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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

 

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2015

 

OR

 

 

 

 

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from __________ to ____________

 

Commission File Number 1-6075

 

UNION PACIFIC CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

 

UTAH

 

13-2626465

(State or other jurisdiction of

 

(I.R.S. Employer

incorporation or organization)

 

Identification No.)

 

1400 DOUGLAS STREET, OMAHA, NEBRASKA

(Address of principal executive offices)

68179

(Zip Code)

(402) 544-5000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

 Yes      No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

 Yes      No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

 

 

 

 

Large accelerated filer 

Accelerated filer 

Non-accelerated filer 

Smaller reporting company 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).

 

 Yes      No

 

As of April 17,  2015, there were 875,590,576 shares of the Registrant's Common Stock outstanding.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

UNION PACIFIC CORPORATION

AND SUBSIDIARY COMPANIES

 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

 

 

 

 

Item 1. 

Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements:

 

 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME (Unaudited)

 

 

For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2015 and 2014

3

 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (Unaudited)

 

 

For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2015 and 2014

3

 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION (Unaudited)

 

 

At March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014

4

 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (Unaudited)

 

 

For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2015 and 2014

5

 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN COMMON SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY (Unaudited)

 

 

For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2015 and 2014

6

 

NOTES TO THE CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Unaudited)

7

Item 2. 

Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

21

Item 3. 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

33

Item 4. 

Controls and Procedures

33

 

 

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION 

 

 

 

 

2


 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income (Unaudited)

Union Pacific Corporation and Subsidiary Companies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions, Except Per Share Amounts,

 

 

 

 

for the Three Months Ended March 31,

2015 
2014 

Operating revenues:

 

 

 

 

     Freight revenues

$

5,251 

$

5,286 

     Other revenues

 

363 

 

352 

Total operating revenues

 

5,614 

 

5,638 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

     Compensation and benefits

 

1,369 

 

1,254 

     Purchased services and materials

 

643 

 

607 

     Fuel

 

564 

 

921 

     Depreciation

 

491 

 

464 

     Equipment and other rents

 

311 

 

312 

     Other

 

259 

 

226 

Total operating expenses

 

3,637 

 

3,784 

Operating income

 

1,977 

 

1,854 

Other income (Note 7)

 

26 

 

38 

Interest expense

 

(148)

 

(133)

Income before income taxes

 

1,855 

 

1,759 

Income taxes

 

(704)

 

(671)

Net income

$

1,151 

$

1,088 

Share and Per Share (Notes 4 and 9):

 

 

 

 

     Earnings per share - basic

$

1.31 

$

1.20 

     Earnings per share - diluted

$

1.30 

$

1.19 

     Weighted average number of shares - basic

 

879.3 

 

908.1 

     Weighted average number of shares - diluted

 

882.8 

 

912.5 

Dividends declared per share

$

0.55 

$

0.455 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Unaudited)

Union Pacific Corporation and Subsidiary Companies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions,

 

 

 

 

for the Three Months Ended March 31,

2015 
2014 

Net income

$

1,151 

$

1,088 

Other comprehensive income/(loss):

 

 

 

 

    Defined benefit plans

 

12 

 

20 

    Foreign currency translation

 

(20)

 

(4)

Total other comprehensive income/(loss) [a]

 

(8)

 

16 

Comprehensive income

$

1,143 

$

1,104 

 

[a] Net of deferred taxes of $(3) million and $5 million during the three months ended March 31, 2015, and 2014, respectively.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

 

 

 

3


 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Financial Position (Unaudited)

Union Pacific Corporation and Subsidiary Companies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 31,

 

December 31,

Millions, Except Share and Per Share Amounts

2015 

 

2014 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

     Cash and cash equivalents

$

1,587 

 

$

1,586 

     Accounts receivable, net (Note 11)

 

1,564 

 

 

1,611 

     Materials and supplies

 

744 

 

 

712 

     Current deferred income taxes

 

250 

 

 

277 

     Other current assets

 

334 

 

 

493 

Total current assets

 

4,479 

 

 

4,679 

Investments

 

1,375 

 

 

1,390 

Net properties (Note 12)

 

46,928 

 

 

46,272 

Other assets

 

363 

 

 

375 

Total assets

$

53,145 

 

$

52,716 

Liabilities and Common Shareholders' Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

     Accounts payable and other current liabilities (Note 13)

$

2,974 

 

$

3,303 

     Debt due within one year (Note 15)

 

416 

 

 

462 

Total current liabilities

 

3,390 

 

 

3,765 

Debt due after one year (Note 15)

 

11,884 

 

 

11,018 

Deferred income taxes

 

14,774 

 

 

14,680 

Other long-term liabilities

 

2,040 

 

 

2,064 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 17)

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities

 

32,088 

 

 

31,527 

Common shareholders' equity:

 

 

 

 

 

     Common shares, $2.50 par value, 1,400,000,000 authorized;   

 

 

 

 

 

     1,110,476,743 and 1,110,100,423 issued; 877,373,800 and 883,366,476

 

 

 

 

 

     outstanding, respectively

 

2,776 

 

 

2,775 

     Paid-in-surplus

 

4,351 

 

 

4,321 

     Retained earnings

 

28,034 

 

 

27,367 

     Treasury stock

 

(12,886)

 

 

(12,064)

     Accumulated other comprehensive loss (Note 10)

 

(1,218)

 

 

(1,210)

Total common shareholders' equity

 

21,057 

 

 

21,189 

Total liabilities and common shareholders' equity

$

53,145 

 

$

52,716 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

 

4


 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (Unaudited)

Union Pacific Corporation and Subsidiary Companies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions,

 

 

for the Three Months Ended March 31,

2015 
2014 

Operating Activities

 

 

 

 

Net income

$

1,151 

$

1,088 

Adjustments to reconcile net income to cash provided by operating activities:

 

 

 

 

  Depreciation

 

491 

 

464 

  Deferred income taxes and unrecognized tax benefits

 

108 

 

75 

  Other operating activities, net

 

32 

 

(57)

  Changes in current assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

     Accounts receivable, net

 

47 

 

(128)

     Materials and supplies

 

(32)

 

(52)

     Other current assets

 

(75)

 

(93)

     Accounts payable and other current liabilities

 

(155)

 

84 

     Income and other taxes

 

497 

 

386 

Cash provided by operating activities

 

2,064 

 

1,767 

Investing Activities

 

 

 

 

Capital investments

 

(1,101)

 

(893)

Proceeds from asset sales

 

32 

 

27 

Other investing activities, net

 

(73)

 

(39)

Cash used in investing activities

 

(1,142)

 

(905)

Financing Activities

 

