  

Selling, general and administrative

  $ 978,265   $ 952,533   $ 25,732     2.7 %

Percentage of net sales

    30.3 %   29.7 %            

        SG&A costs for fiscal 2015 increased by $25,732, or 0.6 percentage points as a percentage of net sales compared to fiscal 2014 primarily due to increases of: (i) salaries of $23,547 due to increased stores in the Holland & Barrett International segment, increased severance relating to certain initiatives within the Consumer Products Group and Corporate / Manufacturing, as well as a lower accrual for the annual bonus expense in the prior comparable period; (ii) professional fees of $13,109 relating to various Consumer Products Group initiatives as well as increased legal settlement costs primarily related to the recording of an estimated settlement value in the current period related to the Glucosamine case; (iii) building and occupancy costs of $12,704 primarily relating to additional stores in the Holland & Barrett International segment; and (iv) additional depreciation of $11,669 primarily due to the implementation of a POS system in our Holland & Barrett International segment and the ongoing implementation and support of our ERP system in Corporate/Manufacturing; these increases were partially offset by decreases of $28,986 due to foreign currency in Holland & Barrett International, as the British pound sterling and Euro have weakened as compared to the U.S. dollar and $3,517 of lower insurance costs as a result of lower premiums.

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    Income (Loss) from Operations

        Income (loss) from operations was as follows:

 
  Fiscal year ended
September 30,
   
   
 
 
  2015   2014   $ Change   % Change  

Consumer Products Group

  $ 186,348   $ 177,069   $ 9,279     5.2 %

Holland & Barrett International

    185,984     191,207     (5,223 )   (2.7 )%

Puritan's Pride

    26,107     (141,660 )   167,767     118.4 %

Vitamin World

    (53,224 )   (26,975 )   (26,249 )   (97.3 )%

Corporate

    (126,514 )   (96,901 )   (29,613 )   (30.6 )%

Total

  $ 218,701   $ 102,740   $ 115,961     112.9 %

Percentage of net sales

    6.8 %   3.2 %            

        The increase in the Consumer Products Group segment was primarily due to the increase in gross margins and the decrease in advertising expenses, partially offset by increases in SG&A expenses (primarily salaries and professional fees). The decrease in the Holland & Barrett International segment was the result of increased advertising and SG&A expenses, partially offset by higher sales volume. On a local currency basis, income from operations increased approximately 5%. The increase in the Puritan's Pride segment was primarily due the impairment of goodwill and intangible assets in the prior fiscal year. The increase in the Vitamin World segment's loss was primarily due the impairment of intangible assets, whereby $55,000 was impaired in the current fiscal year and $35,744 was impaired in the prior fiscal year. Corporate/Manufacturing increased due to increases in depreciation expense with the ongoing implementation of our ERP system and accelerated depreciation as well as severance costs related to the sale of the nutritional bar manufacturing facility assets.

    Interest Expense

        Interest expense for fiscal 2015 decreased as compared to fiscal 2014, primarily due to an interest rate swap that matured in the first quarter of fiscal 2015.

    Miscellaneous, net

        The components of miscellaneous, net were as follows:

 
  Fiscal year ended
September 30,
   
 
 
  2015   2014   $ Change  

Foreign exchange gains (losses)

  $ 1,253   $ (1,994 ) $ 3,247  

Investment income

    1,085     704     381  

Ineffectiveness on cross currency swap

    (1,618 )   966     (2,584 )

Other

    1,014     (385 )   1,399  

Total

  $ 1,734   $ (709 ) $ 2,443  

    Provision for Income Taxes

        Our provision for income taxes is impacted by a number of factors, including federal taxes, our international tax structure, state tax rates in the jurisdictions where we conduct business and our ability to utilize state tax credits that expire between 2015 and 2028. Our overall effective income tax rate could vary as a result of these factors. The effective income tax rate for fiscal 2015 was 15.0% and 2014 was (29.8%). The effective income tax rate was lower than statutory rates in fiscal 2015 primarily due

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to the benefit related to our assertion to reinvest $130,000 of foreign earnings indefinitely and in fiscal 2014 primarily due to the impact of the impairment of goodwill during fiscal 2014, for which no income tax benefit was recorded.

Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2014 Compared to Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2013

    Net Sales

        Net sales by segment were as follows:

 
  Fiscal year ended September 30,    
   
 
 
  2014   2013    
   
 
Segment
  Net Sales   % of total   Net Sales   % of total   $ change   % change  

Consumer Products Group

  $ 1,879,481     58.6 % $ 1,938,921     61.3 % $ (59,440 )   (3.1 )%

Holland & Barrett International

    850,797     26.5 %   743,861     23.5 %   106,936     14.4 %

Puritan's Pride

    250,224     7.8 %   246,731     7.8 %   3,493     1.4 %

Vitamin World

    225,276     7.0 %   233,528     7.4 %   (8,252 )   (3.5 )%

Net sales

  $ 3,205,778     100.0 % $ 3,163,041     100.0 % $ 42,737     1.4 %

Consumer Products Group

        Net sales for the Consumer Products Group were $1,879,481 for fiscal 2014 as compared to $1,938,921 for fiscal 2013. The decrease of $59,440 or 3.1% was primarily attributable to the following:

    $(57,845) from decreased sales of domestic private label products, primarily driven by decreased SKUs to existing customers and pricing pressure,

    $(20,914) from decreased sales of domestic branded products, primarily driven by decreases in joint care and sports nutrition categories, partially offset by continued growth in Nature's Bounty®, and

    $19,319 from increased sales of branded and private label sales to international customers.

        We continue to adjust shelf space allocation between Consumer Products Group brands to provide the best overall product mix and to respond to changing market conditions. These efforts have helped to strengthen the Consumer Products Group's position in the mass market. The Consumer Products Group continues to leverage valuable consumer sales information obtained from our Vitamin World and Puritan's Pride operations to provide our mass-market customers with data and analyses to drive mass market sales.

        We use targeted promotions to grow overall sales. Promotional programs and rebates were $371,344, or 16.2% of sales for fiscal 2014 as compared to $326,963, or 14.2% of sales for fiscal 2013.

        Product returns represented $37,365, or 1.6% of sales for fiscal 2014 as compared to $31,087, or 1.4% of sales for fiscal 2013. The product returns for fiscal 2014 and fiscal 2013 were mainly attributable to returns in the ordinary course of business. We expect returns relating to normal operations to trend between 1% to 2% of the Consumer Products Group's sales in future years.

        One customer, Wal-Mart, represented 19% and 21% of the Consumer Products Group's net sales for fiscal 2014 and 2013, respectively. It also represented 11% and 13% of consolidated net sales for fiscal 2014 and 2013, respectively. The loss of this customer, or any of our other major customers, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations if we were unable to replace that customer.

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    Holland & Barrett International

        Net sales for Holland & Barrett International increased $106,936, or 14.4%, to $850,797 in fiscal 2014 from $743,861 for fiscal 2013. For fiscal 2014 same store sales in U.S. dollars increased 10.1%, or $71,230, as compared to fiscal 2013 (same store sales include online sales). In local currency, same store sales increased 4.2% as compared to fiscal 2013. The average exchange rate of the British pound sterling to the U.S. dollar strengthened 6.1% and the euro to the US dollar strengthened 3.4% as compared to the prior comparable period.

        The following is a summary of Holland & Barrett International store activity:

 
  Fiscal
2014
  Fiscal
2013
 

Holland & Barrett International stores:

             

Company-owned stores

             

Open at beginning of the period

    901     856  

Opened during the period

    39     36  

Acquired during the period

        13  

Closed during the period

    (13 )   (4 )

Open at end of the period

    927     901  

Franchised stores

   
 
   
 
 

Open at beginning of the period

    79     40  

Opened during the period

    17     45  

Closed during the period

    (7 )   (6 )

Open at end of the period

    89     79  

Total company-owned and franchised stores

   
 
   
 
 

Open at beginning of the period

    980     896  

Opened during the period

    56     81  

Acquired during the period

        13  

Closed during the period

    (20 )   (10 )

Open at end of the period

    1,016     980  

    Puritan's Pride

        Net sales for Puritan's Pride increased $3,493, or 1.4%, to $250,224 in fiscal 2014 from $246,731 in fiscal 2013. The total number of orders increased approximately 7% and the average order size declined 5% for fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013. Online orders comprised 72% of this segment's net sales for fiscal 2014 as compared to 70% for fiscal 2013.

        This segment continues to vary its promotional strategy throughout the fiscal year, utilizing highly promotional catalogs which are not offered in every quarter.

    Vitamin World

        Net sales for Vitamin World decreased $8,252 or 3.5%, to $225,276 in fiscal 2014 from $233,528 in fiscal 2013. Same store sales (including online sales) decreased 3% due to declines in volume which are partially attributable to a softer retail environment and lower revenue in the weight management product category due to positive media attention for certain products in this category in the prior comparable period.

