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Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-K

 

 

 

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission file number 0-15341

 

 

DONEGAL GROUP INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Delaware   23-2424711

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

1195 River Road, Marietta, Pennsylvania   17547
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code:

(888) 877-0600

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class

 

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

Class A Common Stock, $.01 par value   The NASDAQ Global Select Market
Class B Common Stock, $.01 par value   The NASDAQ Global Select Market

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None.

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act:    Yes  ¨.     No  x.

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act.    Yes  ¨.    No  x.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x.    No  ¨.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x.    No  ¨.

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements we incorporate by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” or “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act (check one):

 

Large accelerated filer   ¨    Accelerated filer   x
Non-accelerated filer   ¨  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company.    Yes  ¨.    No  x.

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter. $216,408,004.

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date: 21,534,176 shares of Class A common stock and 5,576,775 shares of Class B common stock outstanding on March 2, 2015.

Documents Incorporated by Reference

The registrant incorporates by reference portions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement relating to registrant’s annual meeting of stockholders to be held April 16, 2015 into Part III of this report.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

DONEGAL GROUP INC.

INDEX TO FORM 10-K REPORT

 

          Page  
PART I      
Item 1.   

Business

     1   
Item 1A.   

Risk Factors

     23   
Item 1B.   

Unresolved Staff Comments

     34   
Item 2.   

Properties

     34   
Item 3.   

Legal Proceedings

     34   
Item 4.   

Mine Safety Disclosures

     34   
  

Executive Officers of the Registrant

     35   
PART II      
Item 5.   

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

     36   
Item 6.   

Selected Financial Data

     38   
Item 7.   

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     39   
Item 7A.   

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

     53   
Item 8.   

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

     55   
Item 9.   

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

     91   
Item 9A.   

Controls and Procedures

     91   
Item 9B.   

Other Information

     91   
PART III      
Item 10.   

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

     93   
Item 11.   

Executive Compensation

     93   
Item 12.   

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

     93   
Item 13.   

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

     93   
Item 14.   

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

     93   
PART IV      
Item 15.   

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedule

     94   


Table of Contents

PART I

 

Item 1. Business.

Introduction

Donegal Group Inc., or DGI, is an insurance holding company whose insurance subsidiaries offer personal and commercial lines of property and casualty insurance to businesses and individuals in 21 Mid-Atlantic, Midwestern, New England and Southern states. As used herein, the terms “we,” “us” and “our” refer to Donegal Group Inc. and its subsidiaries.

Donegal Mutual Insurance Company, or Donegal Mutual, organized us as an insurance holding company on August 26, 1986. At December 31, 2014, Donegal Mutual held approximately 36% of our outstanding Class A common stock and approximately 76% of our outstanding Class B common stock. Donegal Mutual’s ownership provides Donegal Mutual with approximately 65% of the aggregate voting power of our outstanding shares of Class A common stock and our outstanding shares of Class B common stock. Our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual have interrelated operations due to our intercompany pooling agreement and other intercompany agreements and transactions we describe in Note 3 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. While maintaining the separate corporate existence of each company, our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual conduct business together as the Donegal Insurance Group. As such, Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries share the same business philosophy, the same management, the same employees and the same facilities and offer the same types of insurance products.

We have been an effective consolidator of smaller “main street” property and casualty insurance companies, and we expect to continue to acquire other insurance companies to expand our business in a given region or to commence operations in a new region. Since 1995, we have completed six acquisitions of property and casualty insurance companies or began to participate in their business through Donegal Mutual’s entry into quota-share reinsurance agreements with them.

Our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual provide their policyholders with a selection of insurance products at competitive rates, while pursuing profitability by adhering to a strict underwriting discipline. Our insurance subsidiaries derive a substantial portion of their insurance business from smaller to mid-sized regional communities. We believe this focus provides our insurance subsidiaries with competitive advantages in terms of local market knowledge, marketing, underwriting, claims servicing and policyholder service. At the same time, we believe our insurance subsidiaries have cost advantages over many smaller regional insurers that result from economies of scale our insurance subsidiaries realize through centralized accounting, administrative, data processing, investment and other services.

We believe we have a substantial opportunity, as a well-capitalized regional insurance holding company with a solid business strategy, to grow profitably and compete effectively with national property and casualty insurers. Our downstream holding company structure, with Donegal Mutual holding approximately 65% of the aggregate voting power of our common stock, has proven its effectiveness and success over the past 29 years of our existence. Over that time frame, we have grown significantly in terms of revenue and financial strength, and the Donegal Insurance Group has developed an excellent reputation as a regional group of property and casualty insurers.

We own 48.2% of Donegal Financial Services Corporation, or DFSC. DFSC is a grandfathered unitary savings and loan holding company that owns all of the outstanding capital stock of Union Community Bank, a state savings bank, or UCB. UCB has 14 banking offices, all of which are located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Donegal Mutual owns the remaining 51.8% of DFSC. For further information regarding DFSC, we refer to “Business - Donegal Financial Services Corporation” in this Form 10-K Report.

We have four segments: our investment function, our personal lines of insurance, our commercial lines of insurance and our investment in DFSC. We set forth financial information about these segments in Note 19 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. The personal lines products of our insurance subsidiaries consist primarily of homeowners and private passenger automobile policies. The commercial lines products of our insurance subsidiaries consist primarily of commercial automobile, commercial multi-peril and workers’ compensation policies.

Available Information

You may obtain our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, including this Form 10-K Report, our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, our current reports on Form 8-K, our proxy statement and our other filings pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or the Exchange Act, without charge by viewing our website at www.donegalgroup.com. You may also view on our website our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics and the charters of the executive committee, the audit committee, the compensation

 

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committee and the nominating committee of our board of directors. Upon request to our corporate secretary, we will also provide printed copies of any of these documents to you without charge. We have provided the address of our website solely for the information of investors. We do not intend the reference to our website address to be an active link or to otherwise incorporate the contents of our website into this Form 10-K Report.

History and Organizational Structure

In the mid-1980’s, Donegal Mutual, as a mutual insurance company, recognized the desirability of developing additional sources of capital and surplus so it could remain competitive and have the surplus to expand its business and ensure its long-term viability. Accordingly, Donegal Mutual determined to implement a downstream holding company structure as one of its business strategies. Thus, in 1986, Donegal Mutual formed us as a downstream holding company. Initially, Donegal Mutual owned all of our outstanding common stock. After Donegal Mutual formed us, we in turn formed Atlantic States as our wholly owned property and casualty insurance company subsidiary.

In connection with the formation of Atlantic States and the establishment of our downstream insurance holding company system, Donegal Mutual and DGI entered into a proportional reinsurance agreement, or pooling agreement, that became effective October 1, 1986. Under the pooling agreement, Donegal Mutual and Atlantic States pool substantially all of their respective premiums, losses and loss expenses to the reinsurance pool, and the reinsurance pool, acting through Donegal Mutual, then cedes a portion of the pooled business, currently 80%, to Atlantic States. Donegal Mutual and Atlantic States share the underwriting results in proportion to their respective participation in the underwriting pool.

Since we established Atlantic States in 1986, Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries have conducted business together as the Donegal Insurance Group, while retaining their separate legal and corporate existences. As the Donegal Insurance Group, Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries share a combined business plan to enhance market penetration and underwriting profitability objectives. As such, Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries share the same business philosophies, the same management, the same employees and the same facilities and offer the same types of insurance products. We believe Donegal Mutual’s majority interest in the combined voting power of our Class A common stock and of our Class B common stock fosters our ability to implement our business philosophies, enjoy management continuity, maintain superior employee relations and provide a stable environment within which we can grow our businesses.

The products Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries offer are generally complementary, which permits the Donegal Insurance Group to offer a broad range of products in a given market and to expand the Donegal Insurance Group’s ability to service an entire personal lines or commercial lines account. Distinctions within the products Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries offer generally relate to specific risk profiles within similar classes of business, such as preferred tier products versus standard tier products. Donegal Mutual and we do not allocate all of the standard risk gradients to one company. As a result, the underwriting profitability of the business the individual companies write directly will vary. However, the underwriting pool homogenizes the risk characteristics of all business Donegal Mutual and Atlantic States write directly. We receive 80% of the results of the underwriting pool because Atlantic States has an 80% participation in the pool. The business Atlantic States derives from the underwriting pool represents a significant percentage of our total consolidated revenues. However, that percentage has gradually decreased over the past few years as we have acquired a number of other property and casualty insurance companies that do not participate in the underwriting pool.

As the capital of Atlantic States and our other insurance subsidiaries has increased, the underwriting capacity of our insurance subsidiaries has increased proportionately. The size of the underwriting pool has also increased substantially. Therefore, as we originally planned in the mid-1980s, Atlantic States has successfully raised the capital necessary to support the growth of its direct business as well as to accept increases in its allocation of business from the underwriting pool. The portion of the underwriting pool allocated to Atlantic States has increased from an initial allocation of 35% in 1986 to an 80% allocation since March 1, 2008. We do not anticipate any further change in the pooling agreement between Atlantic States and Donegal Mutual in the foreseeable future, including any change in the percentage participation of Atlantic States in the underwriting pool.

In addition to Atlantic States, our insurance subsidiaries are Southern Insurance Company of Virginia, or Southern, Le Mars Insurance Company, or Le Mars, The Peninsula Insurance Company and its wholly owned subsidiary, Peninsula Indemnity Company, or collectively, Peninsula, Sheboygan Falls Insurance Company, or Sheboygan, and Michigan Insurance Company, or MICO. We also benefit from Donegal Mutual’s 100% quota-share reinsurance agreement with Southern Mutual Insurance Company, or Southern Mutual, and Donegal Mutual’s placement of its assumed business from Southern Mutual into the underwriting pool.

 

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The following chart depicts our organizational structure, including all of our property and casualty insurance subsidiaries, Southern Mutual and our interest in DFSC:

 

LOGO

 

(1) Because of the different relative voting power of our Class A common stock and Class B common stock, our public stockholders hold approximately 35% of the aggregate voting power of our Class A common stock and Class B common stock and Donegal Mutual holds approximately 65% of the aggregate voting power of our Class A common stock and Class B common stock.

Relationship with Donegal Mutual

Donegal Mutual provides facilities, personnel and other services to us and our insurance subsidiaries. Donegal Mutual allocates certain related expenses to Atlantic States in relation to the relative participation of Donegal Mutual and Atlantic States in the underwriting pool they maintain. Our insurance subsidiaries other than Atlantic States reimburse Donegal Mutual for their respective personnel costs and bear their proportionate share of information services costs based on their respective percentage of the total net written premiums of the Donegal Insurance Group. Charges for these services totaled $98.6 million, $94.0 million and $78.8 million for 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

Our insurance subsidiaries have various reinsurance arrangements with Donegal Mutual. These agreements include:

 

   

excess of loss reinsurance agreements with Le Mars, Peninsula, Sheboygan and Southern;

 

   

catastrophe reinsurance agreements with Atlantic States, Le Mars and Southern; and

 

   

quota-share reinsurance agreements with Le Mars, Peninsula and MICO.

The purpose of the excess of loss and catastrophe reinsurance agreements is to lessen the effects of a single large loss, or an accumulation of smaller losses arising from one event, to levels that are appropriate given each subsidiary’s size, underwriting profile and surplus position.

The purpose of the quota-share reinsurance agreement with Le Mars is to transfer to Le Mars 100% of the premiums and losses related to certain products Donegal Mutual offers in certain Midwest states, which provide the availability of complementary products to Le Mars’ commercial accounts.

The purpose of the quota-share reinsurance agreement with Peninsula is to transfer to Donegal Mutual 100% of the premiums and losses related to the workers’ compensation product line of Peninsula in certain states, which provides the availability of an additional workers’ compensation tier for Donegal Mutual’s commercial accounts. Donegal Mutual places its assumed business from Peninsula into the underwriting pool.

 

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The purpose of the quota-share reinsurance agreement with MICO is to transfer to Donegal Mutual 25% of the premiums and losses related to MICO’s business. Donegal Mutual places its assumed business from MICO into the underwriting pool.

Effective November 1, 2012, Donegal Mutual and Southern terminated their quota-share reinsurance agreement on a run-off basis. The intent of the quota-share reinsurance agreement with Southern was to transfer to Southern 100% of the premiums and losses related to certain personal lines products Donegal Mutual offered in Virginia through the use of its automated policy quoting and issuance system.

We and Donegal Mutual have maintained a coordinating committee since our formation in 1986. The coordinating committee consists of two members of our board of directors, neither of whom is a member of Donegal Mutual’s board of directors, and two members of Donegal Mutual’s board of directors, neither of whom is a member of our board of directors. The purpose of the coordinating committee is to establish and maintain a process for an annual evaluation of the transactions between Donegal Mutual, our insurance subsidiaries and us. The coordinating committee considers the fairness of each intercompany transaction to Donegal Mutual and its policyholders and to us and our stockholders.

A new agreement or any change to a previously approved agreement must receive coordinating committee approval. The approval process for a new agreement between Donegal Mutual and us or one of our insurance subsidiaries or a change in such an agreement is as follows:

 

   

both of our members on the coordinating committee must determine that the new agreement or the change in an existing agreement is fair and equitable to us and in the best interests of our stockholders;

 

   

both of Donegal Mutual’s members on the coordinating committee must determine that the new agreement or the change in an existing agreement is fair and equitable to Donegal Mutual and in the best interests of its policyholders;

 

   

our board of directors must approve the new agreement or the change in an existing agreement; and

 

   

Donegal Mutual’s board of directors must approve the new agreement or the change in an existing agreement.

The coordinating committee also meets annually to review each existing agreement between Donegal Mutual and us or our insurance subsidiaries, including all reinsurance agreements between Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries. The purpose of this annual review is to examine the results of the agreements over the past year and, in the case of reinsurance agreements, over the most recent five-year period and to determine if the results of the existing agreements remain fair and equitable to us and our stockholders and fair and equitable to Donegal Mutual and its policyholders or if Donegal Mutual and we should mutually agree to certain adjustments to the terms of the agreements. In the case of these reinsurance agreements, the annual adjustments typically relate to the reinsurance premiums, losses and reinstatement premiums. These agreements are ongoing in nature and will continue in effect throughout 2015 in the ordinary course of business.

Our members on the coordinating committee, as of the date of this Form 10-K Report, are Robert S. Bolinger and Richard D. Wampler, II. Donegal Mutual’s members on the coordinating committee as of such date are Dennis J. Bixenman and John E. Hiestand. We refer to our proxy statement for our annual meeting of stockholders on April 16, 2015 for further information about the members of the coordinating committee.

We believe our relationships with Donegal Mutual offer us and our insurance subsidiaries a number of competitive advantages, including the following:

 

   

enabling our stable management, the consistent underwriting discipline of our insurance subsidiaries, external growth, long-term profitability and financial strength;

 

   

creating operational and expense synergies from the combination of resources and integrated operations of Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries;

 

   

enhancing our opportunities to expand by acquisition because of the ability of Donegal Mutual to affiliate with and acquire control of other mutual insurance companies and, thereafter, demutualize them and combine them with us;

 

   

producing more stable and uniform underwriting results for our insurance subsidiaries over extended periods of time than we could achieve without our relationship with Donegal Mutual;

 

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providing opportunities for growth because of the ability of Donegal Mutual to enter into reinsurance agreements with other mutual insurance companies and place the business it assumes into the pooling agreement; and

 

   

providing Atlantic States with a significantly larger underwriting capacity because of the underwriting pool Donegal Mutual and Atlantic States have maintained since 1986.

In the first quarter of 2015, our board of directors and the board of directors of Donegal Mutual each undertook a review of the relationships of Donegal Mutual and DGI and determined that continuing the current relationships and the current corporate structure of Donegal Mutual and DGI is in the best interests of DGI and its various constituencies.

Business Strategy

Our strategy is designed to allow our insurance subsidiaries to achieve their longstanding goal of outperforming the United States property and casualty insurance industry in terms of profitability and service, thereby providing value to the policyholders of our insurance subsidiaries and, ultimately, providing value to our stockholders. The annual net premiums earned of our insurance subsidiaries have increased from $265.8 million in 2004 to $556.5 million in 2014, a compound annual growth rate of 7.7%.

The combined ratio of our insurance subsidiaries and that of the United States property and casualty insurance industry as computed using United States generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP, and statutory accounting principles, or SAP, for the years 2010 through 2014 are shown in the following table:

 

     2014     2013     2012     2011     2010  

Our GAAP combined ratio (1)

     101.7     98.8     101.6     110.6     104.7

Our SAP combined ratio

     100.5        97.4        99.8        107.9        102.9   

Industry SAP combined ratio (2)

     97.2        96.4        102.5        106.5        101.1   

 

(1) Our GAAP combined ratio for 2011 was adversely affected by accounting adjustments related to the acquisition of MICO.
(2) As reported or projected by A.M. Best Company.

We and Donegal Mutual believe we can continue to expand our insurance operations over time through organic growth and acquisitions of, or affiliations with, other insurance companies. We and Donegal Mutual have enhanced the performance of companies we have acquired, while leveraging the acquired companies’ core strengths and local market knowledge to expand their operations. Our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual also seek to increase their premium base by making quality independent agency appointments, enhancing their competitive position within each agency, introducing new and enhanced insurance products and developing and maintaining automated systems to improve service, communications and efficiency.

We translate these initiatives into our book value growth in a number of ways, including the following:

 

   

maintaining a conservative underwriting culture and pricing discipline to sustain our record of underwriting profitability;

 

   

continuing our investment in technology to achieve operating efficiencies that lower expenses, enhance the service we provide to agencies and policyholders and increase the speed of our communications with agencies and policyholders; and

 

   

maintaining a conservative investment approach.

A detailed review of our business strategies follows:

 

   

Achieving underwriting profitability.

Our insurance subsidiaries focus on achieving a combined ratio of less than 100%. Our insurance subsidiaries fell modestly short of that objective in 2014 due primarily to severe weather during the first half of the year. We remain committed to achieving consistent underwriting profitability. We believe that underwriting profitability is a fundamental component of our long-term financial strength because it allows our insurance subsidiaries to generate profits without relying exclusively on their investment income. Our insurance subsidiaries seek to enhance their underwriting results by:

 

   

carefully selecting the product lines they underwrite;

 

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carefully selecting the individual risks they underwrite;

 

   

minimizing their individual exposure to catastrophe-prone areas; and

 

   

evaluating their claims history on a regular basis to ensure the adequacy of their underwriting guidelines and product pricing.

Our insurance subsidiaries have no material exposures to asbestos and environmental liabilities. Our insurance subsidiaries seek to provide more than one policy to a given personal lines or commercial lines customer because this “account selling” strategy diversifies their risk and has historically improved their underwriting results. Our insurance subsidiaries also use reinsurance to manage their exposure and limit their maximum net loss from large single risks or risks in concentrated areas. Our insurance subsidiaries believe these practices are key factors in their ability to maintain a statutory combined ratio that has generally been more favorable than the combined ratio of the United States property and casualty insurance industry.

 

   

Pursuing profitable growth by organic expansion within the traditional operating territories of our insurance subsidiaries through developing and maintaining quality agency representation.

We believe that continued expansion of our insurance subsidiaries within their existing markets will be a key source of their continued premium growth and that maintaining an effective and growing network of independent agencies is integral to their expansion. Our insurance subsidiaries seek to be among the top three insurers within each of the independent agencies for the lines of business our insurance subsidiaries write by providing a consistent, competitive and stable market for their products. We believe that the consistency of the product offerings of our insurance subsidiaries enables our insurance subsidiaries to compete effectively for independent agents with other insurers whose product offerings may fluctuate based on industry conditions. Our insurance subsidiaries offer a competitive compensation program to their independent agents that rewards them for producing profitable growth for our insurance subsidiaries. Our insurance subsidiaries provide their independent agents with ongoing support to enable them to better attract and service customers, including:

 

   

fully automated underwriting and policy issuance systems for both personal, commercial and farm lines of insurance;

 

   

training programs;

 

   

marketing support;

 

   

availability of a service center that provides comprehensive service for our personal lines policyholders; and

 

   

field visitations by marketing and underwriting personnel and senior management of our insurance subsidiaries.

Our insurance subsidiaries appoint independent agencies with a strong underwriting and growth track record. We believe that our insurance subsidiaries, by carefully selecting, motivating and supporting their independent agencies, will drive continued long-term growth.

Acquiring property and casualty insurance companies to augment the organic growth of our insurance subsidiaries in existing markets and to expand into new geographic regions.

We have been an effective consolidator of smaller “main street” property and casualty insurance companies, and we expect to continue to acquire other insurance companies to expand our business in a given region or to commence operations in a new region.

Since 1995, we have completed six acquisitions of property and casualty insurance companies or participated in their business through Donegal Mutual’s entry into quota-share reinsurance agreements with them. We intend to continue our growth by pursuing affiliations and acquisitions that meet our criteria. Our primary criteria are:

 

   

location in regions where our insurance subsidiaries are currently conducting business or that offer an attractive opportunity to conduct profitable business;

 

   

a mix of business similar to the mix of business of our insurance subsidiaries;

 

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annual premium volume up to $100.0 million; and

 

   

fair and reasonable transaction terms.

