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Table of Contents

 
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
 
 
 
Form 10-Q
 
 
     
þ
  QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
    For the Quarterly Period Ended March 31, 2011
OR
o
  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
Commission File Number 1-10351
 
 
Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
 
     
Canada   N/A
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
     
122 — 1st Avenue South
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
(Address of principal executive offices)
  S7K 7G3
(Zip Code)
 
 
306-933-8500
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Sections 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes þ     No o
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes o     No o
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
             
Large accelerated filer þ
  Accelerated filer o   Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company o
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Exchange Act Rule 12b-2). Yes o     NO þ
 
 
As at April 30, 2011, Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc. had 854,785,533 Common Shares outstanding.
 


Part I. Financial Information

Part I. Financial Information
Item 1. Financial Statements
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Financial Position
EX-11
EX-31.A
EX-31.B
EX-32


Table of Contents

 
Item 1. Financial Statements
 
Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Financial Position
(in millions of US dollars)
(unaudited)
 
                               
      March 31,
      December 31,
      January 1,
 
      2011       2010       2010  
Assets
                             
Current assets
                             
Cash and cash equivalents
    $ 473       $ 412       $ 385  
Receivables (Note 2)
      1,256         1,059         1,214  
Inventories (Note 3)
      597         570         624  
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
      55         54         69  
                               
        2,381         2,095         2,292  
Non-current assets
                             
Property, plant and equipment
      8,494         8,141         6,444  
Investments in equity-accounted investees
      1,100         1,051         955  
Available-for-sale investments
      3,571         3,842         2,760  
Other assets
      305         303         274  
Intangible assets
      114         115         117  
                               
Total Assets
    $ 15,965       $ 15,547       $ 12,842  
                               
Liabilities
                             
Current liabilities
                             
Short-term debt and current portion of long-term debt
    $ 1,694       $ 1,871       $ 729  
Payables and accrued charges
      1,261         1,198         817  
Current portion of derivative instrument liabilities
      61         75         52  
                               
        3,016         3,144         1,598  
Non-current liabilities
                             
Long-term debt
      3,707         3,707         3,319  
Derivative instrument liabilities
      175         204         123  
Deferred income tax liabilities
      799         737         643  
Accrued pension and other post-retirement benefits
      474         468         455  
Asset retirement obligations and accrued environmental costs
      488         455         300  
Other non-current liabilities and deferred credits
      126         147         99  
                               
Total Liabilities
      8,785         8,862         6,537  
                               
Shareholders’ Equity
                             
Share capital (Note 4)
      1,449         1,431         1,430  
Contributed surplus
      359         308         273  
Accumulated other comprehensive income
      2,148         2,394         1,798  
Retained earnings
      3,224         2,552         2,804  
                               
Total Shareholders’ Equity
      7,180         6,685         6,305  
                               
Total Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
    $ 15,965       $ 15,547       $ 12,842  
                               
Contingencies (Note 10)
                             
 
(See Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements)

PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q  1


Table of Contents

Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income
(in millions of US dollars except per-share amounts)
(unaudited)
 
                     
      Three Months Ended
 
      March 31  
      2011       2010  
Sales (Note 5)
    $ 2,204       $ 1,714  
Freight, transportation and distribution
      (149 )       (155 )
Cost of goods sold
      (959 )       (830 )
                     
Gross Margin
      1,096         729  
Selling and administrative
      (75 )       (60 )
Provincial mining and other taxes
      (34 )       (23 )
Foreign exchange loss
      (8 )       (8 )
Share of earnings of equity-accounted investees
      51         26  
Other (expenses) income
      (5 )       2  
                     
Operating Income
      1,025         666  
Finance Costs (Note 6)
      (50 )       (31 )
                     
Income Before Income Taxes
      975         635  
Income Taxes (Note 7)
      (243 )       (191 )
                     
Net Income
    $ 732       $ 444  
                     
                     
Net Income Attributable to Common Shareholders
    $ 732       $ 444  
                     
                     
Net Income per Share (Note 8)
                   
Basic
    $ 0.86       $ 0.50  
Diluted
    $ 0.84       $ 0.49  
                     
Dividends per Share
    $ 0.07       $ 0.03  
                     
 
(See Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements)

2  PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q


Table of Contents

Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income
(in millions of US dollars)
(unaudited)
 