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        The following is a summary of Vitamin World store activity:

 
  Fiscal
2014
  Fiscal
2013
 

Vitamin World stores:

             

Open at beginning of the period

    421     426  

Opened during the period

    18     4  

Closed during the period

    (25 )   (9 )

Open at end of the period

    414     421  

    Cost of Sales

        Cost of sales was as follows:

 
  Fiscal year ended
September 30,
   
   
 
 
  2014   2013   $ Change   % Change  

Cost of Sales

  $ 1,740,417   $ 1,700,909   $ 39,508     2.3 %

Percentage of net sales

    54.3 %   53.8 %            

        The increase in cost of sales relates primarily to increased sales in our Holland & Barrett International segment. Cost of sales as a percentage of net sales increased by 0.5 percentage points as compared to the prior comparable period. This was the result of higher promotions to maintain sales, lower sales prices for our private label products, as well as costs at our facilities which were not absorbed by certain private label and contract manufacturing products due to lower demand.

    Advertising, Promotion and Catalog Expenses

        Total advertising, promotion and catalog expenses were as follows:

 
  Fiscal year ended
September 30,
   
   
 
 
  2014   2013   $ Change   % Change  

Advertising, promotion and catalog

  $ 202,754   $ 189,485   $ 13,269     7.0 %

Percentage of net sales

    6.3 %   6.0 %            

        As a percentage of sales, advertising promotion and catalog expense has increased by 0.3 percentage points as a percentage of net sales. The increase in advertising, promotion and catalog expense is primarily due to media and website advertising in our Consumer Products Group, as we continue to increase our focus on branded products. To a lesser extent, there were increases in Puritan's Pride due to increased costs associated with internet advertising and in Holland & Barrett International in which advertising costs increased proportionate to the increase in net sales.

    Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

        Selling, general and administrative expenses ("SG&A") were as follows:

 
  Fiscal year ended
September 30,
   
   
 
 
  2014   2013   $ Change   % Change  

Selling, general and administrative

  $ 952,533   $ 910,187   $ 42,346     4.7 %

Percentage of net sales

    29.7 %   28.8 %            

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        SG&A costs for fiscal 2014 increased by $42,346, or 0.9 percentage points as a percentage of net sales compared to fiscal 2013 primarily due to increases of: $16,415 in building and occupancy costs due to additional stores and foreign currency fluctuations in Holland & Barrett International; $11,099 in payroll and payroll related costs, due to increases in salaries in Holland & Barrett International due to the increase in stores and foreign currency fluctuations partially offset by a reduction to performance based compensation; $10,918 in professional services, associated with ongoing implementation and support of our ERP system; $9,092 of additional depreciation and amortization due to the implementation of our new ERP system in the third quarter of fiscal 2013 and additional stores and the implementation of our new Point of Sale (POS) system in Holland & Barrett International in the second quarter of fiscal 2014; $5,321 in freight costs due to increased product and equipment movement between facilities as a result of the facility restructuring. These increases were partially offset by a $13,225 reduction in legal and professional expenses, primarily due to the accrual for the Glucosamine case in the prior comparable period of $12,000, of which, approximately $6,000 of that accrual was reversed in fiscal 2014, offset by other settlements in fiscal 2014.

    Income (Loss) from Operations

        Income from operations was as follows:

 
  Fiscal year ended
September 30,
   
   
 
 
  2014   2013   $ Change   % Change  

Consumer Products Group

  $ 177,069   $ 231,812   $ (54,743 )   (23.6 )%

Holland & Barrett International

    191,207     170,479     20,728     12.2 %

Puritan's Pride

    (141,660 )   39,104     (180,764 )   (462.3 )%

Vitamin World

    (26,975 )   24,538     (51,513 )   (209.9 )%

Corporate

    (97,049 )   (136,512 )   39,463     28.9 %

Total

  $ 102,592   $ 329,421   $ (226,829 )   (68.9 )%

Percentage of net sales

    3.2 %   10.4 %            

        The decrease in the Consumer Products Group is primarily due to decreased net sales as a result of the continued decline in private label sales as well as a decline in the joint care and sports nutrition categories. Furthermore the Consumer Products Group experienced a slight reduction in margins relating to promotional activity due to increased competition as well as increased marketing and advertising expenses in order to maintain sales. The increase in the Holland & Barrett International segment was the result of higher sales volume, partially offset by increased advertising and SG&A costs (primarily payroll costs and building costs associated with new and acquired stores), as well as significant fluctuations in foreign currency as the U.S. dollar weakened as compared to the British pound sterling and the euro. The decrease in the Puritan's Pride segment was primarily due to the impairment of goodwill and intangible assets of $171,590 as well increased promotions and advertising costs in order to maintain sales. The decrease in the Vitamin World segment was primarily due to the impairment of goodwill and intangible assets of $35,744 as well as the decrease in net sales from same store sales and increased SG&A costs. Corporate/Manufacturing loss decreased from the prior comparable period due to the costs of $32,695 associated with the facilities restructuring in the prior year.

    Interest Expense

        Interest expense for fiscal 2014 decreased as compared to fiscal 2013 due to a lower interest rate on the term loan B-2 due to the refinancing that took place in March 2013 and the write-off of deferred financing costs and call premium totaling $5,383 relating to the refinancing in the prior comparable period. See "Liquidity and Capital Resources" for a description of the senior secured credit facilities and the Notes.

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    Miscellaneous, net

        The components of miscellaneous, net were as follows:

 
  Fiscal year ended
September 30,
   
 
 
  2014   2013   $ Change  

Foreign exchange gains (losses)

  $ (1,994 ) $ (2,196 ) $ 202  

Investment income

    704     1,245     (541 )

Ineffectiveness on cross currency swap

    966     1,611     (645 )

Other

    (385 )   1,033     (1,418 )

Total

  $ (709 ) $ 1,693   $ (2,402 )

    Provision for Income Taxes

        Our (benefit) provision for income taxes is impacted by a number of factors, including federal taxes, our international tax structure, state tax rates in the jurisdictions where we conduct business and our ability to utilize state tax credits that expire between 2014 and 2028. Our overall effective income tax rate could vary as a result of these factors. The effective income tax rate for fiscal 2014 and 2013 was (28.9%) and 28.9%, respectively. The effective income tax rate was lower for fiscal 2014 primarily due to the impact of the impairment of goodwill during fiscal 2014, for which no income tax benefit was recorded.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

        NBTY's primary sources of liquidity and capital resources are cash generated from operations and funds available under its revolving credit facility. We expect that ongoing requirements for debt service and capital expenditures will be funded from these sources.

        The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, cash balances and working capital:

 
  Fiscal year ended
September 30,
 
 
  2015   2014
(As revised)
  2013
(As revised)
 

Cash and cash equivalents

  $ 303,350   $ 139,488   $ 198,561  

Working capital (including cash and cash equivalents)

  $ 895,755   $ 813,933   $ 719,068  

        The increase in working capital of $81,822 at September 30, 2015 as compared to September 30, 2014 was primarily due to increases in cash, partially offset by increases in accounts payable and accrued expenses due to the timing of payments and the increase in current portion of long-term debt due to the excess cash flow payment as required by our debt agreement. The increase in cash and cash equivalents of $163,862 at September 30, 2015 as compared to September 30, 2014 was primarily due to income from operations as well as proceeds received for a sale lease-back within the Holland & Barrett International segment.

        The increase in working capital of $94,865 at September 30, 2014 as compared to September 30, 2013 was primarily due to increases in inventory to achieve higher order fulfillment rates, partially offset by a decrease in accounts payable due to the timing of payments. The decrease in cash and cash equivalents of $59,073 at September 30, 2014 as compared to September 30, 2013 was primarily due to net cash used in operations, primarily for inventory, and purchases of property, plant and equipment.

        We monitor current and anticipated future levels of cash and cash equivalents in relation to anticipated operating, investing and financing requirements. As of September 30, 2015, cash and cash equivalents of $137,563 was held by our foreign subsidiaries which would generally be subject to U.S.

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income taxes upon repatriation to the United States. We generally repatriate all earnings from our foreign subsidiaries where permitted under local law. However, during fiscal 2015 and 2013 we permanently reinvested approximately $130,000, and $27,000, respectively of our foreign earnings outside of the United States.

        At September 30, 2015, we had $241,547 of undistributed international earnings on which we have not provided any U.S. tax expense as we intend to permanently reinvest these earnings outside of the U.S. If these earnings are repatriated to the United States, or if the Company determines that such earnings will be remitted in the foreseeable future, additional tax provisions may be required. Due to the complexities in the tax laws and the assumptions that would have to be made, it is not practicable to estimate the amounts of income tax provisions that may be required.

        The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, net cash flows provided by (used in) operating, investing and financing activities and other operating measures:

 
  Fiscal year ended
September 30,
 
 
  2015   2014   2013  

Cash flow provided by operating activities

  $ 290,519   $ 102,744   $ 311,576  

Cash flow used in investing activities

  $ (90,544 ) $ (98,019 ) $ (204,145 )

Cash flow used in financing activities

  $ (27,054 ) $ (60,441 ) $ (224,916 )

Total inventory turnover

    2.1     2.1     2.4  

Finished goods inventory turnover (excluding bulk)

    3.8     4.1     4.4  

Days sales outstanding in accounts receivable

    38     36     34  

        We finance our business to provide adequate funding for at least 12 months. Funding requirements are based on forecasted profitability and working capital needs, which, on occasion, may change. Consequently, we may change our funding structure to reflect any new requirements.

