Attached files

file filename
EXCEL - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - Friendable, Inc.Financial_Report.xls
EX-95 - MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE - Friendable, Inc.exhibit_95.htm
EX-31.1 - SECTION 302 CERTIFICATION UNDER SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002 OF THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER - Friendable, Inc.exhibit_31-1.htm
EX-32.2 - SECTION 906 CERTIFICATION UNDER SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002 OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER - Friendable, Inc.exhibit_32-2.htm
EX-31.2 - SECTION 302 CERTIFICATION UNDER SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002 OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER - Friendable, Inc.exhibit_31-2.htm
EX-32.1 - SECTION 906 CERTIFICATION UNDER SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002 OF THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER - Friendable, Inc.exhibit_32-1.htm


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended: December 31, 2011
or

o TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from __________________ to __________________

Commission file number: 000-52917

TITAN IRON ORE CORP.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Nevada
98-0546715
State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

3040 North Campbell Ave. #110, Tucson, Arizona 85719
(Address of principal executive offices and Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code
(520) 989-0020


Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act

Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Nil
 
N/A

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act

Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share
(Title of Class)

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes o No x

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.   Yes o No x

Note – Checking the box above will not relieve any registrant required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of  the Exchange Act from their obligations under those Sections.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
 Yes x No o

 
i

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
 Yes x No o

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information  statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer
o
 
Accelerated filer
o
Non-accelerated filer
o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company
x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).
 Yes o No x

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter.

As of June 30, 2011, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $2,006,850, based on the closing price (last sale of the day) for the registrant’s common stock on the OTC Bulletin Board on June 30, 2011 of $0.05 per share.

 
APPLICABLE ONLY TO CORPORATE REGISTRANTS
 
Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date. As of April 10, 2012, there were 51,071,000, shares of the registrant’s common stock issued and outstanding.


DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Not Applicable
 

 
ii

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
PART I
 
1
 
ITEM 1. BUSINESS
1
 
Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Information
1
 
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
6
 
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
12
 
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES
13
 
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
16
 
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
17
PART II
 
17
 
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
17
 
ITEM 6 SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
18
 
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
18
 
ITEM 7A QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
24
 
ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
25
 
ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE
26
 
ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
26
 
ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION
27
PART III
 
28
 
ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
28
 
ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
31
 
ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS
35
 
ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE
35
 
ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES
36
PART IV
 
36
 
ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES
36
SIGNATURES
39
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
iii

 

PART I
 
 
ITEM 1. BUSINESS
 
Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Information
 
This report contains forward-looking statements.  Forward-looking statements are projections of events, revenues, income, future economic performance or management’s plans and objectives for future operations.  In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by the use of terminology such as “may”, “should”, “expect”, “plan”, “anticipate”, “believe”, “estimate”, “predict”, “potential” or “continue” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology.  Examples of forward-looking statements made in this report include statements about:
 
 
·
Our future exploration programs and results;
 
 
·
Our future capital expenditures; and
 
 
·
Our future investments in and acquisitions of mineral resource properties.
 
These statements are only predictions and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, including:
 
 
·
risks and uncertainties relating to the interpretation of sampling results, the geology, grade and continuity of mineral deposits;
 
 
·
risks and uncertainties that results of initial sampling and mapping will not be consistent with our expectations;
 
 
·
risks and uncertainties that the mineral deposits will never constitute proven and probable reserves which can be developed and mined economically;
 
 
·
mining and development risks, including risks related to accidents, equipment breakdowns, labor disputes, permitting, or other unanticipated difficulties with or interruptions and delays in development and production;
 
 
·
the potential for delays in exploration activities;
 
 
·
risks related to the inherent uncertainty of cost estimates and the potential for unexpected costs and expenses in exploration, development and production which are beyond the capacity of our company to manage;
 
 
·
risks related to commodity price fluctuations;
 
 
·
the uncertainty of an unproven business plan and lack of revenue generation and profitability based upon our limited history;
 
 
·
substantial risks inherent in the establishment of a new business venture since our company is at a very early stage;
 
 
·
risks and uncertainties inherent in mineral exploration ventures which by their very nature face a high risk of business failure;
 
 
·
risks related to intense competition in the mineral exploration and exploitation industry which causes our company to have to compete with our company’s competitors for financing and for qualified managerial and technical employees;

 
1

 
 
ITEM 1. BUSINESS - continued
 
 
·
risks related to the engagement of our company’s directors and officers and key consultants in other business activities whereby they may not have sufficient time to attend to our company’s business affairs;
 
 
·
risks related to failure to obtain adequate financing and additional capital on a timely basis and on acceptable terms for our planned exploration and development;
 
 
·
risks related to environmental regulation and liability, and the ability to secure necessary governmental permits, consents and approvals;
 
 
·
risks that the amounts reserved or allocated for environmental compliance, reclamation, post-closure control measures, monitoring and on-going maintenance may not be sufficient to cover such costs;
 
 
·
risks related to tax assessments;
 
 
·
political, community, regulatory and permitting risks associated with mining exploration, development and production ; and
 
 
·
the risks in the section entitled “Risk Factors”.
 
Any of these risks could cause our company’s or our industry’s actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements contained in this report.
 
While these forward-looking statements and any assumptions upon which they are based are made in good faith and reflect our current judgment regarding the direction of our business, actual results will almost always vary, sometimes materially, from any estimates, predictions, projections, assumptions or other future performance suggested herein. Except as required by applicable law, including the securities laws of the United States, we do not intend to update any of the forward-looking statements to conform these statements to actual results.
 
In this report, unless otherwise specified, all dollar amounts are expressed in United States dollars and all references to “common shares” refer to the common shares in our capital stock.
 
As used in this report, the terms “we”, “us”, “our” and “our company” mean Titan Iron Ore Corp. unless the context clearly indicates otherwise.
 
Corporate Overview
 
We were incorporated in the State of Nevada on June 5, 2007. Our plan after our inception on June 5, 2007 was to produce user-friendly software that creates interactive digital yearbook software for schools and allows them to create and burn their own interactive digital yearbooks on CD/DVD.
 
Effective June 15, 2011, we completed a merger with our subsidiary, Titan Iron Ore Corp., a Nevada corporation, which was incorporated solely to effect a change in our name from “Digital Yearbook Inc.” to “Titan Iron Ore Corp.”
 
Also effective June 15, 2011, we effected a 37 to one forward stock split of our authorized and issued and outstanding common and preferred stock.  As a result, our authorized capital increased from 100,000,000 shares of common stock with a par value of $0.0001 to 3,700,000,000 shares of common stock with a par value of $0.0001 of which 5,151,000 shares of common stock outstanding increased to 190,587,000 shares of common stock. Subsequently, on June 20, 2011, we issued 2,100,000 common shares pursuant to a private placement unit offering, increasing the number of shares of common stock outstanding to 192,687,000.
 
Effective June 30, 2011 and in connection with the closing of the Acquisition Agreement, as defined below under the heading “Acquisition Agreement”, Ohad David, Ruth Navon and Service Merchant Corp. (the “Vendors”), entered into an affiliate stock purchase agreement, whereby, among other things, the Vendors surrendered 142,950,000 common shares for cancellation.
 
 
2

 
 
ITEM 1. BUSINESS - continued
 
Acquisition Agreement for Wyoming Iron Complex
 
Effective June 30, 2011 and in connection with the entry into an agreement (the “Acquisition Agreement”) with J2 Mining Ventures Ltd. (“J2 Mining”) dated June 13, 2011 and attached as Exhibit 10.1 to our Current Report on Form 8-K filed June 16, 2011, we completed the acquisition of a 100% right, title and interest in and to a properties option agreement (the “Option Agreement”) from J2 Mining with respect to iron ore mineral properties located in Albany County, Wyoming, by way of entering an assignment of mineral property option agreement with J2 Mining and Wyomex LLC (the “Assignment Agreement”), whereby our company was assigned 100% of the right, title and interest in and to the Option Agreement from J2 Mining.
 
The Option Agreement assigned to us from J2 Mining on September 30, 2011 was entered into on May 26, 2011 between J2 Mining and Wyomex LLC, pursuant to which Wyomex LLC, as optionor, granted to J2 Mining, as optionee, an exclusive right and option to acquire 100% undivided legal and beneficial interests in and to certain unpatented lode mining claims, fee lands, leased lands, and other interests in real property situated in Albany County, Wyoming (the “Wyoming Iron Complex”). Pursuant to the Assignment Agreement, J2 Mining agreed to assign all its rights and interests in the property and the Option Agreement, and transfer all of its obligations under the Option Agreement, to our company, and our company accepted and agreed to be bound by the terms of the Option Agreement.
 
The term of the option commenced on May 26, 2011 and was extended for a total of six successive one-month periods, up through and including December 26, 2011, by providing notice to Wyomex LLC and payment of $5,000 for each of the first three additional months and $15,000 for the last three additional months (for a total payment of $60,000). Our company elected to exercise the option on December 21, 2011 by giving Wyomex LLC written notice of such election.
 
On April 10, 2012, we entered into and closed an asset purchase agreement (the “Asset Purchase Agreement”) with Wyomex LLC whereby the Company purchased the Wyoming Iron Complex mineral project located in Albany County, Wyoming.
 
The purchase price for the Wyoming Iron Complex is $7,000,000 payable as follows:
 
 
·
Acknowledgement by Wyomex and credit to us of the sum of US$60,000, previously received by Wyomex for expenses and option payments related to the Wyoming Iron Complex.
 
 
·
Immediate payment by us to Wyomex of US$85,000.
 
 
·
A promissory note (the “Note”) in the principal amount of US$6,855,000 executed by us and delivered to Wyomex. The Note shall be interest-free. All Advance Production Payments and Production Payments (defined below) paid to Wyomex will be credited against any outstanding balance of or amounts due under the Note. The Note is secured by a purchase money mortgage (the “Mortgage”).
 
 
·
Commencing six months from the date of closing and every six months thereafter, we will pay Wyomex, as an advance production payment, the initial amount of $62,500 (the “Advance Production Payment”), as adjusted for inflation, until Commencement of Commercial Production from the Property, which is defined as the first quarter of production in which 4.5 percent of the metal values or gross proceeds from the sales of mineral materials derived from the Wyoming Iron Complex exceeds the amount of the Advance Production Payment.
 
 
·
We assumed all liabilities of Wyomex to make all lease or other payments required following the closing under the mineral lease agreement between Wyomex and Chugwater Iron Company (the “Mineral Lease Agreement”) relating to certain leased real property (the “Leased Real Property”), including payment of real property taxes and payment of the sum of $1,000 per month to be paid as an advance production payment under the Mineral Lease Agreement.
 
 
3

 
 
ITEM 1. BUSINESS - continued
 
 
At the Commencement of Commercial Production, the Advance Production Payment is converted to a 4.5% gross metal value payment (“GMP”) on iron ore, concentrates, and/or other mineral materials produced and sold from the Wyoming Iron Complex by usto unrelated third parties (the “Production Payment”), provided, that for the Leased Real Property, the GMP payable to Wyomex is reduced by 50% such that Wyomex receives a 2.25% GMP on production from such lands, and the owner of the Leased Real Property shall receive the balance or a 2.25% GMP. Except for events of force majeure (including non-operation of the facilities after startup) in no event shall the total Production Payment paid by us to Wyomex and the owner of the Leased Real Property be less than US$150,000 in any given calendar year. All Advance Production Payments and Production Payments, as they relate to Leased Real Property, shall be reduced to Wyomex by the amounts of such payments that must be transmitted to the lessor of the Leased Real Property in accordance with the terms and obligations of the Mineral Lease for the Leased Real Property.
 
Subsequent to the payment by us of the full amount of $7 million, the Purchase Price is deemed to be satisfied, and the Production Payment is reduced such that we pay to Wyomex, and the owner of the Leased Real Property, a total GMP royalty of 1.5% for all iron product and/or other mineral materials produced and sold from the Wyoming Iron Complex during the previous month.  The Production Payments due to Wyomex and the owner of Leased Real Property shall be similarly reduced, as provided above, such that Wyomex receives a 0.75% GMP on such assets, and the owner of Leased Real Property shall receive a 0.75% GMP.
 
The Wyoming Iron Complex consist of certain unpatented lode mining claims situated in an unorganized mining district, Albany County, Wyoming, in Sections 14 and 24, Township 19 North, Range 72 West, 6th Principal Meridian, the names of which and the place of record of the location notices thereof in the official records of the county recorder and the authorized office of the Bureau of Land Management are as follows:
 
Our Current Business
 
With the entry into the Asset Purchase Agreement with respect to the Wyoming Iron Complex, we abandoned our efforts as an interactive software developer, and we are focusing our efforts in the mineral exploration business. Our business plan is to proceed with the exploration of the Wyoming Iron Complex consisting of mineral leases on 320 acres and 23 unpatented mining claims aggregating approximately 463 acres located in the county of Albany, Wyoming, USA.
 
Proposed Initial Work Program
 
The initial two phases lasted six to seven months and entailed expenditures of approximately $258,000.
 
The initial phase lasted three months and included:
 
 
·
Compilation of all existing geological data into one comprehensive data base for each of  the Strong Creek and Iron Mountain Deposits; and
 
 
·
Development of an additional work program for the properties.
 
The second phase took  a further three to four months. The specific work undertaken included confirmation drilling of existing drill targets to validate historic data (2000 feet).
 
The third phase will be contingent on the results of the phases 1 and 2 and would likely involve expansion and infill drilling to expand the resource on the Strong Creek deposit to upgrade and enhance the quality of the resource data base, bulk testing of Iron Mountain Ores to confirm the validity of the Krupp Renn Process, bench scale tests on the Strong Creek ores to validate the Hazen /USBM results, and the initiation of a prefeasibility study based on historic and current data. This work program is expected to take up to one year  and entail an aggregate expenditure of up to $8 million .
 