We believe that our relationship with Donegal Mutual assists us in pursuing affiliations with, and subsequent acquisitions of, mutual insurance companies because, through Donegal Mutual, we understand the concerns and issues that mutual insurance companies face. In particular, Donegal Mutual has had success affiliating with underperforming mutual insurance companies, and we have either acquired them following their conversion to a stock company or benefited from their underwriting results as a result of Donegal Mutual’s entry into a 100% quota-share reinsurance agreement with them and placement of its assumed business into the pooling agreement. We have utilized our strengths and financial position to improve the operations of those underperforming insurance companies. We evaluate a number of areas for operational synergies when considering acquisitions, including product underwriting, expenses, the cost of reinsurance and technology.

We and Donegal Mutual have the ability to employ a number of acquisition and affiliation methods. Our prior acquisitions and affiliations have taken one of the following forms:

 

   

purchase of all of the outstanding stock of a stock insurance company;

 

   

purchase of a book of business;

 

   

quota-share reinsurance transaction; or

 

   

two-step acquisition of a mutual insurance company in which:

 

   

as the first step, Donegal Mutual purchases a surplus note from the mutual insurance company, Donegal Mutual enters into a services agreement with the mutual insurance company and Donegal Mutual’s designees become a majority of the members of the board of directors of the mutual insurance company; and

 

   

as the second step, the mutual insurance company enters into a quota-share reinsurance agreement with Donegal Mutual or demutualizes, or converts, into a stock insurance company. Upon the demutualization or conversion, we purchase the surplus note from Donegal Mutual and exchange it for all of the stock of the stock insurance company resulting from the demutualization or conversion.

We believe that our ability to make direct acquisitions of stock insurance companies and to make indirect acquisitions of mutual insurance companies through a sponsored conversion or a quota-share reinsurance agreement provides us with flexibility that is a competitive advantage in making acquisitions. We also believe our historic record clearly demonstrates our ability to acquire control of an underperforming insurance company, re-underwrite its book of business, reduce its cost structure and return it to sustained profitability.

While Donegal Mutual and we generally engage in preliminary discussions with potential direct or indirect acquisition candidates on an almost continuous basis and are so engaged at the date of this Form 10-K Report, neither Donegal Mutual nor we make any public disclosure regarding a proposed acquisition until Donegal Mutual or we have entered into a definitive acquisition agreement.

 

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The following table highlights our history of insurance company acquisitions and affiliations since 1988:

 

Company Name

  

State of Domicile

  

Year Control
Acquired

  

Method of Acquisition/Affiliation

Southern Mutual Insurance Company and now Southern Insurance Company of Virginia

   Virginia    1984    Surplus note investment by Donegal Mutual in 1984; demutualization in 1988; acquisition of stock by us in 1988.

Pioneer Mutual Insurance Company and then Pioneer Insurance Company (1)(2)

   Ohio    1992    Surplus note investment by Donegal Mutual in 1992; demutualization in 1993; acquisition of stock by us in 1997.

Delaware Mutual Insurance Company and then Delaware Atlantic Insurance Company (1)(2)

   Delaware    1993    Surplus note investment by Donegal Mutual in 1993; demutualization in 1994; acquisition of stock by us in 1995.

Pioneer Mutual Insurance Company and then Pioneer Insurance Company (1)(2)

   New York    1995    Surplus note investment by Donegal Mutual in 1995; demutualization in 1998; acquisition of stock by us in 2001.

Southern Heritage Insurance Company (2)

   Georgia    1998    Purchase of stock by us in 1998.

Le Mars Mutual Insurance Company of Iowa and now Le Mars Insurance Company (1)

   Iowa    2002    Surplus note investment by Donegal Mutual in 2002; demutualization in 2004; acquisition of stock by us in 2004.

Peninsula Insurance Group

   Maryland    2004    Purchase of stock by us in 2004.

Sheboygan Falls Mutual Insurance Company and now Sheboygan Falls Insurance Company (1)

   Wisconsin    2007    Contribution note investment by Donegal Mutual in 2007; demutualization in 2008; acquisition of stock by us in 2008.

Southern Mutual Insurance Company (3)

   Georgia    2009    Surplus note investment by Donegal Mutual and quota-share reinsurance in 2009.

Michigan Insurance Company

   Michigan    2010    Purchase of stock by us and surplus note investment by Donegal Mutual in 2010.

 

(1) Each of these acquisitions initially took the form of an affiliation with Donegal Mutual. Donegal Mutual provided surplus note financing to the insurance company, and, in connection with that financing, sufficient designees of Donegal Mutual were appointed so as to constitute a majority of the members of the board of directors of the insurance company. Donegal Mutual and the insurance company simultaneously entered into a services agreement whereby Donegal Mutual provided services to improve the operations of the insurance company. Once the insurance company’s results of operations improved to the satisfaction of Donegal Mutual, Donegal Mutual sponsored the demutualization of the insurance company. Upon the consummation of the demutualization, Donegal Mutual converted the surplus note to capital stock of the newly demutualized insurance company. We then purchased all of the capital stock of the insurance company from Donegal Mutual and made an additional capital contribution in cash to provide adequate surplus to support the insurance company’s planned premium growth.
(2) To reduce administrative and compliance costs and expenses, these subsidiaries subsequently merged into one of our existing insurance subsidiaries.
(3) Control acquired by Donegal Mutual.

 

   

Providing responsive and friendly customer and agent service to enable our insurance subsidiaries to attract new policyholders and retain existing policyholders.

We believe that excellent policyholder service is important in attracting new policyholders and retaining existing policyholders. Our insurance subsidiaries work closely with their independent agents to provide a consistently responsive level of claims service, underwriting and customer support. Our insurance subsidiaries seek to respond expeditiously and effectively to address customer and independent agent inquiries in a number of ways, including:

 

   

availability of a customer call center for claims reporting;

 

   

availability of a secure website for access to policy information and documents, payment processing and other features;

 

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timely replies to information requests and policy submissions; and

 

   

prompt responses to, and processing of, claims.

Our insurance subsidiaries periodically conduct policyholder surveys to evaluate the effectiveness of their service to policyholders. The management of our insurance subsidiaries meets on a regular basis with the personnel of the independent insurance agents our insurance subsidiaries appoint to seek service improvement recommendations, react to service issues and better understand local market conditions.

 

   

Maintaining premium rate adequacy to enhance the underwriting results of our insurance subsidiaries, while maintaining their existing book of business and preserving their ability to write new business.

Our insurance subsidiaries maintain discipline in their pricing by effecting rate increases to sustain or improve their underwriting profitability without unduly affecting their customer retention. In addition to appropriate pricing, our insurance subsidiaries seek to ensure that their premium rates are adequate relative to the amount of risk they insure. Our insurance subsidiaries review loss trends on a periodic basis to identify changes in the frequency and severity of their claims and to assess the adequacy of their rates and underwriting standards. Our insurance subsidiaries also carefully monitor and audit the information they use to price their policies for the purpose of enabling them to receive an adequate level of premiums for the risk they assume. For example, our insurance subsidiaries inspect substantially all commercial lines risks and a substantial number of personal lines property risks before they commit to insure them to determine the adequacy of the insured amount to the value of the insured property, assess property conditions and identify any liability exposures. Our insurance subsidiaries audit the payroll data of their workers’ compensation customers to verify that the assumptions used to price a particular policy were accurate. By implementing appropriate rate increases and understanding the risks our insurance subsidiaries agree to insure, our insurance subsidiaries are generally able to achieve consistent underwriting profitability.

 

   

Focusing on expense controls and utilization of technology to increase the operating efficiency of our insurance subsidiaries.

Our insurance subsidiaries maintain stringent expense controls under direct supervision of their senior management. We centralize many processing and administrative activities of our insurance subsidiaries to realize operating synergies and better expense control. Our insurance subsidiaries utilize technology to automate much of their underwriting and to facilitate agency and policyholder communications on an efficient, timely and cost-effective basis. We operate on a paperless basis. As a result of our focus on expense control, our insurance subsidiaries have reduced their expense ratio from 36.6% in 1999 to 31.4% in 2014. Our insurance subsidiaries have also increased their annual premium per employee, a measure of efficiency that our insurance subsidiaries use to evaluate their operations, from approximately $470,000 in 1999 to approximately $948,000 in 2014.

Our insurance subsidiaries maintain technology comparable to that of the largest of their competitors. “Ease of doing business” is an increasingly important component of an insurer’s value to an independent agency. Our insurance subsidiaries provide a fully automated personal lines underwriting and policy issuance system called “WritePro®.” WritePro® is a web-based user interface that substantially eases data entry and facilitates the quoting and issuance of policies for the independent agents of our insurance subsidiaries. Our insurance subsidiaries also provide a similar commercial business system called “WriteBiz®.” WriteBiz® is a web-based user interface that provides the independent agents of our insurance subsidiaries with an online ability to quote and issue commercial automobile, workers’ compensation, business owners and tradesman policies automatically. WriteFarm® is a web-based user interface that provides the independent agents of our insurance subsidiaries with an online ability to quote and issue farm policies. As a result, applications of the independent agents for our insurance subsidiaries can result in policy issuance without further re-entry of information. These systems also interface with the policy management systems of the independent agents of our insurance subsidiaries.

 

   

Maintaining a conservative investment approach.

Return on invested assets is an important element of the financial results of our insurance subsidiaries. The investment strategy of our insurance subsidiaries is to generate an appropriate amount of after-tax income on invested assets while minimizing credit risk through investments in high-quality securities. As a result, our insurance subsidiaries seek to invest a high percentage of their assets in diversified, highly rated and marketable fixed-maturity instruments. The fixed-maturity portfolios of our insurance subsidiaries consist of both taxable and tax-exempt securities. Our insurance subsidiaries maintain a portion of their portfolios in short-term securities to provide liquidity for the payment of claims and operation of their respective businesses. Our insurance subsidiaries maintain a small percentage (3.7% at December 31, 2014) of their portfolios in equity securities.

 

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Competition

The property and casualty insurance industry is highly competitive on the basis of both price and service. Numerous companies compete for business in the geographic areas where our insurance subsidiaries operate. Many of these other insurance companies are substantially larger and have greater financial resources than those of our insurance subsidiaries. In addition, because our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual market their respective insurance products exclusively through independent insurance agencies, most of which represent more than one insurance company, our insurance subsidiaries face competition within agencies, as well as competition to retain qualified independent agents.

Products and Underwriting

We report the results of our insurance operations in two segments: personal lines of insurance and commercial lines of insurance. The personal lines our insurance subsidiaries write consist primarily of private passenger automobile and homeowners insurance. The commercial lines our insurance subsidiaries write consist primarily of commercial automobile, commercial multi-peril and workers’ compensation insurance. We describe these lines of insurance in greater detail below:

Personal

 

   

Private passenger automobile — policies that provide protection against liability for bodily injury and property damage arising from automobile accidents and protection against loss from damage to automobiles owned by the insured.

 

   

Homeowners — policies that provide coverage for damage to residences and their contents from a broad range of perils, including fire, lightning, windstorm and theft. These policies also cover liability of the insured arising from injury to other persons or their property while on the insured’s property and under other specified conditions.

Commercial

 

   

Commercial automobile — policies that provide protection against liability for bodily injury and property damage arising from automobile accidents and protection against loss from damage to automobiles owned by the insured.

 

   

Commercial multi-peril — policies that provide protection to businesses against many perils, usually combining liability and physical damage coverages.

 

   

Workers’ compensation — policies employers purchase to provide benefits to employees for injuries sustained during employment. The workers’ compensation laws of each state determine the extent of the coverage we provide.

 

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The following table sets forth the net premiums written of our insurance subsidiaries by line of insurance for the periods indicated:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2014     2013     2012  
(dollars in thousands)    Amount      %     Amount      %     Amount      %  

Personal lines:

               

Automobile

   $ 204,174         35.3   $ 196,363         36.8   $ 195,132         39.3

Homeowners

     113,576         19.6        106,420         20.0        97,120         19.6   

Other

     16,989         2.9        15,915         3.0        16,319         3.3   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total personal lines

     334,739         57.8        318,698         59.8        308,571         62.2   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Commercial lines:

               

Automobile

     65,552         11.3        58,165         10.9        51,261         10.3   

Workers’ compensation

     88,739         15.3        77,589         14.5        65,390         13.2   

Commercial multi-peril

     83,413         14.4        74,516         14.0        64,476         13.0   

Other

     6,758         1.2        4,463         0.8        6,749         1.3   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total commercial lines

     244,462         42.2        214,733         40.2        187,876         37.8   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total business

   $ 579,201         100.0   $ 533,431         100.0   $ 496,447         100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

The personal lines and commercial lines underwriting departments of our insurance subsidiaries evaluate and select those risks that they believe will enable our insurance subsidiaries to achieve an underwriting profit. The underwriting departments have significant interaction with the independent agents regarding the underwriting philosophy and the underwriting guidelines of our insurance subsidiaries. Our underwriting personnel also assist the research and development department in the development of quality products at competitive prices to promote growth and profitability.

In order to achieve underwriting profitability on a consistent basis, our insurance subsidiaries:

 

   

assess and select primarily standard and preferred risks;

 

   

adhere to disciplined underwriting guidelines;

 

   

inspect substantially all commercial lines risks and a substantial number of personal lines property risks; and

 

   

utilize various types of risk management and loss control services.

Our insurance subsidiaries also review their existing policies and accounts to determine whether those risks continue to meet their underwriting guidelines. If a given policy or account no longer meets those underwriting guidelines, our insurance subsidiaries will take appropriate action regarding that policy or account, including raising premium rates or non-renewing the policy to the extent applicable law permits.

As part of the effort of our insurance subsidiaries to maintain acceptable underwriting results, they conduct annual reviews of agencies that have failed to meet their underwriting profitability criteria. The review process includes an analysis of the underwriting and re-underwriting practices of the agency, the completeness and accuracy of the applications the agency submits, the adequacy of the training of the agency’s staff and the agency’s record of adherence to the underwriting guidelines and service standards of our insurance subsidiaries. Based on the results of this review process, the marketing and underwriting personnel of our insurance subsidiaries develop, together with the agency, a plan to improve its underwriting profitability. Our insurance subsidiaries monitor the agency’s compliance with the plan and take other measures as required in the judgment of our insurance subsidiaries, including the termination to the extent applicable law permits of agencies that are unable to achieve acceptable underwriting profitability.

 

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Distribution

Our insurance subsidiaries market their products primarily in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwestern, New England and Southern regions through approximately 2,400 independent insurance agencies. At December 31, 2014, the Donegal Insurance Group actively wrote business in 21 states (Alabama, Delaware, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin). We believe the relationships of our insurance subsidiaries with their independent agents are valuable in identifying, obtaining and retaining profitable business. Our insurance subsidiaries maintain a stringent agency selection procedure that emphasizes appointing agencies with proven marketing strategies for the development of profitable business, and our insurance subsidiaries only appoint agencies with a strong underwriting history and potential growth capabilities. Our insurance subsidiaries also regularly evaluate the independent agencies that represent them based on their profitability and performance in relation to the objectives of our insurance subsidiaries. Our insurance subsidiaries seek to be among the top three insurers within each of their agencies for the lines of business our insurance subsidiaries write.

The following table sets forth the percentage of direct premiums our insurance subsidiaries write, including 80% of the direct premiums Donegal Mutual and Atlantic States write, in each of the states where they conducted a significant portion of their business in 2014:

 

Pennsylvania

     36.9

Michigan

     16.9   

Virginia

     8.8   

Maryland

     8.5   

Delaware

     5.8   

Georgia

     5.6   

Ohio

     3.5   

Wisconsin

     3.3   

Iowa

     2.5   

Tennessee

     2.3   

Nebraska

     2.1   

South Dakota

     1.0   

Other

     2.8   
  

 

 

 

Total

     100.0
  

 

 

 

Our insurance subsidiaries employ a number of policies and procedures that we believe enable them to attract, retain and motivate their independent agents. We believe that the consistency of the product offerings of our insurance subsidiaries enables our insurance subsidiaries to compete effectively for independent agents with other insurers whose product offerings may fluctuate based upon industry conditions. Our insurance subsidiaries have a competitive profit-sharing plan for their independent agents, consistent with applicable state laws and regulations, under which the independent agents may earn additional commissions based upon the volume of premiums produced and the profitability of the business our insurance subsidiaries receive from that agency.

Our insurance subsidiaries encourage their independent agents to focus on “account selling,” or serving all of a particular insured’s property and casualty insurance needs, which our insurance subsidiaries believe generally results in more favorable loss experience than covering a single risk for an individual insured.

Technology

Donegal Mutual owns the majority of the technology systems our insurance subsidiaries use. The technology systems consist primarily of an integrated central processing computer system, a series of server-based computer networks and various communication systems that allow the home office of our insurance subsidiaries and their branch offices to utilize the same systems for the processing of business. Donegal Mutual maintains backup facilities and systems at the office of one of our insurance subsidiaries and tests these backup facilities and systems on a regular basis. Our insurance subsidiaries bear their proportionate share of information services expenses based on their respective percentage of the total net written premiums of the Donegal Insurance Group during the preceding calendar year.

 

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The business strategy of our insurance subsidiaries depends on the use, development and implementation of integrated technology systems. These systems enable our insurance subsidiaries to provide a high level of service to agents and policyholders by processing business in a timely and efficient manner, communicating and sharing data with agents, providing a variety of methods for the payment of premiums and allowing for the accumulation and analysis of information for the management of our insurance subsidiaries.

We believe the availability and use of these technology systems has resulted in improved service to agents and policyholders, increased efficiencies in processing the business of our insurance subsidiaries and lower operating costs. Key components of these integrated technology systems are the agency interface system, the WritePro®, WriteBiz® and WriteFarm® systems, a claims processing system and an imaging system. The agency interface system provides our insurance subsidiaries with a high level of data sharing both to and from agents’ systems and also provides agents with an integrated means of processing new business. The WritePro®, WriteBiz® and WriteFarm® systems are fully automated underwriting and policy issuance systems that provide agents with the ability to generate underwritten quotes and automatically issue policies that meet the underwriting guidelines of our insurance subsidiaries with limited or no intervention by their personnel. The claims processing system allows our insurance subsidiaries to process claims efficiently and in an automated environment. The imaging system eliminates the need to handle paper files, while providing greater access to the same information by a variety of personnel. We believe our technology systems compare favorably to those of many national property and casualty insurance carriers in terms of quality and service levels.

Claims

The management of claims is a critical component of the philosophy of our insurance subsidiaries to achieve underwriting profitability on a consistent basis and is fundamental to the successful operations of our insurance subsidiaries and their dedication to excellent service. Our senior claims management oversees the claims processing units of each of our insurance subsidiaries to assure consistency in the claims settlement process. The field office staff of our insurance subsidiaries receives support from home office technical, litigation, material damage, subrogation and medical audit personnel.

The claims departments of our insurance subsidiaries rigorously manage claims to assure that they settle legitimate claims quickly and fairly and that they identify questionable claims for defense. In the majority of cases, the personnel of our insurance subsidiaries, who have significant experience in the property and casualty insurance industry and know the service philosophy of our insurance subsidiaries, adjust claims. Our insurance subsidiaries provide various means of claims reporting on a 24-hours a day, seven-days a week basis, including toll-free numbers and electronic reporting through our website and mobile applications. Our insurance subsidiaries strive to respond to notifications of claims promptly, generally within the day reported. Our insurance subsidiaries believe that, by responding promptly to claims, they provide quality customer service and minimize the ultimate cost of the claims. Our insurance subsidiaries engage independent adjusters as needed to handle claims in areas in which the volume of claims is not sufficient to justify the hiring of internal claims adjusters by our insurance subsidiaries. Our insurance subsidiaries also employ private adjusters and investigators, structural experts and various outside legal counsel to supplement their internal staff and to assist in the investigation of claims. Our insurance subsidiaries have a special investigative unit staffed by former law enforcement officers that attempts to identify and prevent fraud and abuse and to investigate questionable claims.

The management of the claims departments of our insurance subsidiaries develops and implements policies and procedures for the establishment of adequate claim reserves. Our insurance subsidiaries employ an actuarial staff that regularly reviews their reserves for incurred but not reported claims. The management and staff of the claims departments resolve policy coverage issues, manage and process reinsurance recoveries and handle salvage and subrogation matters. The litigation and personal injury sections of our insurance subsidiaries manage all claims litigation. Branch office claims above certain thresholds require home office review and settlement authorization. Our insurance subsidiaries provide their claims adjusters reserving and settlement authority based upon their experience and demonstrated abilities. Larger or more complicated claims require consultation and approval of senior claims department management.

Liabilities for Losses and Loss Expenses

Liabilities for losses and loss expenses are estimates at a given point in time of the amounts an insurer expects to pay with respect to incurred policyholder claims based on facts and circumstances then known. At the time of establishing its estimates, an insurer recognizes that its ultimate liability for losses and loss expenses will exceed or be less than such estimates. Our insurance subsidiaries base their estimates of liabilities for losses and loss expenses on assumptions as to future loss trends and expected claims severity, judicial theories of liability and other factors. However, during the loss adjustment period, our insurance subsidiaries may learn additional facts regarding individual claims, and, consequently, it often becomes necessary for our insurance subsidiaries to refine and adjust their estimates of liability. We reflect any adjustments to our insurance subsidiaries’ liabilities for losses and loss expenses in our operating results in the period in which our insurance subsidiaries record the changes in their estimates.