        Net cash provided by operating activities of $290,519 during fiscal 2015 was attributable to income earned from operations after adjusting for the impairment charge in our Vitamin World segment and increased depreciation in Corporate / Manufacturing due to the sale of our bar plant assets and increases in accounts payable and other liabilities due to timing of payments, partially offset by increases in inventory to maintain satisfactory customer fulfillment rates and accounts receivable due to timing of collections. During fiscal 2015, net cash used in investing activities consisted of purchases of property, plant and equipment, partially offset by cash received from the sale of certain facilities. During fiscal 2015, net cash used in financing activities related to dividends paid to Holdings offset by proceeds received for a sale lease-back within the Holland & Barrett International segment.

        Net cash provided by operating activities of $102,744 during fiscal 2014 was attributable to income earned from operations after adjusting for the impairment charge in our Puritan's Pride and Vitamin World segments offset by increases in inventory to maintain satisfactory customer fulfillment rates. During fiscal 2014, net cash used in investing activities consisted of purchases of property, plant and equipment, partially offset by cash received from the sale of certain facilities. During fiscal 2014, net cash used in financing activities related to dividends paid to Holdings.

        Cash provided by operating activities of $311,576 during fiscal 2013 was mainly attributable to net income of $129,480 and changes in operating assets and liabilities. During fiscal 2013, cash flows used in investing activities consisted primarily of cash paid for acquisitions relating to Balance Bar and purchases of property, plant and equipment. During fiscal 2013, cash flows from financing activities primarily related to the offering of the Holdco Notes and the dividend discussed above.

        We expect our fiscal 2016 capital expenditures to be higher than fiscal 2015 as a result of the additional investment in our new stores in Holland & Barrett International and our ERP systems.

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Senior Secured Credit Facilities, Holdco Notes and Notes

        On October 1, 2010, NBTY entered into senior secured credit facilities totaling $2,000,000, consisting of $1,750,000 term loan facilities and a $250,000 revolving credit facility. In addition, NBTY issued $650,000 aggregate principal amount of the Notes with an interest rate of 9% and a maturity date of October 1, 2018.

        On March 1, 2011, NBTY, Holdings and Barclays Bank PLC, as administrative agent, and several other lenders entered into the First Amendment and Refinancing Agreement (the "First Refinancing"). Under the terms of the agreement, the $1,750,000 term loan B-1 and revolving credit facility of $200,000 were established. Substantially all other terms are consistent with the original term loan B, including the amortization schedule of term loan B-1 and maturity dates.

        On December 30, 2011, NBTY prepaid $225,000 of principal on its term loan B-1. As a result of this prepayment, $9,289 of deferred financing costs were written off. In accordance with the prepayment provisions of the First Refinancing, no scheduled payments of principal will be required until the final balloon payment in October 2017.

        On October 11, 2012, NBTY amended its credit agreement to allow Holdings to issue and sell Holdco Notes. In addition, among other things, the amendment (i) increased the general restricted payments basket to $50,000, (ii) increased the maximum total leverage ratio test which governs the making of restricted payments using Cumulative Credit (as defined in the credit agreement) and (iii) modified the definition of Cumulative Credit so that it conforms to the builder basket used in NBTY's indenture governing the Notes. Interest on the Holdco Notes is paid via dividends from NBTY to Holdings, to the extent that it is permitted under its credit agreement and the indenture governing the Notes. Expenses of $6,121 related to the amendment were capitalized as a deferred financing cost and are being amortized using the effective interest method. In conjunction with the amendment, NBTY paid Holdings a cash dividend of approximately $193,956 in October 2012.

        On March 21, 2013, NBTY, Holdings, Barclays Bank PLC, as administrative agent, and several other lenders entered into the Third Amendment and Second Refinancing Agreement and completed the Second Refinancing amending the credit agreement governing NBTY's senior secured credit facilities pursuant to which NBTY repriced its term loan B-1 under its then existing credit agreement. Under the terms of the Second Refinancing, the $1,750,000 term loan B-1 was replaced with a new $1,507,500 (the current principal amount outstanding) term loan B-2. Borrowings under term loan B-2 and the revolving credit facility bear interest at a floating rate which can be, at NBTY's option, either (i) eurodollar (LIBOR) rate plus an applicable margin, or (ii) base rate plus an applicable margin, in each case, subject to a eurodollar (LIBOR) rate floor of 1.00% or a base rate floor of 2.00%, as applicable. The applicable margin for term loan B-2 is 2.50% per annum for eurodollar (LIBOR) loans and 1.50% per annum for base rate loans. The applicable margin for the revolving credit facility remained at 3.25% per annum for eurodollar (LIBOR) loans and 2.25% per annum for base rate loans, with a step-down of 25 basis points upon the achievement of a total senior secured leverage ratio as set forth in the senior secured credit facilities. Substantially all other terms are consistent with the original term loan B-1, including the maturity dates. As a result of the Second Refinancing, $4,232 of previously capitalized deferred financing costs as well as $1,151 of the call premium on term loan B-1 were expensed and costs incurred and recorded as deferred financing costs were approximately $15,190, including $13,924 of the call premium paid on term loan B-1, and will be amortized using the effective interest method.

        On November 20, 2014, NBTY amended its senior secured revolving credit facility, extending its maturity to September 2017 and reducing the commitment from $200,000 to $175,000. In connection with this amendment, deferred financing costs of $611 were incurred and are being amortized over the remaining period.

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        NBTY must make prepayments on the term loan B-2 facility with the net cash proceeds of asset sales, casualty and condemnation events, the incurrence or issuance of indebtedness (other than indebtedness permitted to be incurred under its senior secured credit facilities unless specifically incurred to refinance a portion of its senior secured credit facilities) and 50% of excess cash flow (such percentage subject to reduction based on achievement of specified total senior secured leverage ratios), in each case, subject to certain reinvestment rights and other exceptions. For the fiscal year ended September 30, 2015, an excess cash flow payment of $33,498 is required. This computation of excess cash flow payment gives effect to approximately $58,000 held in escrow for a pending acquisition. NBTY is also required to make prepayments under its revolving credit facility at any time when, and to the extent that, the aggregate amount of the outstanding loans and letters of credit under the revolving credit facility exceeds the aggregate amount of commitments in respect of the revolving credit facility.

        In addition, the credit agreement requires the maintenance of a maximum total senior secured leverage ratio on a quarterly basis, calculated with respect to Consolidated EBITDA, as defined therein, if at any time amounts are outstanding under the revolving credit facility (including swingline loans and letters of credit). All other financial covenants required by the senior secured credit facilities were removed as part of the First Refinancing. As of September 30, 2015, NBTY was in compliance with all covenants under the agreement.

        As of September 30, 2015 there were no borrowings drawn from NBTY's $175,000 revolving credit facility and there was a letter of credit totaling $6,100, reducing the net availability to $168,900.

Original Holdco Notes

        On October 17, 2012, Holdings, our parent company, issued $550,000 of the original Holdco Notes. Interest on the original Holdco Notes accrues at the rate of 7.75% per annum with respect to Cash Interest and 8.50% per annum with respect to any paid-in-kind interest. The proceeds from the offering of the original Holdco Notes, along with the $200,000 from NBTY, were used to pay transaction fees and expenses and a dividend of approximately $721,682 to Holdings' shareholders.

Additional Holdco Notes

        On December 2, 2013, Holdings launched the Consent Solicitation. The purpose of the Consent Solicitation was to amend the restricted payment covenant in the indenture governing the Holdco Notes. Holdings sought consent to add a new "basket" in the restricted payment covenant (Section 3.4 of the indenture governing the Holdco Notes) for a dividend or distribution to Holdings' shareholders up to the net proceeds of the offering of additional Holdco Notes in the aggregate principal amount of $450,000 less the amount available as of September 30, 2013 for restricted payments under the "builder" basket in Section 3.4(a)(C) of the indenture governing the Holdco Notes.

        On December 10, 2013, the requisite holders of the original Holdco Notes consented to the Proposed Amendments and Holdings entered into the First Supplemental Indenture to the indenture governing the Holdco Notes. The First Supplemental Indenture became operative upon the payment of the consent fee by Holdings to the paying agent on behalf of the holders of the original Holdco Notes, which was paid concurrently with the closing of the offering of the additional Holdco Notes.

        On December 12, 2013, Holdings issued $450,000 of additional Holdco Notes that mature on November 1, 2017. The $450,000 of additional Holdco Notes and the $550,000 of original Holdco Notes previously issued on October 17, 2012 have identical terms and are treated as a single class for all purposes under the indenture governing the Holdco Notes. The gross proceeds from the offering of the $450,000 of additional Holdco Notes was $460,125, inclusive of a $10,125 premium, which was used to pay transaction fees and expenses, including the consent fee, and a $445,537 dividend to Holdings' shareholders in December 2013.