Once we complete each phase of exploration, we will make a decision as to whether or not and how we proceed with each successive phase based upon the analysis of the results of that program.
 
 
 
4

 
 
ITEM 1. BUSINESS - continued
 
Our plan of operation is to carry out exploration work on our Wyoming Complex in order to ascertain whether it possesses commercially exploitable quantities of iron ore, titanium and other metals. We intend to primarily explore for iron ore and titanium but if we discover that our mineral property holds potential for other minerals that our management determines are worth exploring further, then we intend to explore for those other minerals. We will not be able to determine whether or not the property contains a commercially exploitable mineral deposit, or reserve, until appropriate exploratory work is done and an economic evaluation based on that work indicates economic viability.
 
Progress
 
On October 13, 2011, we announced a targeted first phase drilling program of 1700 feet at the Wyoming Iron Complex. A total of three holes drilled by Union Pacific Resources (c. 1955) and the State of Wyoming (1995) were  twinned for a total of 2000 feet in an effort to duplicate the results of those earlier programs. One hole was  extended to a  depth of  700 feet to expand upon the vertical potential of the ore body.  All work during this phase was  done on the Strong Creek property, the larger of the two prospects within the Wyoming Iron Complex. The drilling was  diamond core of HQ size (2½ inches in diameter). Results of this initial drilling campaign were announced via press releases dated February 8, 2012, February 22, 2012 and March 14, 2012. We announced that each of the holes demonstrated potential ore-grade material over virtually the entire length of each hole with grades as high as 22.8% Fe and 8.6%b Ti.
 
Option Agreement with Globex Mining
 
On July 19, 2011, Titan entered into an option agreement with Globex Mining Enterprises Inc. ("Globex") effective July 12, 2011 (the "Globex Agreement"), pursuant to which Globex granted the Company the right (the "Option") for a period of 90 days from July 12, 2011 to acquire an undivided 100% interest in and to 202 mining claims (the "Property") located in the Labrador trough area in the Province of Quebec, Canada.
 
In September 2011, we initiated a geological reconnaissance survey of a magnetic geophysical anomaly located on the Labrador Trough iron property.  This survey determined that the anomaly was not of sufficient mineral type, grade or size to merit further exploration costs.  Accordingly, we have determined to drop the option on the Labrador Trough iron property and on October 12, 2011 notified the owner of the property that we will not be exercising its option to acquire the property.
 
Competition
 
We are a mineral resource exploration company. We compete with other mineral resource exploration companies for financing and for the acquisition of new mineral properties. Many of the mineral resource exploration companies with whom we compete have greater financial and technical resources than those available to us. Accordingly, these competitors may be able to spend greater amounts on acquisitions of mineral properties of merit, on exploration of their mineral properties and on development of their mineral properties. In addition, they may be able to afford more geological expertise in the targeting and exploration of mineral properties. This competition could result in competitors having mineral properties of greater quality and interest to prospective investors who may finance additional exploration and development. This competition could adversely impact on our ability to achieve the financing necessary for us to conduct further exploration of our mineral properties.
 
We also compete with other mineral resource exploration companies for financing from a limited number of investors that are prepared to make investments in mineral resource exploration companies. The presence of competing mineral resource exploration companies may impact on our ability to raise additional capital in order to fund our exploration programs if investors are of the view that investments in competitors are more attractive based on the merit of the mineral properties under investigation and the price of the investment offered to investors. We also compete with other mineral resource exploration companies for available resources, including, but not limited to, professional geologists, camp staff, helicopter or float planes, mineral exploration supplies and drill rigs.
 
Employees and Key Consultants
 
Our company has one full time employee and 5 part time consultants.
 
 
 
5

 
 
ITEM 1. BUSINESS - continued
 
Intellectual Property
 
We do not own, either legally or beneficially, any patents or trademarks.
 
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
 
In addition to other information in this report, the following risk factors should be carefully considered in evaluating our business because such factors may have a significant impact on our business, operating results, liquidity and financial condition. As a result of the risk factors set forth below, actual results could differ materially from those projected in any forward-looking statements. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us, or that we currently consider to be immaterial, may also impact our business, operating results, liquidity and financial condition. If any such risks occur, our business, operating results, liquidity and financial condition could be materially affected in an adverse manner. Under such circumstances, the trading price of our securities could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.
 
Risks Associated with Mining
 
All of our mineral properties are in the exploration stage. There is no assurance that we can establish the existence of any mineral resource on any of our properties in commercially exploitable quantities. Until we can do so, we cannot earn any revenues from operations and if we do not do so we will lose all of the funds that we expend on exploration. If we do not discover any mineral resource in a commercially exploitable quantity, our business could fail.
 
We have not established that our mineral properties contain any mineral reserve, nor can there be any assurance that we will be able to do so. If we do not, our business could fail.
 
A mineral reserve is defined by the Securities and Exchange Commission in its Industry Guide 7 (which can be viewed over the Internet at http://www.sec.gov/divisions/corpfin/forms/industry.htm#secguide7) as that part of a mineral deposit which could be economically and legally extracted or produced at the time of the reserve determination. The probability of an individual prospect ever having a “reserve” that meets the requirements of the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Industry Guide 7 is extremely remote; in all probability our mineral properties  do not contain any ‘reserve’ and any funds that we spend on exploration will probably be lost.
 
Even if we do eventually discover a mineral reserve on one or more of our properties, there can be no assurance that we will be able to develop our properties into producing mines and extract those resources. Both mineral exploration and development involve a high degree of risk and few properties which are explored are ultimately developed into producing mines.
 
The commercial viability of an established mineral deposit will depend on a number of factors including, by way of example, the size, grade and other attributes of the mineral deposit, the proximity of the resource to infrastructure such as a smelter or processing facilities, power, and water, roads and a point for shipping, available workforce, government regulation, proximity to markets and consumers, and market prices. Most of these factors will be beyond our control, and any of them could increase costs and make extraction of any identified mineral resource unprofitable.
 
Mineral operations are subject to applicable law and government regulation. Even if we discover a mineral resource in a commercially exploitable quantity, these laws and regulations could restrict or prohibit the exploitation of that mineral resource. If we cannot exploit any mineral resource that we might discover on our properties, our business may fail.
 
Both mineral exploration and extraction require permits from various foreign, federal, state, provincial and local governmental authorities and are governed by laws and regulations, including those with respect to prospecting, mine development, mineral production, transport, export, taxation, labor standards, occupational health, waste disposal, toxic substances, land use, environmental protection, mine safety and other matters. There can be no assurance that we will be able to obtain or maintain any of the permits or bonds required for the continued exploration of our mineral properties or for the construction and operation of a mine on our properties at economically viable costs. If we cannot accomplish these objectives, our business could fail.
 
 
 
 
6

 
 
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS - continued
 
There can be no assurance that we can comply with all material laws and regulations that apply to our activities. Current laws and regulations could be amended and we might not be able to comply with them, as amended. Further, there can be no assurance that we will be able to obtain or maintain all permits or bonds necessary for our future operations, or that we will be able to obtain them on reasonable terms. To the extent such approvals are required and are not obtained, we may be delayed or prohibited from proceeding with planned exploration or development of our mineral properties.
 
Exploration development and exploitation activities are subject to comprehensive regulation and permitting which may cause substantial delays or require capital outlays in excess of those anticipated causing a material adverse effect on us.
 
Exploration, development and exploitation activities are subject to federal, provincial, state and local laws, regulations and policies, including laws regulating permitting, bonding, and the removal of natural resources from the ground and the discharge of materials into the environment. Exploration, development and exploitation activities are also subject to federal, provincial, state and local laws and regulations which seek to maintain health and safety standards by regulating the design and use of drilling methods and equipment and other operational activities.
 
Environmental and other legal standards imposed by federal, provincial, state or local authorities may be changed and any such changes may prevent us from conducting planned activities or may increase our costs of doing so, which could have material adverse effects on our business. Moreover, compliance with such laws may cause substantial delays or require capital outlays in excess of those anticipated, thus causing a material adverse effect on us. Additionally, we may be subject to liability for pollution or other environmental damages that we may not be able to or elect not to insure against due to prohibitive premium costs and other reasons. Any laws, regulations or policies of any government body or regulatory agency may be changed, applied or interpreted in a manner which could materially alter and negatively affect our ability to carry on our business.
 
If we establish the existence of a mineral resource on any of our properties in a commercially exploitable quantity, we will require additional capital in order to develop the property into a producing mine. If we cannot raise this additional capital, we will not be able to exploit the resource, and our business could fail.
 
If we do discover mineral resources in commercially exploitable quantities on any of our properties, we will be required to expend substantial sums of money to explore and fully establish the extent of the resource, develop processes to extract it and develop extraction and processing facilities and infrastructure. Although we may derive substantial benefits from the discovery of a major deposit, there can be no assurance that such a resource will be large enough to justify commercial operations, nor can there be any assurance that we will be able to raise the funds required for development on a timely basis. If we cannot raise the necessary capital or complete the necessary facilities and infrastructure, our business may fail.
 
Mineral exploration and development is subject to extraordinary operating risks. We do not currently insure against these risks. In the event of a cave-in or similar occurrence, our liability may exceed our resources, which would have an adverse impact on our company.
 
Mineral exploration, development and production involves many risks which even a combination of experience, knowledge and careful evaluation may not be able to overcome. Our operations will be subject to all the geological, technical and operating hazards and risks inherent in the exploration for mineral resources and, if we discover a mineral resource in commercially exploitable quantity, our operations could be subject to all of the hazards and risks inherent in the development and production of resources, including liability for pollution, cave-ins or similar hazards against which we cannot insure or against which we may elect not to insure. Any such event could result in work stoppages and damage to property, including damage to the environment. We do not currently maintain any insurance coverage against these operating hazards. The payment of any liabilities that arise from any such occurrence would have a material adverse impact on our company.
 
 

 
 
7

 
 
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS - continued
 
Mineral prices are subject to dramatic and unpredictable fluctuations.
 
We expect to derive revenues, if any, either from the sale of our mineral resource properties or from the extraction and sale of iron ore and associated byproducts. The price of those commodities has fluctuated widely in recent years, and is affected by numerous factors beyond our control, including international, economic and political trends, expectations of inflation, currency exchange fluctuations, interest rates, global or regional consumptive patterns, speculative activities and increased production due to new extraction developments and improved extraction and production methods. The effect of these factors on the price of base and precious metals, and therefore the economic viability of any of our exploration properties and projects, cannot accurately be predicted.
 
The mining industry is highly competitive and there is no assurance that we will be successful in acquiring additional mineral claims or selling all of the products that we produce. If we cannot acquire properties to explore for mineral resources, or successfully sell our mineral products, we may be required to reduce or cease operations.
 
The mineral exploration, development, and production industry is largely un-integrated. We compete with other exploration companies looking for mineral resource properties. While we compete with other exploration companies in the effort to locate and acquire mineral resource properties, we may also  compete with them for the removal or sales of mineral products from our properties if we should eventually discover the presence of them in quantities sufficient to make production economically feasible. Readily available markets for the sale of mineral products do not always exist for all mineral commodities Therefore, we may not  be able to sell all of the  mineral products that we identify and produce.
 
In identifying and acquiring mineral resource properties, we compete with many companies possessing greater financial resources and technical facilities. This competition could adversely affect our ability to acquire suitable prospects for exploration in the future. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that we will acquire any interest in additional mineral resource properties that might yield reserves or result in commercial mining operations.
 
Our competition includes large established mining companies with substantial capabilities and with greater financial and technical resources than us. As a result of this competition, we may have to compete for financing and may be unable to acquire financing on terms we consider acceptable. We may also have to compete with the other mining companies for the recruitment and retention of qualified managerial and technical employees. If we are unable to successfully compete for financing or for qualified employees, our exploration programs may be slowed down or suspended, which may cause us to cease operations as a company.
 
If our costs of exploration are greater than anticipated, then we may not be able to complete the exploration program for our Wyoming Iron Complex without additional financing, of which there is no assurance that we would be able to obtain.
 
We are proceeding with the initial stages of exploration on our Wyoming Iron Complex. Our exploration program outlines a budget for completion of the program. However, there is no assurance that our actual costs will not exceed the budgeted costs. Factors that could cause actual costs to exceed budgeted costs include increased prices due to competition for personnel and supplies during the exploration season, unanticipated problems in completing the exploration program and delays due to weather or other factors experienced in completing the exploration program. Increases in exploration costs could result in our not being able to carry out our exploration program without additional financing. There is no assurance that we would be able to obtain additional financing in this event.
 
Because of the speculative nature of exploration of mining properties, there is substantial risk that no commercially exploitable minerals will be found and our business will fail.
 
We have only commenced the initial stage of exploration of our mineral property, and have no way to evaluate the likelihood that we will be successful in establishing commercially exploitable reserves of iron ore or other valuable minerals on our Wyoming Iron Complex. The search for valuable minerals as a business is extremely risky. We may not find commercially exploitable reserves of iron ore or other valuable minerals in our mineral property. Exploration for minerals is a speculative venture necessarily involving substantial risk. The expenditures to be made by us on our exploration program may not result in the discovery of commercial quantities of ore. The likelihood of success must be considered in light of the problems, expenses, difficulties, complications and delays encountered in connection with the exploration of the mineral properties that we plan to undertake. Problems such as unusual or unexpected formations and other conditions are involved in mineral exploration and often result in unsuccessful exploration efforts. In such a case, we would be unable to complete our business plan.
 
 
 
8

 
 
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS - continued
 
Because of the inherent dangers involved in mineral exploration, there is a risk that we may incur liability or damages as we conduct our business.
 
The search for valuable minerals involves numerous hazards. In the course of carrying out exploration of our Wyoming Iron Complex, we may become subject to liability for such hazards, including pollution, cave-ins and other hazards against which we cannot insure or against which we may elect not to insure. We currently have no such insurance nor do we expect to get such insurance for the foreseeable future. If a hazard were to occur, the costs of rectifying the hazard may exceed our asset value and cause us to liquidate all of our assets, resulting in the loss of your entire investment in this offering.
 