 

 

 

Debt issued (Note 15)

 

1,146 

 

995 

Dividends paid (Note 13)

 

(922)

 

(363)

Common share repurchases (Note 18)

 

(792)

 

(644)

Debt repaid

 

(333)

 

(402)

Other financing activities, net

 

(20)

 

(23)

Cash used in financing activities

 

(921)

 

(437)

Net change in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

425 

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

 

1,586 

 

1,432 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

$

1,587 

$

1,857 

Supplemental Cash Flow Information

 

 

 

 

  Non-cash investing and financing activities:

 

 

 

 

     Capital investments accrued but not yet paid

$

146 

$

109 

     Common shares repurchased but not yet paid

 

15 

 

39 

     Cash dividends declared but not yet paid (Note 13)

 

 -

 

407 

  Cash paid for:

 

 

 

 

     Income taxes, net of refunds

$

(47)

$

(146)

     Interest, net of amounts capitalized

 

(192)

 

(178)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

 

5


 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Common Shareholders’ Equity (Unaudited)

Union Pacific Corporation and Subsidiary Companies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Millions

Common
Shares

Treasury
Shares

 

Common Shares

Paid-in-Surplus

Retained Earnings

Treasury Stock

AOCI
[a]

Total 

Balance at January 1, 2014 (Note 4)

1,109.7 
(197.7)

 

 

$   2,774 

 

$   4,210 

 

$   23,901 

 

$    (8,910)

 

$     (750)

 

$   21,225 

Net income

 

 

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

1,088 

 

 -

 

 -

 

1,088 

Other comp. income

 

 

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

16 

 

16 

Conversion, stock option
 exercises, forfeitures, and other

0.4 
1.2 

 

 

 

23 

 

 -

 

16 

 

 -

 

40 

Share repurchases (Note 18)

 -

(7.6)

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

(683)

 

 -

 

(683)

Cash dividends declared
   ($0.455 per share)

 -

 -

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

(414)

 

 -

 

 -

 

(414)

Balance at March 31, 2014

1,110.1 
(204.1)

 

 

$   2,775 

 

$   4,233 

 

$   24,575 

 

$    (9,577)

 

$     (734)

 

$   21,272 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance at January 1, 2015

1,110.1 
(226.7)

 

 

$   2,775 

 

$   4,321 

 

$   27,367 

 

$  (12,064)

 

$  (1,210)

 

$   21,189 

Net income

 

 

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

1,151 

 

 -

 

 -

 

1,151 

Other comp. loss

 

 

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

(8)

 

(8)

Conversion, stock option
 exercises, forfeitures, and other

0.4 
0.5 

 

 

 

30 

 

 -

 

(15)

 

 -

 

16 

Share repurchases (Note 18)

 -

(6.9)

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

(807)

 

 -

 

(807)

Cash dividends declared
   ($0.55 per share)

 -

 -

 

 

 -

 

 -

 

(484)

 

 -

 

 -

 

(484)

Balance at March 31, 2015

1,110.5 
(233.1)

 

 

$   2,776 

 

$   4,351 

 

$   28,034 

 

$  (12,886)

 

$  (1,218)

 

$   21,057 

 

[a]AOCI = Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income/(Loss) (Note 10)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

 

6


 

UNION PACIFIC CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY COMPANIES

 

NOTES TO THE CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

(Unaudited)

 

For purposes of this report, unless the context otherwise requires, all references herein to the “Corporation”, “Company”, “UPC”, “we”, “us”, and “our” mean Union Pacific Corporation and its subsidiaries, including Union Pacific Railroad Company, which will be separately referred to herein as “UPRR” or the “Railroad”.

 

1. Basis of Presentation

 

Our Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements are unaudited and reflect all adjustments (consisting of normal and recurring adjustments) that are, in the opinion of management, necessary for their fair presentation in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (GAAP). Our Consolidated Statement of Financial Position at December 31, 2014, is derived from audited financial statements. This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q should be read in conjunction with our Consolidated Financial Statements and notes thereto contained in our 2014 Annual Report on Form 10-K. The results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2015, are not necessarily indicative of the results for the entire year ending December 31, 2015.

 

The Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements are presented in accordance with GAAP as codified in the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Codification (ASC).

 

2. Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2014, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2014-09 (ASU 2014-09), Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606). ASU 2014-09 supersedes the revenue recognition guidance in Topic 605, Revenue Recognition. The core principle of the guidance is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods and services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in the exchange for those goods or services. This standard is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017. ASU 2014-09 is not expected to have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.

 

In April 2015, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2015-03 (ASU 2015-03), Interest - Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30). ASU 2015-03 changes the presentation of debt issuance costs in the financial statements to present such costs as a direct deduction from the related debt liability rather than as an asset. Amortization of debt issuance costs will be reported as interest expense. This standard is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2015. ASU 2015-03 will not have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.

 

 

7


 

3. Operations and Segmentation

 

The Railroad, along with its subsidiaries and rail affiliates, is our one reportable operating segment. Although we provide and analyze revenue by commodity group, we treat the financial results of the Railroad as one segment due to the integrated nature of our rail network. The following table provides freight revenue by commodity group:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions,

 

 

 

 

for the Three Months Ended March 31,

2015 
2014 

Agricultural Products

$

939 

$

910 

Automotive

 

516 

 

488 

Chemicals

 

897 

 

893 

Coal

 

915 

 

961 

Industrial Products

 

1,017 

 

1,011 

Intermodal

 

967 

 

1,023 

Total freight revenues

$

5,251 

$

5,286 

Other revenues

 

363 

 

352 

Total operating revenues

$

5,614 

$

5,638 

 

Although our revenues are principally derived from customers domiciled in the U.S., the ultimate points of origination or destination for some products transported by us are outside the U.S. Each of our commodity groups includes revenue from shipments to and from Mexico. Included in the above table are revenues from our Mexico business which amounted to $544 million and $540 million, respectively for the three months ended March 31, 2015, and March 31, 2014.

 

4. Stock Split

 

On June 6, 2014, we completed a two-for-one stock split, effected in the form of a 100% stock dividend. The stock split entitled all shareholders of record at the close of business on May 27, 2014, to receive one additional share of our common stock, par value $2.50 per share, for each share of common stock held on that date. All references to common shares and per share amounts have been retroactively adjusted to reflect the stock split for all periods presented.