                     
      Three Months Ended
 
      March 31  
(Net of related income taxes)     2011       2010  
Net Income
    $ 732       $ 444  
                     
Other comprehensive (loss) income
                   
Net (decrease) increase in unrealized gains on available-for-sale investments(1)
      (271 )       126  
Net gains (losses) on derivatives designated as cash flow hedges(2)
      13         (53 )
Reclassification to income of net losses on cash flow hedges(3)
      14         9  
Other
      (2 )       (1 )
                     
Other Comprehensive (Loss) Income
      (246 )       81  
                     
Comprehensive Income
    $ 486       $ 525  
                     
                     
Comprehensive Income Attributable to Common Shareholders
    $ 486       $ 525  
                     
 
(1)  Available-for-sale investments are comprised of shares in Israel Chemicals Ltd. and Sinofert Holdings Limited.
 
(2)  Cash flow hedges are comprised of natural gas derivative instruments, and are net of income taxes of $8 (2010 — $(32)).
 
(3)  Net of income taxes of $8 (2010 — $6).
 
(See Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements)

PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q  3


Table of Contents

Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity
(in millions of US dollars)
(unaudited)
 
                                                                             
      Equity Attributable to Common Shareholders  
                    Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income              
                          Net unrealized
    Actuarial
                         
                    Unrealized
    losses on
    gains
          Total
             
                    gains on
    derivatives
    (losses) on
          Accumulated
             
                    available-for-
    designated as
    defined
          Other
             
      Share
      Contributed
    sale
    cash flow
    benefit
          Comprehensive
    Retained
    Total
 
      Capital       Surplus     investments     hedges     plans     Other     Income     Earnings     Equity  
Balance — January 1, 2011
    $ 1,431       $ 308     $ 2,563     $ (177 )   $ (1)   $ 8     $ 2,394     $ 2,552     $ 6,685  
Net income
                                                  732       732  
Other comprehensive (loss) income
                    (271 )     27             (2 )     (246 )           (246 )
Effect of share-based compensation
              51                                           51  
Dividends declared
                                                  (60 )     (60 )
Issuance of common shares
      18                                                   18  
                                                                             
Balance — March 31, 2011
    $ 1,449       $ 359     $ 2,292     $ (150 )   $ (1)   $ 6     $ 2,148     $ 3,224     $ 7,180  
                                                                             
 
(1)  Any amounts incurred during a period are cleared out to retained earnings at each period end. Therefore, no balance exists in the reserve at beginning or end of period.
 
                                                                             
      Equity Attributable to Common Shareholders  
                    Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income              
                          Net unrealized
    Actuarial
                         
                    Unrealized
    losses on
    gains
          Total
             
                    gains on
    derivatives
    (losses) on
          Accumulated
             
                    available-for-
    designated as
    defined
          Other
             
      Share
      Contributed
    sale
    cash flow
    benefit
          Comprehensive
    Retained
    Total
 
      Capital       Surplus     investments     hedges     plans     Other     Income     Earnings     Equity  
Balance — January 1, 2010
    $ 1,430       $ 273     $ 1,900     $ (111 )   $ (1)   $ 9     $ 1,798     $ 2,804     $ 6,305  
Net income
                                                  444       444  
Other comprehensive income (loss)
                    126       (44 )           (1 )     81             81  
Effect of share-based compensation
              29                                           29  
Dividends declared
                                                  (30 )     (30 )
Issuance of common shares
      14                                                   14  
                                                                             
Balance — March 31, 2010
    $ 1,444       $ 302     $ 2,026     $ (155 )   $ (1)   $ 8     $ 1,879     $ 3,218     $ 6,843  
                                                                             
 
(1)  Any amounts incurred during a period are cleared out to retained earnings at each period end. Therefore, no balance exists in the reserve at beginning or end of period.
 