 

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Our insurance subsidiaries maintain liabilities for the payment of losses and loss expenses with respect to both reported and unreported claims. Our insurance subsidiaries establish these liabilities for the purpose of covering the ultimate costs of settling all losses, including investigation and litigation costs. Our insurance subsidiaries base the amount of their liability for reported losses primarily upon a case-by-case evaluation of the type of risk involved, knowledge of the circumstances surrounding each claim and the insurance policy provisions relating to the type of loss their policyholder incurred. Our insurance subsidiaries determine the amount of their liability for unreported claims and loss expenses on the basis of historical information by line of insurance. Our insurance subsidiaries account for inflation in the reserving function through analysis of costs and trends and reviews of historical reserving results. Our insurance subsidiaries closely monitor their liabilities and recompute them periodically using new information on reported claims and a variety of statistical techniques. Our insurance subsidiaries do not discount their liabilities for losses.

Reserve estimates can change over time because of unexpected changes in assumptions related to our insurance subsidiaries’ external environment and, to a lesser extent, assumptions as to our insurance subsidiaries’ internal operations. For example, our insurance subsidiaries have experienced a decrease in claims frequency on workers’ compensation claims during the past several years while claims severity has gradually increased. These trend changes give rise to greater uncertainty as to the pattern of future loss settlements on workers’ compensation claims. Related uncertainties regarding future trends include the cost of medical technologies and procedures and changes in the utilization of medical procedures. Assumptions related to our insurance subsidiaries’ external environment include the absence of significant changes in tort law and legal decisions that increase liability exposure, consistency in judicial interpretations of insurance coverage and policy provisions and the rate of loss cost inflation. Internal assumptions include consistency in the recording of premium and loss statistics, consistency in the recording of claims, payment and case reserving methodology, accurate measurement of the impact of rate changes and changes in policy provisions, consistency in the quality and characteristics of business written within a given line of business and consistency in reinsurance coverage and the collectability of reinsured losses, among other items. To the extent our insurance subsidiaries determine that underlying factors impacting their assumptions have changed, our insurance subsidiaries attempt to make appropriate adjustments for such changes in their reserves. Accordingly, our insurance subsidiaries’ ultimate liability for unpaid losses and loss expenses will likely differ from the amount recorded at December 31, 2014. For every 1% change in our insurance subsidiaries’ loss and loss expense reserves, net of reinsurance recoverable, the effect on our pre-tax results of operations would be approximately $2.9 million.

The establishment of appropriate liabilities is an inherently uncertain process, and we can provide no assurance that our insurance subsidiaries’ ultimate liability will not exceed our insurance subsidiaries’ loss and loss expense reserves and have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. Furthermore, we cannot predict the timing, frequency and extent of adjustments to our insurance subsidiaries’ estimated future liabilities, since the historical conditions and events that serve as a basis for our insurance subsidiaries’ estimates of ultimate claim costs may change. As is the case for substantially all property and casualty insurance companies, our insurance subsidiaries have found it necessary in the past to increase their estimated future liabilities for losses and loss expenses in certain periods, and, in other periods, their estimates of future liabilities have exceeded their actual liabilities. Changes in our insurance subsidiaries’ estimate of their liability for losses and loss expenses generally reflect actual payments and the evaluation of information received since the prior reporting date. Our insurance subsidiaries recognized an increase in their liability for losses and loss expenses of prior years of $14.5 million, $10.4 million and $7.6 million in 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Our insurance subsidiaries made no significant changes in their reserving philosophy, key reserving assumptions or claims management personnel, and they have made no significant offsetting changes in estimates that increased or decreased their loss and loss expense reserves in these years. The 2014 development represented 5.4% of the December 31, 2013 net carried reserves and resulted primarily from higher-than-expected severity in the private passenger automobile liability, commercial multiple peril and commercial automobile lines of business in accident years prior to 2014. The majority of the 2014 development related to increases in the liability for losses and loss expenses of prior years for Atlantic States and Southern. The 2013 development represented 4.1% of the December 31, 2012 net carried reserves and resulted primarily from higher-than-expected severity in the private passenger automobile liability, commercial multiple peril, commercial automobile and workers’ compensation lines of business in accident years prior to 2013. The majority of the 2013 development related to increases in the liability for losses and loss expenses of prior years for Atlantic States and Southern. The 2012 development represented 3.1% of the December 31, 2011 net carried reserves and resulted primarily from higher-than-expected severity in the private passenger automobile liability and workers’ compensation lines of business in accident years prior to 2012. The majority of the 2012 development related to increases in the liability for losses and loss expenses of prior years for Atlantic States and Southern.

Excluding the impact of catastrophic weather events, our insurance subsidiaries have noted stable amounts in the number of claims incurred and slight downward trends in the number of claims outstanding at period ends relative to their premium

 

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base in recent years across most of their lines of business. However, the amount of the average claim outstanding has increased gradually over the past several years as the property and casualty insurance industry has experienced increased litigation trends and economic conditions that have extended the estimated length of disabilities and contributed to increased medical loss costs and a general slowing of settlement rates in litigated claims. Our insurance subsidiaries could be required to make further adjustments to their estimates in the future. However, on the basis of our insurance subsidiaries’ internal procedures which analyze, among other things, their prior assumptions, their experience with similar cases and historical trends such as reserving patterns, loss payments, pending levels of unpaid claims and product mix, as well as court decisions, economic conditions and public attitudes, we believe that our insurance subsidiaries have made adequate provision for their liability for losses and loss expenses at December 31, 2014.

Differences between liabilities reported in our financial statements prepared on a GAAP basis and our insurance subsidiaries’ financial statements prepared on a SAP basis result from anticipating salvage and subrogation recoveries for GAAP but not for SAP. These differences amounted to $14.2 million, $13.1 million and $12.0 million at December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

The following table sets forth a reconciliation of the beginning and ending GAAP net liability of our insurance subsidiaries for unpaid losses and loss expenses for the periods indicated:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
(in thousands)    2014      2013      2012  

Gross liability for unpaid losses and loss expenses at beginning of year

   $ 495,619       $ 458,827       $ 442,408   

Less reinsurance recoverable

     230,014         207,891         199,393   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net liability for unpaid losses and loss expenses at beginning of year

     265,605         250,936         243,015   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Provision for net losses and loss expenses for claims incurred in the current year

     373,932         332,770         325,276   

Change in provision for estimated net losses and loss expenses for claims incurred in prior years

     14,469         10,358         7,596   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total incurred

     388,401         343,128         332,872   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net losses and loss payments for claims incurred during:

        

The current year

     229,939         201,782         205,876   

Prior years

     131,766         126,677         119,074   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total paid

     361,705         328,459         324,950   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net liability for unpaid losses and loss expenses at end of year

     292,301         265,605         250,936   

Plus reinsurance recoverable

     245,957         230,014         207,891   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Gross liability for unpaid losses and loss expenses at end of year

   $ 538,258       $ 495,619       $ 458,827   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The following table sets forth the development of the liability for net unpaid losses and loss expenses of our insurance subsidiaries from 2004 to 2014. Loss data in the table includes business Atlantic States received from the underwriting pool.

“Net liability at end of year for unpaid losses and loss expenses” sets forth the estimated liability for net unpaid losses and loss expenses recorded at the balance sheet date for each of the indicated years. This liability represents the estimated amount of net losses and loss expenses for claims arising in the current and all prior years that are unpaid at the balance sheet date, including losses incurred but not reported.

The “Net liability re-estimated as of” portion of the table shows the re-estimated amount of the previously recorded liability based on experience for each succeeding year. The estimate increases or decreases as payments are made and more information becomes known about the severity of the remaining unpaid claims. For example, the 2005 liability has developed a redundancy after nine years because we expect the re-estimated net losses and loss expenses to be $21.4 million less than the estimated liability we initially established in 2005 of $173.0 million.

The “Cumulative (excess) deficiency” shows the cumulative excess or deficiency at December 31, 2014 of the liability estimate shown on the top line of the corresponding column. An excess in liability means that the liability established in prior years exceeded the amount of actual payments and currently re-estimated unpaid liability remaining. A deficiency in liability means that the liability established in prior years was less than the amount of actual payments and currently re-estimated remaining unpaid liability.

 

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The “Cumulative amount of liability paid through” portion of the table shows the cumulative net losses and loss expense payments made in succeeding years for net losses incurred prior to the balance sheet date. For example, the 2005 column indicates that at December 31, 2014 payments equal to $147.8 million of the currently re-estimated ultimate liability for net losses and loss expenses of $151.6 million had been made.

Amounts shown in the 2004 column of the table include information for Le Mars and Peninsula for all accident years prior to 2004. Amounts shown in the 2008 column of the table include information for Sheboygan for all accident years prior to 2008. Amounts shown in the 2010 column of the table include information for MICO for the month of December 2010.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
(in thousands)    2004     2005     2006     2007      2008      2009     2010      2011      2012      2013      2014  

Net liability at end of year for unpaid losses and loss expenses

   $ 171,431      $ 173,009      $ 163,312      $ 150,152       $ 161,307       $ 180,262      $ 217,896       $ 243,015       $ 250,936       $ 265,605       $ 292,301   

Net liability re-estimated as of:

                            

One year later

     162,049        159,393        153,299        152,836         171,130         177,377        217,728         250,611         261,294         280,074      

Two years later

     152,292        153,894        150,934        154,435         167,446         177,741        217,355         255,612         268,877         

Three years later

     148,612        151,792        150,078        152,315         166,756         178,403        218,449         257,349            

Four years later

     147,280        150,183        148,745        151,120         166,852         179,909        218,514               

Five years later

     145,874        150,087        148,407        151,287         166,788         179,961                 

Six years later

     146,101        150,555        149,031        151,739         166,964                    

Seven years later

     146,739        151,161        149,487        151,790                       

Eight years later

     147,597        151,243        149,700                         

Nine years later

     147,705        151,563                           

Ten years later

     148,182                             

Cumulative (excess) deficiency

     (23,249     (21,446     (13,612     1,638         5,657         (301     618         14,334         17,941         14,469      
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Cumulative amount of liability paid through:

                            

One year later

   $ 67,229      $ 71,718      $ 72,499      $ 71,950       $ 79,592       $ 84,565      $ 96,202       $ 119,074       $ 126,677       $ 131,766      

Two years later

     102,658        107,599        104,890        105,576         116,035         123,204        148,140         181,288         191,208         

Three years later

     123,236        125,926        121,711        124,659         136,837         147,165        178,073         217,138            

Four years later

     133,844        133,805        132,698        135,392         148,243         161,363        195,948               

Five years later

     136,377        139,935        138,878        140,280         155,331         169,452                 

Six years later

     139,847        143,309        141,752        143,778         160,324                    

Seven years later

     142,016        145,492        143,784        146,491                       

Eight years later

     143,894        146,894        145,290                         

Nine years later

     144,565        147,757                           

Ten years later

     145,232                             

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2006     2007      2008      2009     2010     2011      2012      2013     2014  
     (in thousands)  

Gross liability at end of year

   $ 259,022      $ 226,432       $ 239,809       $ 263,599      $ 383,317      $ 442,408       $ 458,827       $ 495,619      $ 538,258   

Reinsurance recoverable

     95,710        76,280         78,502         83,337        165,421        199,393         207,891         230,014        245,957   

Net liability at end of year

     163,312        150,152         161,307         180,262        217,896        243,015         250,936         265,605        292,301   

Gross re-estimated liability

     240,709        231,100         251,670         204,066        365,155        459,857         480,847         488,030     

Re-estimated recoverable

     91,009        79,310         84,706         24,105        146,641        202,508         211,970         207,956     

Net re-estimated liability

     149,700        151,790         166,964         179,961        218,514        257,349         268,877         280,074     

Gross cumulative deficiency (excess)

     (18,313     4,668         11,861         (59,533     (18,162     17,449         22,020         (7,589  

 

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Third-Party Reinsurance

Our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual purchase certain third-party reinsurance on a combined basis. Le Mars, Peninsula, Sheboygan and MICO also have separate reinsurance programs that provide certain coverage that is commensurate with their relative size and exposures. Our insurance subsidiaries use several different reinsurers, all of which, consistent with the requirements of our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual, have an A.M. Best rating of A- (Excellent) or better or, with respect to foreign reinsurers, have a financial condition that, in the opinion of our management, is equivalent to a company with at least an A- (Excellent) rating from A.M. Best.

The external reinsurance our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual purchase includes:

 

   

“excess of loss reinsurance,” under which the losses of Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries are automatically reinsured, through a series of contracts, over a set retention (generally $1,000,000); and

 

   

catastrophe reinsurance, under which Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries recover, through a series of reinsurance agreements, 100% of an accumulation of many losses resulting from a single event, including natural disasters, over a set retention (generally $5.0 million) and after exceeding an annual aggregate deductible ($1.5 million in 2014, $5.0 million in 2013 and $0 in 2012) up to aggregate losses of $149.0 million per occurrence.

The amount of coverage each of these types of reinsurance provides depends upon the amount, nature, size and location of the risk being reinsured.

For property insurance, our insurance subsidiaries have excess of loss treaties that provide for coverage of $4.0 million per loss over a set retention of $1.0 million. For liability insurance, our insurance subsidiaries have excess of loss treaties that provide for coverage of $49.0 million per occurrence over a set retention of $1.0 million. For workers’ compensation insurance, our insurance subsidiaries have excess of loss treaties that provide for coverage of $9.0 million on any one life over a set retention of $1.0 million.

Our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual also purchase facultative reinsurance to cover exposures from property and casualty losses that exceed the limits provided by their respective treaty reinsurance.

For policies effective through December 31, 2014, MICO maintained a quota-share reinsurance agreement with third-party reinsurers to reduce its net exposures. Effective from December 1, 2010 to December 31, 2011, the quota-share reinsurance percentage was 50%. Effective January 1, 2012, MICO reduced the quota-share reinsurance percentage to 40%. Effective January 1, 2013, MICO reduced the quota-share reinsurance percentage to 30%. Effective January 1, 2014, MICO reduced the quota-share reinsurance percentage to 20%. Effective January 1, 2015, MICO no longer maintains a quota-share reinsurance agreement with third-party reinsurers.

Investments

At December 31, 2014, 99.7% of all debt securities our insurance subsidiaries held had an investment-grade rating. The investment portfolios of our insurance subsidiaries did not contain any mortgage loans or any non-performing assets at December 31, 2014.

 

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The following table shows the composition of the debt securities (at carrying value) in the investment portfolios of our insurance subsidiaries, excluding short-term investments, by rating at December 31, 2014:

 

(dollars in thousands)    December 31, 2014  

Rating(1)

   Amount      Percent  

U.S. Treasury and U.S. agency securities(2)

   $ 259,130         34.9

Aaa or AAA

     30,119         4.1   

Aa or AA

     319,674         43.1   

A

     87,683         11.8   

BBB

     43,735         5.8   

BB

     2,201         0.3   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 742,542         100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) Ratings assigned by Moody’s Investors Services, Inc. or Standard & Poor’s Corporation.
(2) Includes mortgage-backed securities of $184.3 million.

Our insurance subsidiaries invest in both taxable and tax-exempt securities as part of their strategy to maximize after-tax income. This strategy considers, among other factors, the alternative minimum tax. Tax-exempt securities made up approximately 50.2%, 59.0% and 59.8% of the fixed-maturity securities in the combined investment portfolios of our insurance subsidiaries at December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

 

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The following table shows the classification of our investments and the investments of our insurance subsidiaries at December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 (at carrying value):

 

     December 31,  
     2014     2013     2012  
(dollars in thousands)    Amount      Percent of
Total
    Amount      Percent of
Total
    Amount      Percent of
Total
 

Fixed maturities(1):

               

Held to maturity:

               

U.S. Treasury securities and obligations of U.S. government corporations and agencies

   $ 53,619         6.4   $ 47,946         6.1   $ 1,000         0.1

Obligations of states and political subdivisions

     110,999         13.3        108,435         13.7        40,909         5.1   

Corporate securities

     52,226         6.3        14,875         1.9        —           —     

Mortgage-backed securities

     90,548         10.9        69,114         8.7        191         —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total held to maturity

     307,392         36.9        240,370         30.4        42,100         5.2   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Available for sale:

               

U.S. Treasury securities and obligations of U.S. government corporations and agencies

     21,259         2.5        14,334         1.8        71,311         8.8   

Obligations of states and political subdivisions

     266,242         32.0        277,547         35.1        416,987         51.7   

Corporate securities

     53,945         6.5        40,672         5.1        77,356         9.6   

Mortgage-backed securities

     93,704         11.2        71,099         8.9        128,856         16.0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total available for sale

     435,150         52.2        403,652         50.9        694,510         86.1   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total fixed maturities

     742,542         89.1        644,022         81.3        736,610         91.3   

Equity securities(2)

     30,822         3.7        12,423         1.6        8,757         1.1   

Investments in affiliates(3)

     39,284         4.7        35,685         4.5        37,236         4.6   

Short-term investments(4)

     20,293         2.5        99,678         12.6        23,826         3.0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total investments

   $ 832,941         100.0   $ 791,808         100.0   $ 806,429         100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) We refer to Notes 1 and 4 to our Consolidated Financial Statements. We value those fixed maturities we classify as held to maturity at amortized cost; we value those fixed maturities we classify as available for sale at fair value. The total fair value of fixed maturities we classified as held to maturity was $322.2 million at December 31, 2014, $238.8 million at December 31, 2013 and $43.7 million at December 31, 2012. The amortized cost of fixed maturities we classified as available for sale was $414.2 million at December 31, 2014, $390.3 million at December 31, 2013 and $655.2 million at December 31, 2012.
(2) We value equity securities at fair value. Total cost of equity securities was $30.0 million at December 31, 2014, $12.2 million at December 31, 2013 and $8.7 million at December 31, 2012.
(3) We value investments in affiliates at cost, adjusted for our share of earnings and losses of our affiliates as well as changes in equity of our affiliates due to unrealized gains and losses.
(4) We value short-term investments at cost, which approximates fair value.

 

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The following table sets forth the maturities (at carrying value) in the fixed maturity portfolio of our insurance subsidiaries at December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012:

 

     December 31,  
     2014     2013     2012  
            Percent
of
           Percent
of
           Percent
of
 
(dollars in thousands)    Amount      Total     Amount      Total     Amount      Total  

Due in(1):

               

One year or less

   $ 32,886         4.4   $ 8,257         1.3   $ 10,004         1.4

Over one year through three years

     45,967         6.2        22,424         3.5        31,176         4.2   

Over three years through five years

     62,417         8.4        40,234         6.2        64,839         8.8   

Over five years through ten years

     189,082         25.5        190,440         29.6        201,953         27.4   

Over ten years through fifteen years

     169,182         22.8        166,186         25.8        191,179         26.0   

Over fifteen years

     58,756         7.9        76,267         11.8        108,412         14.7   

Mortgage-backed securities

     184,252         24.8        140,214         21.8        129,047         17.5   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 742,542         100.0   $ 644,022         100.0   $ 736,610         100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) Based on stated maturity dates with no prepayment assumptions. Actual maturities will differ because borrowers may have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without call or prepayment penalties.

As shown above, our insurance subsidiaries held investments in mortgage-backed securities having a carrying value of $184.3 million at December 31, 2014. The mortgage-backed securities consist primarily of investments in governmental agency balloon pools with stated maturities between one and 38 years. The stated maturities of these investments limit the exposure of our insurance subsidiaries to extension risk in the event that interest rates rise and prepayments decline. Our insurance subsidiaries perform an analysis of the underlying loans when evaluating a mortgage-backed security for purchase, and they select those securities that they believe will provide a return that properly reflects the prepayment risk associated with the underlying loans.

The following table sets forth the investment results of our insurance subsidiaries for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
(dollars in thousands)    2014     2013     2012  

Invested assets(1)

   $ 812,375      $ 799,119      $ 795,869   

Investment income(2)

     18,344        18,795        20,169   

Average yield

     2.3     2.4     2.5

Average tax-equivalent yield

     3.1        3.3        3.5   

 

(1) Average of the aggregate invested amounts at the beginning and end of the period.
(2) Investment income is net of investment expenses and does not include realized investment gains or losses or provision for income taxes.

A.M. Best Rating

Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries have an A.M. Best rating of A (Excellent), based upon the respective current financial condition and historical statutory results of operations of Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries. We believe that the A.M. Best rating of Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries is an important factor in their marketing of the products to their agents and customers. A.M. Best’s ratings are industry ratings based on a comparative analysis of the financial condition and operating performance of insurance companies. A.M. Best’s classifications are A++ and A+ (Superior), A and A- (Excellent), B++ and B+ (Good), B and B- (Fair), C++ and C+ (Marginal), C and C- (Weak), D (Poor) and E (Under Regulatory Supervision), F (Liquidation) and S (Suspended). A.M. Best bases its ratings upon factors relevant to the payment of claims of policyholders and are not directed toward the protection of investors in insurance companies. According to A.M. Best, the “Excellent” rating that the Donegal Insurance Group maintains is assigned to those companies that, in A.M. Best’s opinion, have an excellent ability to meet their ongoing obligations to policyholders.