 

5. Stock-Based Compensation

 

We have several stock-based compensation plans under which employees and non-employee directors receive stock options, nonvested retention shares, and nonvested stock units. We refer to the nonvested shares and stock units collectively as “retention awards”. We have elected to issue treasury shares to cover option exercises and stock unit vestings, while new shares are issued when retention shares are granted. Information regarding stock-based compensation appears in the table below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions,

 

 

 

 

for the Three Months Ended March 31,

2015 
2014 

Stock-based compensation, before tax:

 

 

 

 

     Stock options

$

$

     Retention awards

 

24 

 

29 

Total stock-based compensation, before tax

$

28 

$

35 

Excess tax benefits from equity compensation plans

$

53 

$

60 

 

 

8


 

Stock Options – We estimate the fair value of our stock option awards using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The table below shows the annual weighted-average assumptions used for valuation purposes:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted-Average Assumptions

2015 
2014 

Risk-free interest rate

 

1.3% 

 

1.6% 

Dividend yield

 

1.8% 

 

2.1% 

Expected life (years)

 

5.1 

 

5.2 

Volatility

 

23.4% 

 

30.0% 

Weighted-average grant-date fair value of options granted

$

22.30 

$

20.18 

 

The risk-free rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant; the dividend yield is calculated as the ratio of dividends paid per share of common stock to the stock price on the date of grant; the expected life is based on historical and expected exercise behavior; and volatility is based on the historical volatility of our stock price over the expected life of the option.

 

A summary of stock option activity during the three months ended March 31, 2015, is presented below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Options (thous.)

Weighted-Average
Exercise Price

Weighted-Average Remaining Contractual Term

Aggregate Intrinsic Value (millions)

Outstanding at January 1, 2015

5,387 

$

53.56 

5.8 yrs.

$

353 

Granted

934 

 

122.85 

N/A

 

N/A

Exercised

(413)

 

44.38 

N/A

 

N/A

Forfeited or expired

(8)

 

80.00 

N/A

 

N/A

Outstanding at March 31, 2015

5,900 

$

65.14 

6.3 yrs.

$

268 

Vested or expected to vest at March 31, 2015

5,842 

$

64.76 

6.2 yrs.

$

268 

Options exercisable at March 31, 2015

3,976 

$

47.87 

4.9 yrs.

$

240 

 

Stock options are granted at the closing price on the date of grant, have ten-year contractual terms, and vest no later than three years from the date of grant. None of the stock options outstanding at March 31, 2015, are subject to performance or market-based vesting conditions.

 

At March 31, 2015, there was $31 million of unrecognized compensation expense related to nonvested stock options, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 1.8 years. Additional information regarding stock option exercises appears in the table below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions,

 

 

 

 

for the Three Months Ended March 31,

2015 
2014 

Intrinsic value of stock options exercised

$

32 

$

34 

Cash received from option exercises

 

14 

 

18 

Treasury shares repurchased for employee payroll taxes

 

(7)

 

(7)

Tax benefit realized from option exercises

 

12 

 

13 

Aggregate grant-date fair value of stock options vested

 

19 

 

17 

 

Retention Awards – The fair value of retention awards is based on the closing price of the stock on the grant date. Dividends and dividend equivalents are paid to participants during the vesting periods.

 

 

9


 

Changes in our retention awards during the three months ended March 31, 2015, were as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares
(thous.)

Weighted-Average
Grant-Date Fair Value

Nonvested at January 1, 2015

3,403 

$

64.39 

Granted

519 

 

122.83 

Vested

(894)

 

46.94 

Forfeited

(23)

 

67.31 

Nonvested at March 31, 2015

3,005 

$

79.65 

 

Retention awards are granted at no cost to the employee or non-employee director and vest over periods lasting up to four years. At March 31, 2015, there was $131 million of total unrecognized compensation expense related to nonvested retention awards, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 2.2 years.

 

Performance Retention Awards – In February 2015, our Board of Directors approved performance stock unit grants. Other than different performance targets, the basic terms of these performance stock units are identical to those granted in February 2013, and February 2014, including using annual return on invested capital (ROIC) as the performance measure. We define ROIC as net operating profit adjusted for interest expense (including interest on the present value of operating leases) and taxes on interest divided by average invested capital adjusted for the present value of operating leases.

 

Stock units awarded to selected employees under these grants are subject to continued employment for 37 months and the attainment of certain levels of ROIC. We expense the fair value of the units that are probable of being earned based on our forecasted ROIC over the 3-year performance period. We measure the fair value of these performance stock units based upon the closing price of the underlying common stock as of the date of grant, reduced by the present value of estimated future dividends. Dividend equivalents are paid to participants only after the units are earned.

 

The assumptions used to calculate the present value of estimated future dividends related to the February 2015 grant were as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2015 

Dividend per share per quarter

$

0.55 

Risk-free interest rate at date of grant

 

0.8% 

 

Changes in our performance retention awards during the three months ended March 31, 2015, were as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares
(thous.)

Weighted-Average
Grant-Date Fair Value

Nonvested at January 1, 2015

1,583 

$

65.33 

Granted

339 

 

117.42 

Vested

(580)

 

54.38 

Forfeited

(13)

 

72.98 

Nonvested at March 31, 2015

1,329 

$

83.32 

 

At March 31, 2015, there was $66 million of total unrecognized compensation expense related to nonvested performance retention awards, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 1.7 years. This expense is subject to achievement of the ROIC levels established for the performance stock unit grants.

 

 

10


 

6. Retirement Plans

 

Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits

 

Pension Plans – We provide defined benefit retirement income to eligible non-union employees through qualified and non-qualified (supplemental) pension plans. Qualified and non-qualified pension benefits are based on years of service and the highest compensation during the latest years of employment, with specific reductions made for early retirements.

 

Other Postretirement Benefits (OPEB) – We provide medical and life insurance benefits for eligible retirees. These benefits are funded as medical claims and life insurance premiums are paid.

 

Expense

 

Both pension and OPEB expense are determined based upon the annual service cost of benefits (the actuarial cost of benefits earned during a period) and the interest cost on those liabilities, less the expected return on plan assets. The expected long-term rate of return on plan assets is applied to a calculated value of plan assets that recognizes changes in fair value over a five-year period. This practice is intended to reduce year-to-year volatility in pension expense, but it can have the effect of delaying the recognition of differences between actual returns on assets and expected returns based on long-term rate of return assumptions. Differences in actual experience in relation to assumptions are not recognized in net income immediately, but are deferred in accumulated other comprehensive income and, if necessary, amortized as pension or OPEB expense.