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        Interest on the Holdco Notes is payable semi-annually in arrears on May 1 and November 1 of each year. Holdings is a holding company with no operations of its own and has no ability to service interest or principal on the Holdco Notes, other than through dividends it may receive from NBTY. NBTY is restricted, in certain circumstances, from paying dividends to Holdings by the terms of the indenture governing the Notes and the senior secured credit facilities. NBTY has not guaranteed the indebtedness of Holdings, nor pledged any of its assets as collateral and the Holdco Notes are not reflected on NBTY's balance sheet.

        Interest on the Holdco Notes is payable entirely in cash ("Cash Interest") to the extent that it is less than the maximum amount of allowable dividends and distributions, plus cash at Holdings ("Applicable Amount") as defined by the indenture governing the Holdco Notes. For any interest period after May 1, 2013 (other than the final interest period ending at stated maturity), if the Applicable Amount for such interest period will:

              (i)  equal or exceed 75%, but be less than 100%, of the aggregate amount of Cash Interest that would otherwise be due on the relevant interest payment date, then Holdings may, at its option, elect to pay interest on (a) 25% of the then outstanding principal amount of the Holdco Notes by increasing the principal amount of the outstanding Holdco Notes or by issuing other PIK notes under the indenture governing the Holdco Notes, on the same terms and conditions of the Holdco Notes, in a principal amount equal to such interest ("PIK Interest") and (b) 75% of the then outstanding principal amount of the Holdco Notes as Cash Interest;

             (ii)  equal or exceed 50%, but be less than 75%, of the aggregate amount of Cash Interest that would otherwise be due on the relevant interest payment date, then Holdings may, at its option, elect to pay interest on (a) 50% of the then outstanding principal amount of the Holdco Notes as PIK Interest and (b) 50% of the then outstanding principal amount of the Holdco Notes as Cash Interest;

            (iii)  equal or exceed 25%, but be less than 50%, of the aggregate amount of Cash Interest that would otherwise be due on the relevant interest payment date, then Holdings may, at its option, elect to pay interest on (a) 75% of the then outstanding principal amount of the Holdco Notes as PIK Interest and (b) 25% of the then outstanding principal amount of the Holdco Notes as Cash Interest; or

            (iv)  be less than 25% of the aggregate amount of Cash Interest that would otherwise be due on the relevant interest payment date, then Holdings may, at its option, elect to pay interest on the Holdco Notes as PIK Interest.

        As described above, Holdings' ability to pay PIK Interest depends on the calculation of the Applicable Amount regardless of the availability of cash at Holdings. All interest payments made to date have been in cash. As of September 30, 2015, NBTY currently anticipates that it will have sufficient restricted payment capacity to enable Holdings to pay cash interest on the Holdco Notes for the current interest period; however, this may change as a result of a variety of factors. To the extent Holdings makes such interest payments in cash, NBTY will be required to provide the necessary funding.

        The indenture governing the Notes, the credit agreement and the indenture governing the Holdco Notes contain a number of covenants imposing significant restrictions on our business. These restrictions may affect our ability to operate our business and may limit our ability to take advantage of potential business opportunities as they arise. The restrictions these covenants place on us include limitations on our ability to:

    incur or guarantee additional indebtedness;

    make certain investments;

    pay dividends or make distributions on our capital stock;

    sell assets, including capital stock of restricted subsidiaries;

    agree to payment restrictions affecting our restricted subsidiaries;

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    consolidate, merge, sell or otherwise dispose of all or substantially all of our assets;

    enter into transactions with our affiliates;

    incur liens; and

    designate any of our subsidiaries as unrestricted subsidiaries.

        Our ability to make payments on and to refinance our indebtedness, including the Notes and Holdco Notes, will depend on our ability to generate cash in the future. We believe that our cash on hand, together with dividends from NBTY generated by NBTY's cash from operations and, if required, available borrowing capacity under the revolving portion of our senior secured credit facilities, will be sufficient for our cash requirements for the next twelve months.

        We or our affiliates, at any time and from time to time, may purchase Notes, Holdco Notes, or other indebtedness. Any such purchases may be made through the open market or privately negotiated transactions with third parties or pursuant to one or more tender or exchange offers or otherwise, upon such terms and at such prices, as well as with such consideration, as we, or any of our affiliates, may determine.

EBITDA and Consolidated EBITDA

        EBITDA consists of earnings before interest expense, taxes, depreciation and amortization. Consolidated EBITDA, as defined in our senior secured credit facilities, as amended, eliminates the impact of a number of items we do not consider indicative of our ongoing operating performance. You are encouraged to evaluate each adjustment and the reasons we consider it appropriate for supplemental analysis. Consolidated EBITDA is a component of certain covenants under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities. We present Consolidated EBITDA because NBTY's senior secured credit facilities provide for certain total senior secured leverage ratio thresholds calculated on a period of four consecutive fiscal quarters, with respect to Consolidated EBITDA and the senior secured debt which can be reduced by unrestricted cash-on-hand up to a maximum of $150 million during any fiscal quarter end that revolving loans or letters of credit (to the extent not cash collateralized) are outstanding or at the time of incurrence of revolving loans. The maximum senior secured leverage ratio thresholds, to the extent then applicable, are as follows: 4.25 to 1.00 in fiscal 2013; 4.00 to 1.00 in fiscal 2014; 3.75 to 1.00 in fiscal 2015; 3.50 to 1.00 in fiscal 2016 and 3.25 to 1.00 in fiscal 2017. Furthermore, we present both EBITDA and Consolidated EBITDA because we consider these items to be important supplemental measures of our performance and believe these measures are frequently used by securities analysts, investors and other interested parties in the evaluation of companies in our industry with similar capital structures. We believe issuers of debt securities also present EBITDA and Consolidated EBITDA because investors, analysts and rating agencies consider it useful in measuring the ability of those issuers to meet debt service obligations. We believe that these items are appropriate supplemental measures of debt service capacity, because cash expenditures for interest are, by definition, available to pay interest, and tax expense is inversely correlated to interest expense because tax expense goes down as deductible interest expense goes up; and depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges.

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        The computation of NBTY's senior secured leverage ratio is as follows:

 
   
  Fiscal 2015   Fiscal 2014   Fiscal 2013  

Senior secured debt

      $ 1,507,500   $ 1,507,500   $ 1,507,500  

Less up to $150,000 unrestricted cash balance

        (150,000 )   (132,161 )   (150,000 )

  (a)   $ 1,357,500   $ 1,375,339   $ 1,357,500  

Consolidated EBITDA (four consecutive quarters)

  (b)   $ 505,568   $ 486,538   $ 536,183  

Senior Secured Leverage Ratio

 

(a/b)

   
2.69x
   
2.83x
   
2.53x
 

Maximum Allowed (per the senior secured credit facilities to the extent then applicable)

        3.75x     4.00x     4.25x  

        EBITDA and Consolidated EBITDA have limitations as analytical tools, and should not be considered in isolation, or as a substitute for analysis of our results as reported under GAAP. Some of these limitations are:

    EBITDA and Consolidated EBITDA:

    exclude certain tax payments that may represent a reduction in cash available to us;

    do not reflect our cash expenditures, or future requirements, for capital expenditures or contractual commitments;

    do not reflect changes in, or cash requirements for, our working capital needs; and

    do not reflect the significant interest expense, or the cash requirements necessary to service interest or principal payments on our debt, including the Notes and the Holdco Notes;

    although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the assets being depreciated and amortized will often have to be replaced in the future, and EBITDA and Consolidated EBITDA do not reflect any cash requirements for such replacements; and

    other companies in our industry may calculate EBITDA and Consolidated EBITDA differently than we do, limiting their usefulness as comparative measures.

        Because of these limitations, EBITDA and Consolidated EBITDA should not be considered as measures of discretionary cash available to us to invest in the growth of our business. As a result, we rely primarily on our GAAP results and use EBITDA and Consolidated EBITDA only supplementally.

        In addition, in calculating Consolidated EBITDA, we make certain adjustments that are based on assumptions and estimates that may prove to be inaccurate.

        In addition, in evaluating Consolidated EBITDA, you should be aware that in the future we may incur expenses similar to those eliminated in this presentation. Our presentation of Consolidated EBITDA should not be construed as an inference that our future results will be unaffected by unusual or non-recurring items.