 

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Regulation

The supervision and regulation of insurance companies consists primarily of the laws and regulations of the various states in which the insurance companies transact business, with the primary regulatory authority being the insurance regulatory authorities in the state of domicile of the insurance company. Such supervision and regulation relate to numerous aspects of an insurance company’s business and financial condition. The primary purpose of such supervision and regulation is the protection of policyholders. The authority of the state insurance departments includes the establishment of standards of solvency that insurers must meet and maintain, the licensing of insurers and insurance agents to do business, the nature of, and limitations on, investments, premium rates for property and casualty insurance, the provisions that insurers must make for current losses and future liabilities, the deposit of securities for the benefit of policyholders, the approval of policy forms, notice requirements for the cancellation of policies and the approval of certain changes in control. State insurance departments also conduct periodic examinations of the affairs of insurance companies and require the filing of annual and other reports relating to the financial condition of insurance companies.

In addition to state-imposed insurance laws and regulations, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, or the NAIC, maintains a risk-based capital system, or RBC, for assessing the adequacy of statutory capital and surplus that augments the states’ current fixed dollar minimum capital requirements for insurance companies. At December 31, 2014, our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual each exceeded by a substantial margin the minimum levels of statutory capital the RBC rules require.

Generally, every state has guaranty fund laws under which insurers licensed to do business in that state can be assessed on the basis of premiums written by the insurer in that state in order to fund policyholder liabilities of insolvent insurance companies. Under these laws in general, an insurer is subject to assessment, depending upon its market share of a given line of business, to assist in the payment of policyholder claims against insolvent insurers. Our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual have made accruals for their portion of assessments related to such insolvencies based upon the most current information furnished by the guaranty associations.

We are part of an insurance holding company system of which Donegal Mutual is the ultimate controlling person. All of the states in which our insurance companies and Donegal Mutual maintain a domicile have legislation that regulates insurance holding company systems. Each insurance company in the insurance holding company system must register with the insurance supervisory agency of its state of domicile and furnish information concerning the operations of companies within the insurance holding company system that may materially affect the operations, management or financial condition of the insurers within the system. Pursuant to these laws, the respective insurance departments in which our subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual maintain a domicile may examine our insurance subsidiaries or Donegal Mutual at any time, require disclosure of material transactions by the holding company with another member of the insurance holding company system and require prior notice or prior approval of certain transactions, such as “extraordinary dividends” from the insurance subsidiaries to the holding company. We have insurance subsidiaries domiciled in Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin.

The Pennsylvania Insurance Holding Companies Act, which generally applies to Donegal Mutual, us and our insurance subsidiaries, requires that all transactions within an insurance holding company system to which an insurer is a party must be fair and reasonable and that any charges or fees for services performed must be reasonable. Any management agreement, service agreement, cost sharing arrangement and material reinsurance agreement must be filed with the Pennsylvania Insurance Department, or the Department, and is subject to the Department’s review. We have filed the pooling agreement between Donegal Mutual and Atlantic States that established the underwriting pool and all material agreements between Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries with the Department.

Approval of the applicable insurance commissioner is also required prior to consummation of transactions affecting the control of an insurer. In virtually all states, including Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin, where our insurance subsidiaries are domiciled, the acquisition of 10% or more of the outstanding capital stock of an insurer or its holding company or the intent to acquire such an interest creates a rebuttable presumption of a change in control. Pursuant to an order issued in April 2003, the Department approved Donegal Mutual’s ownership of up to 70% of our outstanding Class A common stock and up to 100% of our outstanding Class B common stock.

Our insurance subsidiaries have the legal obligation under state insurance laws to participate in involuntary insurance programs for automobile insurance, as well as other property and casualty insurance lines, in the states in which they conduct business. These programs include joint underwriting associations, assigned risk plans, fair access to insurance requirements plans, reinsurance facilities, windstorm plans and tornado plans. Legislation establishing these programs requires all companies that write lines covered by these programs to provide coverage, either directly or through reinsurance, for insureds who are

 

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unable to obtain insurance in the voluntary market. The legislation creating these programs usually allocates a pro rata portion of risks attributable to such insureds to each company on the basis of the direct premiums it has written in that state or the number of automobiles it insures in that state. Generally, state law requires participation in these programs as a condition to obtaining a certificate of authority. Our loss ratio on insurance we write under these involuntary programs has traditionally been significantly greater than our loss ratio on insurance we voluntarily write in those states.

Regulatory requirements, including RBC requirements, may impact our insurance subsidiaries’ ability to pay dividends. The amount of statutory capital and surplus necessary for our insurance subsidiaries to satisfy regulatory requirements, including RBC requirements, was not significant in relation to our insurance subsidiaries’ statutory capital and surplus at December 31, 2014. Generally, the maximum amount that one of our insurance subsidiaries may pay to us as ordinary dividends during any year after notice to, but without prior approval of, the insurance commissioner of its domiciliary state is limited to a stated percentage of that subsidiary’s statutory capital and surplus at December 31 of the preceding fiscal year or the net income of that subsidiary for its preceding fiscal year. Our insurance subsidiaries paid dividends to us of $11.5 million, $12.5 million and $7.0 million in 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively. At December 31, 2014, the amount of dividends our insurance subsidiaries could pay to us during 2015, without the prior approval of their respective domiciliary insurance commissioners, is shown in the following table.

 

Name of Insurance Subsidiary

   Ordinary
Dividend Amount
 

Atlantic States

   $ 19,119,531   

Southern

     987,335   

Le Mars

     2,725,125   

Peninsula

     4,206,515   

Sheboygan

     —     

MICO

     4,198,999   
  

 

 

 

Total

   $ 31,237,505   
  

 

 

 

Donegal Mutual Insurance Company

Donegal Mutual organized as a mutual fire insurance company in Pennsylvania in 1889. At December 31, 2014, Donegal Mutual had admitted assets of $393.7 million and policyholders’ surplus of $204.4 million. At December 31, 2014, Donegal Mutual had total liabilities of $189.4 million, including reserves for net losses and loss expenses of $53.8 million and unearned premiums of $47.6 million. Donegal Mutual’s investment portfolio of $230.9 million at December 31, 2014 consisted primarily of investment-grade bonds of $25.3 million, its investment in DFSC’s common stock and its investment in our Class A common stock and our Class B common stock. At December 31, 2014, Donegal Mutual owned 7,755,953 shares, or approximately 36%, of our Class A common stock, which Donegal Mutual carried on its books at $101.6 million, and 4,247,038 shares, or approximately 76%, of our Class B common stock, which Donegal Mutual carried on its books at $55.6 million. We present Donegal Mutual’s financial information in accordance with SAP as the NAIC Accounting Practices and Procedures Manual requires. Donegal Mutual does not, nor is it required to, prepare financial statements in accordance with GAAP.

Donegal Financial Services Corporation

In 2000, we and Donegal Mutual formed DFSC as a unitary thrift holding company and its wholly owned subsidiary, Province Bank FSB, as a federal savings bank. In May 2011, DFSC merged with Union National Financial Corporation, or UNNF, with DFSC as the surviving company in the merger. Under the merger agreement, Province Bank FSB and Union National Community Bank, which UNNF owned, also merged to form UCB. UCB is a state savings bank with 14 branch offices in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and approximately $506.4 million in assets at December 31, 2014.

Because Donegal Mutual and we together own all of the outstanding capital stock of DFSC, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, or the FRB, regulates Donegal Mutual, DFSC and us as grandfathered savings and loan holding companies. As a result, Donegal Mutual, DFSC and we are subject to regulation by the FRB under the holding company provisions of the federal Home Owners’ Loan Act, or HOLA. However, if any of Donegal Mutual, DFSC or we were to lose this grandfathered status, they or we would become a bank holding company regulated by the FRB under the Bank Holding Company Act. UCB, as a state-chartered stock savings bank, is subject to regulation and supervision by the Pennsylvania Department of Banking and by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The primary purpose of the statutory and regulatory

 

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supervision of financial institutions is to protect depositors, the financial institutions and the financial system as a whole rather than the stockholders of financial institutions or their holding companies. UCB converted from a federally-chartered stock savings bank to a Pennsylvania-chartered stock savings bank during 2013.

Sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act impose quantitative and qualitative restrictions on transactions between a savings association and its “affiliates.” Affiliates of a savings association include, among other entities, the savings association’s holding company and non-banking companies under common control with the savings association such as Donegal Mutual and us. These restrictions on transactions with affiliates apply to transactions between DFSC and UCB, on the one hand, and Donegal Mutual and us and our insurance subsidiaries, on the other hand. These restrictions also apply to transactions among DFSC, UCB and Donegal Mutual. Because DFSC directly controls UCB and Donegal Mutual and we indirectly control UCB, DFSC, Donegal Mutual and we are subject to the Change in Bank Control Act.

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This Form 10-K Report and the documents we incorporate by reference in this Form 10-K Report contain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements include certain discussions relating to underwriting, premium and investment income volumes, business strategies, reserves, profitability and business relationships and our other business activities during 2014 and beyond. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “would,” “expect,” “plan,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “objective,” “project,” “predict,” “potential,” “goal” and similar expressions. These forward-looking statements reflect our current views about future events, our current assumptions and are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties that may cause our results, performance or achievements to differ materially from those we anticipate or imply by our forward-looking statements. We cannot control or predict many of the factors that could determine our future financial condition or results of operations. Such factors may include those we describe under “Risk Factors.” The forward-looking statements contained in this Form 10-K Report reflect our views and assumptions only as of the date of this Form 10-K Report. Except as required by law, we do not intend to update, and we assume no responsibility for updating, any forward-looking statements we have made. We qualify all of our forward-looking statements by these cautionary statements.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

Risk Factors

Risks Relating to Us and Our Business

Donegal Mutual is our controlling stockholder. Donegal Mutual and its directors and executive officers have potential conflicts of interest between the best interests of our stockholders and the best interests of the policyholders of Donegal Mutual.

Donegal Mutual controls the election of all of the members of our board of directors. Six of the eleven members of our board of directors are also directors of Donegal Mutual. Donegal Mutual and we share the same executive officers. These common directors and executive officers have a fiduciary duty to our stockholders and also have a fiduciary duty to the policyholders of Donegal Mutual. Among the potential conflicts of interest that could arise from these separate fiduciary duties are the following:

 

   

We and Donegal Mutual periodically review the percentage participation of Atlantic States and Donegal Mutual in the underwriting pool that Donegal Mutual and Atlantic States have maintained since 1986;

 

   

Our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual annually review and then establish the terms of certain reinsurance agreements between them with the objective, over the long-term, of having an approximately equal balance between payments and recoveries;

 

   

We and Donegal Mutual periodically allocate certain shared expenses among ourselves and our insurance subsidiaries in accordance with various inter-company expense-sharing agreements; and

 

   

We and our insurance subsidiaries may enter into other transactions or contractual relationships with Donegal Mutual, including, for example, our purchases from time to time from Donegal Mutual of the surplus note of a mutual insurance company that will convert into a stock insurance company and ultimately become one of our wholly owned subsidiaries.

 

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Donegal Mutual has sufficient voting power to determine the outcome of all matters submitted to our stockholders for approval.

Each share of our Class A common stock has one-tenth of a vote per share and generally votes as a single class with our Class B common stock. Our Class B common stock has one vote per share and generally votes as a single class with our Class A common stock. Donegal Mutual has the right to vote approximately 65% of the aggregate voting power of our Class A common stock and our Class B common stock and has sufficient voting control to:

 

   

elect all of the members of our board of directors, who determine our management and policies; and

 

   

control the outcome of any corporate transaction or other matter submitted to a vote of our stockholders for approval, including mergers or other acquisition proposals and the sale of all or substantially all of our assets, in each case regardless of how all of our other stockholders other than Donegal Mutual vote their shares.

The interests of Donegal Mutual in maintaining this greater-than-majority control of us may have an adverse effect on the price of our Class A common stock and the price of our Class B common stock because of the absence of any potential “takeover” premium and may, therefore, be inconsistent with the interests of our stockholders other than Donegal Mutual.

Donegal Mutual’s majority voting control, certain provisions of our certificate of incorporation and by-laws and certain provisions of Delaware law make it remote that anyone could acquire actual control of us unless Donegal Mutual were in favor of another person’s acquisition of control of us.

Donegal Mutual’s majority voting control, certain anti-takeover provisions in our certificate of incorporation and by-laws and certain provisions of the Delaware General Corporation Law, or the DGCL, could delay or prevent the removal of members of our board of directors and could make a merger, tender offer or proxy contest involving us more expensive as well as unlikely to succeed, even if such events were in the best interests of our stockholders other than Donegal Mutual. These factors could also discourage a third party from attempting to acquire control of us. In particular, our certificate of incorporation and by-laws include the following anti-takeover provisions:

 

   

our board of directors is classified into three classes, so that our stockholders elect only one-third of the members of our board of directors each year;

 

   

our stockholders may remove our directors only for cause;

 

   

our stockholders may not take stockholder action except at an annual or special meeting of our stockholders;

 

   

the request of stockholders holding at least 20% of the aggregate voting power of our Class A common stock and our Class B common stock is required for a stockholder to call a special meeting of our stockholders;

 

   

our by-laws require that stockholders provide advance notice to us to nominate candidates for election to our board of directors or to propose any other item of stockholder business at a stockholders’ meeting;

 

   

we do not permit cumulative voting rights in the election of our directors;

 

   

our certificate of incorporation does not provide for preemptive rights in connection with any issuance of securities by us; and

 

   

our board of directors may issue, without stockholder approval unless otherwise required by law, preferred stock with such terms as our board of directors may determine.

We have authorized preferred stock that we could issue without stockholder approval to make it more difficult for a third party to acquire us.

We have 2.0 million authorized shares of preferred stock that we could issue in one or more series without further stockholder approval, unless the DGCL or the rules of the NASDAQ Global Select Market otherwise require, and upon such terms and conditions, and having such rights, privileges and preferences, as our board of directors may determine. Our potential issuance of preferred stock may make it more difficult for a third party to acquire control of us.

 

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Because we are an insurance holding company, no person can acquire or seek to acquire a 10% or greater interest in us without first obtaining approval of the insurance commissioners of the states of domicile of each of our insurance subsidiaries.

We own insurance subsidiaries domiciled in the states of Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin, and Donegal Mutual controls an insurance company domiciled in Georgia. The insurance laws of each of these states provide that no person can acquire or seek to acquire a 10% or greater interest in us without first filing specified information with the insurance commissioners of those states and obtaining the prior approval of the proposed acquisition of a 10% or greater interest in us by each of the state insurance commissioners based on statutory standards designed to protect the safety and soundness of the insurance holding company and its subsidiary.

Because we are a grandfathered unitary savings and loan holding company, no person can acquire or seek to acquire more than a 10% interest in either class of our common stock without first obtaining approval of, or an exemption from, the FRB.

We own 48.2% of the outstanding stock of DFSC, which owns all of the outstanding stock of UCB. As a result of our ownership interest in DFSC, we are a grandfathered unitary savings and loan holding company regulated by the FRB under HOLA. No person may lawfully acquire more than 10% of any class of voting security of a unitary savings and loan holding company registered under the Exchange Act, as we are, without first filing specified information with the FRB and obtaining the FRB’s prior approval of the proposed acquisition or an exemption from the FRB for such acquisition.

Our insurance subsidiaries currently conduct business in a limited number of states, with a concentration of business in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Maryland and Virginia. Any single catastrophe occurrence or other condition affecting losses in these states could adversely affect the results of operations of our insurance subsidiaries.

Our insurance subsidiaries conduct business in 21 states located primarily in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwestern, New England and Southern states. A substantial portion of their business consists of private passenger and commercial automobile, homeowners and workers’ compensation insurance in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Maryland and Virginia. While our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual actively manage their respective exposure to catastrophes through their underwriting processes and the purchase of reinsurance, a single catastrophic occurrence, destructive weather pattern, general economic trend, terrorist attack, regulatory development or other condition affecting one or more of the states in which our insurance subsidiaries conduct substantial business could materially adversely affect their business, financial condition and results of operations. Common catastrophic events include hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, wind and hail storms, fires, explosions and severe winter storms.

If the independent agents who market the products of our insurance subsidiaries do not maintain their current levels of premium writing with us, fail to comply with established underwriting guidelines of our insurance subsidiaries or otherwise inappropriately market the products of our insurance subsidiaries, the business, financial condition and results of operations of our insurance subsidiaries could be adversely affected.

Our insurance subsidiaries market their insurance products solely through a network of approximately 2,400 independent insurance agencies. This agency distribution system is one of the most important components of the competitive profile of our insurance subsidiaries. As a result, our insurance subsidiaries depend to a material extent upon their independent agents, each of whom has the authority to bind our insurance subsidiaries to insurance coverage. To the extent that such independent agents’ marketing efforts fail to result in the maintenance of their current levels of volume and quality or they bind our insurance subsidiaries to unacceptable insurance risks, fail to comply with the established underwriting guidelines of our insurance subsidiaries or otherwise inappropriately market the products of our insurance subsidiaries, the business, financial condition and results of operations of our insurance subsidiaries could suffer.

The business of our insurance subsidiaries may not continue to grow and may be materially adversely affected if our insurance subsidiaries cannot retain existing, and attract new, independent agents or if insurance consumers increase their use of insurance marketing systems other than independent agents.

Our insurance subsidiaries’ ability to retain existing, and to attract new, independent agents is essential to the continued growth of the business of our insurance subsidiaries. If independent agents find it easier to do business with the competitors of our insurance subsidiaries, our insurance subsidiaries could find it difficult to retain their existing business or to attract new business. While our insurance subsidiaries believe they maintain good relationships with the independent agents they have appointed, our insurance subsidiaries cannot be certain that these independent agents will continue to sell the products of our insurance subsidiaries to the consumers these independent agents represent. Some of the factors that could adversely affect the ability of our insurance subsidiaries to retain existing, and attract new, independent agents include:

 

   

the significant competition among insurance companies to attract independent agents;

 

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the labor-intensive and time-consuming process of selecting new independent agents;

 

   

the insistence of our insurance subsidiaries that independent agents adhere to consistent underwriting standards; and

 

   

the ability of our insurance subsidiaries to pay competitive and attractive commissions, bonuses and other incentives to independent agents.

While our insurance subsidiaries sell insurance to policyholders solely through their network of independent agencies, many competitors of our insurance subsidiaries sell insurance through a variety of delivery methods, including independent agencies, captive agencies, the Internet and direct sales. To the extent that current and potential policyholders change their marketing system preference, the business, financial condition and results of operations of our insurance subsidiaries may be adversely affected.

We are dependent on dividends from our insurance subsidiaries for the payment of our operating expenses, our debt service and dividends to our stockholders; however, there are regulatory restrictions and business considerations that may limit the amount of dividends our insurance subsidiaries may pay to us.

As a holding company, we rely primarily on dividends from our insurance subsidiaries as a source of funds to meet our corporate obligations and to pay dividends to our stockholders. The amount of dividends our insurance subsidiaries can pay to us is subject to regulatory restrictions and depends on the amount of surplus our insurance subsidiaries maintain. From time to time, the NAIC and various state insurance regulators consider modifying the method of determining the amount of dividends that an insurance company may pay without prior regulatory approval. The maximum amount of ordinary dividends that our insurance subsidiaries can pay to us in 2015 without prior regulatory approval is approximately $31.2 million. Other business and regulatory considerations, such as the impact of dividends on surplus that could affect the ratings of our insurance subsidiaries, competitive conditions, RBC requirements, the investment results of our insurance subsidiaries and the amount of premiums that our insurance subsidiaries write could also adversely impact the ability of our insurance subsidiaries to pay dividends to us.

If A.M. Best downgrades the rating it has assigned to Donegal Mutual or any of our insurance subsidiaries, it would adversely affect their competitive position.

Industry ratings are a factor in establishing and maintaining the competitive position of insurance companies. A.M. Best, an industry-accepted source of insurance company financial strength ratings, rates Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries. A.M. Best ratings provide an independent opinion of an insurance company’s financial health and its ability to meet its obligations to its policyholders. We believe that the financial strength rating of A.M. Best is material to the operations of Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries. Currently, Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries each have an A (Excellent) rating from A.M. Best. If A.M. Best were to downgrade the rating of Donegal Mutual or any of our insurance subsidiaries, it would adversely affect the competitive position of Donegal Mutual or that insurance subsidiary and make it more difficult for it to market its products and retain its existing policyholders.

Our strategy to grow in part through acquisitions of smaller insurance companies exposes us to risks that could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

The affiliation with, and acquisition of, smaller, and often undercapitalized, insurance companies involves risks that could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. The risks associated with these affiliations and acquisitions include:

 

   

the potential inadequacy of reserves for losses and loss expenses of the other insurer;

 

   

the need to supplement management of the other insurer with additional experienced personnel;

 

   

conditions imposed by regulatory agencies that make the realization of cost-savings through integration of the operations of the other insurer with our operations more difficult;

 

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the need of the other insurer for additional capital that we did not anticipate at the time of the acquisition; and

 

   

the use of more of our management’s time in improving the operations of the other insurer than we originally anticipated.