 

The components of our net periodic pension and OPEB cost/(benefit) were as follows for the three months ended March 31:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pension

OPEB

Millions

2015 
2014 
2015 
2014 

Service cost

$

24 

$

18 

$

$

Interest cost

 

40 

 

39 

 

 

Expected return on plan assets

 

(64)

 

(58)

 

 -

 

 -

Amortization of:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Prior service credit

 

 -

 

 -

 

(2)

 

(3)

      Actuarial loss

 

26 

 

17 

 

 

Net periodic pension cost

$

26 

$

16 

$

$

 

Cash Contributions

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2015, we did not make any cash contributions to the qualified pension plan. Any contributions made during 2015 will be based on cash generated from operations and financial market considerations. Our policy with respect to funding the qualified plans is to fund at least the minimum required by law and not more than the maximum amount deductible for tax purposes. At March 31, 2015, we do not have minimum cash funding requirements for 2015.

 

 

11


 

7. Other Income

 

Other income included the following:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions,

 

 

 

 

for the Three Months Ended March 31,

2015 
2014 

Rental income

$

24 

$

24 

Net gain on non-operating asset dispositions

 

 

Interest income

 

 

Non-operating environmental costs and other [a]

 

(6)

 

Total

$

26 

$

38 

 

[a] 2014 includes $14 million related to the sale of a permanent easement.

 

8. Income Taxes

 

Internal Revenue Service (IRS) examinations have been completed and settled for all years prior to 2009, and the statute of limitations bars any additional tax assessments. The IRS has completed their examinations and issued notices of deficiency for tax years 2009 and 2010. We disagreed with many of their proposed adjustments, and went to IRS Appeals for those years.

 

In the first quarter of 2015, we reached an agreement in principle with IRS Appeals to resolve all issues related to tax years 2009 and 2010, except for calculations of interest. We anticipate signing a closing agreement with the IRS within the next 12 months. Once formalized, this agreement will have an immaterial effect on our income tax expense and result in an immaterial payment of tax and interest.

 

Additionally, several state tax authorities are examining our state income tax returns for years 2006 through 2010.

 

At March 31, 2015, we had a net liability for unrecognized tax benefits of $141 million. Of that amount, $29 million is classified as a current liability in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Financial Position.

 

9. Earnings Per Share

 

The following table provides a reconciliation between basic and diluted earnings per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions, Except Per Share Amounts,

 

 

 

 

for the Three Months Ended March 31,

2015 
2014 

Net income

$

1,151 

$

1,088 

Weighted-average number of shares outstanding:    

 

 

 

 

    Basic

 

879.3 

 

908.1 

    Dilutive effect of stock options

 

1.8 

 

2.6 

    Dilutive effect of retention shares and units 

 

1.7 

 

1.8 

Diluted

 

882.8 

 

912.5 

Earnings per share – basic

$

1.31 

$

1.20 

Earnings per share – diluted

$

1.30 

$

1.19 

Stock options excluded as their inclusion would be anti-dilutive

 

0.6 

 

0.7 

 

 

12


 

10. Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income/(Loss)

 

Reclassifications out of accumulated other comprehensive income/(loss) for the three months ended March 31, 2015, and 2014, were as follows (net of tax):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions

Defined
benefit
plans

Foreign
currency
translation

Total

Balance at January 1, 2015

$

(1,161)

$

(49)

$

(1,210)

Other comprehensive income/(loss) before reclassifications

 

(4)

 

(20)

 

(24)

Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income/(loss) [a]

 

16 

 

 -

 

16 

Net year-to-date other comprehensive income/(loss),
net of taxes of $(3) million

 

12 

 

(20)

 

(8)

Balance at March 31, 2015

$

(1,149)

$

(69)

$

(1,218)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance at January 1, 2014

$

(713)

$

(37)

$

(750)

Other comprehensive income/(loss) before reclassifications

 

10 

 

(4)

 

Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income/(loss) [a]

 

10 

 

 -

 

10 

Net year-to-date other comprehensive income/(loss),
net of taxes of $5 million

 

20 

 

(4)

 

16 

Balance at March 31, 2014

$

(693)

$

(41)

$

(734)

 

[a] The accumulated other comprehensive income/(loss) reclassification components are 1) prior service cost/(benefit) and 2) net actuarial loss which are both included in the computation of net periodic pension cost. See Note 6 Retirement Plans for additional details.

 

11. Accounts Receivable

 

Accounts receivable includes freight and other receivables reduced by an allowance for doubtful accounts. The allowance is based upon historical losses, credit worthiness of customers, and current economic conditions. At both March 31, 2015, and December 31, 2014, our accounts receivable were reduced by $5 million. Receivables not expected to be collected in one year and the associated allowances are classified as other assets in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Financial Position. At March 31, 2015, and December 31, 2014, receivables classified as other assets were reduced by allowances of $14 million and $16 million, respectively.

 

Receivables Securitization Facility – The Railroad maintains a $650 million, 3-year receivables securitization facility maturing in July 2017 under which it sells most of its eligible third-party receivables to Union Pacific Receivables, Inc. (UPRI), a wholly-owned, bankruptcy-remote subsidiary that may subsequently transfer, without recourse, an undivided interest in accounts receivable to investors. The investors have no recourse to the Railroad’s other assets except for customary warranty and indemnity claims. Creditors of the Railroad do not have recourse to the assets of UPRI.

 

The amount outstanding under the facility was $400 million at both March 31, 2015, and December 31, 2014. The facility was supported by $1.2 billion of accounts receivable as collateral at both March 31, 2015, and December 31, 2014, respectively, which, as a retained interest, is included in accounts receivable, net in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Financial Position.

 

The outstanding amount the Railroad is allowed to maintain under the facility, with a maximum of $650 million, may fluctuate based on the availability of eligible receivables and is directly affected by business volumes and credit risks, including receivables payment quality measures such as default and dilution ratios. If default or dilution ratios increase one percent, the allowable outstanding amount under the facility would not materially change.

 

 

13


 

The costs of the receivables securitization facility include interest, which will vary based on prevailing benchmark and commercial paper rates, program fees paid to participating banks, commercial paper issuing costs, and fees of participating banks for unused commitment availability. The costs of the receivables securitization facility are included in interest expense and were $1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2015, and 2014.