Because access to our mineral property is often restricted by inclement weather, we may be delayed in our exploration and any future mining efforts.
 
Access to the mineral property may be restricted during the period between October and April of each year because the period between these months can typically feature heavy snow cover, extreme cold and high winds which makes it difficult if not impossible to carry out exploration and other activities at the Wyoming Iron Complex.  We can attempt to visit, test or explore our mineral property only when weather permits such activities. These limitations can result in significant delays in exploration efforts, as well as in mining and production in the event that commercial amounts of minerals are found. Such delays can cause our business to fail.
 
Because our executive officer has other business interests, he may not be able or willing to devote a sufficient amount of time to our business operation, causing our business to fail.
 
Our President and CEO will devote approximately 50% of his working time on providing management services to us. If the demands on our executive officer from his other obligations increase, he may no longer be able to devote sufficient time to the management of our business. This could negatively impact our business development.
 
Risks Related to Our Company
 
We have a limited operating history on which to base an evaluation of our business and prospects.
 
We have been in the business of exploring mineral resource properties only since June 2011 and we have not yet located or identified any mineral reserves. As a result, we have never had any revenues from our mining operations. In addition, our operating history has been restricted to the acquisition and exploration of our mineral properties and this does not provide a meaningful basis for an evaluation of our prospects if we ever determine that we have a mineral reserve and commence the construction and operation of a mine. We have no way to evaluate the likelihood of whether our mineral properties contain any mineral reserve or, if they do that we will be able to build or operate a mine successfully. We anticipate that we will continue to incur operating costs without realizing any revenues during the period when we are exploring our properties. We therefore expect to continue to incur significant losses into the foreseeable future. We recognize that if we are unable to generate significant revenues from mining operations and any dispositions of our properties, we will not be able to earn profits or continue operations. At this early stage of our operation, we also expect to face the risks, uncertainties, expenses and difficulties frequently encountered by companies at the start up stage of their business development. We cannot be sure that we will be successful in addressing these risks and uncertainties and our failure to do so could have a materially adverse effect on our financial condition. There is no history upon which to base any assumption as to the likelihood that we will prove successful and we can provide investors with no assurance that we will generate any operating revenues or ever achieve profitable operations.
 
The fact that we have not earned any significant operating revenues since our incorporation raises substantial doubt about our ability to continue to explore our mineral properties as a going concern.
 
 
 
 
9

 
 
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS - continued
 
We have not generated any significant revenue from operations since our incorporation and we anticipate that we will continue to incur operating expenses without revenues unless and until we are able to identify a mineral resource in a commercially exploitable quantity on one or more of our mineral properties and we build and operate a mine. At December 31, 2011, we had working capital deficit of $120,962. We incurred a net loss of $954,677 for the year ended December 31, 2011, and $1,030,196 since inception. We will require additional financing to sustain our business operations if we are not successful in earning revenues once exploration is complete. If our exploration programs are successful in discovering reserves of commercial tonnage and grade, we will require significant additional funds in order to place the Wyoming Iron Complex into commercial production. Should the results of our planned exploration require us to increase our current operating budget, we may have to raise additional funds to meet our currently budgeted operating requirements for the next 12 months. As we cannot assure a lender that we will be able to successfully explore and develop our mineral properties, we will probably find it difficult to raise debt financing from traditional lending sources. We have traditionally raised our operating capital from sales of equity and debt securities, but there can be no assurance that we will continue to be able to do so. If we cannot raise the money that we need to continue exploration of our mineral properties, we may be forced to delay, scale back, or eliminate our exploration activities. If any of these were to occur, there is a substantial risk that our business would fail.
 
These circumstances lead our independent registered public accounting firm, in their report dated April 12, 2012, to comment about our company’s ability to continue as a going concern. When an auditor issues a going concern opinion, the auditor has substantial doubt that our company will continue to operate indefinitely and not go out of business and liquidate its assets. These conditions raise substantial doubt about our company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded assets, or the amounts of and classification of liabilities that might be necessary in the event our company cannot continue in existence. We continue to experience net operating losses.
 
Risks Associated with Our Common Stock
 
If we issue additional shares in the future, it will result in the dilution of our existing shareholders.
 
Our articles of incorporation authorize the issuance of up to 3,700,000,000 shares of common stock with a par value of $0.0001 per share. Our board of directors may choose to issue some or all of such shares to acquire one or more companies or properties and to fund our overhead and general operating requirements. The issuance of any such shares will reduce the book value per share and may contribute to a reduction in the market price of the outstanding shares of our common stock. If we issue any such additional shares, such issuance will reduce the proportionate ownership and voting power of all current shareholders. Further, such issuance may result in a change of control of our corporation.
 
Our common stock is illiquid and the price of our common stock may be negatively impacted by factors which are unrelated to our operations.
 
The market price of our common stock could fluctuate substantially due to a variety of factors, including market perception of our ability to achieve our planned growth, quarterly operating results of our competitors, trading volume in our common stock, changes in general conditions in the economy and the financial markets or other developments affecting our competitors or us. In addition, the stock market is subject to extreme price and volume fluctuations. This volatility has had a significant effect on the market price of securities issued by many companies for reasons unrelated to their operating performance and could have the same effect on our common stock.
 
We do not intend to pay cash dividends on any investment in the shares of stock of our company.
 
We have never paid any cash dividends and currently do not intend to pay any cash dividends for the foreseeable future. Because we do not intend to declare cash dividends, any gain on an investment in our company will need to come through an increase in the stock’s price. This may never happen and investors may lose all of their investment in our company.
 
 
 
10

 
 
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS - continued
 
Trading of our stock is restricted by the Securities Exchange Commission’s penny stock regulations, which may limit a stockholder’s ability to buy and sell our common stock.
 
The Securities and Exchange Commission has adopted regulations which generally define “penny stock” to be any equity security that has a market price (as defined) less than $5.00 per share or an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. Our securities are covered by the penny stock rules, which impose additional sales practice requirements on broker-dealers who sell to persons other than established customers and “accredited investors”. The term “accredited investor” refers generally to institutions with assets in excess of $5,000,000 or individuals with a net worth in excess of $1,000,000 or annual income exceeding $200,000 or $300,000 jointly with their spouse. The penny stock rules require a broker-dealer, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from the rules, to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document in a form prepared by the Securities and Exchange Commission, which provides information about penny stocks and the nature and level of risks in the penny stock market. The broker-dealer also must provide the customer with current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction and monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer’s account. The bid and offer quotations, and the broker-dealer and salesperson compensation information, must be given to the customer orally or in writing prior to effecting the transaction and must be given to the customer in writing before or with the customer’s confirmation. In addition, the penny stock rules require that prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from these rules; the broker-dealer must make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction. These disclosure requirements may have the effect of reducing the level of trading activity in the secondary market for the stock that is subject to these penny stock rules. Consequently, these penny stock rules may affect the ability of broker-dealers to trade our securities. We believe that the penny stock rules discourage investor interest in and limit the marketability of our common stock.
 
FINRA sales practice requirements may also limit a stockholder’s ability to buy and sell our stock.
 
In addition to the “penny stock” rules described above, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (known as “FINRA”) has adopted rules that require that in recommending an investment to a customer, a broker-dealer must have reasonable grounds for believing that the investment is suitable for that customer. Prior to recommending speculative low priced securities to their non-institutional customers, broker-dealers must make reasonable efforts to obtain information about the customer’s financial status, tax status, investment objectives and other information. Under interpretations of these rules, FINRA believes that there is a high probability that speculative low priced securities will not be suitable for at least some customers. FINRA requirements make it more difficult for broker-dealers to recommend that their customers buy our common stock, which may limit your ability to buy and sell our stock and have an adverse effect on the market for our shares.\
 
Risks Relating to the Early Stage of our Company and Ability to Raise Capital
 
We are at a very early stage and our success is subject to the substantial risks inherent in the establishment of a new business venture.
 
The implementation of our business strategy is in a very early stage and subject to all of the risks inherent in the establishment of a new business venture. Accordingly, our intended business and prospective operations may not prove to be successful in the near future, if at all. Any future success that we might enjoy will depend upon many factors, many of which are beyond our control, or which cannot be predicted at this time, and which could have a material adverse effect upon our financial condition, business prospects and operations and the value of an investment in our company.
 
We have no operating history and our business plan is unproven and may not be successful.
 
We have no commercial operations. None of our projects have proven or provable reserves, are built, or are in production. We have not licensed or sold any mineral products commercially and do not have any definitive agreements to do so. We have not proven that our business model will allow us to generate a profit.
 
 
 
 
11

 
 
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS - continued
 
We expect to suffer continued operating losses and we may not be able to achieve profitability.
 
We expect to continue to incur significant discovery and development expenses in the foreseeable future related to exploration and the completion of feasibility, development and commercialization of our projects. As a result, we will be sustaining substantial operating and net losses, and it is possible that we will never be able to sustain or develop the revenue levels necessary to attain profitability.
 
We may have difficulty raising additional capital, which could deprive us of necessary resources.
 
We expect to continue to devote significant capital resources to fund exploration and development of our properties. In order to support the initiatives envisioned in our business plan, we will need to raise additional funds through public or private debt or equity financing, collaborative relationships or other arrangements. Our ability to raise additional financing depends on many factors beyond our control, including the state of capital markets, the market price of our common stock, the market price for commodities, and the development or prospects for development of competitive technology or competitive projects by others. Because our common stock is not listed on a major stock market, many investors may not be willing or allowed to purchase our common shares or may demand steep discounts. Sufficient additional financing may not be available to us or may be available only on terms that would result in further dilution to the current owners of our common stock.
 
We expect to raise additional capital during 2012 and have, as of January 11, 2012, closed a private placement financing in the gross amount of $1,050,000, but we do not have any firm commitments for funding beyond this recent placement. If we are unsuccessful in raising additional capital, or the terms of raising such capital are unacceptable, we may have to modify our business plan and/or significantly curtail our planned activities. If we are successful raising additional capital through the issuance of additional equity, our investor’s interests will be diluted.
 
There are substantial doubts about our ability to continue as a going concern and if we are unable to continue our business, our shares may have little or no value.
 
Our ability to become a profitable operating company is dependent upon our ability to generate revenues and/or obtain financing adequate to explore and develop our properties. Achieving a level of revenues adequate to support our cost structure has raised substantial doubts about our ability to continue as a going concern. We plan to attempt to raise additional equity capital by issuing shares covered and, if necessary through one or more private placement or public offerings. However, the doubts raised relating to our ability to continue as a going concern may make our shares an unattractive investment for potential investors. These factors, among others, may make it difficult to raise any additional capital.
 
Failure to effectively manage our growth could place additional strains on our managerial, operational and financial resources and could adversely affect our business and prospective operating results.
 
Our anticipated growth is expected to continue to place a strain on our managerial, operational and financial resources. Further, as we acquire interests in more properties or subsidiaries and other entities, we will be required to manage multiple relationships. Any further growth by us, or an increase in the number of our strategic relationships will increase this strain on our managerial, operational and financial resources. This strain may inhibit our ability to achieve the rapid execution necessary to implement our business plan, and could have a material adverse effect upon our financial condition, business prospects and prospective operations and the value of an investment in our company.
 
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
 
Not Applicable.

 
12

 

 
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES
 
Principal Office
 
As of the date of this report, our executive offices consist of 800 square feet are located at 3040 North Campbell Ave, Suite 110 Tucson, Arizona 85719. The office lease costs $2,100 per month, which, along with utilities and related expenses, is allocated proportionally among our company and several other junior mining companies which are administered by Kriyah Consultants LLC out of the same location. We believe that our office space and facilities are sufficient to meet our present needs and do not anticipate any difficulty securing alternative or additional space, as needed, on terms acceptable to us.
 
Our registered agent is located at Eastbiz.com, Inc., 5348 Vegas Drive, Las Vegas, NV  89108.
 
Mineral Properties
 
Pursuant to the Asset Purchase Agreement, we have acquired a 100% interest in the Wyoming Iron Complex properties. The mineral concessions and rights that form the Wyoming Iron Complex property consist of 23 unpatented US mining claims (Strong Creek Claims) located under the Mining Law of 1872, comprising approximately 463 acres, and 2 mineral leases (Iron Mountain Leases) totalling approximately 320 acres with Chugwater Mining Company. The claims were originally staked by John Simons, an individual, then conveyed to Wyomex Resources Inc, and then assigned to Wyomex LLC, a duly incorporated limited liability company under the laws of Wyoming., and  are registered with the Office of the Registrar Albany County, Wyoming and with the US Bureau of Land Management located in Cheyenne Wyoming and registered in the name of Wyomex LLC in accordance with the requirements of the Mining Law of 1872.  Costs of maintaining the claims in 2010 were $140 per claim payable annually by August 31st. Wyomex LLC is also the lessee under the two aforementioned mineral leases.
 