If we cannot obtain sufficient capital to fund the organic growth of our insurance subsidiaries and to make acquisitions, we may not be able to expand our business.

Our strategy is to expand our business through the organic growth of our insurance subsidiaries and through our strategic acquisitions of regional insurance companies. Our insurance subsidiaries will require additional capital in the future to support this strategy. If we cannot obtain sufficient capital on satisfactory terms and conditions, we may not be able to expand the business of our insurance subsidiaries or to make future acquisitions. Our ability to obtain additional financing will depend on a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control. For example, we may not be able to obtain additional debt or equity financing because we or our insurance subsidiaries may already have substantial debt at the time, because we or our insurance subsidiaries do not have sufficient cash flow to service or repay our existing or additional debt or because financial institutions are not making financing available. In addition, any equity capital we obtain in the future could be dilutive to our existing stockholders.

A number of the competitors of our insurance subsidiaries have greater financial strength than our insurance subsidiaries, and these competitors may be able to offer their products at lower prices than our insurance subsidiaries can afford to offer their products.

The property and casualty insurance industry is intensely competitive. Competition can be based on many factors, including:

 

   

the perceived financial strength of the insurer;

 

   

premium rates;

 

   

policy terms and conditions;

 

   

policyholder service;

 

   

reputation; and

 

   

experience.

Our insurance subsidiaries compete with many regional and national property and casualty insurance companies, including direct sellers of insurance products, insurers having their own agency organizations and other insurers represented by independent agents. Many of these insurers have greater capital than our insurance subsidiaries, have substantially greater financial, technical and operating resources and have equal or higher ratings from A.M. Best than our insurance subsidiaries. In addition, our competitors may become increasingly better capitalized in the future as the property and casualty insurance industry continues to consolidate.

The greater capitalization of many of the competitors of our insurance subsidiaries enables them to operate with lower profit margins and, therefore, allows them to market their products more aggressively, to take advantage more quickly of new marketing opportunities and to offer lower premium rates. Our insurance subsidiaries may not be able to maintain their current competitive position in the markets in which they operate if their competitors offer prices for their products that are lower than the prices our insurance subsidiaries are prepared to offer. Moreover, if these competitors lower the price of their products and our insurance subsidiaries meet their pricing, the profit margins and revenues of our insurance subsidiaries may decrease and their ratios of claims and expenses to premiums may increase. All of these factors could materially adversely affect the financial condition and results of operations of our insurance subsidiaries and their A.M. Best ratings.

Because the investment portfolios of our insurance subsidiaries consist primarily of fixed-income securities, their investment income and the fair value of their investment portfolios could decrease as a result of a number of factors.

Our insurance subsidiaries invest the premiums they receive from their policyholders and maintain investment portfolios that consist primarily of fixed-income securities. The management of these investment portfolios is an important component of the profitability of our insurance subsidiaries. Our insurance subsidiaries derive a significant portion of their operating income

 

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from the income they receive on their invested assets. A number of factors may affect the quality and/or yield of their portfolios, including the general economic and business environment, government monetary policy, changes in the credit quality of the issuers of the fixed-income securities our insurance subsidiaries own, changes in market conditions and regulatory changes. The fixed-income securities our insurance subsidiaries own consist primarily of securities issued by domestic entities that are backed either by the credit or collateral of the underlying issuer. Factors such as an economic downturn, disruption in the credit market or the availability of credit, a regulatory change pertaining to a particular issuer’s industry, a significant deterioration in the cash flows of the issuer or a change in the issuer’s marketplace may adversely affect the ability of our insurance subsidiaries to collect principal and interest from the issuer in which they invest.

The investments of our insurance subsidiaries are also subject to risk resulting from interest rate fluctuations. Increasing interest rates or a widening in the spread between interest rates available on U.S. Treasury securities and corporate debt or asset-backed securities, for example, will typically have an adverse impact on the market values of fixed-rate securities. If interest rates remain at historically low levels, our insurance subsidiaries will generally have a lower overall rate of return on investments of cash their operations generate. In addition, in the event of the call or maturity of investments in a low interest rate environment, our insurance subsidiaries may not be able to reinvest the proceeds in securities with comparable interest rates. Changes in interest rates may reduce both the profitability and the return on the invested capital of our insurance subsidiaries.

We and our insurance subsidiaries depend on key personnel. The loss of any member of our executive management or the senior management of our insurance subsidiaries could negatively affect the continuation of our business strategies and achievement of our growth objectives.

The loss of, or failure to attract, key personnel could significantly impede our financial plans, growth, marketing and other objectives and those of our insurance subsidiaries. The continued success of our insurance subsidiaries depends to a substantial extent on the ability and experience of their senior management. Our insurance subsidiaries and we believe that our future success is dependent on our ability to attract and retain additional skilled and qualified personnel and to expand, train and manage our employees. We and Donegal Mutual have two to five year automatically renewing employment agreements with our senior officers, including all of our named executive officers.

The reinsurance agreements on which our insurance subsidiaries rely do not relieve our insurance subsidiaries from their primary liability to their policyholders, and our insurance subsidiaries face a risk of non-payment from their reinsurers as well as the non-availability of reinsurance in the future.

Our insurance subsidiaries rely on reinsurance agreements to limit their maximum net loss from large single catastrophic risks or excess of loss risks in areas where our insurance subsidiaries may have a concentration of policyholders. Reinsurance also enables our insurance subsidiaries to increase their capacity to write insurance because it has the effect of leveraging the surplus of our insurance subsidiaries. Although the reinsurance our insurance subsidiaries maintain provides that the reinsurer is liable to them for any reinsured losses, the reinsurance agreements do not generally relieve our insurance subsidiaries from their primary liability to their policyholders if the reinsurer fails to pay the reinsurance claims of our insurance subsidiaries. To the extent that a reinsurer is unable to pay losses for which it is liable to our insurance subsidiaries, our insurance subsidiaries remain liable for such losses. At December 31, 2014, our insurance subsidiaries had approximately $119.6 million of reinsurance receivables from third-party reinsurers relating to paid and unpaid losses. Any insolvency or inability of these reinsurers to make timely payments to our insurance subsidiaries under the terms of their reinsurance agreements would adversely affect the results of operations of our insurance subsidiaries.

Michigan law requires MICO to provide unlimited lifetime medical benefits under the personal injury protection, or PIP, coverage of the personal automobile and commercial automobile policies it writes in the State of Michigan. Michigan law also requires MICO to be a member of the Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association, or MCCA, in order to write automobile insurance. The MCCA receives funding through assessments that its members collect from policyholders in the state and provides reinsurance for PIP claims that exceed a set retention. At December 31, 2014, MICO had approximately $49.3 million of reinsurance receivables from MCCA relating to paid and unpaid losses. The MCCA has generated significant operating deficits in recent years. Although we currently consider the risk to be remote, should the MCCA be unable to fulfill its payment obligations to MICO in the future, MICO’s financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

In addition, our insurance subsidiaries face a risk of the non-availability of reinsurance or an increase in reinsurance costs that could adversely affect their ability to write business or their results of operations. Market conditions beyond the control of our insurance subsidiaries, such as the amount of surplus in the reinsurance market and the frequency and severity of natural and man-made catastrophes, affect both the availability and the cost of the reinsurance our insurance subsidiaries purchase. If our insurance subsidiaries cannot maintain their current level of reinsurance or purchase new reinsurance protection in amounts that our insurance subsidiaries consider sufficient, our insurance subsidiaries would either have to accept an increase in their net risk retention or reduce their insurance writings, which would adversely affect them.

 

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Our equity investment in DFSC subjects us to certain risks inherent to community banking organizations.

Our equity in the earnings of DFSC primarily reflects the underlying results of operations of UCB. UCB is subject to a number of risks, which include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

   

variations in interest rates that may negatively affect UCB’s financial performance;

 

   

inherent risks associated with UCB’s lending activities;

 

   

a significant decline in general economic conditions in the specific markets in which UCB operates;

 

   

the potential adverse impact of extensive federal and state regulation and supervision;

 

   

potential declines in the value of UCB’s investments that are considered other than temporary;

 

   

competition for loans and deposits with numerous regional and national banks and other financial institutions; and

 

   

UCB’s inability to attract and retain qualified key personnel.

The growth and profitability of our insurance subsidiaries depend, in part, on the effective maintenance and ongoing development of Donegal Mutual’s information technology systems.

Our insurance subsidiaries utilize Donegal Mutual’s information technology systems to conduct their insurance business, including policy quoting and issuance, claims processing, processing of incoming premium payments and other important functions. As a result, the ability of our insurance subsidiaries to grow their business and conduct profitable operations depends on Donegal Mutual’s ability to maintain its existing information technology systems and to develop new technology systems that will support the business of Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries in a cost-efficient manner and provide information technology capabilities equivalent to those of our competitors. The allocation among our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual of the costs of developing and maintaining Donegal Mutual’s information technology systems may impact adversely our insurance subsidiaries’ expense ratio and underwriting profitability, and such costs may exceed Donegal Mutual’s and our expectations. In addition, while Donegal Mutual is committed to developing and maintaining information technology systems that will allow Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries to compete effectively, Donegal Mutual’s information technology systems may not deliver the benefits Donegal Mutual and we expect and may fail to keep pace with our competitors’ information technology systems. As a result, Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries may not have the ability to grow their business and meet their profitability objectives.

Our insurance subsidiaries rely on Donegal Mutual’s information technology systems, and the disruption or failure of these systems or the compromise of the security of those systems that results in the theft or misuse of confidential information could materially impact adversely the business of Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries.

Our insurance subsidiaries’ business operations depend significantly upon the availability and successful operation of Donegal Mutual’s information technology systems in order to process new and renewal business, service their policies, process and settle claims and facilitate processing of premium payments. In addition, in the normal course of their operations, Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries collect, utilize and maintain confidential information regarding individuals and businesses. While Donegal Mutual has established various security measures to protect its information technology systems and confidential data, unanticipated computer viruses, malware, power outages, unauthorized access or other cyberattacks could disrupt those systems or result in the misappropriation or loss of confidential data. Disruption in the availability of Donegal Mutual’s information technology systems could impact the ability of Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries to underwrite and process their policies timely, process and settle claims promptly and provide expected levels of customer service to agents and policyholders.

While Donegal Mutual has identified threats to the security of its information technology systems, Donegal Mutual and we are unaware of any significant breach of the security measures Donegal Mutual maintains. A significant breach of the security of Donegal Mutual’s information technology systems that results in the misappropriation or misuse of confidential information could damage the business reputation of Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries and could expose Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries to litigation. The financial impact to Donegal Mutual, us and our insurance subsidiaries of a significant breach could be material.

 

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Risks Relating to the Property and Casualty Insurance Industry

Industry trends, such as increased litigation against the insurance industry and individual insurers, the willingness of courts to expand covered causes of loss, rising jury awards, escalating medical costs and increasing loss severity may contribute to increased costs and result in the deterioration of the reserves of our insurance subsidiaries.

Loss severity in the property and casualty insurance industry has increased in recent years, principally driven by larger court judgments and increasing medical costs. In addition, many classes of complainants have brought legal actions and proceedings that tend to increase the size of judgments. The propensity of policyholders and third-party claimants to litigate and the willingness of courts to expand causes of loss and the size of awards to eliminate exclusions and to increase coverage limits may make the loss reserves of our insurance subsidiaries inadequate for current and future losses.

Loss or significant restriction of the use of credit scoring in the pricing and underwriting of the personal lines insurance products by our insurance subsidiaries could adversely affect their future profitability.

Our insurance subsidiaries use credit scoring as a factor in making risk selection and pricing decisions for personal lines insurance products where allowed by state law . Recently, some consumer groups and regulators have questioned whether the use of credit scoring unfairly discriminates against people with low incomes, minority groups and the elderly. These consumer groups and regulators often call for the prohibition or restriction on the use of credit scoring in underwriting and pricing. Laws or regulations enacted in a number of states that significantly curtail the use of credit scoring in the underwriting process could reduce the future profitability of our insurance subsidiaries.

Changes in applicable insurance laws or regulations or changes in the way regulators administer those laws or regulations could adversely affect the operating environment of our insurance subsidiaries and increase their exposure to loss or put them at a competitive disadvantage.

Property and casualty insurers are subject to extensive supervision in their domiciliary states and in the states in which they do business. This regulatory oversight includes matters relating to:

 

   

licensing and examination;

 

   

approval of premium rates;

 

   

market conduct;

 

   

policy forms;

 

   

limitations on the nature and amount of certain investments;

 

   

claims practices;

 

   

mandated participation in involuntary markets and guaranty funds;

 

   

reserve adequacy;

 

   

insurer solvency;

 

   

transactions between affiliates;

 

   

the amount of dividends that insurers may pay; and

 

   

restrictions on underwriting standards.

Such regulation and supervision are primarily for the benefit and protection of policyholders rather than stockholders. For instance, our insurance subsidiaries are subject to involuntary participation in specified markets in various states in which they operate and the premium rates our insurance subsidiaries may charge do not always correspond with the underlying costs of providing that coverage.

 

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The NAIC and state insurance regulators are re-examining existing laws and regulations, specifically focusing on:

 

   

insurance company investments;

 

   

issues relating to the solvency of insurance companies;

 

   

risk-based capital guidelines;

 

   

restrictions on the terms and conditions included in insurance policies;

 

   

certain methods of accounting;

 

   

reserves for unearned premiums, losses and other purposes;

 

   

the values at which insurance companies may carry investment securities and the definition of other-than-temporary impairment; and

 

   

interpretations of existing laws and the development of new laws.

Changes in state laws and regulations, as well as changes in the way state regulators view related-party transactions in particular, could change the operating environment of our insurance subsidiaries and have an adverse effect on their business. The state insurance regulatory framework has recently come under increased federal scrutiny. Congress is considering proposals that it should create an optional federal charter for insurers. Federal chartering has the potential to create an uneven playing field for insurers by subjecting federally-chartered and state-chartered insurers to different regulatory requirements. Federal chartering also raises the possibility of duplicative or conflicting federal and state requirements. In addition, if federal legislation repeals the partial exemption for the insurance industry from federal antitrust laws, our ability to collect and share loss cost data with the industry could adversely affect the results of operations of our insurance subsidiaries.

Insurance companies are subject to assessments, based on their market share in a given line of business, to assist in the payment of unpaid claims and related costs of insolvent insurance companies. Such assessments could adversely affect the financial condition of our insurance subsidiaries.

Our insurance subsidiaries are subject to assessments pursuant to the guaranty fund laws of the various states in which they conduct business. Generally, under these laws, our insurance subsidiaries can be assessed, depending upon the market share of our insurance subsidiaries in a given line of insurance business, to assist in the payment of unpaid claims and related costs of insolvent insurance companies in those states. We cannot predict the number and magnitude of future insurance company failures in the states in which our insurance subsidiaries conduct business, but future assessments could adversely affect the business, financial condition and results of operations of our insurance subsidiaries.

Our insurance subsidiaries must establish premium rates and loss and loss expense reserves from forecasts of the ultimate costs they expect will arise from risks underwritten during the policy period, and the profitability of our insurance subsidiaries could be adversely affected if their premium rates or reserves are insufficient to satisfy their ultimate costs.

One of the distinguishing features of the property and casualty insurance industry is that it prices its products before it knows its costs, since insurers generally establish their premium rates before they know the amount of losses they will incur. Accordingly, our insurance subsidiaries establish premium rates from forecasts of the ultimate costs they expect to arise from risks they have underwritten during the policy period. These premium rates may not be sufficient to cover the ultimate losses incurred. Further, our insurance subsidiaries must establish reserves for losses and loss expenses as balance sheet liabilities based upon estimates involving actuarial and statistical projections at a given time of what our insurance subsidiaries expect their ultimate liability to be. Significant periods of time often elapse between the occurrence of an insured loss and the reporting of the loss and the payment of that loss. It is possible that our insurance subsidiaries’ ultimate liability could exceed these estimates because of the future development of known losses, the existence of losses that have occurred but are currently unreported and larger than historical settlements of pending and unreported claims. The process of estimating reserves is inherently judgmental and can be influenced by a number of factors, including the following:

 

   

trends in claim frequency and severity;

 

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changes in operations;

 

   

emerging economic and social trends;

 

   

inflation; and

 

   

changes in the regulatory and litigation environments.

If our insurance subsidiaries have insufficient premium rates or reserves, insurance regulatory authorities may require increases to these reserves. An increase in reserves results in an increase in losses and a reduction in net income for the period in which our insurance subsidiaries recognize a deficiency in reserves. Accordingly, an increase in reserves may adversely impact their business, liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

The financial results of our insurance subsidiaries depend primarily on their ability to underwrite risks effectively and to charge adequate rates to policyholders.

The financial condition, cash flows and results of operations of our insurance subsidiaries depend on their ability to underwrite and set rates accurately for a full spectrum of risks across a number of lines of insurance. Rate adequacy is necessary to generate sufficient premium to pay losses, loss adjustment expenses and underwriting expenses and to realize a profit.

The ability to underwrite and set rates effectively is subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, including:

 

   

the availability of sufficient, reliable data;

 

   

the ability to conduct a complete and accurate analysis of available data;

 

   

the ability to recognize in a timely manner changes in trends and to project both the severity and frequency of losses with reasonable accuracy;

 

   

uncertainties generally inherent in estimates and assumptions;

 

   

the ability to project changes in certain operating expense levels with reasonable certainty;

 

   

the development, selection and application of appropriate rating formulae or other pricing methodologies;

 

   

the use of modeling tools to assist with correctly and consistently achieving the intended results in underwriting and pricing;

 

   

the ability to innovate with new pricing strategies and the success of those innovations on implementation;

 

   

the ability to secure regulatory approval of premium rates on an adequate and timely basis;

 

   

the ability to predict policyholder retention accurately;

 

   

unanticipated court decisions, legislation or regulatory action;

 

   

unanticipated changes in our claim settlement practices;

 

   

changes in driving patterns for auto exposures;

 

   

changes in weather patterns for property exposures;

 

   

changes in the medical sector of the economy;

 

   

unanticipated changes in auto repair costs, auto parts prices and used car prices;

 

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the impact of inflation and other factors on the cost of construction materials and labor;

 

   

the ability to monitor property concentration in catastrophe-prone areas, such as hurricane, earthquake and wind/hail regions; and

 

   

the general state of the economy in the states in which our insurance subsidiaries operate.

Such risks may result in the premium rates of our insurance subsidiaries being based on inadequate or inaccurate data or inappropriate assumptions or methodologies and may cause our estimates of future changes in the frequency or severity of claims to be incorrect. As a result, our insurance subsidiaries could underprice risks, which would negatively affect our margins, or our insurance subsidiaries could overprice risks, which could reduce their volume and competitiveness. In either event, underpricing or overpricing risks could adversely impact our operating results, financial condition and cash flows.

The cyclical nature of the property and casualty insurance industry may reduce the revenues and profit margins of our insurance subsidiaries.

The property and casualty insurance industry is highly cyclical with respect to both individual lines of business and the overall insurance industry. Premium rate levels relate to the availability of insurance coverage, which varies according to the level of surplus available in the insurance industry. The level of surplus in the industry varies with returns on invested capital and regulatory barriers to withdrawal of surplus. Increases in surplus may result in increased price competition among property and casualty insurers. If our insurance subsidiaries find it necessary to reduce premiums or limit premium increases due to these competitive pressures on pricing, our insurance subsidiaries may experience a reduction in their profit margins and revenues, an increase in their ratios of losses and expenses to premiums and, therefore, lower profitability.

Risks Relating to Our Common Stock

The price of our common stock may be adversely affected by its low trading volume.

Our Class A common stock and our Class B common stock have limited liquidity. Reported average daily trading volume for our Class A common stock and our Class B common stock for the year ended December 31, 2014 was approximately 20,870 shares and approximately 458 shares, respectively. This limited liquidity could subject our shares of Class A common stock and our shares of Class B common stock to greater price volatility.

Donegal Mutual’s ownership of our stock, anti-takeover provisions of our certificate of incorporation and by-laws and certain state laws make it unlikely anyone could acquire control of us unless Donegal Mutual were in favor of the acquisition of control.

Donegal Mutual’s ownership of our Class A common stock and Class B common stock, certain anti-takeover provisions of our certificate of incorporation and by-laws, certain provisions of Delaware law and the insurance laws and regulations of Iowa, Georgia, Maryland, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin could delay or prevent the removal of members of our board of directors and could make it more difficult for a merger, tender offer or proxy contest involving us to succeed, even if our stockholders other than Donegal Mutual believed any of such events would be beneficial to them. These factors could also discourage a third party from attempting to acquire control of us. The classification of our board of directors could also have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in our control.

In addition, we have 2,000,000 authorized shares of preferred stock that we could issue in one or more series without stockholder approval, to the extent applicable law permits, and upon such terms and conditions, and having such rights, privileges and preferences, as our board of directors may determine. Our ability to issue preferred stock could make it difficult for a third party to acquire us. We have no current plans to issue any preferred stock.