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        The following table reconciles net income (loss) to EBITDA and Consolidated EBITDA (as defined in our senior secured credit facilities) for the four consecutive quarters ended September 30, 2015, 2014 and 2013:

 
  Fiscal 2015   Fiscal 2014   Fiscal 2013  

Net income (loss)

  $ 74,418   $ (44,152 ) $ 129,480  

Interest expense

    132,930     136,038     147,100  

Income tax provision

    13,087     10,145     54,878  

Depreciation and amortization

    135,406     106,557     110,636  

EBITDA

    355,841     208,588     442,094  

Severance costs(a)

    19,251     7,078     22,235  

Stock-based compensation(b)

    2,845     4,088     1,982  

Management fee(c)

    3,000     3,000     3,000  

Inventory fair value adjustment(d)

            2,417  

Consulting Fees(e)

    30,121     23,586     26,578  

Impariments and disposals(f)

    67,668     214,683     2,195  

Other items(g)

    39,719     17,202     41,189  

Proforma cost savings(h)

    51,950     35,133     61,300  

Limitation on certain EBITDA adjustments(i)

    (64,827 )   (26,820 )   (66,807 )

Consolidated EBITDA

  $ 505,568   $ 486,538   $ 536,183  

(a)
Reflects the exclusion of severance costs incurred at various subsidiaries of the Company. Included in fiscal 2013 are workforce reduction costs of $16,752, which relate to the facility restructuring.

(b)
Reflects the exclusion of non-cash expenses related to stock options.

(c)
Reflects the exclusion of the Carlyle consulting fee.

(d)
Reflects the exclusion of the sell-through of the increased fair value of opening inventory at time of acquisition required under acquisition accounting.

(e)
Reflects the exclusion of consulting fees, as permitted in our senior secured credit facilities, for items such as business optimization consulting.

(f)
Reflects the impairment of certain assets, including the impairment of goodwill and intangible assets of $55,000 relating to our Vitamin World segment in fiscal 2015 and $207,334 relating to our Puritan's Pride and Vitamin World segments in fiscal 2014.

(g)
Reflects the exclusion of various items, as permitted in NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, which among other items includes: restructuring charges, business optimization expenses, ineffectiveness on certain derivative instruments, gains and losses on dispositions and integration costs associated with acquisitions.

(h)
Reflects four consecutive quarters of prospective savings permitted in accordance with NBTY's senior secured credit facilities; specifically, the amount of cost savings expected to be realized from operating expense reductions and other operating improvements as a result of specified actions taken or initiated, less the amount of any actual cost savings realized during the period.

(i)
In accordance with the definition of Consolidated EBITDA under NBTY's senior secured credit facilities, this represents the limitation of certain Consolidated EBITDA adjustments such as pro forma cost savings, restructuring charges, business optimization expenses and integration costs associated with acquisitions that exceed 10% of Consolidated EBITDA for the applicable period, without giving effect to these adjustments.

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Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

        See description of the Holdco Notes above for off-balance sheet arrangements. For additional information relating to certain contractual cash obligations see below.

Contractual Obligations

        A summary of contractual cash obligations as of September 30, 2015 is as follows:

 
  Payments Due By Period  
 
  Total   Less Than
1 Year
  1-3
Years
  4-5
Years
  After 5
Years
 

Long-term debt, excluding interest(1)

  $ 2,163,654   $ 34,496   $ 1,445,044   $ 641,977   $ 42,137  

Interest(1)

    308,899     114,475     174,201     2,593     17,630  

Operating leases

    783,102     126,494     207,303     164,513     284,792  

Management fee

    15,000     3,000     6,000     6,000      

Purchase commitments

    273,734     273,734              

Employment and consulting agreements

    5,542     1,575     2,800     1,167      

Total contractual cash obligations

  $ 3,549,931   $ 553,774   $ 1,835,348   $ 816,250   $ 344,559  

(1)
Excludes the $1 billion of Holdco Notes and related interest at 7.75%, assuming cash interest.

        Future interest expense included in the above table on our variable rate debt is calculated based on the current rate in effect after the Second Refinancing. Variable interest on our senior secured credit facilities, included in the above table, is calculated assuming the current interest rate following the Second Refinancing of 3.5% (which assumes a 2.5% spread over the LIBOR floor of 1.00%) remains in effect for all future periods. To the extent future LIBOR rates are greater than 1.00%, actual future interest expense will be greater than noted in the above table.

        We conduct retail operations under operating leases, which generally have lease terms between 5 and 15 years, with the longest lease term expiring in 2034. Some of the leases contain escalation clauses, as well as renewal options, and provide for contingent rent based upon sales plus certain tax and maintenance costs. At September 30, 2015, we had $783,102 in future minimum rental payments (excluding real estate tax and maintenance costs) for retail locations and other leases that have initial or noncancelable lease terms in excess of one year. Future minimum rental payments (excluding real estate tax and maintenance costs) for retail locations and other leases that have initial or non-cancelable lease terms in excess of one year are noted in the above table.

        A management fee of $3,000 per year is paid to Carlyle. For the purposes of the above table, a term of five years was assumed. See Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions, and Director Independence—Consulting Agreement—Carlyle.

        During fiscal 2015, no one supplier individually represented greater than 10% of our raw material purchases. We do not believe that the loss of any single supplier would have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial condition or results of operations. We were committed to make future purchases for inventory related items, such as raw materials and finished goods, under various purchase arrangements, with fixed price provisions as well as open capital commitments, primarily related to leasehold improvements, manufacturing equipment, computer hardware and software aggregating $273,734 at September 30, 2015. Generally, most of our purchase commitments are cancelable at our discretion until the order has been shipped, but require repayment of all expenses incurred through the date of cancellation.

        At September 30, 2015, we had a liability of $5,228 for unrecognized tax benefits, the recognition of which would have an effect of $3,760 on income tax expense and the effective income tax rate. We

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do not believe that the amount will change significantly in the next 12 months. At this time, we are unable to make a reasonably reliable estimate of the timing of payments in individual years beyond 12 months due to uncertainties in the timing of tax audit outcomes.

Seasonality

        Although we believe that our business is not seasonal in nature, historically we have experienced, and expect to continue to experience, a substantial variation in our net sales and operating results from quarter to quarter. The factors that influence this variability of quarterly results include general economic and industry conditions affecting consumer spending, changing consumer demands and current news on nutritional supplements, the timing of our introduction of new products, promotional program incentives offered to customers, the timing of catalog promotions, the level of consumer acceptance of new products and actions of competitors. Accordingly, a comparison of our results of operations from consecutive periods is not necessarily meaningful, and our results of operations for any period are not necessarily indicative of future performance. Additionally, we may experience higher net sales in a quarter depending upon when we have engaged in significant promotional activities.

Foreign Currency

        Approximately 36%, 35% and 32% of our net sales for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively, were denominated in currencies other than U.S. dollars, principally British pounds sterling and to a lesser extent euros, Canadian dollars and Chinese renminbi. A significant weakening of such currencies versus the U.S. dollar could have a material adverse effect on us, as this would result in a decrease in our consolidated operating results.

        Our foreign subsidiaries accounted for the following percentages of assets and total liabilities as of September 30, 2015 and 2014:

 
  2015   2014  

Total assets

    29 %   28 %

Total liabilities

    7 %   6 %

        In preparing the consolidated financial statements, the financial statements of the foreign subsidiaries are translated from the functional currency, generally the local currency, into U.S. dollars. This process results in exchange rate gains and losses, which are included as a separate component of stockholders' equity under the caption "Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)."

        During fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, translation (losses)/gains of $81,223, ($18,799) and $605, respectively, were included in determining other comprehensive income. Accordingly, cumulative translation gains (losses) of approximately ($109,704) and ($28,481) were included as part of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) within the consolidated balance sheet at September 30, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

        The magnitude of these gains or losses is dependent upon movements in the exchange rates of the foreign currencies against the U.S. dollar. These currencies include the British pound sterling, the euro, the Canadian dollar and the Chinese renminbi. Any future translation gains or losses could be significantly different than those noted in each of these years.

Inflation

        Inflation affects the cost of raw materials, goods and services we use. High energy costs and fluctuations in commodity prices can affect the cost of all raw materials and components. The competitive environment somewhat limits our ability to recover higher costs resulting from inflation by raising prices. However, we anticipate passing these costs to our customers, to the extent possible. We

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seek to mitigate the adverse effects of inflation primarily through improved productivity and strategic buying initiatives.

Item 7A.    Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

        We are subject to currency fluctuations, primarily with respect to the British pound sterling, the euro, the Canadian dollar and the Chinese renminbi, and interest rate risks that arise from normal business operations. We regularly assess these risks.

        We have subsidiaries whose operations are denominated in foreign currencies (primarily the British pound, the euro, the Canadian dollar and the Chinese renminbi). We consolidate the earnings of our foreign subsidiaries by translating them into U.S. dollars at the average exchange rates in each applicable period. To the extent the U.S. dollar weakens against foreign currencies, the remeasurement of these foreign currency denominated transactions results in increased net sales, operating expenses and net income. Similarly, our net sales, operating expenses and net income will decrease when the U.S. dollar strengthens against foreign currencies.

        To manage the potential exposure from adverse changes in currency exchange rates, specifically the British pound sterling, arising from our net investment in British pound sterling denominated operations, on December 16, 2010, we entered into three cross currency swap contracts to hedge a portion of the net investment in our British pound sterling denominated foreign operations. The aggregate notional amount of the swap contracts is 194,200 British pounds sterling (approximately $300,000 U.S. dollars), with a forward rate of 1.56, and a termination date of September 30, 2017.