The unpatented lode mining claims are situated in an unorganized mining district, Albany County, Wyoming, in Sections 14 and 24, Township 19 North, Range 72 West, 6th Principal Meridian, the names of which and the place of record of the location notices thereof in the official records of the county recorder and the authorized office of the Bureau of Land Management are as follows:
 
       
County Records
 
BLM Serial #
Claim Name
 
Location Date
 
Book
 
Page
 
W MC & Location
                 
VAN NO. 1
 
10/12/1976
  256   946  
127756 SW¼  Sec. 24
VAN NO. 2
 
10/12/1976
  256   947  
127757 SW¼  Sec. 24
VAN NO. 3
 
10/12/1976
  256   948  
127758 SW¼  Sec. 24
VAN NO. 4
 
10/12/1976
  256   949  
127759 SW¼  Sec. 24
VAN NO. 5
 
10/12/1976
  256   950  
127760 SW¼  Sec. 24
VAN NO. 6
 
10/12/1976
  256   951  
127761 SW¼  Sec. 24
VAN NO. 7
 
10/12/1976
  256   952  
127762 SW¼  Sec. 24
VAN NO. 8
 
10/12/1976
  256   953  
127763 SW¼  Sec. 24
VAN NO. 9
 
10/12/1976
  256   954  
127764 SW¼  Sec. 24
VAN NO. 10
 
10/12/1976
  256   955  
127765 SW¼  Sec. 24
VAN NO. 11
 
10/12/1976
  256   956  
127766 SW¼  Sec. 24
VAN NO. 12
 
10/12/1976
  256   957  
127767 SE¼  Sec. 24
                 
TI NO. 15
 
10/12/1976
  256   993  
127744 NW¼  Sec 14
TI NO. 16
 
10/12/1976
  256   993  
127745 NE¼  Sec. 14
 
 
 
13

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES - continued
 
 
   
Document Number
             
VAN 13
 
7/17/2005
 
2005-6333
 
268116 SE¼  Sec. 24
VAN 14
 
7/17/2005
 
2005-6334
 
268117 SE¼  Sec. 24
VAN 15
 
7/17/2005
 
2005-6335
 
268118 E½  Sec. 24
VAN 16
 
7/17/2005
 
2005-6336
 
268119 E½  Sec. 24
VAN 17
 
7/17/2005
 
2005-6337
 
268120 NW¼  Sec 24
VAN 18
 
7/17/2005
 
2005-6338
 
268121 NW¼  Sec 24
VAN 19
 
7/17/2005
 
2005-6339
 
268122 NW¼  Sec 24
VAN 20
 
7/17/2005
 
2005-6340
 
268123 SW¼  Sec. 24
VAN 21
 
7/17/2005
 
2005-6341
 
268124 NW¼  Sec 24
VAN 22
 
7/17/2005
 
2005-6342
 
268125 NE¼  Sec. 24
VAN 23
 
7/17/2005
 
2005-6343
 
268126 NE¼  Sec. 24
VAN 24
 
7/17/2005
 
2005-6344
 
268127 NE¼  Sec. 24
 
Note:  The VAN Nos. 1-12 are included within Mineral Survey No. 605.
 
Technical Reports
 
All reports completed prior to January 2002 are considered to be “historic in nature” and are not compliant with National Instrument 43-101 or SEC Guide 7, and therefore can not be relied upon.  In August 2005, a due diligence program was undertaken by Radar Acquisitions Corp. in which 10 rotary air blast drill holes were completed on a selected area of the Strong Creek portion of the property that exhibited higher grade titanium grades.  A technical report compliant with National Instrument 43-101 was produced for this area but its content is not considered to be applicable to our  planned work program.
 
Description of Property, Location, Means and Access
 
The Wyoming Iron Complex is located approximately 30 miles north-northeast of the city Laramie in southeastern Wyoming, (See Figure 1 below). The Strong Creek Claims are located in the central portion of the Laramie Anorthosite Complex (LAC), approximately a one hour drive north from Laramie, along Hwy 287 to 34 and then secondary roads from the Greaser Ranch.  The Iron Mountain Leases are located approximately 6 miles to the east of Strong Creek and are accessible by secondary roads.  The Wyoming Iron Complex also lies 9  miles to the east of the main rail line of the Union Pacific. Power and water are available at the property.
 
The closest major town to the Wyoming Iron Complex is Laramie, Wyoming, a city of approximately 25,000 people. It has an elevation of 7,200 feet, resulting in a varied, but semi-arid climate. Laramie is located along the I-80 corridor and is on the main rail line of the Union Pacific. Laramie is a full-service city which hosts all amenities, and is the home of the University of Wyoming.

 
14

 
 
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES - continued
 
 
 
Climate, Local Resources, Infrastructure and Physiography
 
Albany County, population 27,204 (US Census Bureau, 2003), is located in the high plains region of south-eastern Wyoming. Most of the county is located in a cool and arid basin (<12 inches of precipitation annually) containing the Laramie River watershed, a major tributary to the North Platte River system. The county is flanked on the west by the Medicine Bow Mountains and on the east by the Laramie Range.
 
Due to its elevation, Wyoming has a relatively cool climate. Above the 6,000 foot level, the temperature rarely exceeds 100 F. Summer nights are usually cool, though daytime readings may be quite high. Away from the mountains, low July temperatures range from 50 to 60 F. A typical winter would see freezing temperatures from December through March with most accumulation of snow occurring in March.
 
History of Exploration
 
Since the earliest geological investigations of the area by Stansbury in 1851, and Hayden in 1871, Fe-Ti oxide deposits have been known in Albany County. There have been numerous economic evaluations of these deposits by Ball, 1907; Singewald, 1913; Frey, 1946 and Hild, 1953.
 
From the completion of the railway until 1975 the property was owned by Union Pacific Resources (“UPR”) a wholly owned subsidiary of Union Pacific. From the mid 1950’s through 1972 the properties were drilled and evaluated which produced a resource estimate (non-compliant with SEC Guide 7 or Canadian NI 43-101) for contained iron, titanium dioxide and vanadium.
 
 
 
15

 
 
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES - continued
 
UPR conducted a comprehensive drilling program on both of the properties  and which included bulk sampling and a 30,000 ton pilot plant test based on the Krupp Renn pyrometallurgical recovery process.  This was part of a  study produced in 1968 later revisited in 1972 for Fe and Ti recovery which concluded that Iron recovery can be achieved using the Iron Mountain ores and that the Strong Creek Concentrates may be more amenable to the Krupp Renn  process.  The iron material produced from this test is referred to as Luppen – a 98.5% (an) iron product, considered to be a superior feed stock for electric arc furnaces as it contains none of the contaminants found in scrap or Pig Iron.  This test also confirmed that a portion of the Vanadium could be recovered as Vanadium Pentoxide.
 
In 1995, the State of Wyoming drilled 27 large bore rotary drill holes on the Strong Creek Property to obtain a bulk sample for testing by the laboratories US Bureau of Mines of Salt Lake City,  Utah and by Hazen Research Inc. of Golden, Colorado.  These tests demonstrated that the ore can be concentrated using a coarsely ground product (-20 + 40 mesh), followed by spiral concentration, magnetic separation, and electrostatic concentration to produce two distinct concentrates of Titanium Dioxide  and Magnetite – Vanadium.
 
To date, our activities have been limited to organizational matters, obtaining a geology report on the Strong Creek claims and planning our initial, 2000 foot, 3-hole exploration program on the Strong Creek claims.
 
Geological Setting and Mineralization
 
The Laramie Anorthosite Complex (LAC), hosting the Strong Creek Fe-Ti deposits, is a 1.4 Billion year old intrusion that was emplaced into the Cheyenne suture between the Archean Wyoming Province and Early Proterozoic island-arc assemblages of the south-western United States. The LAC is comprised of older, layered anorthositic and gabbroic rocks and younger syenitic to monzonitic rocks.
 
The oxide-bearing gabbro-noritic and anothorositic rocks at Strong Creek host layered, late stage cumulate horizons of disseminated oxide mineralization. These rocks are unaltered and only show weak alteration along late fractures. A north-south, doubly plunging antiform produces local geology that has a core complex of anorthosite grading into progressively more differentiated leuco-gabbro-norite and syenite outer rims.
 
The economic model proposed for the Wyoming Iron Complex is an example of a Magmatic Ti­Fe-V Oxide Deposit, which is described in “Magmatic Ti-Fe±V Oxide Deposits, in Geological Fieldwork 1997, British Columbia Ministry of Employment and Investment” by Gross, G.A., Gower, C.F., and Lefebure, D. V., as follows:
 
Geologic Setting: Deposits occur in intrusive complexes which typically are emplaced at deeper levels in the crust. Progressive differentiation of liquids residual from anorthosite-nodte magmas leads to late stage intrusions enriched in Fe and Ti oxides and apatite. Some of the iron-titanium deposits occur at continental margins related to island arc magmatism, followed by an episode of orogenic compression.
 
Age of Mineralization: Mainly Mid proterozoic (1.65 to 0.90 Bn Years old) for the ilmenite deposits, but this may be a consequence of a particular combination of tectonic circumstances, rather than any a prior temporal control. The Fe-Ti deposits with titaniferous magnetite do not appear to be restricted in time.
 
Host/Associated Rocks: Hosted by massive, layered or zoned intrusive complexes - anorthosite, norite, gabbro, diorite, diabase, quartz monzonite and hornblende pyroxenite. The anorthosites are commonly emplaced in granitoid gneiss, granulite, schist, amphibolite and quartzite. Some deposits associated with lower grade rocks.
 
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
 
We know of no material pending legal proceedings to which our company is a party or of which any of our property is the subject. In addition, we do not know of any such proceedings contemplated by any governmental authorities.
 
We know of no material proceedings in which any director, officer or affiliate of our company, or any registered or beneficial stockholder of our company, or any associate of any such director, officer, affiliate, or stockholder is a party adverse to our company or has a material interest adverse to our company.
 
 
 
16

 
 
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
 
Under Section 1503(a) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and under the SEC's recently adopted Item 104 of Regulation S-K, each operator of a coal or other mine is required to include disclosures regarding certain mine safety results in its periodic reports filed with the SEC. The operation of the our quarries is subject to regulation by the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. The information required under Section 1503(a) and the newly adopted Item 104 of Regulation S-K regarding certain mining safety and health matters is presented in Exhibit 95 to this report.
 
PART II
 
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
 
Market Information
 
Our shares of common stock are quoted on the OTC Bulletin Board of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. under the symbol “TFER”.
 
Set forth below are the range of high and low bid quotations for the periods indicated as reported by the OTC Bulletin Board. The market quotations reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, mark-down or commissions and may not necessarily represent actual transactions:
 
Year
Calendar Quarter
High ($)
Low ($)
2011
First Quarter
Nil
Nil
 
Second Quarter
Nil
Nil
 
Third Quarter(1)
1.01
0.25
 
Fourth Quarter
1.10
0.40
2012
First Quarter
1.74
0.98
 
(1)   The first trade of the shares of our common stock on the OTC Bulletin Board was July 12, 2011.
 
Transfer Agent
 
Our Transfer Agent is Holladay Stock Transfer, Inc., 2939 N. 67th Place, Suite C, Scottsdale, Arizona 85251, phone (480) 481-3940.
 
Holders of Our Common Stock
 
As of April 10, 2012, there were approximately 48 stockholders of record holding 51,071,000 shares of our common stock.
 
Dividends
 
We have not declared any dividends since incorporation and do not anticipate that we will do so in the foreseeable future. Although there are no restrictions that limit the ability to pay dividends on our common shares, our intention is to retain future earnings, if any, for use in our operations and the expansion of our business.
 

 
 
17

 
 
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES - continued
 
Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans
 
Effective November 22, 2011 our board of directors adopted and approved the stock option plan. The purpose of the stock option plan is to enhance the long-term stockholder value of our company by offering opportunities to directors, key employees, officers, independent contractors and consultants of our company to acquire and maintain stock ownership in our company in order to give these persons the opportunity to participate in our company’s growth and success, and to encourage them to remain in the service of our company. A total of 9,947,400 shares of our common stock are available for issuance under the stock option plan.

Plan Category
Number of Securities to be Issued Upon Exercise of Outstanding Options, Warrants and Rights
Weighted-Average Exercise Price of Outstanding Options, Warrants and Rights
Number of Securities Remaining Available for Future Issuance under Equity Compensation Plan
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders
Nil
Nil
Nil
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders
3,950,000
$0.84
5,997,400
Total
3,950,000
$0.84
5,997,400
 
Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities
 
On January 11, 2012, we accepted two subscription agreements and issued an aggregate of 1,334,000 units of our company to two investors at a price of $0.75 per unit for gross proceeds of $1,000,500.  Each unit is comprised of one share of our common stock and one half of one share purchase warrant.  One whole share purchase warrant is exercisable into one share of our common stock at an exercise price of $1.00 per share until January 11, 2015.
 
We issued the securities to two non-U.S. persons (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended) in an offshore transaction in which we relied on the registration exemption provided for in Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.
 
On June 20, 2011 we entered into subscription agreements with two investors and issued 2,100,000 units of our securities at a purchase price of US $0.50 per unit for gross proceeds of US $1,050,000.  Each unit consists of one share of our common stock and one-half of one share purchase warrant.  Each whole share purchase warrant entitles the holder to purchase one share of our common stock at a purchase price of US $0.75 per share for a period of three years.
 
We issued the units to three non-U.S. persons (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended) in an offshore transaction in which we relied on the registration exemption provided for in Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.
 
Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers
 
None.
 
ITEM 6 SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
 
Not applicable.
 
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our audited financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2011 and related notes thereto included in such filings. This discussion contains forward-looking statements reflecting our current expectations and estimates and assumptions about events and trends that may affect our future operating results or financial position. Our actual results and the timing of certain events could differ materially from those discussed in these forward-looking statements due to a number of factors, including, but not limited to, those set forth in the sections of this report titled “Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Information” and “Risk Factors”.
 
 
 
 
18

 
 
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS - continued
 
Overview
 
We are a mineral exploration company. Our plan of operation is to carry out exploration work on our Wyoming Iron Complex in order to ascertain whether it possesses commercially exploitable quantities of iron ore and other metals. We intend to primarily explore for iron ore but if we discover that our mineral property hold potential for other minerals that our management determines are worth exploring further, then we intend to explore for those other minerals. We will not be able to determine whether or not the property contains a commercially exploitable mineral deposit, or reserve, until appropriate exploratory work is done and an economic evaluation based on that work indicates economic viability.
 