 

12. Properties

 

The following tables list the major categories of property and equipment, as well as the weighted average estimated useful life for each category (in years):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions, Except Estimated Useful Life

 

 Accumulated

Net Book

Estimated

As of March 31, 2015

Cost

 Depreciation

Value

Useful Life

Land

$

5,215 

$

N/A

$

5,215 

N/A

Road:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Rail and other track material

 

14,745 

 

5,307 

 

9,438 
37 

  Ties

 

9,194 

 

2,495 

 

6,699 
33 

  Ballast

 

4,869 

 

1,288 

 

3,581 
34 

  Other roadway [a]

 

16,615 

 

2,898 

 

13,717 
47 

Total road 

 

45,423 

 

11,988 

 

33,435 

N/A

Equipment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Locomotives

 

8,587 

 

3,775 

 

4,812 
20 

  Freight cars

 

2,106 

 

968 

 

1,138 
25 

  Work equipment and other

 

742 

 

161 

 

581 
18 

Total equipment 

 

11,435 

 

4,904 

 

6,531 

N/A

Technology and other

 

899 

 

326 

 

573 
11 

Construction in progress

 

1,174 

 

 -

 

1,174 

N/A

Total

$

64,146 

$

17,218 

$

46,928 

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions, Except Estimated Useful Life

 

 Accumulated

Net Book

Estimated

As of December 31, 2014

Cost

 Depreciation

Value

Useful Life

Land

$

5,194 

$

N/A

$

5,194 

N/A

Road:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Rail and other track material

 

14,588 

 

5,241 

 

9,347 
33 

  Ties

 

9,102 

 

2,450 

 

6,652 
33 

  Ballast

 

4,826 

 

1,264 

 

3,562 
34 

  Other roadway [a]

 

16,476 

 

2,852 

 

13,624 
47 

Total road 

 

44,992 

 

11,807 

 

33,185 

N/A

Equipment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Locomotives

 

8,276 

 

3,694 

 

4,582 
20 

  Freight cars

 

2,116 

 

968 

 

1,148 
25 

  Work equipment and other

 

684 

 

153 

 

531 
18 

Total equipment 

 

11,076 

 

4,815 

 

6,261 

N/A

Technology and other

 

872 

 

320 

 

552 
10 

Construction in progress

 

1,080 

 

 -

 

1,080 

N/A

Total

$

63,214 

$

16,942 

$

46,272 

N/A

 

[a]Other roadway includes grading, bridges and tunnels, signals, buildings, and other road assets.

 

 

 

14


 

13. Accounts Payable and Other Current Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mar. 31,

Dec. 31,

Millions

2015 
2014 

Accounts payable

$

882 

$

877 

Income and other taxes payable

 

675 

 

412 

Accrued wages and vacation

 

421 

 

409 

Accrued casualty costs

 

208 

 

249 

Interest payable

 

133 

 

178 

Equipment rents payable

 

101 

 

100 

Dividends payable [a]

 

 -

 

438 

Other

 

554 

 

640 

Total accounts payable and other current liabilities

$

2,974 

$

3,303 

 

[a]Beginning in 2015, the timing of the dividend declaration and payable dates was aligned to occur within the same quarter. The 2015 dividends paid amount includes the fourth quarter 2014 dividend of $438 million, which was paid on January 2, 2015, as well as the first quarter 2015 dividend of $484 million, which was paid on March 30, 2015.

 

14. Financial Instruments

 

Strategy and Risk – We may use derivative financial instruments in limited instances for other than trading purposes to assist in managing our overall exposure to fluctuations in interest rates and fuel prices. We are not a party to leveraged derivatives and, by policy, do not use derivative financial instruments for speculative purposes. Derivative financial instruments qualifying for hedge accounting must maintain a specified level of effectiveness between the hedging instrument and the item being hedged, both at inception and throughout the hedged period. We formally document the nature and relationships between the hedging instruments and hedged items at inception, as well as our risk-management objectives, strategies for undertaking the various hedge transactions, and method of assessing hedge effectiveness. Changes in the fair market value of derivative financial instruments that do not qualify for hedge accounting are charged to earnings. We may use swaps, collars, futures, and/or forward contracts to mitigate the risk of adverse movements in interest rates and fuel prices; however, the use of these derivative financial instruments may limit future benefits from favorable interest rate and fuel price movements.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments – The fair value of our short- and long-term debt was estimated using a market value price model, which utilizes applicable U.S. Treasury rates along with current market quotes on comparable debt securities. All of the inputs used to determine the fair market value of the Corporation’s long-term debt are Level 2 inputs and obtained from an independent source. At March 31, 2015, the fair value of total debt was $14.1 billion, approximately $1.8 billion more than the carrying value. At December 31, 2014, the fair value of total debt was $13.0 billion, approximately $1.5 billion more than the carrying value. The fair value of the Corporation’s debt is a measure of its current value under present market conditions. It does not impact the financial statements under current accounting rules. At both March 31, 2015, and December 31, 2014, approximately $163 million of debt securities contained call provisions that allow us to retire the debt instruments prior to final maturity, with the payment of fixed call premiums, or in certain cases, at par. The fair value of our cash equivalents approximates their carrying value due to the short-term maturities of these instruments.

 

15. Debt

 

Credit Facilities – At March 31, 2015, we had $1.7 billion of credit available under our revolving credit facility (the facility), which is designated for general corporate purposes and supports the issuance of commercial paper. We did not draw on the facility during the three months ended March 31, 2015. Commitment fees and interest rates payable under the facility are similar to fees and rates available to comparably rated, investment-grade borrowers. The facility allows for borrowings at floating rates based on London Interbank Offered Rates, plus a spread, depending upon credit ratings for our senior unsecured debt. The facility matures in May 2019 under a five-year term and requires the Corporation to maintain a debt-to-net-worth coverage ratio. At March 31, 2015, and December 31, 2014 (and at all times during the periods presented), we were in compliance with this covenant.

 

 

15


 

The definition of debt used for purposes of calculating the debt-to-net-worth coverage ratio includes, among other things, certain credit arrangements, capital leases, guarantees and unfunded and vested pension benefits under Title IV of ERISA. At March 31, 2015, the debt-to-net-worth coverage ratio allowed us to carry up to $42.1 billion of debt (as defined in the facility), and we had $12.4 billion of debt (as defined in the facility) outstanding at that date. Under our current capital plans, we expect to continue to satisfy the debt-to-net-worth coverage ratio; however, many factors beyond our reasonable control could affect our ability to comply with this provision in the future. The facility does not include any other financial restrictions, credit rating triggers (other than rating-dependent pricing), or any other provision that could require us to post collateral. The facility also includes a $125 million cross-default provision and a change-of-control provision.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2015, we did not issue or repay any commercial paper, and at March 31, 2015, we had no commercial paper outstanding. Our revolving credit facility supports our outstanding commercial paper balances, and, unless we change the terms of our commercial paper program, our aggregate issuance of commercial paper will not exceed the amount of borrowings available under the facility.