Moreover, the DGCL contains provisions that prohibit certain business combination transactions under certain circumstances. In addition, state insurance laws and regulations generally prohibit any person from acquiring, or seeking to acquire, a 10% or greater interest in an insurance company without the prior approval of the state insurance commissioner of the state of domicile of the insurer. Because of our indirect control of UCB, HOLA also prohibits the acquisition of a 10% or greater interest in either our Class A common stock or our Class B common stock without the prior approval of the FRB or the granting of an exemption by the FRB.

 

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Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.

We have no unresolved written comments from the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) staff regarding our filings under the Exchange Act.

 

Item 2. Properties.

We and our insurance subsidiaries share administrative headquarters with Donegal Mutual in a building in Marietta, Pennsylvania that Donegal Mutual owns. Donegal Mutual charges us and our insurance subsidiaries for an appropriate portion of the building expenses under an inter-company allocation agreement. The Marietta headquarters has approximately 230,000 square feet of office space. Southern owns a facility of approximately 10,000 square feet in Glen Allen, Virginia. Le Mars owns a facility of approximately 25,500 square feet in Le Mars, Iowa, Peninsula owns a facility of approximately 14,600 square feet in Salisbury, Maryland and Sheboygan owns a facility of approximately 8,800 square feet in Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin.

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

Our insurance subsidiaries are parties to routine litigation that arises in the ordinary course of their insurance business. We believe that the resolution of these lawsuits will not have a material adverse effect on the financial condition or results of operations of our insurance subsidiaries.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

Not applicable.

 

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Executive Officers of the Registrant

The following table sets forth information regarding the executive officers of Donegal Mutual and the Registrant as of December 31, 2014, each of whom has served with us for more than 10 years:

 

Name

  

Age

    

Position

Donald H. Nikolaus

     72       President and Chief Executive Officer of Donegal Mutual since 1981; President and Chief Executive Officer of us since 1986. Chairman of our board of directors since April 2012.

Kevin G. Burke

     49       Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Donegal Mutual and us since 2014; Acting Chief Executive Officer of us since August 29, 2014 and of Donegal Mutual since October 6, 2014; Senior Vice President of Human Resources of Donegal Mutual and us from 2005 to 2014; Vice President of Human Resources of Donegal Mutual and us from 2001 to 2005; other positions from 2000 to 2001.

Jeffrey D. Miller

     50       Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Donegal Mutual and us since 2014; Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Donegal Mutual and us from 2005 to 2014; Vice President and Controller of Donegal Mutual and us from 2000 to 2005; other positions from 1995 to 2000.

Cyril J. Greenya

     70       Senior Vice President and Chief Underwriting Officer of Donegal Mutual and us since 2005; Senior Vice President, Underwriting, of Donegal Mutual from 1997 to 2005; other positions from 1986 to 1997.

Sanjay Pandey

     48       Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer of Donegal Mutual and us since 2013; Vice President and Chief Information Officer of Donegal Mutual and us from 2009 to 2013; other positions from 2000 to 2009.

Robert G. Shenk

     61       Senior Vice President, Claims, of Donegal Mutual and us since 1997; other positions from 1986 to 1997.

Daniel J. Wagner

     54       Senior Vice President and Treasurer of Donegal Mutual and us since 2005; Vice President and Treasurer of Donegal Mutual and us from 2000 to 2005; other positions from 1993 to 2000.

 

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PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

Our Class A common stock and Class B common stock trade on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbols “DGICA” and “DGICB,” respectively. The following table shows the dividends paid per share and the stock price range for both classes of stock for each quarter during 2014 and 2013:

 

Quarter

   High      Low      Cash
Dividend
Declared
Per Share
 

2014 - Class A

        

1st

   $ 15.96       $ 13.84       $ —     

2nd

     15.90         14.05         0.1315   

3rd

     16.18         15.00         0.1315   

4th

     16.10         14.96         0.2630   

2014 - Class B

        

1st

   $ 26.01       $ 21.14       $ —     

2nd

     27.75         18.26         0.1160   

3rd

     24.90         21.00         0.1160   

4th

     23.88         21.00         0.2320   

2013 - Class A

        

1st

   $ 16.52       $ 12.93       $ —     

2nd

     15.59         13.90         0.1275   

3rd

     14.90         13.35         0.1275   

4th

     16.88         14.15         0.2550   

2013 - Class B

        

1st

   $ 28.49       $ 17.92       $ —     

2nd

     27.85         19.00         0.1150   

3rd

     24.03         18.00         0.1150   

4th

     26.00         19.21         0.2300   

At the close of business on March 2, 2015, we had approximately 1,889 holders of record of our Class A common stock and approximately 327 holders of record of our Class B common stock.

We declared dividends of $0.526 per share on our Class A common stock and $0.464 per share on our Class B common stock in 2014, compared to $0.51 per share on our Class A common stock and $0.46 per share on our Class B common stock in 2013.

We and Donegal Mutual did not purchase any shares of our Class A common stock or Class B common stock between October 1, 2014 and December 31, 2014.

 

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Stock Performance Chart.

The following graph provides an indicator of cumulative total stockholder returns on our Class A common stock and our Class B common stock for the period beginning on December 31, 2009 and ending on December 31, 2014, compared to the Russell 2000 Index and a peer group comprised of seven property and casualty insurance companies over the same period. The peer group consists of Cincinnati Financial Corp., EMC Insurance Group Inc., Hanover Insurance, Horace Mann Educators, Selective Insurance Group Inc., State Auto Financial Corp. and United Fire and Casualty Co. The graph shows the change in value of an initial $100 investment on December 31, 2009, assuming reinvestment of all dividends.

 

LOGO

 

     2009      2010      2011      2012      2013      2014  

Donegal Group Inc. Class A

   $ 100.00       $ 96.36       $ 97.82       $ 100.45       $ 117.81       $ 122.55   

Donegal Group Inc. Class B

     100.00         107.32         102.63         115.25         154.62         143.31   

Russell 2000 Index

     100.00         125.31         118.47         135.81         186.07         192.63   

Peer Group

     100.00         119.50         110.92         140.54         200.97         215.39   

Value Line Publishing LLC prepared the foregoing performance graph and data. The performance graph and accompanying data shall not be deemed “filed” as part of this Form 10-K Report for purposes of Section 18 of the Exchange Act or otherwise subject to the liabilities of that section and should not be deemed incorporated by reference into any other filing we make under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, except to the extent we specifically incorporate the performance graph and accompanying data by reference into such filing.

 

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Item 6. Selected Financial Data.

 

Year Ended December 31,    2014      2013      2012      2011     2010  

Income Statement Data

             

Premiums earned

   $ 556,497,535       $ 515,291,944       $ 475,002,222       $ 431,470,184      $ 378,030,129   

Investment income, net

     18,344,382         18,795,239         20,168,919         20,858,179        19,949,714   

Realized investment gains

     3,134,081         2,423,442         6,859,439         12,281,267        4,395,720   

Total revenues

     586,547,742         547,110,065         514,982,585         475,017,619        408,549,446   

Income (loss) before income taxes (benefit)

     16,282,817         32,710,265         27,858,260         (6,739,313     9,844,149   

Income taxes (benefit)

     1,743,799         6,388,273         4,765,640         (7,192,266     (1,623,030

Net income

     14,539,018         26,321,992         23,092,620         452,953        11,467,179   

Basic earnings per share - Class A

     0.56         1.04         0.92         0.02        0.46   

Diluted earnings per share - Class A

     0.55         1.02         0.91         0.02        0.46   

Cash dividends per share - Class A

     0.53         0.51         0.49         0.48        0.46   

Basic earnings per share - Class B

     0.49         0.94         0.83         0.01        0.41   

Diluted earnings per share - Class B

     0.49         0.94         0.83         0.01        0.41   

Cash dividends per share - Class B

     0.46         0.46         0.44         0.43        0.41   

Balance Sheet Data at Year End

             

Total investments

   $ 832,941,077       $ 791,808,307       $ 806,429,032       $ 785,308,991      $ 728,541,814   

Total assets

     1,458,654,644         1,385,410,502         1,336,889,187         1,290,793,478        1,174,619,523   

Debt obligations

     58,500,000         63,000,000         72,465,000         74,965,000        56,082,371   

Stockholders’ equity

     416,134,643         396,877,111         400,034,094         383,451,592        380,102,810   

Book value per share

     15.40         15.02         15.63         15.01        14.86   

 

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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Overview

Donegal Mutual Insurance Company (“Donegal Mutual”) organized us as an insurance holding company on August 26, 1986. See “Business - History and Organizational Structure” for more information. Our insurance subsidiaries, Atlantic States Insurance Company (“Atlantic States”), Southern Insurance Company of Virginia (“Southern”), Le Mars Insurance Company (“Le Mars”), The Peninsula Insurance Company and Peninsula Indemnity Company (collectively, “Peninsula”), Sheboygan Falls Insurance Company (“Sheboygan Falls”) and Michigan Insurance Company (“MICO”) write personal and commercial lines of property and casualty coverages exclusively through a network of independent insurance agents in certain Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, New England and Southern states. The personal lines products of our insurance subsidiaries consist primarily of homeowners and private passenger automobile policies. The commercial lines products of our insurance subsidiaries consist primarily of commercial automobile, commercial multi-peril and workers’ compensation policies. We also own 48.2% of the outstanding stock of Donegal Financial Services Corporation (“DFSC”), a grandfathered unitary savings and loan holding company. Donegal Mutual owns the remaining 51.8% of the outstanding stock of DFSC.

At December 31, 2014, Donegal Mutual held approximately 36% of our outstanding Class A common stock and approximately 76% of our outstanding Class B common stock. This ownership provides Donegal Mutual with approximately 65% of the aggregate voting power of our outstanding shares of Class A common stock and our outstanding shares of Class B common stock.

Donegal Mutual and Atlantic States entered into a proportional reinsurance agreement, or pooling agreement, effective October 1, 1986. Under this pooling agreement, Donegal Mutual and Atlantic States pool and then share proportionately substantially all of their respective premiums, losses and expenses. Atlantic States’ participation in the pool has been 80% since March 1, 2008. The operations of our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual are interrelated due to the pooling agreement and other factors. While maintaining the separate corporate existence of each company, our insurance subsidiaries and Donegal Mutual conduct business together as the Donegal Insurance Group. As such, Donegal Mutual and our insurance subsidiaries share the same business philosophy, the same management, the same employees and the same facilities and offer the same types of insurance products. See “Business - History and Organizational Structure” for more information regarding the pooling agreement and other transactions with our affiliates.

In February 2009, our board of directors authorized a share repurchase program, pursuant to which we may purchase up to 300,000 shares of our Class A common stock at prices prevailing from time to time in the open market subject to the provisions of Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) Rule 10b-18 and in privately negotiated transactions. We purchased 846 and 24,240 shares of our Class A common stock under this program during 2014 and 2013, respectively. At December 31, 2014, we had the authority remaining to purchase 3,222 shares under this program.

On July 18, 2013, our board of directors authorized a share repurchase program pursuant to which we have the authority to purchase up to 500,000 additional shares of our Class A common stock at prices prevailing from time to time in the open market subject to the provisions of the SEC Rule 10b-18 and in privately negotiated transactions. We did not purchase shares under this program during 2014 or 2013.

At our annual meeting of stockholders on April 18, 2013, our stockholders approved an amendment to our certificate of incorporation that increased the number of shares of our Class A common stock we have the authority to issue from 30.0 million shares to 40.0 million shares.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

We combine our financial statements with those of our insurance subsidiaries and present them on a consolidated basis in accordance with GAAP.

Our insurance subsidiaries make estimates and assumptions that can have a significant effect on amounts and disclosures we report in our financial statements. The most significant estimates relate to the reserves of our insurance subsidiaries for property and casualty insurance unpaid losses and loss expenses, valuation of investments and determination of other-than-temporary investment impairments and the policy acquisition costs of our insurance subsidiaries. While we believe our estimates and the estimates of our insurance subsidiaries are appropriate, the ultimate amounts may differ from the estimates we provided. We regularly review our methods for making these estimates, and we reflect any adjustment we consider necessary in our results of operations for the period in which we make an adjustment.

 

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Liability for Losses and Loss Expenses

Liabilities for losses and loss expenses are estimates at a given point in time of the amounts an insurer expects to pay with respect to policyholder claims based on facts and circumstances then known. At the time of establishing its estimates, an insurer recognizes that its ultimate liability for losses and loss expenses will exceed or be less than such estimates. Our insurance subsidiaries base their estimates of liabilities for losses and loss expenses on assumptions as to future loss trends, expected claims severity, judicial theories of liability and other factors. However, during the loss adjustment period, our insurance subsidiaries may learn additional facts regarding individual claims, and, consequently, it often becomes necessary for our insurance subsidiaries to refine and adjust their estimates of liability. We reflect any adjustments to our insurance subsidiaries’ liabilities for losses and loss expenses in our consolidated results of operations in the period in which our insurance subsidiaries make the changes in estimates.

Our insurance subsidiaries maintain liabilities for the payment of losses and loss expenses with respect to both reported and unreported claims. Our insurance subsidiaries establish these liabilities for the purpose of covering the ultimate costs of settling all losses, including investigation and litigation costs. Our insurance subsidiaries base the amount of their liability for reported losses primarily upon a case-by-case evaluation of the type of risk involved, knowledge of the circumstances surrounding each claim and the insurance policy provisions relating to the type of loss the policyholder incurred. Our insurance subsidiaries determine the amount of their liability for unreported claims and loss expenses on the basis of historical information by line of insurance. Our insurance subsidiaries account for inflation in the reserving function through analysis of costs and trends and reviews of historical reserving results. Our insurance subsidiaries closely monitor their liabilities and recompute them periodically using new information on reported claims and a variety of statistical techniques. Our insurance subsidiaries do not discount their liabilities for losses.

Reserve estimates can change over time because of unexpected changes in assumptions related to our insurance subsidiaries’ external environment and, to a lesser extent, assumptions related to our insurance subsidiaries’ internal operations. For example, our insurance subsidiaries have experienced a decrease in claims frequency on workers’ compensation claims during the past several years while claims severity has gradually increased. These trend changes give rise to greater uncertainty as to the pattern of future loss settlements on workers’ compensation claims. Related uncertainties regarding future trends include the cost of medical technologies and procedures and changes in the utilization of medical procedures. Assumptions related to our insurance subsidiaries’ external environment include the absence of significant changes in tort law and the legal environment that increase liability exposure, consistency in judicial interpretations of insurance coverage and policy provisions and the rate of loss cost inflation. Internal assumptions include consistency in the recording of premium and loss statistics, consistency in the recording of claims, payment and case reserving methodology, accurate measurement of the impact of rate changes and changes in policy provisions, consistency in the quality and characteristics of business written within a given line of business and consistency in reinsurance coverage and collectability of reinsured losses, among other items. To the extent our insurance subsidiaries determine that underlying factors impacting their assumptions have changed, our insurance subsidiaries attempt to make appropriate adjustments for such changes in their reserves. Accordingly, our insurance subsidiaries’ ultimate liability for unpaid losses and loss expenses will likely differ from the amount recorded at December 31, 2014. For every 1% change in our insurance subsidiaries’ estimate for loss and loss expense reserves, net of reinsurance recoverable, the effect on our pre-tax results of operations would be approximately $2.9 million.

The establishment of appropriate liabilities is an inherently uncertain process and we can provide no assurance that our insurance subsidiaries’ ultimate liability will not exceed our insurance subsidiaries’ loss and loss expense reserves and have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. Furthermore, we cannot predict the timing, frequency and extent of adjustments to our insurance subsidiaries’ estimated future liabilities, since the historical conditions and events that serve as a basis for our insurance subsidiaries’ estimates of ultimate claim costs may change. As is the case for substantially all property and casualty insurance companies, our insurance subsidiaries have found it necessary in the past to increase their estimated future liabilities for losses and loss expenses in certain periods and, in other periods, their estimates of future liabilities have exceeded their actual liabilities. Changes in our insurance subsidiaries’ estimate of their liability for losses and loss expenses generally reflect actual payments and their evaluation of information received since the prior reporting date. Our insurance subsidiaries recognized an increase in their liability for losses and loss expenses of prior years of $14.5 million, $10.4 million and $7.6 million in 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Our insurance subsidiaries made no significant changes in their reserving philosophy, key reserving assumptions or claims management personnel, and have made no significant offsetting changes in estimates that increased or decreased their loss and loss expense reserves in these years. The 2014 development represented 5.4% of the December 31, 2013 net carried reserves and resulted primarily from higher-than-expected severity in the private passenger automobile liability, commercial multiple peril and commercial automobile lines of business in accident years prior to 2014.

 

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Excluding the impact of weather events, our insurance subsidiaries have noted stable amounts in the number of claims incurred and a slight downward trend in the number of claims outstanding at period ends relative to their premium base in recent years across most of their lines of business. However, the amount of the average claim outstanding has increased gradually over the past several years as the United States property and casualty insurance industry has experienced increased litigation trends and economic conditions that have extended the estimated length of disabilities and contributed to increased medical loss costs. We have also experienced a general slowing of settlement rates in litigated claims. Our insurance subsidiaries could have to make further adjustments to their estimates in the future. However, on the basis of our insurance subsidiaries’ internal procedures, which analyze, among other things, their prior assumptions, their experience with similar cases and historical trends such as reserving patterns, loss payments, pending levels of unpaid claims and product mix, as well as court decisions, economic conditions and public attitudes, we believe that our insurance subsidiaries have made adequate provision for their liability for losses and loss expenses at December 31, 2014.

Atlantic States’ participation in the pool with Donegal Mutual exposes it to adverse loss development on the business of Donegal Mutual that the pool includes. However, pooled business represents the predominant percentage of the net underwriting activity of both companies, and Donegal Mutual and Atlantic States proportionately share any adverse risk development of the pooled business. The business in the pool is homogeneous and each company has a pro-rata share of the entire pool. Since substantially all of the business of Atlantic States and Donegal Mutual is pooled and the results shared by each company according to its participation level under the terms of the pooling agreement, the intent of the underwriting pool is to produce a more uniform and stable underwriting result from year to year for each company than either would experience individually and to spread the risk of loss between the companies.

Our insurance subsidiaries’ liability for losses and loss expenses by major line of business at December 31, 2014 and 2013 consisted of the following:

 

     2014      2013  
     (in thousands)  

Commercial lines:

     

Automobile

   $ 44,270       $ 36,017   

Workers’ compensation

     89,995         79,932   

Commercial multi-peril

     48,499         39,822   

Other

     2,679         2,716   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total commercial lines

     185,443         158,487   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Personal lines:

     

Automobile

     90,207         92,280   

Homeowners

     15,053         13,367   

Other

     1,598         1,471   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total personal lines

     106,858         107,118   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total commercial and personal lines

     292,301         265,605   

Plus reinsurance recoverable

     245,957         230,014   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total liability for losses and loss expenses

   $ 538,258       $ 495,619   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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We have evaluated the effect on our insurance subsidiaries’ loss and loss expense reserves and our stockholders’ equity in the event of reasonably likely changes in the variables we consider in establishing loss and loss expense reserves. We established the range of reasonably likely changes based on a review of changes in accident year development by line of business and applied it to our insurance subsidiaries’ loss reserves as a whole. The selected range does not necessarily indicate what could be the potential best or worst case or the most-likely scenario. The following table sets forth the effect on our insurance subsidiaries’ loss and loss expense reserves and our stockholders’ equity in the event of reasonably likely changes in the variables considered in establishing loss and loss expense reserves:

 

Change in Loss and Loss
Expense Reserves Net  of
Reinsurance
    Adjusted Loss and Loss
Expense Reserves Net of
Reinsurance at
December 31, 2014
    Percentage Change in
Equity at
December 31, 2014(1)
    Adjusted Loss and Loss
Expense Reserves Net of
Reinsurance  at
December 31, 2013
    Percentage Change in
Equity at
December 31, 2013(1)
 
(dollars in thousands)  
  -10.0   $ 263,071        4.6   $ 239,045        4.4
  -7.5        270,378        3.4        245,685        3.3   
  -5.0        277,686        2.3        252,325        2.2   
  -2.5        284,993        1.1        258,965        1.1   
  Base        292,301        —          265,605        —     
  2.5        299,609        -1.1        272,245        -1.1   
  5.0        306,916        -2.3        278,885        -2.2   
  7.5        314,224        -3.4        285,525        -3.3   
  10.0        321,531        -4.6        292,166        -4.4   

 

(1) Net of income tax effect.