According to our plan of operation, we estimate our cash needs for the next 12 months to be as follows:

Expense
 
Amount
 
Mineral exploration expenses for Wyoming Complex
  $ 8,000,000  
Amounts payable under acquisition agreement for Wyoming Iron Complex
    210,000  
Professional Fees
    130,000  
General Administrative Expenses
    650,000  
Investor Relations
    120,000  
Travel
    30,000  
Total
  $ 9,140,000  
 
We have no ongoing revenues, have achieved losses since inception, have been issued a going concern opinion by our auditors and rely upon the sale of our securities to fund operations.  Accordingly, we will be dependent on future additional financing in order to fund our anticipated cash needs, and to seek other business opportunities in the mining industry or new business opportunities. There are no assurances that we will be able to complete such future additional financings or seek other business opportunities.
 
We are considered an exploration stage company as we are involved in the examination and investigation of the mineral property that we believe may contain valuable minerals, for the purpose of discovering the presence of ore, if any, and its extent. Since we are an exploration stage company, there is no assurance that a commercially viable mineral deposit exists on our property, and a great deal of further exploration will be required before a final evaluation as to the economic and legal feasibility for our exploration is determined. We have no known reserves of any type of mineral. To date, we have not discovered an economically viable mineral deposit on the mineral property, and there is no assurance that we will discover one
 
Results of Operations
 
We were incorporated in the State of Nevada on June 5, 2007. Our plan after our inception on June 5, 2007 was to produce user-friendly software that creates interactive digital yearbook software for schools and allows them to create and burn their own interactive digital yearbooks on CD/DVD.
 
On June 13, 2011, we entered into a mineral property option acquisition agreement (“Acquisition Agreement”) with J2 Mining Ventures Ltd. pursuant to which J2 Mining agreed to transfer, sell and assign all (100%) of its right, title and interest in and to a iron ore mineral property option agreement (the “Option Agreement”) regarding property located in Albany County, Wyoming.
 
On June 30, 2011, we closed the Acquisition Agreement and entered into an assignment agreement (the “Assignment Agreement”) with J2 Mining and the owner of the property, Wyomex LLC, transferring J2 Mining’s interest in the Option Agreement to our company.

 
19

 
 
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS - continued
 
From Inception on June 5, 2007, through December 31, 2011
 
Our cash in the bank at December 31, 2011 was $118,066. For the period from inception (June 5, 2007) to December 31, 2011 we had no operating revenues and incurred net operating losses of $1,046,660 consisting of general and administrative expenses and professional fees incurred in connection with the day-to-day operation of our business and filing of our periodic reports.
 
As a result of our minimal amount of revenues and ongoing expenditures in pursuit of our business, we incurred net losses since our inception. For the year ended December 31, 2011, our net loss was $954,677.
 
Our net loss and comprehensive loss for our fiscal year ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 and the changes between those periods for the respective items are summarized as follows:
 
   
Year ended December
   
Year ended December
 
    30, 2011     30, 2010  
                 
REVENUES
  $ -     $ -  
                 
Advertising
    22,732          
General and administrative
    345,928       2,333  
Impairment of mineral property acquisition costs
    50,124          
Investor Relations
    22,046          
Professional fees
    93,056       5,985  
Mineral property exploration costs 
    329,107          
Stock based compensation
    107,772       -  
Travel
    1,543          
                 
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES
    972,308       8,313  
 
Total operating expenses were $972,308 for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to $8,313 for the year ended December 31, 2010. All expenses increased due to the Company beginning operations in earnest in the year 2011.
 
Liquidity and Capital Resources
 
Working Capital
   
December 31, 2011 (audited)
   
December 31, 2010 (audited)
 
Current Assets
  $ 143,066     $ --  
Current Liabilities
  $ 22,104     $ 17,569  
Working Capital Deficiency
  $ 120,962     $ (17,569 )
 
Current assets as at December 31, 2011 were $143,066 comprised of cash of $118,066 and prepaid expenses of $25,000. Current assets as at December 31, 2010 were $nil. Cash increased over the prior year due to raising of funds through private placements. Pre paid expenses increased over the prior year due to advances provided to service providers. Current liabilities as at December 31, 2011 were $22,104 comprised of $21,457 of accounts payable and $647 of accrued expenses – related party. Current liabilities as at December 31, 2010 were $17,569 comprised of $7,491 of accounts payable and $10,078 of accrued expenses – related party. Accounts payable increased over the prior year due to start up of exploration activity. Accrued expenses – related party decreased from the prior year due to settlement of debts with related parties.
 
 
 
20

 
 
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS - continued
 
Cash Flows
 
   
December 31, 2011 (audited)
   
December 31, 2010 (audited)
 
Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Operating Activities
  $ (817,246 )   $ --  
Net Cash Used in Investing Activities
  $ (110,124 )   $ --  
Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities
  $ 1,045,436     $ --  
Net Increase in Cash and Cash Equivalents
  $ 118,066     $ --  
 
Operating Activities
 
Net cash used in operating activities was $817,246 for our 12-month period ended December 31, 2011 compared with nil cash used in operating activities in the same period in 2010.  The reason for the change is the start up of operations and exploration activity in 2011.
 
Investing Activities
 
Net cash used in investing activities was $110,124 for our 12-month period ended December 31, 2011 compared with nil net cash used in investing activities in the same period in 2010. The reason for the change is payments for options on mineral properties
 
Financing Activities
 
Net cash from financing activities was $1,045,436 for our 12-month period ended December 31, 2011 compared with nil net cash in the same period in 2010. The reason for the change is the raising of funds through private placements in 2011.
 
Going Concern
 
At December 30, 2011, we had an accumulated deficit of $1,030,196 since our inception and incurred a net loss of $954,677 for the year ended December 30, 2011.  We expect to incur further losses in the development of our business, all of which casts substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon our ability to generate future profitable operations and/or to obtain the necessary financing to meet our obligations and repay our liabilities arising from normal business operations when they come due. Our independent auditors included an explanatory paragraph regarding substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern in their report on our annual financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2011.
 
We have generated minimal revenues and have incurred losses since inception. Accordingly, we will be dependent on future additional financing in order to seek other business opportunities in the mining industry or new business opportunities. We are considered an exploration stage company as we are involved in the examination and investigation of the mineral property that we believe may contain valuable minerals, for the purpose of discovering the presence of ore, if any, and its extent. Since we are an exploration stage company, there is no assurance that a commercially viable mineral deposit exists on our property, and a great deal of further exploration will be required before a final evaluation as to the economic and legal feasibility for our exploration is determined. We have no known reserves of any type of mineral. To date, we have not discovered an economically viable mineral deposit on the mineral property, and there is no assurance that we will discover one.
 
Application of Critical Accounting Policies

Basis of Presentation
 
These financial statements and related notes are presented in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, and are expressed in US dollars. The Company’s fiscal year-end is December 31, 2011.
 
 
 
 
21

 
 
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS - continued
 
Use of Estimates
 
The preparation of these statements in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses in the reporting period. The Company regularly evaluates estimates and assumptions related to useful life and recoverability of long-lived assets, deferred income tax asset valuations, asset retirement obligations, financial instrument valuations, and loss contingencies. The Company bases its estimates and assumptions on current facts, historical experience and various other factors that it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities and the accrual of costs and expenses that are not readily apparent from other sources. The actual results experienced by the Company may differ materially and adversely from the Company’s estimates. To the extent there are material differences between the estimates and the actual results, future results of operations will be affected. 

Revenue Recognition
 
The Company recognizes revenue when products are fully delivered or services have been provided and collection is reasonably assured.
 
Advertising Costs
 
The Company’s policy regarding advertising is to expense advertising when incurred.

Cash and Cash Equivalents
 
The Company considers all highly liquid instruments purchased with a maturity of six months or less to be cash equivalents to the extent the funds are not being held for investment purposes.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets
 
The Company continually monitors events and changes in circumstances that could indicate carrying amounts of long-lived assets may not be recoverable. When such events or changes in circumstances are present, the Company assesses the recoverability of long-lived assets by determining whether the carrying value of such assets will be recovered through undiscounted expected future cash flows.
 
If the total of the future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of those assets, the Company recognizes an impairment loss based on the excess of the carrying amount over the fair value of the assets. Assets to be disposed of are reported at the lower of the carrying amount or the fair value less costs to sell.

Stock-based compensation
 
The Company records stock-based compensation in accordance with ASC 718, Compensation – Stock Based Compensation, which requires the measurement and recognition of compensation expense based on estimated fair values for all share-based awards made to employees and directors, including stock options.

ASC 718 requires companies to estimate the fair value of share-based awards on the date of grant using an option-pricing model. The Company uses the Black-Scholes option pricing model as its method in determining fair value. This model is affected by the Company’s stock price as well as assumptions regarding a number of subjective variables. These subjective variables include, but are not limited to the Company’s expected stock price volatility over the terms of the awards, and actual and projected employee stock option exercise behaviors. The value of the portion of the award that is ultimately expected to vest is recognized as an expense in the statement of operations over the requisite service period.

Mineral Property Costs
 
The Company is in the exploration stage and has not yet realized any revenues from its planned operations. It is primarily engaged in the acquisition and exploration of mineral properties. Mineral property exploration costs are expensed as incurred. Mineral property acquisition costs are initially capitalized.  The Company assesses the carrying costs for impairment,whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying cost may not be recoverable under ASC 360, Property, Plant, and Equipment at each reporting date. When it has been determined that a mineral property can be economically developed as a result of establishing proven and probable reserves, the costs then incurred to develop such property, will be capitalized. Such costs will be amortized using the units-of-production method over the estimated recoverable reserves. If mineral properties are subsequently abandoned or impaired, any capitalized costs will be charged to operations.

 
 
 
22

 
 
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS - continued
 
Asset Retirement Obligations
 
The Company records asset retirement obligations in accordance with ASC 410-20, Asset Retirement Obligations, which addresses financial accounting and reporting for obligations associated with the retirement of tangible long-lived assets and the associated retirement costs. The standard applies to legal obligations associated with the retirement of long-lived assets that result from the acquisition, construction, development and normal use of the asset. ASC 410-20 requires that the fair value of a liability for an asset retirement obligation be recognized in the period in which it is incurred if a reasonable estimate of fair value can be made. The fair value of the liability is added to the carrying amount of the associated asset and this additional carrying amount is depreciated over the life of the asset. The liability is accreted at the end of each period through charges to operating expense. If the obligation is settled for other than the carrying amount of the liability, the Company will recognize a gain or loss on settlement. As at December 31, 2011, the Company has not incurred any asset retirement obligation related to the exploration and development of its resource properties.

Comprehensive Loss
 
ASC 220, Comprehensive Income establishes standards for the reporting and display of comprehensive loss and its components in the consolidated financial statements. As at December 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, the Company has no items that represent other comprehensive loss and, therefore, has not included a schedule of other comprehensive loss in the financial statements.

Financial Instruments
 
FASB ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value under generally accepted accounting principles and enhances disclosures about fair value measurements. Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Valuation techniques used to measure fair value, as required by ASC 820, must maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs.

The Company’s assessment of the significance of a particular input to the fair value measurements requires judgment, and may affect the valuation of the assets and liabilities being measured and their placement within the fair value hierarchy. The carrying values of cash, accounts payable, and due to related parties approximate fair values because of the short-term maturity of these instruments. Unless otherwise noted, it is management’s opinion that the Company is not exposed to significant interest, currency or credit risks arising from these financial instruments.

Basic and Diluted Net Loss Per Share
 
The Company computes net loss per share in accordance with ASC 260, Earnings per Share.  ASC 260 requires presentation of both basic and diluted earnings per share (EPS) on the face of the statement of operations. Basic EPS is computed by dividing net income (loss) available to common shareholders (numerator) by the weighted average number of shares outstanding (denominator) during the period. Diluted EPS gives effect to all dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period using the treasury stock method and convertible preferred stock using the if-converted method. In computing diluted EPS, the average stock price for the period is used in determining the number of shares assumed to be purchased from the exercise of stock options or warrants. Diluted EPS excludes all dilutive potential shares if their effect is anti-dilutive. Shares underlying these securities totaled approximately 5,000,000 as of  December 31, 2011.

Income Taxes
 
The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability method in accordance with ASC 740, Income Taxes. The asset and liability method provides that deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities and for operating loss and tax credit carry forwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using the currently enacted tax rates and laws that will be in effect when the differences are expected to reverse. The Company records a valuation allowance to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that is believed more likely than not to be realized.
 
 
 
 
23

 
 
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS - continued
 
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
 
Comprehensive Income
 
In June 2011, ASC guidance was issued related to comprehensive income. Under the updated guidance, an entity will have the option to present the total of comprehensive income either in a single continued statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. In addition, the update requires certain disclosure requirements when reporting other comprehensive income. The update does not change the items reported in other comprehensive income or when an item of other comprehensive income must be reclassified to income. The update is effective for the Company’s fiscal year beginning January 1, 2012. The Company does not expect the updated guidance to have an impact on the balance sheets, results of operations or cash flows.

Fair Value Accounting
 
In May 2011, ASC guidance was issued related to disclosures around fair value accounting. The updated guidance clarifies different components of fair value accounting including the application of the highest and best use and valuation premise concepts, measuring the fair value of an instrument classified in a reporting entity’s shareholders’ equity and disclosing quantitative information about the unobservable inputs used in fair value measurements that are categorized in Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy. The update is effective for the Company’s fiscal year beginning January 1, 2012. The Company does not expect the updated guidance to have a significant impact on the balance sheets, results of operations or cash flows.

The Company has implemented all other new accounting pronouncements that are in effect and that may impact its financial statements and does not believe that there are any other new accounting pronouncements that have been issued that might have a material impact on its financial position or results of operations.