 

Shelf Registration Statement and Significant New Borrowings – We filed an automatic shelf registration statement with the SEC that became effective on February 9, 2015. The Board of Directors authorized the issuance of up to $4 billion of debt securities, replacing the $4 billion authorized under our shelf registration filed in February 2013, which was fully utilized after our January 2015 debt offering noted below. Under our current shelf registration, we may issue, from time to time, any combination of debt securities, preferred stock, common stock, or warrants for debt securities or preferred stock in one or more offerings.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2015, we issued the following unsecured, fixed-rate debt securities under our prior shelf registration:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Date

Description of Securities

January 29, 2015

$250 million of 1.80% Notes due February 1, 2020

 

$450 million of 3.375% Notes due February 1, 2035

 

$450 million of 3.875% Notes due February 1, 2055

 

We used the net proceeds from this offering for general corporate purposes, including the repurchase of common stock pursuant to our share repurchase program. These debt securities include change-of-control provisions. At March 31, 2015, we had remaining authority to issue up to $4.0 billion of debt securities under our current shelf registration.

 

Receivables Securitization Facility – As of both March 31, 2015, and December 31, 2014, we recorded $400 million of borrowings under our receivables securitization facility as secured debt. (See further discussion of our receivables securitization facility in Note 11).

 

16. Variable Interest Entities

 

We have entered into various lease transactions in which the structure of the leases contain variable interest entities (VIEs). These VIEs were created solely for the purpose of doing lease transactions (principally involving railroad equipment and facilities) and have no other activities, assets or liabilities outside of the lease transactions. Within these lease arrangements, we have the right to purchase some or all of the assets at fixed prices. Depending on market conditions, fixed-price purchase options available in the leases could potentially provide benefits to us; however, these benefits are not expected to be significant.

 

We maintain and operate the assets based on contractual obligations within the lease arrangements, which set specific guidelines consistent within the railroad industry. As such, we have no control over activities that could materially impact the fair value of the leased assets. We do not hold the power to direct the activities of the VIEs and, therefore, do not control the ongoing activities that have a significant impact on the economic performance of the VIEs. Additionally, we do not have the obligation to absorb losses of the VIEs or the right to receive benefits of the VIEs that could potentially be significant to the VIEs.

 

16


 

 

We are not considered to be the primary beneficiary and do not consolidate these VIEs because our actions and decisions do not have the most significant effect on the VIE’s performance and our fixed-price purchase options are not considered to be potentially significant to the VIEs. The future minimum lease payments associated with the VIE leases totaled $2.8 billion as of March 31, 2015.

 

17. Commitments and Contingencies

 

Asserted and Unasserted Claims – Various claims and lawsuits are pending against us and certain of our subsidiaries. We cannot fully determine the effect of all asserted and unasserted claims on our consolidated results of operations, financial condition, or liquidity. To the extent possible, we have recorded a liability where asserted and unasserted claims are considered probable and where such claims can be reasonably estimated. We do not expect that any known lawsuits, claims, environmental costs, commitments, contingent liabilities, or guarantees will have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations, financial condition, or liquidity after taking into account liabilities and insurance recoveries previously recorded for these matters.

 

Personal Injury – The cost of personal injuries to employees and others related to our activities is charged to expense based on estimates of the ultimate cost and number of incidents each year. We use an actuarial analysis to measure the expense and liability, including unasserted claims. The Federal Employers’ Liability Act (FELA) governs compensation for work-related accidents. Under FELA, damages are assessed based on a finding of fault through litigation or out-of-court settlements. We offer a comprehensive variety of services and rehabilitation programs for employees who are injured at work.

 

Our personal injury liability is not discounted to present value due to the uncertainty surrounding the timing of future payments. Approximately 93% of the recorded liability is related to asserted claims and approximately 7% is related to unasserted claims at March 31, 2015. Because of the uncertainty surrounding the ultimate outcome of personal injury claims, it is reasonably possible that future costs to settle these claims may range from approximately $299 million to $327 million. We record an accrual at the low end of the range as no amount of loss within the range is more probable than any other. Estimates can vary over time due to evolving trends in litigation.

 

Our personal injury liability activity was as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions,

 

 

 

 

for the Three Months Ended March 31,

2015 
2014 

Beginning balance

$

335 

$

294 

Current year accruals

 

23 

 

23 

Changes in estimates for prior years

 

(6)

 

(6)

Payments

 

(53)

 

(17)

Ending balance at March 31

$

299 

$

294 

Current portion, ending balance at March 31

$

70 

$

78 

 

We have insurance coverage for a portion of the costs incurred to resolve personal injury-related claims, and we have recognized an asset for estimated insurance recoveries at March 31, 2015, and December 31, 2014.

 

Asbestos – We are a defendant in a number of lawsuits in which current and former employees and other parties allege exposure to asbestos. We assess our potential liability using a statistical analysis of resolution costs for asbestos-related claims. This liability is updated annually and excludes future defense and processing costs. The liability for resolving both asserted and unasserted claims was based on the following assumptions:

 

·

The ratio of future claims by alleged disease would be consistent with historical averages adjusted for inflation.

·

The number of claims filed against us will decline each year.

·

The average settlement values for asserted and unasserted claims will be equivalent to historical averages.

 

17


 

·

The percentage of claims dismissed in the future will be equivalent to historical averages.

 

Our liability for asbestos-related claims is not discounted to present value due to the uncertainty surrounding the timing of future payments. Approximately 22% of the recorded liability related to asserted claims and approximately 78% related to unasserted claims at March 31, 2015.

 

Our asbestos-related liability activity was as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions,

 

 

 

 

for the Three Months Ended March 31,

2015 
2014 

Beginning balance

$

126 

$

131 

Accruals

 

 -

 

 -

Payments

 

(1)

 

(2)

Ending balance at March 31

$

125 

$

129 

Current portion, ending balance at March 31

$

$

 

We have insurance coverage for a portion of the costs incurred to resolve asbestos-related claims, and we have recognized an asset for estimated insurance recoveries at March 31, 2015, and December 31, 2014.

 

We believe that our estimates of liability for asbestos-related claims and insurance recoveries are reasonable and probable. The amounts recorded for asbestos-related liabilities and related insurance recoveries were based on currently known facts. However, future events, such as the number of new claims filed each year, average settlement costs, and insurance coverage issues, could cause the actual costs and insurance recoveries to be higher or lower than the projected amounts. Estimates also may vary in the future if strategies, activities, and outcomes of asbestos litigation materially change; federal and state laws governing asbestos litigation increase or decrease the probability or amount of compensation of claimants; and there are material changes with respect to payments made to claimants by other defendants.

 

Environmental Costs – We are subject to federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations. We have identified 274 sites at which we are or may be liable for remediation costs associated with alleged contamination or for violations of environmental requirements. This includes 29 sites that are the subject of actions taken by the U.S. government, 16 of which are currently on the Superfund National Priorities List. Certain federal legislation imposes joint and several liability for the remediation of identified sites; consequently, our ultimate environmental liability may include costs relating to activities of other parties, in addition to costs relating to our own activities at each site.