Our insurance subsidiaries base their reserves for unpaid losses and loss expenses on current trends in loss and loss expense development and reflect their best estimates for future amounts needed to pay losses and loss expenses with respect to incurred events currently known to them plus incurred but not reported (“IBNR”) claims. Our insurance subsidiaries develop their reserve estimates based on an assessment of known facts and circumstances, review of historical loss settlement patterns, estimates of trends in claims severity, frequency, legal and regulatory changes and other assumptions. Our insurance subsidiaries consistently apply actuarial loss reserving techniques and assumptions, which rely on historical information as adjusted to reflect current conditions, including consideration of recent case reserve activity. Our insurance subsidiaries use the most-likely number their actuaries determine. For the year ended December 31, 2014, the actuaries developed a range from a low of $266.3 million to a high of $310.4 million and with a most-likely number of $292.3 million. The actuaries’ range of estimates for commercial lines in 2014 was $169.0 million to $203.5 million, and the actuaries selected the most-likely number of $185.4 million. The actuaries’ range of estimates for personal lines in 2014 was $97.3 million to $106.9 million, and the actuaries selected the most-likely number of $106.9 million. For the year ended December 31, 2013, the actuaries developed a range from a low of $238.8 million to a high of $295.5 million and with a most-likely number of $265.6 million. The actuaries’ range of estimates for commercial lines in 2013 was $142.5 million to $176.2 million, and the actuaries selected the most-likely number of $158.5 million. The actuaries’ range of estimates for personal lines in 2013 was $96.2 million to $119.3 million, and the actuaries selected the most-likely number of $107.1 million.

Our insurance subsidiaries seek to enhance their underwriting results by carefully selecting the product lines they underwrite. For personal lines products, our insurance subsidiaries insure standard and preferred risks in private passenger automobile and homeowners lines. For commercial lines products, the commercial risks that our insurance subsidiaries primarily insure are business offices, wholesalers, service providers, contractors, artisans and light manufacturing operations. Our insurance subsidiaries have limited exposure to asbestos and other environmental liabilities. Our insurance subsidiaries write no medical malpractice liability risks. Through the consistent application of this disciplined underwriting philosophy, our insurance subsidiaries have avoided many of the “long-tail” issues other insurance companies have faced. We consider workers’ compensation to be a “long-tail” line of business, in that workers’ compensation claims tend to be settled over a longer time frame than those in the other lines of business of our insurance subsidiaries.

 

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The following table presents 2014 and 2013 claim count and payment amount information for workers’ compensation. Workers’ compensation losses primarily consist of indemnity and medical costs for injured workers.

 

     For the Year Ended December 31,  
(dollars in thousands)    2014      2013  

Number of claims pending, beginning of period

     2,609         2,345   

Number of claims reported

     6,165         6,869   

Number of claims settled or dismissed

     6,092         6,605   

Number of claims pending, end of period

     2,682         2,609   

Losses paid

   $ 36,753       $ 32,419   

Loss expenses paid

     7,602         7,365   

Investments

We make estimates concerning the valuation of our investments and the recognition of other-than-temporary declines in the value of our investments. For equity securities, we write down the investment to its fair value and we reflect the amount of the write-down as a realized loss in our results of operations when we consider the decline in value of an individual investment to be other than temporary. We individually monitor all investments for other-than-temporary declines in value. Generally, we assume there has been an other-than-temporary decline in value if an individual equity security has depreciated in value by more than 20% of original cost and has been in such an unrealized loss position for more than six months. We held 12 equity securities that were in an unrealized loss position at December 31, 2014. Based upon our analysis of general market conditions and underlying factors impacting these equity securities, we considered these declines in value to be temporary. With respect to a debt security that is in an unrealized loss position, we first assess if we intend to sell the debt security. If we determine we intend to sell the debt security, we recognize the impairment loss in our results of operations. If we do not intend to sell the debt security, we determine whether it is more likely than not that we will be required to sell the security prior to recovery. If we determine it is more likely than not that we will be required to sell the debt security prior to recovery, we recognize an impairment loss in our results of operations. If we determine it is more likely than not that we will not be required to sell the debt security prior to recovery, we then evaluate whether a credit loss has occurred. We determine whether a credit loss has occurred by comparing the amortized cost of the debt security to the present value of the cash flows we expect to collect. If we expect a cash flow shortfall, we consider that a credit loss has occurred. If we determine that a credit loss has occurred, we consider the impairment to be other than temporary. We then recognize the amount of the impairment loss related to the credit loss in our results of operations, and we recognize the remaining portion of the impairment loss in our other comprehensive income, net of applicable taxes. In addition, we may write down securities in an unrealized loss position based on a number of other factors, including when the fair value of an investment is significantly below its cost, when the financial condition of the issuer of a security has deteriorated, the occurrence of industry, company or geographic events that have negatively impacted the value of a security and rating agency downgrades. We held 95 debt securities that were in an unrealized loss position at December 31, 2014. Based upon our analysis of general market conditions and underlying factors impacting these debt securities, we considered these declines in value to be temporary. We did not recognize any impairment losses in 2014, 2013 or 2012.

We held fixed maturities and equity securities with unrealized losses representing declines that we considered temporary at December 31, 2014 as follows:

 

     Less than 12 months      12 months or longer  
     Fair Value      Unrealized
Losses
     Fair Value      Unrealized
Losses
 

U.S. Treasury securities and obligations of U.S. government corporations and agencies

   $ 6,821,013       $ 18,511       $ 937,448       $ 1,482   

Obligations of states and political subdivisions

     4,145,920         15,356         1,309,285         3,686   

Corporate securities

     26,854,423         499,697         2,397,635         35,866   

Mortgage-backed securities

     13,360,859         71,730         9,025,795         132,134   

Equity securities

     7,511,808         815,628         —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Totals

   $ 58,694,023       $ 1,420,922       $ 13,670,163       $ 173,168   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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We held fixed maturities and equity securities with unrealized losses representing declines that we considered temporary at December 31, 2013 as follows:

 

     Less than 12 months      12 months or longer  
     Fair Value      Unrealized
Losses
     Fair Value      Unrealized
Losses
 

U.S. Treasury securities and obligations of U.S. government corporations and agencies

   $ 50,802,809       $ 821,941       $ 4,642,775       $ 104,331   

Obligations of states and political subdivisions

     65,170,891         363,240         13,404,781         98,676   

Corporate securities

     16,693,759         83,535         6,851,898         71,802   

Mortgage-backed securities

     72,878,347         535,944         19,013,889         213,414   

Equity securities

     1,628,893         92,867         —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Totals

   $ 207,174,699       $ 1,897,527       $ 43,913,343       $ 488,223   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

We present our investments in available-for-sale fixed maturity and equity securities at estimated fair value. The estimated fair value of a security may differ from the amount that could be realized if we sold the security in a forced transaction. In addition, the valuation of fixed maturity investments is more subjective when markets are less liquid, increasing the potential that the estimated fair value does not reflect the price at which an actual transaction would occur. We utilize nationally recognized independent pricing services to estimate fair values or obtain market quotations for substantially all of our fixed maturity and equity investments. We generally obtain two prices per security. The pricing services utilize market quotations for fixed maturity and equity securities that have quoted prices in active markets. For fixed maturity securities that generally do not trade on a daily basis, the pricing services prepare estimates of fair value measurements based predominantly on observable market inputs. The pricing services do not use broker quotes in determining the fair values of our investments. Our investment personnel review the estimates of fair value the pricing services provide to determine if the estimates we obtain are representative of fair values based upon their general knowledge of the market, their research findings related to unusual fluctuations in value and their comparison of such values to execution prices for similar securities. Our investment personnel monitor the market and are familiar with current trading ranges for similar securities and pricing of specific investments. Our investment personnel review all pricing estimates that we receive from the pricing services against the expectations of our investment personnel with respect to pricing based on fair market curves, security ratings, coupon rates, security type and recent trading activity. Our investment personnel review documentation with respect to the pricing services’ pricing methodology that they obtain periodically to determine if the primary pricing sources, market inputs and pricing frequency for various security types are reasonable. At December 31, 2014, we received two estimates per security from the pricing services, and we priced substantially all of our Level 1 and Level 2 investments using those prices. In our review of the estimates the pricing services provided at December 31, 2014, we did not identify any material discrepancies, and we did not make any adjustments to the estimates the pricing services provided.

We had no sales or transfers from the held to maturity portfolio in 2014, 2013 or 2012.

Policy Acquisition Costs

We defer our insurance subsidiaries’ policy acquisition costs, consisting primarily of commissions, premium taxes and certain other underwriting costs, reduced by ceded commissions, that vary with and relate directly to the production of business. We amortize these costs over the period in which our insurance subsidiaries earn the premiums on that business. The method our insurance subsidiaries follow in computing deferred policy acquisition costs limits the amount of such deferred costs to their estimated realizable value, which gives effect to the premium to be earned, related investment income, losses and loss expenses and certain other costs we expect to incur as our insurance subsidiaries earn the premium.

Management Evaluation of Operating Results

Despite headwinds from economic uncertainty, challenging insurance market conditions and unusually adverse weather conditions that affected our results in recent years, we believe that our focused business strategy, including our insurance subsidiaries’ disciplined underwriting practices, have positioned us well for 2015 and beyond.

The property and casualty insurance industry is highly cyclical, and individual lines of business experience their own cycles within the overall property and casualty insurance industry cycle. Premium rate levels relate to the availability of insurance coverage, which varies according to the level of surplus in the insurance industry and other factors. The level of surplus in the industry varies with returns on capital and regulatory barriers to the withdrawal of surplus. Increases in surplus have generally been accompanied by increased price competition among property and casualty insurers. If our insurance

 

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subsidiaries were to find it necessary to reduce premiums or limit premium increases due to competitive pressures on pricing, our insurance subsidiaries could experience a reduction in profit margins and revenues, an increase in ratios of losses and expenses to premiums and, therefore, lower profitability. The cyclicality of the insurance market and its potential impact on our results is difficult to predict with any significant reliability. We evaluate the performance of our commercial lines and personal lines segments primarily based upon the underwriting results of our insurance subsidiaries as determined under statutory accounting practices (“SAP”), which our management uses to measure performance for the total business of our insurance subsidiaries.

We use the following financial data to monitor and evaluate our operating results:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
(in thousands)    2014     2013     2012  

Net premiums written:

      

Personal lines:

      

Automobile

   $ 204,174      $ 196,363      $ 195,132   

Homeowners

     113,576        106,420        97,120   

Other

     16,989        15,915        16,319   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total personal lines

     334,739        318,698        308,571   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Commercial lines:

      

Automobile

     65,552        58,165        51,261   

Workers’ compensation

     88,739        77,589        65,390   

Commercial multi-peril

     83,413        74,516        64,476   

Other

     6,758        4,463        6,749   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total commercial lines

     244,462        214,733        187,876   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total net premiums written

   $ 579,201      $ 533,431      $ 496,447   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Components of GAAP combined ratio:

      

Loss ratio

     69.8     66.6     70.1

Expense ratio

     31.4        31.8        31.2   

Dividend ratio

     0.5        0.4        0.3   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

GAAP combined ratio

     101.7     98.8     101.6
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Revenues:

      

Premiums earned:

      

Personal lines

   $ 325,442      $ 312,309      $ 300,272   

Commercial lines

     231,056        202,983        174,735   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

SAP premiums earned

     556,498        515,292        475,007   

GAAP adjustments

     —          —          (5
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

GAAP premiums earned

     556,498        515,292        475,002   

Net investment income

     18,344        18,795        20,169   

Realized investment gains

     3,134        2,423        6,859   

Equity in earnings of DFSC

     1,243        2,908        4,533   

Other

     7,329        7,692        8,420   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

   $ 586,548      $ 547,110      $ 514,983   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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     Year Ended December 31,  
(in thousands)    2014      2013      2012  

Components of net income:

        

Underwriting (loss) income:

        

Personal lines

   $ (6,383    $ 1,654       $ (18,236

Commercial lines

     (9,434      (524      5,251   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

SAP underwriting (loss) income

     (15,817      1,130         (12,985

GAAP adjustments

     6,312         5,175         5,545   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

GAAP underwriting (loss) income

     (9,505      6,305         (7,440

Net investment income

     18,344         18,795         20,169   

Realized investment gains

     3,134         2,423         6,859   

Equity in earnings of DFSC

     1,243         2,908         4,533   

Other

     3,067         2,279         3,737   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Income before income tax

     16,283         32,710         27,858   

Income tax

     (1,744      (6,388      (4,765
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 14,539       $ 26,322       $ 23,093   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Statutory Combined Ratios

We evaluate our insurance operations by monitoring certain key measures of growth and profitability. In addition to using GAAP-based performance measurements, we also utilize certain non-GAAP financial measures that we believe are valuable in managing our business and for comparison to our peers. These non-GAAP measures are underwriting (loss) income, statutory combined ratio and net premiums written. An insurance company’s statutory combined ratio is a standard measure of underwriting profitability. This ratio is the sum of the ratio of calendar-year incurred losses and loss expenses to premiums earned; the ratio of expenses incurred for commissions, premium taxes and underwriting expenses to premiums written and the ratio of dividends to policyholders to premiums earned. The statutory combined ratio does not reflect investment income, federal income taxes or other non-operating income or expense. A ratio of less than 100 percent generally indicates underwriting profitability. The statutory combined ratio differs from the GAAP combined ratio. In calculating the GAAP combined ratio, installment payment fees are not deducted from incurred expenses and the expense ratio is based on premiums earned instead of premiums written. The following table sets forth our insurance subsidiaries’ statutory combined ratios by major line of business for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2014     2013     2012  

Commercial lines:

      

Automobile

     115.0     104.9     94.5

Workers’ compensation

     91.1        96.9        98.1   

Commercial multi-peril

     102.9        92.9        90.5   

Total commercial lines

     99.8        95.7        91.2   

Personal lines:

      

Automobile

     102.8        103.2        108.1   

Homeowners

     97.8        93.0        100.9   

Total personal lines

     101.0        98.8        105.0   

Total commercial and personal lines

     100.5        97.4        99.8   

 

 

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Results of Operations

YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2014 COMPARED TO YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2013

Net Premiums Written

Our insurance subsidiaries’ 2014 net premiums written increased 8.6% to $579.2 million, compared to $533.4 million for 2013. We primarily attribute the increase to a reduction in MICO’s quota-share reinsurance, the impact of premium rate increases and an increase in the writing of commercial lines of insurance. Effective January 1, 2014, MICO reduced its external quota-share reinsurance percentage from 30% to 20%. Commercial lines net premiums written increased $29.7 million, or 13.8%, for 2014 compared to 2013. The increase includes $5.6 million related to the reduction in the amount of premium MICO reinsured in 2014, with the remainder attributable to premium rate increases and increased writings of new accounts in the commercial automobile, commercial multi-peril and workers’ compensation lines of business. Personal lines net premiums written increased $16.0 million, or 5.0%, for 2014 compared to 2013. The increase includes $4.1 million resulting from the reduction in the amount of premium MICO reinsured in 2014, with the remainder primarily attributable to premium rate increases.

Net Premiums Earned

Our insurance subsidiaries’ net premiums earned increased to $556.5 million for 2014, an increase of $41.2 million, or 8.0%, over 2013, reflecting increases in net premiums written during 2013 and 2014. Our insurance subsidiaries earn premiums and recognize them as income over the terms of the policies they issue. Such terms are generally one year or less in duration. Therefore, increases or decreases in net premiums earned generally reflect increases or decreases in net premiums written in the preceding twelve-month period compared to the same period one year earlier.

Investment Income

For 2014, our net investment income was $18.3 million, representing a slight decrease from 2013. An increase in our average invested assets from $799.1 million in 2013 to $812.4 million in 2014 was offset by a decrease in our annualized average rate of return to 2.3% in 2014, compared to 2.4% in 2013.

Installment Payment Fees

Our insurance subsidiaries’ installment fees decreased primarily as a result of their customers’ increased usage of payment plans that have lower installment payment fees during 2014.

Net Realized Investment Gains/Losses

Our net realized investment gains in 2014 and 2013 were $3.1 million and $2.4 million, respectively. The net realized investment gains in 2014 and 2013 resulted from normal turnover within our investment portfolio. We did not recognize any impairment losses during 2014 or 2013.

Equity in Earnings of DFSC

Our equity in the earnings of DFSC in 2014 and 2013 was $1.2 million and $2.9 million, respectively. The decrease in DFSC’s earnings during 2014 compared to 2013 resulted from a lesser benefit from acquisition accounting adjustments and a charge to terminate a lease obligation related to UCB’s former main office.

Losses and Loss Expenses

Our insurance subsidiaries’ loss ratio, which is the ratio of incurred losses and loss expenses to premiums earned, was 69.8% in 2014, compared to 66.6% in 2013. Our insurance subsidiaries’ commercial lines loss ratio increased to 72.0% in 2014, compared to 67.1% in 2013. This increase resulted primarily from the commercial automobile loss ratio increasing to 83.2% in 2014, compared to 73.0% in 2013, and the commercial multi-peril loss ratio increasing to 73.5% in 2014, compared to 61.5% in 2013. The personal lines loss ratio increased to 68.2% in 2014, compared to 66.3% in 2013, primarily as a result of a increase in the homeowners loss ratio to 60.4% in 2014, compared to 57.7% in 2013, primarily as a result of an increase in weather-related claims. Our insurance subsidiaries experienced unfavorable loss reserve development of approximately $14.5 million during 2014 in their reserves for prior accident years, compared to unfavorable loss reserve development of approximately $10.4 million during 2013. The change in loss reserve development patterns occurred primarily within our insurance subsidiaries’ commercial automobile, commercial multi-peril and personal automobile reserves.

 

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Underwriting Expenses

Our insurance subsidiaries’ expense ratio, which is the ratio of policy acquisition and other underwriting expenses to premiums earned, was 31.4% in 2014, compared to 31.8% in 2013.

Combined Ratio

Our insurance subsidiaries’ combined ratio was 101.7% and 98.8% in 2014 and 2013, respectively. The combined ratio represents the sum of the loss ratio, the expense ratio and the dividend ratio, which is the ratio of workers’ compensation policy dividends incurred to premiums earned. We attribute the increase in our combined ratio primarily to the increase in our loss ratio.

Interest Expense

Our interest expense in 2014 decreased slightly to $1.5 million, compared to $1.6 million in 2013.

Income Taxes

Our income tax expense was $1.7 million in 2014, compared to $6.4 million in 2013. Our effective tax rate for 2014 was 10.7%, compared to 19.5% for 2013. The decrease in our 2014 effective tax rate was primarily due to tax-exempt interest income representing a larger proportion of income before income tax expense in 2014 compared to 2013.

Net Income and Earnings Per Share

Our net income in 2014 was $14.5 million, or $.55 per share of Class A common stock on a diluted basis and $.49 per share of Class B common stock, compared to $26.3 million, or $1.02 per share of Class A common stock on a diluted basis and $.94 per share of Class B common stock, in 2013. We had 21.4 million and 20.8 million Class A shares outstanding at December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. We had 5.6 million Class B shares outstanding for both periods. There are no outstanding securities that dilute our shares of Class B common stock.

Book Value Per Share and Return on Equity

Our stockholders’ equity increased by $19.3 million in 2014. We attribute the increase primarily to net after-tax unrealized gains within our available-for-sale fixed maturity investment portfolio during 2014. Book value per share increased to $15.40 at December 31, 2014, compared to $15.02 a year earlier. Our return on average equity was 3.6% for 2014, compared to 6.6% for 2013.

YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2013 COMPARED TO YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2012

Net Premiums Written

Our insurance subsidiaries’ 2013 net premiums written increased 7.5% to $533.4 million, compared to $496.4 million for 2012. We primarily attribute the increase to a reduction in MICO’s quota-share reinsurance, the impact of premium rate increases and an increase in the writing of commercial lines of insurance. Effective January 1, 2013, MICO reduced its external quota-share reinsurance percentage from 40% to 30%. Commercial lines net premiums written increased $26.6 million, or 14.1%, for 2013 compared to 2012. The increase includes $5.6 million related to the reduction in the amount of premium MICO reinsured in 2013, with the remainder attributable to increased writings of new accounts in the commercial automobile, commercial multi-peril and workers’ compensation lines of business. Personal lines net premiums written increased $10.4 million, or 3.4%, for 2013 compared to 2012. The increase includes $4.2 million resulting from the reduction in the amount of premium MICO reinsured in 2013, with the remainder primarily attributable to premium rate increases our subsidiaries implemented throughout 2012 and 2013 and reduced reinsurance reinstatement premiums.

 

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Net Premiums Earned

Our insurance subsidiaries’ net premiums earned increased to $515.3 million for 2013, an increase of $40.3 million, or 8.5%, over 2012, reflecting increases in net premiums written during 2012 and 2013. Our insurance subsidiaries earn premiums and recognize them as income over the terms of the policies they issue. Such terms are generally one year or less in duration. Therefore, increases or decreases in net premiums earned generally reflect increases or decreases in net premiums written in the preceding twelve-month period compared to the same period one year earlier.

Investment Income

For 2013, our net investment income was $18.8 million, a $1.4 million decrease from 2012. An increase in our average invested assets from $795.9 million in 2012 to $799.1 million in 2013 was offset by a decrease in our annualized average rate of return to 2.4% in 2013, compared to 2.5% in 2012.

Installment Payment Fees

Our insurance subsidiaries’ installment fees decreased primarily as a result of their customers’ increased usage of payment plans that have lower installment payment fees during 2013.

Net Realized Investment Gains/Losses

Our net realized investment gains in 2013 and 2012 were $2.4 million and $6.9 million, respectively. The net realized investment gains in 2013 and 2012 resulted from normal turnover within our investment portfolio. We did not recognize any impairment losses during 2013 or 2012.