        Net sales denominated in foreign currencies were approximately $1,147,579, or 36% of total net sales, for fiscal 2015. A majority of our foreign currency exposure is denominated in the British pound sterling, euro, Canadian dollars and the Chinese renminbi. For fiscal 2015, as compared to the prior comparable period the following currencies fluctuated against the U.S. dollar as follows: the British pound sterling decreased 6.7%; the euro decreased 15.3%; the Canadian dollar decreased 11.6%; and the renminbi decreased 0.5%. The combined effect of the changes in these currency rates resulted in a decrease of $103,789 in net sales and a decrease of $19,502 in operating income.

        Additionally, NBTY's senior secured credit facilities are subject to market conditions, whereby interest rates will fluctuate based on the Eurodollar LIBOR, as defined in the related agreement. Assuming NBTY's senior secured credit facilities are fully drawn, each one quarter percentage point increase or decrease, above the interest rate floor, in the applicable interest rates would correspondingly change our interest expense on our senior secured credit facilities by approximately $4,200 per year.

Item 8.    Financial Statements and Supplemental Data

        See the "Index to Consolidated Financial Statements" included in this Report.

Item 9.    Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

        None.

Item 9A.    Controls and Procedures

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

        We maintain disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission's rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our

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principal executive officer ("CEO") and principal financial officer ("CFO"), as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures. Any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives. Our management, with the participation of our CEO and CFO, has evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of September 30, 2015. Our CEO and CFO concluded that the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of September 30, 2015 due to the material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting, which were determined to exist as of September 30, 2015, as described below.

Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Management's Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

        Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Internal control over financial reporting is a process designed under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our CEO and CFO, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles ("GAAP").

        Our management assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of September 30, 2015. In making this assessment, our management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013). Based on this assessment, our management, under the supervision and with the participation of our CEO and CFO, concluded that, as of September 30, 2015, our internal control over financial reporting was not effective based on those criteria due to the material weaknesses described below.

        A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the Company's annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

        The Company has identified the following material weaknesses:

    The Company did not maintain effective internal controls with respect to the accounting for property and equipment in connection with a triggering event. Specifically, the Company's controls did not identify that the accelerated depreciation calculation did not reflect the terms and conditions of the final contract.

    The Company did not design and maintain effective internal controls over the evaluation of individually immaterial out of period adjustments. Specifically, the Company did not adjust the precision of its internal controls after making immaterial out of period adjustments and consider that these adjustments would be evaluated together with other adjustments in the aggregate when considering whether the financial statements, including substantially all account balances and disclosures, are stated fairly in all material respects and whether internal control over financial reporting is effective.

        With respect to the second material weakness, the Company had recorded and disclosed two out of period adjustments related to changes to our accounting policy conventions during the first nine months of 2015, the individual and aggregate impact of which were at the time immaterial to the financial statements. However, the aggregate impact of these out of period adjustments and the error in our calculation of accelerated depreciation in connection with our triggering event analysis identified in the fourth quarter of 2015, resulted in a restatement of the Company's financial statements for the three and nine month fiscal periods ended June 30, 2015. The material weaknesses did not result in a material misstatement to our audited financial statements for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2014,

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or any of the interim financial statements for the quarters included therein, or to our financial statements for the three month period ended December 31, 2014, and the three and six months ended March 31, 2015. The control deficiencies could result in further misstatements of the aforementioned account balances or disclosures that would result in a material misstatement to the annual or interim consolidated financial statements that would not be prevented or detected in a timely manner.

        The effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of September 30, 2015 has been audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their report which appears on page F-1.

Remediation Plan

        The Company has established and initiated implementation of a remediation plan as follows:

    To remediate the deficiency with respect to the accounting for property and equipment in connection with a triggering event, the Company is in the process of developing communications to reinforce its current design of its existing controls such that the review of any calculations prepared in connection with a triggering event analysis will include a comparison of the calculations to the final accounting memorandum prepared by the Company as well as to the final signed agreement, to the extent applicable.

    To remediate the deficiency with respect to the evaluation of out of period adjustments, the Company is enhancing the design of its controls such that a formal, documented quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the following will be performed on an individual and aggregate basis by members of the senior finance team:

    Accounting conventions used in the preparation of the Company's financial statements;

    Unrecorded financial statement adjustments and disclosures;

    Out of period adjustments recorded to correct misstatements.

      As part of this evaluation the senior finance team will assess the impact these items have on the precision of other controls to mitigate the increasing risk of a material misstatement.

        Management believes the foregoing efforts will effectively remediate these material weaknesses. We will continue to devote significant time and attention to these remediation efforts in order to remediate them as soon as reasonably possible. As the Company continues to evaluate and work to improve its internal control over financial reporting management may execute additional measures to address these material weaknesses or modify the remediation plans described above, and will continue to review and make necessary changes to improve the overall design of its internal controls. We will test the ongoing operating effectiveness of the revised controls in future periods. A material weakness cannot be considered remediated until the applicable controls operate for a sufficient period of time and management has concluded, through testing, that these controls are operating effectively.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

        There was no change in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during our most recent fiscal quarter that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

Item 9B.    Other Information

        None.

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PART III

Item 10.    Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

        The following table sets forth the names and ages of members of our Board of Directors (the "Board" or "Directors") and executive officers and the positions they held with us as of November 17, 2015, each of whom serves an indefinite term until his or her successor has been appointed and qualified.

Name
  Age   Position

Sandra J. Horbach

  55   Chairman of the Board

Susan Arnold

  61   Director

David Bernauer

  71   Director

Marco De Benedetti

  53   Director

Robert Essner

  68   Director

Allan Holt

  63   Director

Elliot Wagner

  39   Director

Steven Cahillane

  50   Director, Chief Executive Officer and President

Dipak Golechha

  41   Chief Financial Officer

Harvey Kamil

  71   Vice Chairman

Brian Wynne

  51   President—NBTY Americas

Joseph Looney

  58   Chief Accounting Officer, Vice President—Finance

Christopher Brennan

  44   Senior Vice President—General Counsel, Chief Compliance Officer and Corporate Secretary

Karla Packer

  56   Senior Vice President—Human Resources

Bernard O'Keefe

  62   Chief Supply Chain Officer

Sandra J. Horbach

        Sandra J. Horbach has served as a member of our Board since October 2010 and Chairman of the Board since May 2011. She is a Managing Director of The Carlyle Group, where she focuses on U.S. buyout investment opportunities in the consumer and retail industries and serves as head of the Global Consumer and Retail team. She currently serves on the Board of Directors of Acosta, Inc., Dunkin' Brands, CVC Brasil Operadora e Agencia de Viagens S.A. and Vogue International. Ms. Horbach is a member of the Board of Trustees at Rockefeller University and the Investment Committee at Rockefeller University, and is Chairman of the Stanford Business School Advisory Council. Before joining Carlyle, Ms. Horbach spent 18 years at Forstmann Little, a private investment firm. She also spent two years in the mergers and acquisition department of Morgan Stanley. Ms. Horbach received her Master's in Business Administration from the Stanford University Graduate School of Business and her Bachelor of Arts from Wellesley College. This experience, in particular her extensive experience in the retail and consumer industries, and her experience on other boards, led to the conclusion that Ms. Horbach should serve as a Director.

Susan Arnold

        Susan Arnold has served as a member of our Board since November 2013. She is an Operating Executive at The Carlyle Group focused on global investment opportunities in the consumer and retail sectors. Prior to joining Carlyle, Ms. Arnold was an executive with Procter & Gamble for more than 29 years. Prior to retiring in 2009 as President of Procter & Gamble's Global Business Units, Ms. Arnold held various positions within the firm, including Vice Chair of Global Beauty and Health. She has been a director of McDonalds Corporation since 2008 and Director of The Walt Disney Company since 2007. This experience, including her prior executive and other leadership roles at a major consumer goods company, led to the conclusion that Ms. Arnold should serve as a Director.

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David Bernauer

        David Bernauer has served as a member of our Board since February 2011. He is the retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Walgreen Co. He previously served as Chairman of Walgreen from July 2006 until July 2007. From 2003 until July 2006, Mr. Bernauer served as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Walgreen. From 2002 to 2003, he served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Walgreen; from 1999 to 2002 as President and Chief Operating Officer of Walgreen; and he has served in various management positions, with increasing areas of responsibility at Walgreen since 1966. Currently, he also is a director of Lowe's Companies, Inc. Mr. Bernauer also served on the Board of Office Depot, Inc. from 2004 to April 2011. This experience, including his prior executive and other leadership roles at a major national retailer, led to the conclusion that Mr. Bernauer should serve as a Director.