 

When we identify an environmental issue with respect to property owned, leased, or otherwise used in our business, we perform, with assistance of our consultants, environmental assessments on the property. We expense the cost of the assessments as incurred. We accrue the cost of remediation where our obligation is probable and such costs can be reasonably estimated. Our environmental liability is not discounted to present value due to the uncertainty surrounding the timing of future payments.

 

Our environmental liability activity was as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions,

 

 

 

 

for the Three Months Ended March 31,

2015 
2014 

Beginning balance

$

182 

$

171 

Accruals

 

19 

 

Payments

 

(10)

 

(11)

Ending balance at March 31

$

191 

$

166 

Current portion, ending balance at March 31

$

58 

$

52 

 

The environmental liability includes future costs for remediation and restoration of sites, as well as ongoing monitoring costs, but excludes any anticipated recoveries from third parties. Cost estimates are

 

18


 

based on information available for each site, financial viability of other potentially responsible parties, and existing technology, laws, and regulations. The ultimate liability for remediation is difficult to determine because of the number of potentially responsible parties, site-specific cost sharing arrangements with other potentially responsible parties, the degree of contamination by various wastes, the scarcity and quality of volumetric data related to many of the sites, and the speculative nature of remediation costs. Estimates of liability may vary over time due to changes in federal, state, and local laws governing environmental remediation. Current obligations are not expected to have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations, financial condition, or liquidity.

 

Insurance – The Company has a consolidated, wholly-owned captive insurance subsidiary (the captive), that provides insurance coverage for certain risks including FELA claims and property coverage which are subject to reinsurance. The captive entered into annual reinsurance treaty agreements that insure workers compensation, general liability, auto liability and FELA risk. The captive cedes a portion of its FELA exposure through the treaty and assumes a proportionate share of the entire risk. The captive receives direct premiums, which are netted against the Company’s premium costs in other expenses in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income. The treaty agreements provide for certain protections against the risk of treaty participants’ non-performance, and we do not believe our exposure to treaty participants’ non-performance is material at this time. In the event the Company leaves the reinsurance program, the Company is not relieved of its primary obligation to the policyholders for activity prior to the termination of the treaty agreements. We record both liabilities and reinsurance receivables using an actuarial analysis based on historical experience in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Financial Position.

 

Guarantees – At March 31, 2015, and December 31, 2014, we were contingently liable for guarantees of $78 million and $82 million, respectively. We have recorded a liability of $5.2 million and $0.3 million for the fair value of these obligations as of March 31, 2015, and December 31, 2014, respectively. We entered into these contingent guarantees in the normal course of business, and they include guaranteed obligations related to equipment financings and affiliated operations. The final guarantee expires in 2022. We are not aware of any existing event of default that would require us to satisfy these guarantees. We do not expect that these guarantees will have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial condition, results of operations, or liquidity.

 

IndemnitiesWe are contingently obligated under a variety of indemnification arrangements, although in some cases the extent of our potential liability is limited, depending on the nature of the transactions and the agreements. Due to uncertainty as to whether claims will be made or how they will be resolved, we cannot reasonably determine the probability of an adverse claim or reasonably estimate any adverse liability or the total maximum exposure under these indemnification arrangements. We do not have any reason to believe that we will be required to make any material payments under these indemnity provisions.  

 

Operating Leases – At March 31, 2015, we had commitments for future minimum lease payments under operating leases with initial or remaining non-cancelable lease terms in excess of one year of approximately $3.6 billion.

 

Gain ContingencyUPRR and Santa Fe Pacific Pipelines (SFPP, a subsidiary of Kinder Morgan Energy Partners, L.P.) currently are engaged in a proceeding to resolve the fair market rent payable to UPRR commencing on January 1, 2004, for pipeline easements on UPRR rights-of-way (Union Pacific Railroad Company vs. Santa Fe Pacific Pipelines, Inc., SFPP, L.P., Kinder Morgan Operating L.P. “D” Kinder Morgan G.P., Inc., et al., Superior Court of the State of California for the County of Los Angeles, filed July 28, 2004). In February 2007, a trial began to resolve this issue, and in May 2012, the trial judge rendered an opinion establishing the fair market rent and entering judgment for back rent, including prejudgment interest.  SFPP appealed the judgment.  On November 5, 2014, the Second District Circuit Court of Appeal in California issued an opinion holding that UPRR was not entitled to collect rent from SFPP for easements on the portions of the property acquired solely through federal government land grants issued during the 1800s.  The Appellate Court also reversed the award of prejudgment interest and remanded the case to the trial court.  A favorable final judgment may materially affect UPRR's results of operations in the period of any monetary recoveries.  Due to the uncertainty regarding the amount and timing of any recovery or any subsequent proceedings, we consider this a gain contingency and have not recognized any amounts in the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements as of March 31, 2015.

 

 

19


 

18. Share Repurchase Program

 

Effective January 1, 2014, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to 120 million shares of our common stock by December 31, 2017, replacing our previous repurchase program. As of March 31, 2015, we repurchased a total of $13.4 billion of our common stock since the commencement of our repurchase programs in 2007. The table below represents shares repurchased under this repurchase program during this reporting period.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of Shares Purchased

Average Price Paid

 

2015 
2014 
2015 
2014 

First quarter

6,881,455 
7,640,000 

$

117.28 

$

89.43 

Remaining number of shares that may be repurchased under current authority

 

81,075,145 

 

Management's assessments of market conditions and other pertinent factors guide the timing and volume of all repurchases.  We expect to fund any share repurchases under this program through cash generated from operations, the sale or lease of various operating and non-operating properties, debt issuances, and cash on hand.  Repurchased shares are recorded in treasury stock at cost, which includes any applicable commissions and fees.

 

From April 1, 2015, through April 22, 2015, we repurchased 2.3 million shares at an aggregate cost of approximately $244 million.

 

 

20


 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

UNION PACIFIC CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY COMPANIES

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2015, Compared to

Three Months Ended March 31, 2014

 

 

For purposes of this report, unless the context otherwise requires, all references herein to “UPC”, “Corporation”, “Company”, “we”, “us”, and “our” shall mean Union Pacific Corporation and its subsidiaries, including Union Pacific Railroad Company, which we separately refer to as “UPRR” or the “Railroad”.

 

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements and applicable notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements, Item 1, and other information included in this report. Our Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements are unaudited and reflect all adjustments (consisting only of normal and recurring adjustments) that are, in the opinion of management, necessary for their fair presentation in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (GAAP).