ITEM 7A QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
 
Not Applicable
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
24

 
 
 
ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 
TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2011


 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm   F-1
     
Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010
 
F-2
     
Statements of Operations for the year ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, and for the period from June 5, 2007 (inception) to December 31, 2011
 
F-3
     
Statement of Stockholders’ Equity  (Deficit) for the year ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, and for the period from June 5, 2007 (inception) to December 31, 2011
 
F-4
     
Statements of Cash Flows for the year ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, and for the period from June 5, 2007 (inception) to December 31, 2011
 
F-5
     
 Notes to the Financial Statements 
 
F-6
 
 
 

 


 
25

 
 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm


To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of
Titan Iron Ore Corp.
(An Exploration Stage Company)


We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Titan Iron Ore Corp. (An Exploration Stage Company) (formerly Digital Yearbook Inc.) as of December 31, 2011 and 2010 and the related statements of operations, cash flows and stockholders’ deficit for the years then ended and for the period from June 5, 2007 (date of inception) through to December 31, 2011. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. An audit includes consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Titan Iron Ore Corp. (An Exploration Stage Company) (formerly Digital Yearbook Inc.) as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, and the results of its operations, cash flows and stockholders’ deficit for the years then ended and for the period from June 5, 2007 (date of inception) through December 31, 2011 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1 to the financial statements, the Company has accumulated losses since inception. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans in regard to these matters are also discussed in Note 1. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

/s/ “Manning Elliott LLP”

CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
 
Vancouver, Canada
 
April 12, 2012


 
F-1

 

TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)
(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)
BALANCE SHEETS
(Expressed in US dollars)

 
 
             
ASSETS
 
December 31,
2011
   
December 31,
2010
 
             
Current Assets
           
Cash
 
$
118,066
   
$
-
 
Prepaid expenses (Note 8)
   
25,000
         
Total current assets
   
143,066
     
-
 
                 
Mineral property options (Note 3)
   
60,000
     
-
 
                 
TOTAL ASSETS
 
$
203,066
   
$
-
 
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)
               
                 
LIABILITIES
               
Current Liabilities
               
Accounts payable
 
$
21,457
   
$
7,491
 
Accrued expenses - related party (Note 8)
   
647
     
10,078
 
Total Current Liabilities
   
22,104
     
17,569
 
                 
Total Liabilities
   
22,104
     
17,569
 
                 
Commitments and Contingencies (Notes 1 and 7)
               
Subsequent Events (Note 12)
               
                 
STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)
               
Preferred stock, 50,000,000 shares authorized at par value of $0.0001, no shares issued and outstanding
   
-
     
-
 
Common stock, 3,700,000,000 shares authorized at par value of $0.0001, 49,737,000 (December 31, 2010 – 190,587,000) shares issued and outstanding (Note 4)
   
4,974
     
19,059
 
Additional paid-in capital
   
1,206,184
     
38,891
 
Deficit accumulated during the exploration stage
   
(1,030,196
)
   
(75,519
)
Total Stockholders' Equity (Deficit)
   
180,962
     
(17,569
)
                 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)
 
$
203,066
   
$
-
 

 

 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements.

 
 
F-2

 
 


TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)
(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)
STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(Expressed in US dollars)
 
 
   
Year ended 
December 30,
   
Year ended 
December 30,
   
Accumulated from June 5, 2007 (Inception) to December 31,
 
   
2011
   
2010
   
2011
 
                   
REVENUES
  $ -     $ -     $ 4,855  
                         
OPERATING EXPENSES
                       
                         
Advertising
    22,732               22,732  
    General and administrative (Note 8)
    345,928       2,333       392,063  
Impairment of mineral property acquisition costs (Note 3)
    50,124               50,124  
Investor relations
    22,046               22,046  
Professional fees
    93,056       5,985       126,128  
Mineral property exploration costs  (Note 10)
    329,107               329,107  
Stock-based compensation (Note 6)
    107,772       -       107,772  
Travel
    1,543               1,543  
                         
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES
    972,308       8,318       1,051,515  
                         
LOSS FROM OPERATIONS
    (972,308       (8,318       (1,046,660  
                         
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSES)
                       
Gain on debt settlement
    17,631       -       17,631  
Other income (expenses)
    -       (1,167       (1,167  
                         
NET LOSS
  $ (954,677     $ (9,485     $ (1,030,196  
                         
BASIC LOSS PER SHARE
    (0.01     $ (0.00          
                         
 WEIGHTED AVERAGE NUMBER OF SHARES OUTSTANDING
    121,990,562       190,587,000          
 
 

 The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements.

 
 
F-3

 
 


TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)
(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)
STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT
FOR THE PERIOD FROM INCEPTION TO DECEMBER 31, 2011
(Expressed in US dollars)
 
   
Common # Stock
(Note 4)
   
Common Stock Amount
   
Additional Paid-in Capital
   
Deficit Accumulated During the Development Stage
   
Total
 
Balance, June 5, 2007 (Inception)
   
-
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
-
 
                                         
Common Stock issued for cash
                                       
at $0.0001 per share
   
148,000,000
     
14,800
     
(14,400
)
   
-
     
400
 
                                         
Common Stock issued for cash
                                       
at $0.05 per share
   
29,637,000
     
2,964
     
37,086
     
-
     
40,050
 
                                         
Net loss for the period ended
                                       
December 31, 2007
   
-
     
-
     
-
     
(21,874
)
   
(21,874
)
                                         
Balance, December 31, 2007
   
177,637,000
     
17,764
     
22,686
     
(21,874
)
   
18,576
 
                                         
Common Stock issued for creditors
                                       
at $0.05 per share
   
12,950,000
     
1,295
     
16,205
     
-
     
17,500
 
                                         
Net loss 2008
   
-
     
-
     
-
     
(34,675
)
   
(34,675
)
                                         
Balance, December 31, 2008
   
190,587,000
     
19,059
     
38,891
     
(56,549
)
   
1,401
 
                                         
Net loss 2009
   
-
     
-
     
-
     
(9,485
)
   
(9,485
)
                                         
Balance, December 31, 2009
   
190,587,000
     
19,059
     
38,891
     
(66,034
)
   
(8,084
)
                                         
Net loss 2010
   
-
     
-
     
-
     
(9,485
)
   
(9,485
)
                                         
Balance, December 31, 2010
   
190,587,000
     
19,059
     
38,891
     
(75,519
)
   
(17,569
)
                                         
Common Stock issued for cash
                                       
at $0.50 per share
   
2,100,000
     
210
     
1,049,790
     
-
     
1,050,000
 
                                         
Share issuance costs
   
-
     
-
     
(4,564
)
   
-
     
(4,564
)
                                         
Shares cancelled
   
(142,950,000
)
   
(14,295
)
   
14,295
     
-
     
-
 
                                         
Stock-based compensation
   
-
     
-
     
107,772
     
-
     
107,772
 
                                         
Net loss 2011
   
-
     
-
     
-
     
(954,677
)
   
(954,677
)
                                         
Balance, December 31, 2011
   
49,737,000
   
$
4,974
   
$
1,206,184
   
$
(1,030,196
)
 
$
180,962
 

 

 The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements.

 
 
F-4

 
 


TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)
(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)
STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Expressed in US dollars)


   
Year ended December 31, 2011
   
Year ended December 31, 2010
   
Period from June 5, 2007 (Inception) to December 31, 2011
 
Cash Flows from Operating Activities:
                 
Net loss
 
$
(954,677
)
 
$
(9,485
)
 
$
(1,030,196
)
                         
Adjustments to Reconcile Net Loss to Net Cash Used in Operating Activities:
                       
Depreciation expense
   
-
     
2,333
     
5,833
 
Stock-based compensation
   
107,772
     
-
     
107,772
 
Loss on disposal of assets
   
-
     
1,167
     
1,167
 
Impairment of mineral property
   
50,124
     
-
     
50,124
 
Shares issued for services
   
-
     
-
     
17,500
 
Gain on debt settlement
   
(17,631
)
   
-
     
(17,631
)
Changes in Assets and Liabilities
                       
Decrease (increase) in prepaid expenses
   
(25,000
)
   
-
     
(25,000
)
Increase (decrease) in accounts payable
   
21,519
     
785
     
29,010
 
Increase in accrued expenses – related party
   
647
     
5,200
     
10,725
 
Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Operating Activities
   
(817,246
)
   
-
     
(850,696
)
                         
Cash Flows used in Investing Activities:
                       
Acquisition of property and equipment
   
-
     
-
     
(7,000
)
Payment on mineral property options
   
(110,124
)
   
-
     
(110,124
)
Net Cash Used in Investing Activities
   
(110,124
)
   
-
     
(117,124
)
                         
Cash Flows from Financing Activities:
                       
Common stock issued for cash
   
1,045,436
     
-
     
1,085,886
 
Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities
   
1,045,436
     
-
     
1,085,886
 
                         
Net Increase in Cash and Cash Equivalents
   
118,066
     
-
     
118,066
 
                         
Cash and Cash Equivalents – Beginning
   
-
     
-
     
-
 
                         
Cash and Cash Equivalents – Ending
 
$
118,066
   
$
-
   
$
118,066
 
                         
Supplemental Cash Flow Information:
                       
Cash paid for interest
 
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
-
 
Cash paid for income taxes
 
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
-
 
 



 The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements.

 
 
F-5

 
TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)
(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011
(Expressed in US dollars)
 


1.  NATURE OF BUSINESS

Titan Iron Ore Corp. (the Company) (formerly Digital Yearbook, Inc.) was incorporated in the State of Nevada on June 5, 2007. At its inception, the Company was engaged in developing and offering software products for the creation of interactive digital yearbook software for high schools.

Effective June 15, 2011, the Company completed a merger with its subsidiary, Titan Iron Ore Corp., a Nevada corporation, which was incorporated solely to effect a change in our name from “Digital Yearbook Inc.” to “Titan Iron Ore Corp.” effective becoming an exploration stage company. The Company’s principal business includes the acquisition, and exploration of mineral properties.
Also effective June 15, 2011, the Company effected a 37 to one forward stock split of our authorized and issued and outstanding common stock.  As a result, 5,151,000 shares of common stock outstanding increased to 190,587,000 shares of common stock. Subsequently, on June 20, 2011, the Company issued 2,100,000 common shares pursuant to a private placement unit offering, increasing the number of shares of common stock outstanding to 192,687,000. Effective June 30, 2011 and in connection with the acquisition of an option to purchase a mineral property, certain shareholders surrendered 142,950,000 common shares of the Company. As a result of the Company’s cancellation of these shares, the Company’s outstanding shares of common stock decreased to 49,737,000.

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern, which implies that the Company would continue to realize its assets and discharge its liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has never paid any dividends and is unlikely to pay dividends or generate earnings in the immediate or foreseeable future. As at December 31, 2011, the Company has accumulated losses of $1,030,196 since inception and its operations continue to be funded primarily from sales of its stock. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern, including completion of the acquisition, exploration and development of its mineral properties is dependent on the Company’s ability to obtain the necessary financing from sales of its stock financings. The financial statements do not include any adjustments to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.


2.  SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
 
Basis of Presentation
These financial statements and related notes are presented in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, and are expressed in US dollars. The Company’s fiscal year-end is December 31, 2011.

Use of Estimates
The preparation of these statements in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses in the reporting period. The Company regularly evaluates estimates and assumptions related to useful life and recoverability of long-lived assets, deferred income tax asset valuations, asset retirement obligations, financial instrument valuations, and loss contingencies. The Company bases its estimates and assumptions on current facts, historical experience and various other factors that it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities and the accrual of costs and expenses that are not readily apparent from other sources. The actual results experienced by the Company may differ materially and adversely from the Company’s estimates. To the extent there are material differences between the estimates and the actual results, future results of operations will be affected. 

Revenue Recognition
The Company recognizes revenue when products are fully delivered or services have been provided and collection is reasonably assured.
 
Advertising Costs
The Company’s policy regarding advertising is to expense advertising when incurred.




 
 
 
F-6

 
TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)
(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011
(Expressed in US dollars)
 


2.  SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

Cash and Cash Equivalents
The Company considers all highly liquid instruments purchased with a maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets
The Company continually monitors events and changes in circumstances that could indicate carrying amounts of long-lived assets may not be recoverable. When such events or changes in circumstances are present, the Company assesses the recoverability of long-lived assets by determining whether the carrying value of such assets will be recovered through undiscounted expected future cash flows.

If the total of the future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of those assets, the Company recognizes an impairment loss based on the excess of the carrying amount over the fair value of the assets. Assets to be disposed of are reported at the lower of the carrying amount or the fair value less costs to sell.

Stock-based compensation
The Company records stock-based compensation in accordance with ASC 718, Compensation – Stock Based Compensation, which requires the measurement and recognition of compensation expense based on estimated fair values for all share-based awards made to employees and directors, including stock options.

ASC 718 requires companies to estimate the fair value of share-based awards on the date of grant using an option-pricing model. The Company uses the Black-Scholes option pricing model as its method in determining fair value. This model is affected by the Company’s stock price as well as assumptions regarding a number of subjective variables. These subjective variables include, but are not limited to the Company’s expected stock price volatility over the terms of the awards, and actual and projected employee stock option exercise behaviors. The value of the portion of the award that is ultimately expected to vest is recognized as an expense in the statement of operations over the requisite service period.

Mineral Property Costs
The Company is in the exploration stage and has not yet realized any revenues from its planned operations. It is primarily engaged in the acquisition and exploration of mineral properties. Mineral property exploration costs are expensed as incurred. Mineral property acquisition costs are capitalized.  The Company assesses the carrying costs for impairment, whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying cost may not be recoverable under ASC 360, Property, Plant, and Equipment at each reporting date. When it has been determined that a mineral property can be economically developed as a result of establishing proven and probable reserves, the costs then incurred to develop such property, will be capitalized. Such costs will be amortized using the units-of-production method over the estimated recoverable reserves. If mineral properties are subsequently abandoned or impaired, any capitalized costs will be charged to operations.