Marco De Benedetti

        Marco De Benedetti has served as a member of our Board since October 2010. He is a Partner and Managing Director of The Carlyle Group and Co-Head of its Europe buyout team. He is based in Milan, Italy. Mr. De Benedetti serves on the Board of Directors of Cofide S.p.A (since 1994), CIR S.p.A. (since 2014), Moncler (since 2008), Commscope (since 2010), Twin-Set Simona Barbieri (since 2012), Marelli Motori S.p.A. (since 2013) and Sematic S.p.A (since 2015), as well as Save the Children Italia. Before joining Carlyle, Mr. De Benedetti was the Chief Executive Officer of Telecom Italia. Mr. De Benedetti was the Chief Executive Officer of Telecom Italia Mobile from 1999 until its merger with Telecom Italia. Previously, Mr. De Benedetti was the Chairman of Infostrada, the main alternative fixed-line carrier for voice services and internet access in Italy, and Chief Executive Officer of Olivetti Telemedia, the telecommunications and multimedia business of the Olivetti Group. Between 1987 and 1989, Mr. De Benedetti worked for Wasserstein, Perrella & Co. in New York. In 1990, he joined the Olivetti Group as Assistant to the Chief Executive Officer of Olivetti Systems and Networks, and he was later appointed as Group Director of Marketing and Services. In 1992, he was appointed General Manager of Olivetti Portugal. Mr. De Benedetti received his Bachelor's degree in history and economics from Wesleyan University and his Masters in Business Administration from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. This experience, in particular his extensive executive and business management experience, led to the conclusion that Mr. De Benedetti should serve as a Director.

Robert Essner

        Robert Essner has served as a member of our Board since February 2011. He is an Operating Executive at The Carlyle Group focused on global investment opportunities in the healthcare sector. Mr. Essner was Chairman for Wyeth from 2003 until 2008 and Chief Executive Officer for Wyeth from 2001 until 2008. Mr. Essner worked for 32 years in the pharmaceutical industry and during that time served in many leadership roles, including Chairman of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers Association. Mr. Essner is currently a director of MassMutual Life Insurance Company, Pharmaceutical Product Development, LLC and Amicus Therapeutics, Inc. He currently serves as Chairman of the not-for-profit Children's Health Fund and as Trustee of Mote Marine Laboratories. Mr. Essner is Executive-in-Residence and Adjunct Professor at Columbia Business School, where he teaches courses in Healthcare Management. Mr. Essner received a Master's degree from the University of Chicago and a Bachelor's degree from Miami University. This experience, including his extensive background and experience in the pharmaceutical industry, led to the conclusion that Mr. Essner should serve as a Director.

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Allan Holt

        Allan Holt has served as a member of our Board since October 2010. Mr. Holt, a Partner and Managing Director of The Carlyle Group, is currently a Co-head of its US Buyout group. Mr. Holt is a graduate of Rutgers University and received his Masters in Business Administration from the University of California, Berkeley. He serves on the boards of directors of Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics and SS&C Technologies, Inc., and the boards of managers of HCR ManorCare, LLC and HCRMC Operations, LLC. He is also an Executive Committee member of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council and serves on the board of advisors or directors of the non-profit DC Greens, The Hillside Foundation and the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Mr. Holt's prior board service includes the boards of directors of HD Supply, Inc., Sequa Corporation, Vought Aircraft Industries, Inc., Booz Allen Hamilton Holding Corporation and Axalta Coating Systems Ltd. This experience and his extensive knowledge of finance led to the conclusion that Mr. Holt should serve as a Director.

Elliot Wagner

        Elliot Wagner has served as a member of our Board since October 2010. He is a Managing Director of The Carlyle Group, where he focuses on U.S. buyout opportunities in the consumer and retail sector. From 2000 to 2008, Mr. Wagner was a member of Carlyle's Global Aerospace, Defense, and Government/Business Services team. Before joining Carlyle in 2000, Mr. Wagner was with Lehman Brothers Inc., focusing on mergers, acquisitions and financings for aerospace, defense, consumer and technology companies. Mr. Wagner received his Bachelor of Science degree from Cornell University, where he currently serves on the Advisory Council of the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management. Mr. Wagner also currently serves on the Board of Directors for Acosta, Inc. Mr. Wagner was previously a member of the board of directors and audit committee of Sequa Corporation and Wesco Aircraft Hardware Corporation. This experience, in particular his experience with companies in the retail and consumer industries, led to the conclusion that Mr. Wagner should serve as a Director.

Steven Cahillane

        Steven Cahillane has served as a member of our Board and has been our Chief Executive Officer and President since September 8, 2014. Prior to joining our company, Mr. Cahillane served as Executive Vice President of The Coca Cola Company from February 2013 to February 2014 and President of Coca-Cola Americas from January 2013 to February 2014. Mr. Cahillane served as President of various Coca-Cola operating groups from 2007 to 2012. From 2003 until 2005, Mr. Cahillane served as the Chief Executive for Interbrew UK and Ireland, a division of InBev S.A and from 2005 to 2007 he served as the Chief Commercial Officer of InBev S.A. Mr. Cahillane received his bachelor's degree from Northwestern University and his Masters in Business Administration from Harvard University.

Dipak Golechha

        Dipak Golechha became our Chief Financial Officer on August 25, 2014. Prior to joining NBTY, he served as Chief Financial Officer of Chobani from January 2014 until June 2014. From 1995 to 2013, Mr. Golechha served in several leadership positions at Procter & Gamble, including Chief Financial Officer of the snacks global business unit from 2009 until 2012 and Chief Financial Officer of the feminine health & hygiene global business unit from 2012 to 2013. Mr. Golechha received both his bachelor's and master's degrees in economics from St. John's College, Cambridge University.

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Harvey Kamil

        Harvey Kamil was the President of NBTY from 2002 and Chief Financial Officer from 1982, when he joined our company. Effective June 13, 2011, Mr. Kamil stepped down as President and Chief Financial Officer of NBTY and became Holdings' and NBTY's Vice Chairman. Mr. Kamil taught as an adjunct associate professor at Suffolk County Community College for thirteen years. He is the Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Council for Responsible Nutrition and serves on the Board of Directors of the Natural Products Association. Presently, he is a member of the Dean's Advisory Council of the Zicklin School of Business of Baruch College and a member of the NY State Regional Economic Development Council for Long Island. Mr. Kamil received his Bachelor of Business Administration and Masters in Business Administration from the Baruch School of Business, City University of New York, and is a Certified Public Accountant and Certified Management Accountant.

Brian Wynne

        Brian Wynne has served as President—NBTY Americas since January 2015. Prior to joining our company, Mr. Wynne served as Senior Vice President Strategy, Franchise Relations & Transformation for Coca-Cola North America Group from January 2013 to December 2014 and President of The Coca-Cola Company's North American Still Beverages Unit from October 2010 to December 2012. Prior to this Mr. Wynne held a wide variety of roles in general management, sales, operations, marketing and human resources for various Coca Cola operating groups from 1988 to 2010. Mr. Wynne received his bachelor's degree from Villanova University and also has received Management Certificates from Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University; Columbia University and the University of Michigan.

Joseph Looney

        Joseph Looney has served as Chief Accounting Officer since September 2012 and as Vice President-Finance since joining NBTY in June 2006. Mr. Looney was the Chief Financial Officer of EVCI Career College Holding Corp. from October 2005 to May 2006. Previously, he had been the Chief Financial Officer and Secretary of Astrex, Inc., a distributor of electronic components, since 2002. From 1996 to 2002, he was the Chief Financial Officer, V.P. of Finance and Assistant Secretary of Manchester Technologies, Inc., a network integrator and reseller of computer products. From 1984 to 1996, he was employed by the accounting firm of KPMG LLP. He is a Certified Public Accountant and has a B.A. from Queens College, City University of New York and an M.S. from Long Island University. Since 1996, Mr. Looney has also been an Adjunct Professor of Accounting and Business Law at Hofstra University.

Christopher Brennan

        Christopher Brennan has served as our Senior Vice President/General Counsel since March 2012, Corporate Secretary since January 2013 and Chief Compliance Officer since February 2013. Mr. Brennan served as Senior Vice President/General Counsel at PharmaNet Development Group, Inc., a contract research organization serving the clinical research needs of large and medium sized multi-national pharmaceutical companies from 2009 to early 2012. Before joining PharmaNet, Mr. Brennan was Executive Vice President/Corporate Affairs & General Counsel at Quinnova Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company with global operations. Prior to joining Quinnova in 2005, Mr. Brennan was a corporate associate at the law firms of Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP and Dechert LLP. Mr. Brennan served as a Captain in the United States Air Force for five years prior to attending law school. He received his Bachelor of Arts and Juris Doctorate degrees from Fordham University.

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Karla Packer

        Karla Packer has served as Senior Vice President/Human Resources since April 2011. Ms. Packer previously served as Senior Vice President of Human Resources at IMS Health Incorporated, a leading provider of market intelligence to the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries since 2007. Before joining IMS Health, Ms. Packer was Vice President of Human Resources for IAC/InteractiveCorp, a $6 billion E-Commerce entity, whose brands include Ticketmaster, Expedia and Home Shopping Network. Ms. Packer spent six years at Avon Products, where she developed human resources strategies in support of Global Marketing, Brand Development, Manufacturing, Supply Chain Strategy, and Research and Development. She started her career at IBM, where she held several positions in the areas of information technology, sales, marketing and human resources. Ms. Packer received her Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from Tufts University.