 

The Railroad, along with its subsidiaries and rail affiliates, is our one reportable business segment. Although we provide and analyze revenue by commodity group, we treat the financial results of the Railroad as one segment due to the integrated nature of our rail network.

 

Available Information

 

Our Internet website is www.up.com. We make available free of charge on our website (under the “Investors” caption link) our Annual Reports on Form 10-K; our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q; eXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL) documents; our current reports on Form 8-K; our proxy statements; Forms 3, 4, and 5, filed on behalf of directors and executive officers; and amendments to any such reports filed or furnished pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the Exchange Act), as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is electronically filed with, or furnished to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). We also make available on our website previously filed SEC reports and exhibits via a link to EDGAR on the SEC’s Internet site at www.sec.gov. We provide these previously filed reports as a convenience and their contents reflect only information that was true and correct as of the date of the report. We assume no obligation to update this historical information. Additionally, our corporate governance materials, including By-Laws, Board Committee charters, governance guidelines and policies, and codes of conduct and ethics for directors, officers, and employees are available on our website. From time to time, the corporate governance materials on our website may be updated as necessary to comply with rules issued by the SEC and the New York Stock Exchange or as desirable to promote the effective and efficient governance of our company. Any security holder wishing to receive, without charge, a copy of any of our SEC filings or corporate governance materials should send a written request to: Secretary, Union Pacific Corporation, 1400 Douglas Street, Omaha, NE 68179.

 

References to our website address in this report, including references in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, Item 2, are provided as a convenience and do not constitute, and should not be deemed, an incorporation by reference of the information contained on, or available through, the website. Therefore, such information should not be considered part of this report.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

We base our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations upon our Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements. The preparation of these financial statements requires estimation and judgment that affect the reported amounts of revenues, expenses, assets, and liabilities. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. If these estimates differ materially from actual results, the impact on the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements may be material. Our critical accounting policies are available in Item 7 of our 2014 Annual

 

21


 

Report on Form 10-K. There have not been any significant changes with respect to these policies during the first three months of 2015.

 

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Quarterly Summary

 

We reported earnings of $1.30 per diluted share on net income of $1.2 billion in the first quarter of 2015 compared to earnings of $1.19 per diluted share on net income of $1.1 billion for the first quarter of 2014. Freight revenues decreased 1%, or $35 million, in the first quarter compared to the same period in 2014. The decrease was due to lower fuel surcharge revenue and a 2% decline in volume, partially offset by higher average revenue per car (ARC) resulting from core pricing gains and positive business mix. The decline in volume in international intermodal, coal, and crude oil more than offset the growth in domestic intermodal, automotive and agricultural products. Lower fuel expense, partially offset by labor inflation and costs associated with increased resources, more than offset the lower revenue, resulting in a first quarter record for operating ratio.

 

Throughout 2014, we focused on adding resources to improve fluidity and service with increasing demand. Expecting another strong year of demand in 2015, we continued to add resources during the quarter and are now sufficiently resourced and focused on continuing to drive better customer service and operating efficiencies. However, the West Coast port slowdown and lower crude oil and natural gas prices drove volume declines, requiring us to adjust our resources. At the end of the quarter, we had approximately 500 employees either furloughed or in alternate work status and about 475 locomotives in storage, which replenished a portion of our surge resources. We will continue to monitor and adjust our resources in light of changing volumes, notable in our coal business.

 

As reported to the Association of American Railroads (AAR), average train speed for the first quarter of 2015 essentially was flat compared to the first quarter of 2014. Lower volumes, a strong resource position and more favorable weather were offset by the impact of more extensive track maintenance projects. Average terminal dwell time improved slightly compared to the first quarter of 2014. The slight improvement was achieved despite a 1% increase in manifest traffic volumes. Although operations improved, we remained below optimal levels.

 

Operating Revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Millions,

 

%

for the Three Months Ended March 31,

2015 
2014 

Change

Freight revenues

$

5,251 

$

5,286 
(1)

%

Other revenues

 

363 

 

352 

 

Total

$

5,614 

$

5,638 

 -

%

 

 

We generate freight revenues by transporting freight or other materials from our six commodity groups. Freight revenues vary with volume (carloads) and ARC. Changes in price, traffic mix and fuel surcharges drive ARC. We provide some of our customers with contractual incentives for meeting or exceeding specified cumulative volumes or shipping to and from specific locations, which we record as reductions to freight revenues based on the actual or projected future shipments. We recognize freight revenues as shipments move from origin to destination. We allocate freight revenues between reporting periods based on the relative transit time in each reporting period and recognize expenses as we incur them.

 

Other revenues include revenues earned by our subsidiaries, revenues from commuter rail operations that we manage, accessorial revenues, which we earn when customers retain equipment owned or controlled by us or when we perform additional services such as switching or storage, and miscellaneous contract revenue. We recognize other revenues as we perform services or meet contractual obligations.

 

Freight revenues, before the impact of lower fuel surcharge revenue, increased for five of the six commodity groups during the first quarter of 2015 compared to 2014, reflecting strong pricing gains. Volume levels decreased for four of the six commodity groups, driven by declines in international intermodal, coal and crude oil shipments.

 

22


 

 

Each of our commodity groups includes revenue from fuel surcharges. Freight revenues from fuel surcharge programs were $447 million in the first quarter of 2015 compared to $651 million in the same period of 2014. Lower fuel surcharge revenue resulted from lower fuel prices and lower volumes, partially offset by the lag impact of our fuel surcharge programs (it can generally take up to two months for changing fuel prices to affect fuel surcharge recoveries). We estimate the lag impact added just over $100 million to operating income this quarter.

 

Other revenues increased in the first quarter of 2015 compared to 2014 due to accessorial revenue resulting from the West Coast port slowdown. This increase was partially offset by lower revenues at our subsidiaries, primarily those that broker intermodal and automotive services.

 

The following tables summarize the year-over-year changes in freight revenues, revenue carloads, and ARC by commodity type:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Freight Revenues

 

 

 

 

Millions,

 

 

 

 

%  

for the Three Months Ended March 31,

2015 
2014 

Change

Agricultural Products

$

939 

$

910 

%

Automotive

 

516 

 

488 

 

Chemicals

 

897 

 

893 

 -

 

Coal

 

915 

 

961 
(5)

 

Industrial Products

 

1,017 

 

1,011 

 

Intermodal

 

967 

 

1,023 
(5)

 

Total

$

5,251 

$

5,286 
(1)

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue Carloads

 

 

 

Thousands,

 

 

%  

for the Three Months Ended March 31,

2015 
2014 

Change

Agricultural Products

245 
239 

%

Automotive

202 
188 

 

Chemicals

267 
270 
(1)

 

Coal

399 
430 
(7)

 

Industrial Products