Asset Retirement Obligations
The Company records asset retirement obligations in accordance with ASC 410-20, Asset Retirement Obligations, which addresses financial accounting and reporting for obligations associated with the retirement of tangible long-lived assets and the associated retirement costs. The standard applies to legal obligations associated with the retirement of long-lived assets that result from the acquisition, construction, development and normal use of the asset. ASC 410-20 requires that the fair value of a liability for an asset retirement obligation be recognized in the period in which it is incurred if a reasonable estimate of fair value can be made. The fair value of the liability is added to the carrying amount of the associated asset and this additional carrying amount is depreciated over the life of the asset. The liability is accreted at the end of each period through charges to operating expense. If the obligation is settled for other than the carrying amount of the liability, the Company will recognize a gain or loss on settlement. As at December 31, 2011, the Company has not incurred any asset retirement obligation related to the exploration of its mineral property option.

Comprehensive Loss
ASC 220, Comprehensive Income establishes standards for the reporting and display of comprehensive loss and its components in the consolidated financial statements. As at December 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, the Company has no items that represent other comprehensive loss and, therefore, has not included a schedule of other comprehensive loss in the financial statements.


 
 
 
F-7

 
TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)
(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011
(Expressed in US dollars)
 


2.  SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

Financial Instruments
FASB ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value under generally accepted accounting principles and enhances disclosures about fair value measurements. Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Valuation techniques used to measure fair value, as required by ASC 820, must maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs.

The Company’s assessment of the significance of a particular input to the fair value measurements requires judgment, and may affect the valuation of the assets and liabilities being measured and their placement within the fair value hierarchy. The carrying values of cash, accounts payable, and due to related parties approximate fair values because of the short-term maturity of these instruments. Unless otherwise noted, it is management’s opinion that the Company is not exposed to significant interest, currency or credit risks arising from these financial instruments.

Basic and Diluted Net Loss Per Share
The Company computes net loss per share in accordance with ASC 260, Earnings per Share.  ASC 260 requires presentation of both basic and diluted earnings per share (EPS) on the face of the statement of operations. Basic EPS is computed by dividing net income (loss) available to common shareholders (numerator) by the weighted average number of shares outstanding (denominator) during the period. Diluted EPS gives effect to all dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period using the treasury stock method and convertible preferred stock using the if-converted method. In computing diluted EPS, the average stock price for the period is used in determining the number of shares assumed to be purchased from the exercise of stock options or warrants. Diluted EPS excludes all dilutive potential shares if their effect is anti-dilutive. Shares underlying these securities totaled approximately 5,000,000 as of December 31, 2011.

Income Taxes
The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability method in accordance with ASC 740, Income Taxes. The asset and liability method provides that deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities and for operating loss and tax credit carry forwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using the currently enacted tax rates and laws that will be in effect when the differences are expected to reverse. The Company records a valuation allowance to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that is believed more likely than not to be realized.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Comprehensive Income
In June 2011, ASC guidance was issued related to comprehensive income. Under the updated guidance, an entity will have the option to present the total of comprehensive income either in a single continued statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. In addition, the update requires certain disclosure requirements when reporting other comprehensive income. The update does not change the items reported in other comprehensive income or when an item of other comprehensive income must be reclassified to income. The update is effective for the Company’s fiscal year beginning January 1, 2012. The Company does not expect the updated guidance to have an impact on the balance sheets, results of operations or cash flows.

Fair Value Accounting
In May 2011, ASC guidance was issued related to disclosures around fair value accounting. The updated guidance clarifies different components of fair value accounting including the application of the highest and best use and valuation premise concepts, measuring the fair value of an instrument classified in a reporting entity’s shareholders’ equity and disclosing quantitative information about the unobservable inputs used in fair value measurements that are categorized in Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy. The update is effective for the Company’s fiscal year beginning January 1, 2012. The Company does not expect the updated guidance to have a significant impact on the balance sheets, results of operations or cash flows.

The Company has implemented all other new accounting pronouncements that are in effect and that may impact its financial statements and does not believe that there are any other new accounting pronouncements that have been issued that might have a material impact on its financial position or results of operations.



 
 
 
F-8

 
TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)
(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011
(Expressed in US dollars)
 


3.  MINERAL PROPERTY OPTIONS

Strong Creek and Iron Mountain Properties
Effective June 30, 2011 and in connection with the entry into an agreement (the “Acquisition Agreement”) with J2 Mining Ventures Ltd. (“J2 Mining”) dated June 13, 2011, the Company completed the acquisition of a 100% right, title and interest in and to a properties (Strong Creek and Iron Mountain) option agreement (the “Option Agreement”) from J2 Mining with respect to an iron ore mineral property located in Albany County, Wyoming by entering into an assignment of mineral property option agreement with J2 Mining and Wyomex LLC (the “Assignment Agreement”), whereby the Company was assigned the 100% right, title and interest in and the Option Agreement from J2 Mining.

The Option Agreement assigned to the Company from J2 Mining on June 30, 2011, was originally entered into on May 26, 2011 between J2 Mining and Wyomex LLC, pursuant to which Wyomex LLC (“Optionor”), granted to J2 Mining, as optionee, an exclusive right and option to acquire 100% undivided legal and beneficial interests in and to certain unpatented lode mining claims, fee lands, leased lands, and other interests in real property situated in Albany County, Wyoming (the “Wyoming Iron Complex”). Pursuant to the Assignment Agreement, J2 Mining agreed to assign all its rights and interests in the property and the Option Agreement, and transfer all of its obligations under the Option Agreement, to the Company.

The term of the option commenced on May 26, 2011 and could be extended for a maximum of six successive one-month periods, at the sole election of the Company, through notice to Wyomex LLC and tender of $5,000 from the Company to Wyomex LLC for each of the first three additional months and $15,000 for each additional month for months four through six. As at December 31, 2011, total payments of $60,000 had been made.

Prior to December 31, 2010, the Company provided written notice to the Optionor of its intent to exercise its option. Subsequent to the balance sheet date, on April 10, 2012, the Company executed an asset purchase agreement (see Note 12) to exercise its option for consideration of $7,000,000, consisting of the following:

 
a)
A cash payment at closing of $85,000 as an initial payment (paid);
 
b)
$60,000 of consideration previously paid and received by the Optionor (see above);
 
c)
A $6,855,000 promissory note (issued), non-interest bearing, secured by the Strong Creek and Iron Mountain properties. The note is repayable through advance minimum royalty payments of $62,500 commencing six months from the date of closing and after receipt of the initial payment, and every six months thereafter, until the commencement of commercial production from the property. At the commencement of commercial production from the properties, the semi-annual advance minimum royalty shall convert to a 4.5% gross metal value royalty on iron ore and/or other mineral materials produced and sold from the property and, except for events of force majeure, in no event shall the production royalty paid to the Optionor be less than $150,000 in any given calendar year. Repayment of the promissory note may be demanded by the Optionor upon an event of default as defined in the agreement.

Upon full settlement of the promissory note, the production royalty shall be reduced, and the Company shall pay the optionor a gross metal value royalty of 1.5% for all iron product and/or other mineral materials mined and sold from the property.

Labrador Trough Property
On July 19, 2011, the Company entered into an option agreement with Globex Mining Enterprises Inc. ("Globex") effective July 12, 2011 (the "Agreement"), pursuant to which Globex granted the Company the right (the "Option") for a period of 90 days from July 12, 2011 to acquire an undivided 100% interest in and to 144 mining claims (the "Property") located in the Labrador trough area in the Province of Quebec, Canada.

On October 12, 2011, the Company notified the owner of the Labrador Trough iron ore property that the Company would not be exercising the option to acquire the property. The Company recorded an impairment of mineral property charge of $50,124 during the year ended December 31, 2011.



 
 
 
F-9

 
TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)
(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011
(Expressed in US dollars)
 


4.  COMMON STOCK

Effective June 15, 2011 the Company effected a 37 to 1 forward stock split of the Company’s authorized and outstanding commons stock. As a result, the 5,151,000 shares outstanding increased to 190,587,000.  All share amounts have been retroactively adjusted for all periods presented.

On June 20, 2011, the Company closed a private placement for 2,100,000 units at a price of $0.50 per units for net proceeds of $1,045,436 after share issue costs. Each unit consists of one share of our common stock and one-half of one share purchase warrant. Each whole share purchase warrant entitles the holder to purchase one share of our common stock at a purchase price of $0.75 for a period of three years.

Effective June 30, 2011 and in connection with the acquisition of an option to purchase a mineral property, certain shareholders surrendered 142,950,000 common shares of the Company. As a result of the Company’s cancellation of these shares, the Company’s outstanding shares of common stock decreased to 49,737,000.


5.  SHARE PURCHASE WARRANTS

         
Weighted Average
 
   
Number of
   
Exercise
 
   
Warrants
   
Price
 
 Balance, December 31, 2010 and 2009
 
-
   
-
 
 Warrants granted with private placement
   
1,050,000
   
$
0.75
 
                 
 Balance, December 31, 2011   
   
1,050,000
   
$
0.75
 

Details of share purchase warrants outstanding as of December 31, 2011 are:

Number of Warrants Outstanding and Exercisable
  Exercise Price
2011
   
per Share
 
Expiry Date
           
  1,050,000    
$
0.75
 
June 20, 2014

 
 
 
F-10

 
TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)
(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011
(Expressed in US dollars)
 


6. STOCK BASED COMPENSATION

On November 22, 2011, the Board of Directors approved a stock option plan (“2011 Stock Option Plan”), the purpose of which is to enhance the Company’s stockholder value and financial performance by attracting, retaining and motivating the Company’s officers, directors, key employees, consultants and its affiliates and to encourage stock ownership by such individuals by providing them with a means to acquire a proprietary interest in the Company’s success through stock ownership. Under the 2011 Stock Option Plan, officers, directors, employees and consultants who provide services to the Company may be granted options to acquire common shares of the Company.   The aggregate number of options authorized by the plan shall not exceed 9,947,400 common shares of the Company. 
 
During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company granted 3,450,000 and 500,000 stock options at an exercise price of $0.84 per share for 10 years and 3 years respectively.  During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company recorded stock-based compensation of $107,772.
 
The weighted average grant date fair value of stock options granted during the year ended December 31, 2011 was $0.80.

The weighted average assumptions used for each of the years ended December 31, are as follows:
 
   
2011
 
Expected dividend yield
    0 %
Risk-free interest rate
    1.64 %
Expected volatility
    115 %
Expected option life (in years)
    8.41  

The following table summarizes the options outstanding as at December 31, 2011:

   
Option Price
   
Number of shares
 
Expiry Date
 
Per Share
   
2011
   
2010
 
December 21, 2021
  0.84       3,450,000       -  
December 21, 2014
  0.84       500,000       -  

The following table summarizes the continuity of the Company’s stock options:
 
   
Number of Options
   
Weighted Average Exercise Price
   
Weighted-Average Remaining Contractual Term (years)
   
Aggregate Intrinsic Value
 
                $       $    
                             
Outstanding, December 31, 2010 and 2009
    -       -                  
                                 
Granted
    3,950,000       0.84                  
                                 
Outstanding, December 31, 2011
    3,950,000       0.84       9.08       869,000  
                                 
Exercisable, December 31, 2011
    -       -       -       -  

As at December 31, 2011, there was $6,058,492 of unrecognized compensation cost related to non-vested stock option agreements. This cost is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of 1.47 years.


 
 

 
 
 
F-11

 
TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)
(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011
(Expressed in US dollars)
 


7.  COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

On June 30, 2011, the Company entered into an employment agreement with an officer to serve as President and Chief Executive Officer of our company for a term of two years with automatic renewals for similar two year periods pursuant to the terms of the agreement.  Under the agreement, the officer receives monthly remuneration at a gross rate of $15,000. The Company can terminate the agreement within 60 days of notice. If the executive is terminated without cause, the executive shall be entitled to one month’s severance pay for each one month of service up to a maximum of two years. The officer shall also be entitled to receive 2.4 million options to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock pursuant to the Company’s Stock Option Plan, with 1.0 million of the options being granted in calendar year 2011 (completed) and 1.4 million option being granted after December 31, 2011.

On June 30, 2011, the Company entered into consulting agreements with a management company managed by the CEO, for consulting fee of $2,500 per month to provide office space and administrative services. The Company can terminate the agreement within 15 days written notice. The agreement commences on June 30, 2011 for a one year period and shall automatically renew from year to year unless terminated.

On June 30, 2011, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with a firm to provide the services of the company’s Vice President, Exploration, who will provide and perform for the benefit of our company certain geological advisory services as may be requested by our company. Under the agreement, the firm receives monthly compensation at a gross rate of $6,000. The Company can terminate the consulting agreement at any time. The agreement commences on June 30, 2011 and shall automatically renew from year to year unless terminated.

On June 30, 2011, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with a consulting firm who will provide and perform for the benefit of our company certain geological, engineering, marketing and project management services as may be requested by our company at monthly rate of $8,000. The Company can terminate the consulting agreement at any time. The agreement commences on June 30, 2011 and shall automatically renew from year to year unless terminated.

On November 1, 2011, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with a financial public relations firm for a term of 1 year. Under the agreement, the consultant receives $8,000 per month, and 500,000 options (granted) to purchase common stock of the Company.


8.  RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS AND BALANCES

During the year ended December 31, 2011 the Company advanced $25,000 at December 31, 2011 to a management firm managed by the Company’s CEO (2010: $0). This advance for expenses to be incurred on the Company’s behalf was recorded as prepaid expenses.
 
During the year ended December 31, 2010 a former officer provided $10,078 in advances to the Company and this amount was owing as at December 31, 2010. This amount was assumed by previous management during the year ended December 31, 2011 in connection with the acquisition of an option to purchase a mineral property.