Bernard O'Keefe

        Bernard O'Keefe has served as our Chief Supply Chain Officer, since September 2012. Mr. O'Keefe served as Vice President of Product Supply, for multiple businesses of Procter & Gamble, including Global Feminine Care, Corporate Manufacturing and Global Personal Health Care & Pharmaceuticals since 2002. Prior to 2002, Mr. O'Keefe held several positions in the areas of supply chain management within Procter & Gamble in Asia, Latin America and North America.

Director Independence and Selection

        Following the Merger, NBTY's equity securities are owned by Holdings; certain investment funds affiliated with Carlyle own substantially all the outstanding equity of Holdings. As of November 17, 2015, our Board of Directors consisted of Steven Cahillane and seven persons associated with and appointed by Carlyle. Our Board has not made a formal determination as to whether each director is "independent" because we have no equity securities listed for trading on a national securities exchange. Because of their relationships with Carlyle or with us, however, we do not believe that any of our directors would be considered independent under the NYSE's definition of independence.

        In identifying nominees for director, consideration is given to the diversity of professional experience, education and backgrounds among the directors so that a variety of points of view are represented in Board discussions and deliberations concerning our business.

Committees of the Board of Directors

        Following the Merger, the Board has three standing committees: (i) the Audit Committee; (ii) the Compensation Committee; and (iii) the Executive Committee.

        Audit Committee.    The Audit Committee is comprised of Messrs. Bernauer and Wagner and assists the Board in its oversight of:

    the qualifications, independence and performance of our independent accountants and the performance of our internal auditors and internal audit function;

    the integrity of our financial statements and our financial reporting processes and systems of internal control; and

    our compliance with legal and regulatory requirements.

        The Audit Committee provides an avenue of communication among management, the independent accountants, the internal auditors and the Board. In carrying out its responsibilities, the Audit Committee also meets with the Company's internal audit staff and with the independent accountants in executive session, without members of management present.

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        Mr. Wagner is an Audit Committee "financial expert," as defined by SEC rules, based on the experience noted in his biography above.

        Compensation Committee.    The Compensation Committee is comprised of Mr. De Benedetti and Ms. Horbach and assists the Board in:

    developing and periodically reviewing our compensation policies, including equity and similar awards, consistent with, and linked to, our strategies;

    evaluating the performance of our CEO and determining his compensation annually;

    evaluating the performance and compensation of our other executive officers annually;

    reviewing management's recommendations on executive compensation policies and programs;

    recommending to the Board the fees of outside directors;

    reviewing and approving new company benefit plans and amendments to existing benefit plans;

    approving all equity-based compensation plans; and

    reviewing benefit plan administration.

        The Compensation Committee has the authority to retain and terminate any consultants, including legal counsel, to assist it in performing its duties and to approve all fee arrangements with consultants. From time to time, the Compensation Committee may seek information and advice regarding executive compensation market practices from outside independent consultants.

        Executive Committee.    The Executive Committee is composed of Messrs. Cahillane and Wagner and Ms. Horbach. Its primary function is to act on behalf of the Board during intervals between regularly scheduled meetings of the Board. The Executive Committee may exercise all powers of the Board, except as otherwise provided by law and our by-laws. The Board reviews all actions taken by the Executive Committee between Board meetings at the following Board meeting.

Code of Ethics for Senior Financial Officers

        We have adopted a Code of Ethics for its Directors, officers and employees, including its senior financial officers and CEO. We will provide a copy of the Code of Ethics to any person upon written request made to Christopher Brennan, our General Counsel, at our headquarters at 2100 Smithtown Avenue, Ronkonkoma, New York 11779. We intend to satisfy the disclosure requirements of amendments to or waivers from a provision of the code of ethics applicable to our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or persons performing similar functions by posting such information on our website, www.nbty.com. Our website and the information in or connected to its website are not incorporated into this annual report.

Item 11.    Executive Compensation

Compensation Discussion and Analysis

        This Compensation Discussion and Analysis (this "CD&A") describes the principles underlying our compensation policy for fiscal 2015 with respect to the individuals listed below and in the "Summary Compensation Table", whom we call our "named executive officers".

        Steven Cahillane, Chief Executive Officer and President
        Dipak Golechha, Chief Financial Officer
        Brian Wynne, President—NBTY Americas (effective January 1, 2015)
        Bernard O'Keefe, Chief Supply Chain Officer

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      Christopher Brennan, Senior Vice President, General Counsel, Chief Compliance Officer and Corporate Secretary

Overview; Compensation Philosophy and Objectives

        During fiscal 2015, the boards of directors of NBTY and Holdings, and the compensation committees of NBTY and Holdings, each comprised of the same individuals (collectively, the "Compensation Committee" or the "Committee"), oversaw our executive compensation program. The Committee designed an executive compensation program to achieve the following goals:

    Attract and retain talented professionals by providing competitive compensation levels;

    Align the interests of our executive officers with those of our primary stockholder through equity-based awards with long-term value; and

    Reward our executives for their contributions to our overall performance as well as for their individual performance.

        The ratio of short-term compensation to long-term compensation for each executive varies depending upon the roles and responsibilities of the executive, with generally higher proportions of long-term compensation for more senior executives.

        The Compensation Committee seeks to encourage our executives to maximize their performance to achieve our strategy and goals. As part of its compensation assessment, the Compensation Committee considers many factors to understand the compensation landscape among similarly-sized companies. Although the Compensation Committee does not target specific compensation levels based upon an established group, the Compensation Committee uses external data to inform the decision-making process.

Executive Compensation Determinations for Fiscal 2015

        During fiscal 2015, total compensation for some or all of our named executive officers consisted of the following components, each discussed in more detail below:

    base salary,

    annual cash bonuses,

    long-term incentive (equity) compensation,

    retirement plans, and

    perquisites.

Role of CEO in Compensation Determinations

        Our Compensation Committee determines the nature and amount of all compensation for our executive officers. Our CEO typically provides recommendations to our Compensation Committee with respect to all elements of compensation for the named executed officers, except himself, and for the other executives that report to him. Our CEO attends Compensation Committee meetings, except those that address his own compensation. Historically, the Compensation Committee has given substantial weight to our CEO's recommendations, insights and observations. However, the Compensation Committee may modify or reject any of our CEO's recommendations.

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An Overview

        The Compensation Committee's approach to compensation is consistent with that at other Carlyle portfolio companies, but takes into account factors particular to our company to establish compensation levels appropriate to each executive's skills, experience and potential value to our company.

        Discussed below is how the Compensation Committee determined the amount and type of compensation best suited to our goals and how the Compensation Committee believes these decisions reflect our compensation philosophy. The Compensation Committee seeks to establish competitive levels of compensation, align executive interests with those of our primary stockholder and closely link compensation to both short-term and long-term company and individual performance.

        Competitive Market/Retention of Talent.    The Compensation Committee considered the market for executive talent and attempted to set compensation at competitive levels when measured against other similarly-sized companies (based on revenue), regardless of industry. We seek to set our total compensation to be competitive with the market but do not target specific compensation levels based upon an established group.

        Company Performance.    In evaluating performance, the Compensation Committee considered our overall financial and operating performance during the period, as well as our achievement of strategic and tactical goals. In fiscal 2015, the Committee principally assessed company performance based on earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization, or "EBITDA", adjusted for non-recurring and extraordinary items ("Adjusted EBITDA"). The Compensation Committee believes that Adjusted EBITDA is a useful performance metric for a portfolio company, and correlates closely with financial success and growth in equity value.

        Individual Contributions and Performance.    As discussed in further detail below, the Compensation Committee evaluated each executive's contributions to our financial and operational achievements. The Compensation Committee considered each executive's individual performance, both in terms of personal responsibilities and contributions to company goals. The Compensation Committee also considered the executive's potential for future contributions to our long-term success, and evaluated the executive's experience, management skills and leadership abilities.

Base Salary

        We believe we must offer competitive base salaries to attract and retain high-quality executives who provide our primary stockholder and other stakeholders with increased value. Base salaries provide executives with a fixed level of income security, offering stability and predictability. Our executives understand that our entrepreneurial atmosphere and need for performance accountability place their employment, and not their income alone, at risk. Base salaries with our named executive officers are initially established based on an arm's-length negotiation. We consider base salary adjustments, if any, annually, and we determine these adjustments based upon individual performance, assumption of new responsibilities, employee retention efforts, our annual salary budget guidelines, and other factors that the Compensation Committee considers relevant, such as compensation packages that competitively-sized (based on revenue) companies offer their executives. Larger annual increases may be made to higher performers and key contributors, if the overall increases are within our budgeted guidelines. The actual base salaries paid to all of our named executive officers during fiscal 2015 are set forth in the "Summary Compensation Table" below.

        The Compensation Committee determined that the level of base salaries was appropriate for the named executive officers and there were no base salary increases for our named executive officers in fiscal 2015. Mr. Wynne joined our company in 2015 and his initial base salary was determined as a result of an arm's-length negotiation.

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