Equity in Earnings of DFSC

Our equity in the earnings of DFSC in 2013 and 2012 was $2.9 million and $4.5 million, respectively. The decrease in DFSC’s earnings resulted from a lesser benefit from acquisition accounting adjustments and lower net realized gains during 2013 compared to 2012.

Losses and Loss Expenses

Our insurance subsidiaries’ loss ratio, which is the ratio of incurred losses and loss expenses to premiums earned, was 66.6% in 2013, compared to 70.1% in 2012. Our insurance subsidiaries’ commercial lines loss ratio increased to 67.1% in 2013, compared to 65.5% in 2012. This increase resulted primarily from the commercial automobile loss ratio increasing to 73.0% in 2013, compared to 63.8% in 2012, and the commercial multi-peril ratio increasing to 61.5% in 2013, compared to 60.2% in 2012. We primarily attribute these increases to increased weather-related claims and increases in claims severity. The personal lines loss ratio decreased to 66.3% in 2013, compared to 72.8% in 2012, primarily as a result of a decrease in the homeowners loss ratio to 57.7% in 2013, compared to 66.1% in 2012, as a result of a decrease in weather-related claims. Our insurance subsidiaries experienced unfavorable loss reserve development of approximately $10.4 million during 2013 in their reserves for prior accident years, compared to unfavorable loss reserve development of approximately $7.6 million during 2012. The change in loss reserve development patterns occurred primarily within our insurance subsidiaries’ workers’ compensation, commercial automobile, commercial multi-peril and personal automobile reserves.

Underwriting Expenses

Our insurance subsidiaries’ expense ratio, which is the ratio of policy acquisition and other underwriting expenses to premiums earned, was 31.8% in 2013, compared to 31.2% in 2012.

Combined Ratio

Our insurance subsidiaries’ combined ratio was 98.8% and 101.6% in 2013 and 2012, respectively. The combined ratio represents the sum of the loss ratio, the expense ratio and the dividend ratio, which is the ratio of workers’ compensation policy dividends incurred to premiums earned.

 

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Interest Expense

Our interest expense in 2013 was $1.6 million, compared to $2.4 million in 2012. The decrease was related to a lower average interest rate on borrowings during 2013 compared to 2012 due to the utilization of Federal Home Loan Bank (“FHLB”) borrowings to prepay $15.5 million of subordinated debentures during the first quarter of 2013.

Income Taxes

Our income tax expense was $6.4 million in 2013, compared to $4.8 million in 2012. Our effective tax rate for 2013 was 19.5%, compared to 17.1% for 2012. The change in effective tax rates is primarily due to tax-exempt interest income representing a smaller proportion of income before income tax expense in 2013 compared to 2012.

Net Income and Earnings Per Share

Our net income in 2013 was $26.3 million, or $1.02 per share of Class A common stock on a diluted basis and $.94 per share of Class B common stock, compared to $23.1 million, or $.91 per share of Class A common stock on a diluted basis and $.83 per share of Class B common stock, in 2012. We had 20.8 million and 20.0 million Class A shares outstanding at December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively. We had 5.6 million Class B shares outstanding for both periods. There are no outstanding securities that dilute our shares of Class B common stock.

Book Value Per Share and Return on Equity

Our stockholders’ equity decreased by $3.2 million in 2013. We attribute the decrease to net after-tax unrealized losses within our available-for-sale fixed maturity investment portfolio during 2013. Book value per share decreased to $15.02 at December 31, 2013, compared to $15.63 a year earlier. Our return on average equity was 6.6% for 2013, compared to 5.9% for 2012.

Financial Condition

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Liquidity is a measure of an entity’s ability to secure enough cash to meet its contractual obligations and operating needs as they arise. Our major sources of funds from operations are the net cash flows generated from our insurance subsidiaries’ underwriting results, investment income and maturing investments.

We have historically generated sufficient net positive cash flow from our operations to fund our commitments and build our investment portfolio, thereby increasing future investment returns. The pooling agreement with Donegal Mutual historically has been cash flow positive because of the profitability of the underwriting pool. Because we settle the pool monthly, our cash flows are substantially similar to the cash flows that would result from the underwriting of direct business. We maintain a high degree of liquidity in our investment portfolio in the form of marketable fixed maturities, equity securities and short-term investments. We structure our fixed-maturity investment portfolio following a “laddering” approach so that projected cash flows from investment income and principal maturities are evenly distributed from a timing perspective. This laddering approach provides an additional measure of liquidity to meet our obligations and the obligations of our insurance subsidiaries should an unexpected variation occur in the future. Net cash flows provided by operating activities in 2014, 2013 and 2012 were $44.5 million, $46.0 million and $25.0 million, respectively.

In June 2014, we renewed our existing credit agreement with Manufacturers and Traders Trust Company (“M&T”) relating to a $60.0 million unsecured, revolving line of credit. The line of credit now expires in July 2017. We have the right to request a one-year extension of the credit agreement as of each anniversary date of the agreement. At December 31, 2014, we had $38.5 million in outstanding borrowings and had the ability to borrow an additional $21.5 million at interest rates equal to M&T’s current prime rate or the then current LIBOR rate plus 2.25%. The interest rate on our outstanding borrowings is adjustable quarterly. At December 31, 2014, the interest rate on our outstanding borrowings was 2.42%. We pay a fee of 0.2% per annum on the loan commitment amount regardless of usage. The credit agreement requires our compliance with certain covenants. These covenants include minimum levels of our net worth, leverage ratio, statutory surplus and the A.M. Best ratings of our insurance subsidiaries. We complied with all requirements of the credit agreement during 2014.

 

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MICO has an agreement with the FHLB of Indianapolis. Through its membership, MICO has the ability to issue debt to the FHLB of Indianapolis in exchange for cash advances. There were no outstanding borrowings at December 31, 2014 or 2013.

Atlantic States is a member of the FHLB of Pittsburgh. Through its membership, Atlantic States has the ability to issue debt to the FHLB of Pittsburgh in exchange for cash advances. During 2013, Atlantic States issued secured debt in the principal amount of $15.0 million to the FHLB of Pittsburgh in exchange for cash advances in the amount of $15.0 million. Atlantic States then loaned $15.0 million to us. We used the proceeds of our loan from Atlantic States to fund our prepayment of our subordinated debentures. Atlantic States had $15.0 million in outstanding borrowings with the FHLB of Pittsburgh at December 31, 2014 and 2013. The interest rate on the advances from the FHLB of Pittsburgh was .31% at December 31, 2014.

The following table shows expected payments for our significant contractual obligations at December 31, 2014:

 

(in thousands)    Total      Less than 1
year
     1-3 years      4-5 years      After 5 years  

Net liability for unpaid losses and loss expenses of our insurance subsidiaries

   $ 292,301       $ 137,419       $ 130,521       $ 11,297       $ 13,064   

Subordinated debentures

     5,000         —           —           —           5,000   

Borrowings under lines of credit

     53,500         15,000         38,500         —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total contractual obligations

   $ 350,801       $ 152,419       $ 169,021       $ 11,297       $ 18,064   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

We estimated the timing of the amounts for the net liability for unpaid losses and loss expenses of our insurance subsidiaries based on historical experience and expectations of future payment patterns. We have shown the liability net of reinsurance recoverable on unpaid losses and loss expenses to reflect expected future cash flows related to such liability. Assumed amounts from the underwriting pool with Donegal Mutual represent a substantial portion of our insurance subsidiaries’ gross liability for unpaid losses and loss expenses, and ceded amounts to the underwriting pool represent a substantial portion of our insurance subsidiaries’ reinsurance recoverable on unpaid losses and loss expenses. We include cash settlements of Atlantic States’ assumed liability from the pool in our monthly settlements of pooled activity. In these monthly settlements, we net amounts ceded to and assumed from the pool. Although Donegal Mutual and Atlantic States do not anticipate any further changes in the pool participation levels in the foreseeable future, any such change would be prospective in nature and therefore would not impact the timing of expected payments for Atlantic States’ proportionate liability for pooled losses occurring in periods prior to the effective date of such change.

We estimated the timing of the amounts for the borrowings under our lines of credit based on their contractual maturities that we discuss in Note 9 - Borrowings. Our borrowings under our lines of credit carry interest rates that vary as discussed in Note 9 - Borrowings. Based upon the interest rates in effect at December 31, 2014, our annual interest cost associated with our borrowings under our lines of credit is approximately $1.0 million. For every 1% change in the interest rate associated with our borrowings under our lines of credit, the effect on our annual interest cost would be approximately $535,000.

The cash dividends we declared to our stockholders totaled $13.7 million, $13.0 million and $12.3 million in 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively. There are no regulatory restrictions on our payment of dividends to our stockholders, although there are state law restrictions on the payment of dividends from our insurance subsidiaries to us. Our insurance subsidiaries are required by law to maintain certain minimum surplus on a statutory basis and are subject to regulations under which their payment of dividends from statutory surplus is restricted and may require prior approval of their domiciliary insurance regulatory authorities. Our insurance subsidiaries are also subject to risk-based capital (“RBC”) requirements. The amount of statutory capital and surplus necessary for our insurance subsidiaries to satisfy regulatory requirements, including the RBC requirements, was not significant in relation to our insurance subsidiaries’ statutory capital and surplus at December 31, 2014. In 2015, amounts available for distribution as dividends to us from our insurance subsidiaries without prior approval of their domiciliary insurance regulatory authorities are $19.1 million from Atlantic States, $1.0 million from Southern, $2.7 million from Le Mars, $4.2 million from Peninsula, $0 from Sheboygan and $4.2 million from MICO, or a total of approximately $31.2 million.

 

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Investments

At December 31, 2014 and 2013, our investment portfolio of primarily investment-grade bonds, common stock, short-term investments and cash totaled $868.5 million and $819.4 million, respectively, representing 59.5% and 59.1%, respectively, of our total assets (see “Business - Investments” for more information).

 

     December 31,  
     2014     2013     2012  
(dollars in thousands)    Amount      Percent of
Total
    Amount      Percent of
Total
    Amount      Percent of
Total
 

Fixed maturities:

               

Total held to maturity

   $ 307,392         36.9   $ 240,370         30.4   $ 42,100         5.2

Total available for sale

     435,150         52.2        403,652         51.0        694,510         86.1   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total fixed maturities

     742,542         89.1        644,022         81.4        736,610         91.3   

Equity securities

     30,822         3.7        12,423         1.5        8,757         1.1   

Investments in affiliates

     39,284         4.7        35,685         4.5        37,236         4.6   

Short-term investments

     20,293         2.5        99,678         12.6        23,826         3.0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total investments

   $ 832,941         100.0   $ 791,808         100.0   $ 806,429         100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

The carrying value of our fixed maturity investments represented 89.1% and 81.4% of our total invested assets at December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

Our fixed maturity investments consisted of high-quality marketable bonds, of which 99.3% and 100.0% were rated at investment-grade levels at December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

At December 31, 2014, the net unrealized gain on our available-for-sale fixed maturity investments, net of deferred taxes, amounted to $13.6 million, compared to $8.7 million at December 31, 2013.

At December 31, 2014, the net unrealized gain on our equity securities, net of deferred taxes, amounted to $543,526, compared to $165,573 at December 31, 2013.

Impact of Inflation

Our insurance subsidiaries establish their property and casualty insurance premium rates before they know the amount of losses and loss settlement expenses or the extent to which inflation may impact such expenses. Consequently, our insurance subsidiaries attempt, in establishing rates, to anticipate the potential future impact of inflation. Our insurance subsidiaries account for inflation in the reserving function through analysis of costs and trends and reviews of historical reserving results.

Impact of New Accounting Standards

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued an accounting standard update (“ASU”) related to the accounting for revenue from contracts with customers. The intent of this standard is to help reduce diversity in practice and enhance comparability between entities related to revenue recognition. The standard is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016. Since the accounting for insurance contracts is outside of the scope of this ASU, we do not expect this standard to have a significant impact on our financial condition, cash flows or results of operations.

In August 2014, the FASB issued an ASU related to the disclosure of uncertainties about an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. The intent of this standard is to help reduce the diversity in the timing and content of footnote disclosures as those disclosures relate to an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. The standard is effective for annual periods ending after December 15, 2016. If conditions or events raise substantial doubt that is not alleviated, an entity should disclose that there is substantial doubt about the entity’s ability to continue as a going concern within one year after the date that the financial statements are issued (or available to be issued), along with the principal conditions or events that raise substantial doubt, management’s evaluation of the significance of those conditions or events in relation to the entity’s ability to meet its obligations and management’s plans that are intended to mitigate those conditions.

 

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Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

We are exposed to the impact of interest rate changes, to changes in fair values of investments and to credit risk.

In the normal course of business, we employ established policies and procedures to manage our exposure to changes in interest rates, fluctuations in the fair market value of our debt and equity securities and credit risk. We seek to mitigate these risks by various actions we describe below.

Interest Rate Risk

Our exposure to market risk for a change in interest rates is concentrated in our investment portfolio. We monitor this exposure through periodic reviews of our asset and liability positions. We regularly monitor estimates of cash flows and the impact of interest rate fluctuations relating to our investment portfolio. Generally, we do not hedge our exposure to interest rate risk because we have the capacity to, and do, hold fixed-maturity investments to maturity.

Principal cash flows and related weighted-average interest rates by stated maturity dates for the financial instruments we hold that are sensitive to interest rates at December 31, 2014 are as follows:

 

(in thousands)    Principal Cash
Flows
     Weighted-
Average
Interest Rate
 

Fixed-maturity and short-term investments:

     

2015

   $ 54,875         1.99

2016

     19,014         3.91   

2017

     26,595         3.29   

2018

     30,317         4.47   

2019

     32,461         3.07   

Thereafter

     584,622         3.91   
  

 

 

    

Total

   $ 747,884      
  

 

 

    

Fair value

   $ 777,599      
  

 

 

    

Debt:

     

2014

   $ 15,000         0.31

2015

     38,500         2.42   

Thereafter

     5,000         5.00   
  

 

 

    

Total

   $ 58,500      
  

 

 

    

Fair value

   $ 58,500      
  

 

 

    

Actual cash flows from investments may differ from those depicted above as a result of calls and prepayments.

Equity Price Risk

Our portfolio of equity securities, which we carry on our consolidated balance sheets at estimated fair value, has exposure to price risk, which is the risk of potential loss in estimated fair value resulting from an adverse change in prices. Our objective is to mitigate this risk and to earn competitive relative returns by investing in a diverse portfolio of high-quality, liquid securities.

Credit Risk

Our objective is to earn competitive returns by investing in a diversified portfolio of securities. Our portfolio of fixed maturity securities and, to a lesser extent, short-term investments is subject to credit risk. We define this risk as the potential loss in fair value resulting from adverse changes in the borrower’s ability to repay the debt. We manage this risk by performing an analysis of prospective investments and through regular reviews of our portfolio by our investment staff. We also limit the amount of our total investment portfolio that we invest in any one security.

 

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Our insurance subsidiaries provide property and liability insurance coverages through independent insurance agencies located throughout their operating areas. Our insurance subsidiaries bill the majority of this business directly to the insured, although our insurance subsidiaries bill a portion of their commercial business through their agents, to whom they extend credit in the normal course of business.

Because the pooling agreement does not relieve Atlantic States of primary liability as the originating insurer, Atlantic States is subject to a concentration of credit risk arising from the business Atlantic States cedes to Donegal Mutual. Our insurance subsidiaries maintain reinsurance agreements with Donegal Mutual and with a number of other major unaffiliated authorized reinsurers.

Through November 30, 2010, MICO and West Bend Mutual Insurance Company (“West Bend”) were parties to quota-share reinsurance agreements whereby MICO ceded 75% of its business to West Bend. MICO and West Bend terminated the reinsurance agreement in effect at November 30, 2010 on a run-off basis. West Bend’s obligations related to all past reinsurance agreements with MICO remain in effect for all policies with effective dates prior to December 1, 2010. West Bend and MICO entered into a trust agreement on December 1, 2010. Under the terms of the trust agreement, West Bend placed into trust, for the sole benefit of MICO, assets with a fair value equal to the amount of unearned premiums and unpaid losses and loss expenses, reduced by any net premium balances not yet paid by MICO, that West Bend had assumed pursuant to such reinsurance agreements at November 30, 2010. The amount of assets required to be held in trust adjusts monthly based upon the remaining net obligations of West Bend. West Bend may terminate the trust agreement on the earlier of December 1, 2020 or the date on which the obligations of West Bend are equal to or less than $5.0 million. As of December 31, 2014, West Bend’s net obligations under the reinsurance agreements were approximately $10.8 million, and the fair value of assets held in trust was approximately $12.6 million.

 

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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets

     56   

Consolidated Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income

     57   

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity

     58   

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

     59   

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

     60   

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm - Consolidated Financial Statements

     90   

 

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Donegal Group Inc.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

     December 31,  
     2014     2013  

Assets

    

Investments

    

Fixed maturities

    

Held to maturity, at amortized cost (fair value $322,155,079 and $238,790,476 )

   $ 307,391,699      $ 240,370,277   

Available for sale, at fair value (amortized cost $414,201,436 and $390,254,251)

     435,149,784        403,651,965   

Equity securities, available for sale, at fair value (cost $29,985,828 and $12,168,110)

     30,822,022        12,422,837   

Investments in affiliates

     39,283,924        35,685,433   

Short-term investments, at cost, which approximates fair value

     20,293,648        99,677,795   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total investments

     832,941,077        791,808,307   

Cash

     35,578,509        27,636,416   

Accrued investment income

     5,751,376        5,423,531   

Premiums receivable

     133,306,961        123,904,629   

Reinsurance receivable

     253,635,890        244,239,113   

Deferred policy acquisition costs

     48,298,608        43,627,510   

Deferred tax asset, net

     17,146,303        20,310,558   

Prepaid reinsurance premiums

     115,871,783        112,663,942   

Property and equipment, net

     7,668,340        6,424,703   

Accounts receivable - securities

     —          1,187,866   

Federal income taxes recoverable

     581,477        420,952   

Goodwill

     5,625,354        5,625,354   

Other intangible assets

     958,010        958,010   

Other

     1,290,956        1,179,611   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 1,458,654,644      $ 1,385,410,502   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity

    

Liabilities

    

Losses and loss expenses

   $ 538,258,406      $ 495,619,269   

Unearned premiums

     408,646,363        382,734,642   

Accrued expenses

     19,429,627        19,265,097   

Reinsurance balances payable

     7,841,172        17,948,808   

Borrowings under lines of credit

     53,500,000        58,000,000   

Cash dividends declared to stockholders

     3,467,273        3,299,182   

Subordinated debentures

     5,000,000        5,000,000   

Accounts payable - securities

     —          751,641   

Due to affiliate

     2,409,347        2,170,225   

Drafts payable

     1,950,765        1,386,285   

Other

     2,017,048        2,358,242   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     1,042,520,001        988,533,391   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Stockholders’ Equity

    

Preferred stock, $.01 par value, authorized 2,000,000 shares; none issued

     —          —     

Class A common stock, $.01 par value, authorized 40,000,000 shares, issued 22,389,369 and 21,786,765 shares and outstanding 21,447,661 and 20,845,903 shares

     223,894        217,868   

Class B common stock, $.01 par value, authorized 10,000,000 shares, issued 5,649,240 shares and outstanding 5,576,775 shares

     56,492        56,492   

Additional paid-in capital

     200,348,783        189,116,410   

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)

     5,353,269        (2,312,890

Retained earnings

     223,253,887        222,888,887   

Treasury stock, at cost

     (13,101,682     (13,089,656
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

     416,134,643        396,877,111   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 1,458,654,644      $ 1,385,410,502   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

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Donegal Group Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income

 

     Years Ended December 31,  
     2014     2013     2012  

Statements of Income

      

Revenues

      

Net premiums earned (includes affiliated reinsurance of $167,070,235, $156,938,714 and $142,608,940 - see note 3)

   $ 556,497,535      $ 515,291,944      $ 475,002,222   

Investment income, net of investment expenses

     18,344,382        18,795,239        20,168,919   

Installment payment fees

     6,473,288        6,841,778        7,465,532   

Lease income

     855,546        849,795        953,216   

Net realized investment gains (includes $3,134,081 and 2,423,442 accumulated other comprehensive income reclassification)

     3,134,081        2,423,442        6,859,439   

Equity in earnings of DFSC

     1,242,910        2,907,867        4,533,257   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

     586,547,742        547,110,065        514,982,585   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Expenses

      

Net losses and loss expenses (includes affiliated reinsurance of $108,847,508, $86,962,750 and $81,219,926 - see note 3)

     388,401,182        343,127,951        332,871,584   

Amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs

     90,146,000        81,753,000        74,314,000   

Other underwriting expenses

     84,659,364        82,196,700        73,914,514   

Policyholder dividends

     2,795,515        1,909,569        1,342,582   

Interest

     1,516,983        1,635,323        2,358,711   

Other

     2,745,881        3,777,257        2,322,934   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total expenses

     570,264,925        514,399,800        487,124,325   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income tax expense

     16,282,817        32,710,265        27,858,260   

Income tax expense (includes $1,065,588 and $823,970 income tax expense from reclassification items)

     1,743,799        6,388,273        4,765,640   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 14,539,018      $ 26,321,992      $