During the year ended December 31, 2011 the Company incurred $30,000 (2010: $0) in management fees to a former officer and director.

During the year ended December 31, 2011 the Company incurred $15,000 in management fees and $7,355 in rent expense to a management firm managed by the Company’s CEO (2010: $0) with such costs being recorded as general and administrative costs. As at December 31, 2011, the Company owed $430 including unreimbursed expenses to this firm (2010: $0).

During the year ended December 31, 2011 the Company incurred $194,797 in management fees to officers and director of the Company (2010: $0) with such costs being recorded as general and administrative costs. As at December 31, 2011, the Company owed $217 in unreimbursed expenses to an officer (2010: $0).

During the year ended December 31, 2011 the Company incurred $10,000 in management fees to a director (2010: $0) with such costs being recorded as general and administrative costs.

The above transactions were recorded at their exchange amounts, being the amounts agreed by the related parties.

 
 
 
F-12

 
TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)
(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011
(Expressed in US dollars)
 


9.  FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENT

ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures require an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. ASC 820 establishes a fair value hierarchy based on the level of independent, objective evidence surrounding the inputs used to measure fair value. A financial instrument’s categorization within the fair value hierarchy is based upon the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. ASC 820 prioritizes the inputs into three levels that may be used to measure fair value:

Level 1
Level 1 applies to assets or liabilities for which there are quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Valuations are based on quoted prices that are readily and regularly available in an active market and do not entail a significant degree of judgment.

Level 2
Level 2 applies to assets or liabilities for which there are other than Level 1 observable inputs such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets; quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in markets with insufficient volume or infrequent transactions (less active markets); or model-derived valuations in which significant inputs are observable or can be derived principally from, or corroborated by, observable market data.

Level 2 instruments require more management judgment and subjectivity as compared to Level 1 instruments. For instance: determining which instruments are most similar to the instrument being priced requires management to identify a sample of similar securities based on the coupon rates, maturity, issuer, credit rating and instrument type, and subjectively select an individual security or multiple securities that are deemed most similar to the security being priced; and determining whether a market is considered active requires management judgment.

Level 3
Level 3 applies to assets or liabilities for which there are unobservable inputs to the valuation methodology that are significant to the measurement of the fair value of the assets or liabilities. The determination of fair value for Level 3 instruments requires the most management judgment and subjectivity.

Pursuant to ASC 825, cash is based on "Level 1" inputs. The Company believes that the recorded values of accounts payable approximate their current fair values because of their nature or respective relatively short durations.

Assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis were presented on the Company’s balance sheet as of December 31, 2011, as follows.
 
   
Fair Value Measurements Using
       
                         
   
Quoted Prices in
   
Significant
             
   
Active Markets
   
Other
   
Significant
       
   
For Identical
   
Observable
   
Unobservable
   
Balance as of
 
   
Instruments
   
Inputs
   
Inputs
   
December 31,
 
   
(Level 1)
   
(Level 2)
   
(Level 3)
   
2011
 
   
$
     
$
     
$
     
$
   
                                 
Assets:
                               
Cash
   
118,066
     
     
     
118,066
 

As at December 31, 2011, there were no liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis presented on the Company’s balance sheet.

 

 
 
 
F-13

 
TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)
(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011
(Expressed in US dollars)
 


10.  MINERAL PROPERTY EXPLORATION COSTS

During the year ended December 31, 2011 the following project costs were incurred:
 
   
Year ended December 31, 2011
   
Year ended December 31, 2010
 
             
Strong Creek and Iron Mountain:
           
Technical Report
 
$
49,767
   
$
-
 
Drilling
   
202,098
         
Travel
   
2,652
     
-
 
Claims
   
3,255
     
-
 
TOTAL
   
257,772
     
-
 
                 
Labrador Trough:
               
Reconnaissance
   
71,335
     
-
 
                 
Total Exploration Costs
 
$
329,107
   
$
-
 


11.  INCOME TAXES

The Company has adopted the provisions of ASC 740, Income Taxes. Pursuant to ASC 740 the Company is required to compute tax asset benefits for net operating losses carried forward. The potential benefit of net operating losses have not been recognized in the financial statements because the Company cannot be assured that it is more likely than not that it will utilize the net operating losses carried forward in future years. The Company has approximately $846,905 of net operating losses to carry forward which are available to offset taxable income in future years which expire through fiscal 2031. For the years ended December 31, 2011, and 2010, the valuation allowance established against the deferred tax assets increased by $296,417, and $3,320 respectively.

The components of the net deferred tax asset at December 31, 2011, and 2010, the statutory tax rate, the effective tax rate, and the amount of the valuation allowance are indicated below:
 
   
December 31,
2011
$
   
December 31,
2010
$
 
             
Net loss before taxes
    (954,677 )     (9,485 )
Statutory rate
    35 %     35 %
                 
Computed expected tax (recovery)
    (334,137 )     (3,320 )
Stock-based compensation
    37,720        
Increase in valuation allowance:
    296,417       3,320  
                 
Reported income taxes
           

   
December 31,
2011
$
   
December 31,
2010
$
 
             
Potential deferred tax asset
           
 - Net operating losses
    194,729       26,431  
-  Mineral properties
    128,119        
 - Less valuation allowance
    (322,848 )     (26,431 )
                 
Net deferred tax asset
           



 
 
 
F-14

 
TITAN IRON ORE CORP.
(FORMERLY DIGITAL YEARBOOK, INC.)
(AN EXPLORATION STAGE COMPANY)
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011
(Expressed in US dollars)
 


12.  SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

On January 12, 2012 the Company completed a non-brokered private placement of 1,334,000 units at $0.75 per unit, for total gross proceeds of $1,000,500. Each unit consists of one common share in the capital of the Company and one half common share purchase warrant entitling the purchaser to acquire one additional common share at the exercise price of $1.00 per common share until January 10, 2015.

On April 10, 2012, the Company exercised its option to purchase the Strong Creek and Iron Mountain mineral properties located in Albany County, Wyoming for consideration totaling $7,000,000 (see Note 3).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
F-15

 


ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE
 
(a)  Resignation of Independent Accountant.
 
On August 8, 2011, the Board of Directors of our company dismissed by mutual agreement, Silberstein Ungar, PLLC, as our principal independent accountant.  On August 8, 2011, we engaged Manning Elliott LLP Chartered Accountants as our principal independent accountant.
 
Silberstein’s report on our company’s financial statements for each of the two fiscal years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009 did not contain an adverse opinion or disclaimer of opinion, or qualification or modification as to uncertainty, audit scope, or accounting principles, except that such report on our company’s financial statements contained an explanatory paragraph in respect to the substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.
 
During our fiscal years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009 and in the subsequent interim period through the date of dismissal, there were no disagreements, resolved or not, with Silberstein on any matter of accounting principles or practices, financial statement disclosure, or audit scope and procedures, which disagreement(s), if not resolved to the satisfaction of Silberstein, would have caused Silberstein to make reference to the subject matter of the disagreement(s) in connection with its report.
 
During our fiscal years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009 and in the subsequent interim period through the date of dismissal, there were no reportable events as described in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K.
 
We provided Silberstein with a copy of our Current Report on Form 8-K prior to its filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and requested that he furnish us with a letter addressed to the Securities and Exchange Commission stating whether he agrees with the statements made in our Current Report on Form 8-K, and if not, stating the respects with which he does not agree. A copy of the letter provided from Silberstein is filed as an exhibit to this Current Report on Form 8-K.
 
(b)  Engagement of Independent Accountant.
 
During the Company’s fiscal years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009 and in the subsequent interim period through the date of appointment of Manning Elliott on August 8, 2011, the Company has not consulted with Manning Elliott regarding either the application of accounting principles to a specified transaction, either completed or proposed, or the type of audit opinion that might be rendered on our financial statements, nor has Manning Elliott provided to us a written report or oral advice that Manning Elliott concluded was an important factor considered by our company in reaching a decision as to the accounting, auditing or financial reporting issue. In addition, during such periods, we have not consulted with Manning Elliott regarding any matter that was either the subject of a disagreement (as defined in Item 304(a)(1)(iv) and the related instructions) or a reportable event (as described in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K).
 
ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
 
Disclosure Controls and Procedures
 
We maintain “disclosure controls and procedures”, as that term is defined in Rule 13a-15(e), promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.  Disclosure controls and procedures include controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our company’s reports filed under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive officer and our principal financial officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 
26

 
 
ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES - continued
 
As required by paragraph (b) of Rules 13a-15 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, our management, with the participation of our principal executive officer and our principal financial officer, evaluated our company’s disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this annual report on Form 10-K. Based on this evaluation, our management concluded that as of the end of the period covered by this annual report on Form 10-K, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective.
 
Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
 
Our management, including our principal executive officer, principal financial officer and our Board of Directors, is responsible for establishing and maintaining a process to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
 
Our management, with the participation of our principal executive officer and our principal financial officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2011.  Our management’s evaluation of our internal control over financial reporting was based on the framework in Internal Control—Integrated Framework, issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on this evaluation, our management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective as of December 31, 2011 due to the following material weaknesses which are indicative of many small companies with small staff: (i) inadequate segregation of duties and ineffective risk assessment; and (ii) insufficient written policies and procedures for accounting and financial reporting with respect to the requirements and application of both US GAAP and SEC guidelines.
 
A material weakness is a deficiency or a combination of control deficiencies in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.
 
Our principal executive officer and our principal financial officer do not expect that our disclosure controls or our internal control over financial reporting will prevent all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within our company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of a simple error or mistake. Additional controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the controls. The design of any system of controls also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.
 
Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting
 
There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the fiscal quarter ended December 31, 2011 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect our internal control over financial reporting.
 
ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION
 
None
 
 
 

 
 
27

 

 
PART III
 
ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
 
Directors and Executive Officers
 
Our directors hold office until the next annual meeting or until their successors have been elected and qualified, or until they resign or are removed. Our board of directors appoints our officers, and our officers hold office for such term as may be prescribed by our board of directors and until their successors are chosen and qualify, or until their death or resignation, or until their removal.
 
Our directors and executive officers, their ages, positions held, and duration of such are as follows:
 
Name
Position Held with Our Company
Age
Date First Elected or Appointed
Andrew Brodkey
President, CEO and Director
55
June 30, 2011
Frank Garcia
CFO
53
June 30, 2011
Dr. David Hackman
V.P. Exploration
69
June 30, 2011
Ed Mulhern(1)
Director
52
April 6, 2011
Dr. Ronald Richman
Director
70
July 22, 2011
 
1 Mr. Mulhern resigned as a director effective June 30, 2011;
 
Business Experience
 
The following is a brief account of the education and business experience during at least the past five years of each director and executive officer of our company, indicating the person’s principal occupation during that period, and the name and principal business of the organization in which such occupation and employment were carried out.
 
Andrew Brodkey, President Chief Executive Officer and Director
 
Andrew Brodkey is a mining engineer and a lawyer. He graduated with distinction with a B.S. in Mining Engineering from the University of Arizona in 1979. Mr. Brodkey earned a law degree, cum laude, from Creighton University in 1982. He worked at the Denver, Colorado law firm of Gorsuch, Kirgis, Campbell, Walker and Grover as an associate specializing in natural resources and environmental law from 1982 until 1987. Subsequently, Mr. Brodkey joined Magma Copper Company, a NYSE-traded mining company in 1987, where he held various positions, eventually succeeding to the role of Vice President and General Counsel in 1992. Following Magma’s acquisition by BHP in 1996, he remained in a senior legal position with BHP Copper Inc., and in 2000 moved to the position of Vice President, Business Development for BHP Copper. Following his departure from BHP in 2002, Mr. Brodkey held the position of Managing Director of the International Mining & Metals Group of CB Richard Ellis, Inc (“CBRE”), where he was responsible for creating and building the mining property practice of CBRE. Currently, Mr. Brodkey is  a Director of Pacific Copper Corp and  President, CEO and Director of Pan American Lithium Corp.. His is also the Manager of Kriyah Consultants LLC, which has a contractual relationship with our company.
 
We believe Mr. Brodkey is qualified to serve as an officer and director because he brings significant mineral industry background as well as business and public company experience to our company.
 
Frank Garcia, CFO
 
Frank Garcia from 2007 to the present has worked as Accounting Manager for Kriyah Consultants LLC providing accounting services for mining exploration companies. From 1997 to 2006, Mr. Garcia was employed in senior management positions by Misys PLC, a global software and solutions company serving customers in international banking and securities, international healthcare, and UK retail financial services. Prior to 1997 Mr. Garcia held executive positions with CEMEX, a world leader in the construction materials industry. Mr. Garcia is currently the CFO of two publicly-traded mining companies-- Zoro Mining Corp. (OTCBB: ZORM) and Pan American Lithium Corp. (OTCBB: PALTF; TSX-V: PL). Mr. Garcia received his Bachelor of Science –Business Administration—Major in Accounting from the University of Arizona in 1981.
 
We believe Mr. Garcia is qualified to serve as an officer because he brings significant mineral industry background as well as business and public company experience to our company.
 

 
28

 
 
ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE - continued
 
Dr. David Hackman, V.P. Exploration
 
Dr. Hackman is a geologist and a registered professional engineer with over 35 years international experience specializing in the evaluation of leachable and other metal deposits. He has worked as a geologist for Mobil Oil Company and ALCOA. From 1990 to 1995, he was the president, of Liximin, Inc., a mineral exploration and mine development company based in Tucson, Arizona. From 1996 to 2000, he was an officer and director of Silver Eagle Resources Ltd. Currently, Dr. Hackman is the V.P of Exploration and a Director of  Zoro Mining Corp. and CEO and a Director of Pacific Copper Corp., and is also the V.P. of Exploration for Pan American Lithium Corp.
 
We believe Dr. Hackman is qualified to serve as an officer because he brings significant mineral industry background as well as business and public company experience to our company.