(See Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements)

4  PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q


Table of Contents

Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flow
(in millions of US dollars)
(unaudited)
 
                     
      Three Months Ended
 
      March 31  
      2011       2010  
Operating Activities
                   
Net income
    $ 732       $ 444  
                     
Adjustments to reconcile net income to cash provided by operating activities
                   
Depreciation and amortization
      124         110  
Share-based compensation
      14         15  
Excess tax benefit related to share-based compensation
      12         7  
Provision for deferred income tax
      75         58  
Undistributed earnings of equity-accounted investees
      (51 )       (26 )
Other
      (7 )       25  
                     
Subtotal of adjustments
      167         189  
                     
Changes in non-cash operating working capital
                   
Receivables
      (213 )       94  
Inventories
      (27 )       42  
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
              6  
Payables and accrued charges
      31         36  
                     
Subtotal of changes in non-cash operating working capital
      (209 )       178  
                     
Cash provided by operating activities
      690         811  
                     
Investing Activities
                   
Additions to property, plant and equipment
      (441 )       (457 )
Purchase of long-term investments
              (422 )
Other assets and intangible assets
              (34 )
                     
Cash used in investing activities
      (441 )       (913 )
                     
Cash before financing activities
      249         (102 )
                     
Financing Activities
                   
Proceeds from long-term debt obligations
              400  
Repayment of long-term debt obligations
              (150 )
Repayments of short-term debt obligations
      (253 )       (215 )
Dividends
      (28 )       (29 )
Issuance of common shares
      18         10  
                     
Cash (used in) provided by financing activities
      (263 )       16  
                     
Decrease in Cash Position
      (14 )       (86 )
Cash Position, Beginning of Period
      412         385  
                     
Cash Position, End of Period
    $ 398       $ 299  
                     
Cash position comprised of:
                   
Cash
    $ 82       $ 51  
Short-term investments
      391         248  
                     
Cash and cash equivalents
      473         299  
Bank overdraft (included in short-term debt)
      (75 )        
                     
      $ 398       $ 299  
                     
Supplemental cash flow disclosure
                   
Interest paid
    $ 41       $ 42  
Income taxes paid
    $ 175       $ 22  
                     
 
(See Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements)

PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q  5


Table of Contents

Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc.
 
Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2011
(in millions of US dollars except share, per-share, percentage and ratio amounts)
(unaudited)
 
 
1.  Significant Accounting Policies
 
 
Basis of Presentation
 
With its subsidiaries, Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc. (“PCS”) — together known as “PotashCorp” or “the company” except to the extent the context otherwise requires — forms an integrated fertilizer and related industrial and feed products company.
 
The company previously prepared its financial statements in accordance with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles (“Canadian GAAP”) as set out in the Handbook of the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants (“CICA Handbook”). In 2010, the CICA Handbook was revised to incorporate International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”), and required publicly accountable enterprises to apply such standards effective for years beginning on or after January 1, 2011, with early adoption permitted. Accordingly, these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements are based on IFRS, as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”). In these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements, the term “Canadian GAAP” refers to Canadian GAAP before the company’s adoption of IFRS.
 
As these financial statements represent the company’s initial presentation of its financial position, financial performance and cash flows under IFRS, they have been prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard (“IAS”) 34, Interim Financial Reporting, and IFRS 1, First-Time Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS 1”). Subject to certain transition elections disclosed in Note 13, the company has consistently applied the same accounting policies in its opening IFRS statement of financial position as at January 1, 2010 and throughout all periods presented, as if these policies had always been in effect. Note 13 discloses the impact of the transition to IFRS on the company’s reported financial position and financial performance, including the nature and effect of significant changes in accounting policies from those used in its Canadian GAAP consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2010. Except as disclosed in Note 12, these policies are consistent with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“US GAAP”) in all material respects.
 
These unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements are based on IFRS issued and outstanding as of May 3, 2011, the date the company’s Board of Directors approved the statements and the policies the company plans to adopt in its annual consolidated financial statements for the year ending December 31, 2011. The company will ultimately prepare its opening statement of financial position and financial statements for 2010 and 2011 by applying existing IFRS with an effective date of December 31, 2011 or prior. Accordingly, the opening statement of financial position and financial statements for 2010 and 2011 may differ from these financial statements.
 
These unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of PCS and its wholly owned subsidiaries; however, they do not include all disclosures normally provided in annual consolidated financial statements and should be read in conjunction with the 2010 annual consolidated financial statements. Certain information and note disclosures which are considered material to the understanding of the company’s unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements and which are normally included in annual consolidated financial statements prepared in accordance with IFRS are provided below and in Note 13, along with reconciliations and descriptions of the effect of the transition from Canadian GAAP to IFRS on financial performance and financial position. In management’s opinion, the unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements include all adjustments (consisting solely of normal recurring adjustments) necessary to fairly present such information. Interim results are not necessarily indicative of the results expected for the fiscal year.
 
These unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements were prepared under the historical cost convention, except for certain items not carried at historical cost as discussed below.
 

6  PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q


Table of Contents

 
Below is a summary description of the accounting policies the company considered to be significant, including a comparison to policies previously disclosed in the corresponding area under Canadian GAAP. Please refer to Note 13, “Transition to IFRS”, for a more complete description of the impacts of adopting IFRS (including policies elected upon first-time adoption of IFRS) on the company’s consolidated financial statements.
 
       
IFRS Accounting Policies     Comparison to Prior Canadian GAAP Policies
Principles of Consolidation      
       
Subsidiaries are all entities (including special purpose entities) over which the company has the power to govern the financial and operating policies generally accompanying a shareholding of more than one-half of the voting rights. The existence and effect of potential voting rights that are currently exercisable or convertible are considered when assessing whether the group controls another entity. Subsidiaries are fully consolidated from the date on which control is transferred to the group. They are deconsolidated from the date that control ceases. Principal (wholly owned) operating subsidiaries are:

•   PCS Sales (Canada) Inc.
    — PCS Joint Venture, Ltd. (“PCS Joint Venture”)
•   PCS Sales (USA), Inc. 
    The consolidated financial statements included the accounts of PotashCorp and its subsidiaries, and any material variable interest entities (“VIEs”) for which the company was the primary beneficiary. Principal (wholly owned) operating subsidiaries were consistent with the principal operating subsidiaries identified under IFRS.
•   PCS Phosphate Company, Inc. (“PCS Phosphate”)
     
— PCS Purified Phosphates
     
•   White Springs Agricultural Chemicals, Inc. (“White Springs”)
     
•   PCS Nitrogen Fertilizer, L.P.
     
•   PCS Nitrogen Ohio, L.P.
     
•   PCS Nitrogen Trinidad Limited
     
•   PCS Cassidy Lake Company
     
       
All significant intercompany balances and transactions are eliminated.      
       
Foreign Currency Transactions      
       
Items included in the consolidated financial statements of the company and each of its subsidiaries are measured using the currency of the primary economic environment in which the individual entity operates (“the functional currency”). The consolidated financial statements are presented in United States dollars (“US dollars”), which is the functional currency of the company and the majority of its subsidiaries.

Foreign currency transactions, including Canadian, Trinidadian and Chilean dollar operating transactions, are generally translated to US dollars at the average exchange rate for the previous month. Monetary assets and liabilities are translated at period-end exchange rates.
    Translation of transactions and balances depended upon whether a subsidiary was considered integrated or self-sustaining. The majority of the company’s operations were considered integrated and were translated into US dollars using the temporal method, which is consistent with the methods described under IFRS.
       
Foreign exchange gains and losses resulting from the settlement of such transactions and from the translation at period-end exchange rates of monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are recognized in profit or loss in the period in which they arise.      
       
All other foreign exchange gains and losses are presented in the income statement within foreign exchange gain (loss).      
       
Translation differences on non-monetary assets and liabilities carried at fair value are recognized as part of changes in fair value. Translation differences on non-monetary financial assets such as investments in equity securities classified as available-for-sale are included in other comprehensive income (“OCI”).      
       
Cash Equivalents      
       
Highly liquid investments with a maturity of three months or less from the date of purchase are considered to be cash equivalents.     Canadian GAAP policy was consistent.
       

PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q  7


Table of Contents

 
       
IFRS Accounting Policies     Comparison to Prior Canadian GAAP Policies
Asset Impairment      
       
Assets that have an indefinite useful life (i.e., goodwill) are not subject to amortization and are tested at least annually for impairment (in April), or more frequently if events or circumstances indicate there may be an impairment. At the end of each reporting period, the company reviews the carrying amounts of both its long-lived assets to be held and used and identifiable intangible assets with finite lives to determine whether there is any indication that those assets have suffered an impairment loss. For the purposes of assessing impairment, assets are grouped at the lowest levels for which there are separately identifiable cash flows (this can be at the asset or cash-generating unit level). A cash-generating unit is the smallest identifiable group of assets that generates cash inflows that are largely independent of the cash inflows from other assets or groups of assets. If an indication of impairment exists, the recoverable amount of the asset is estimated in order to determine the extent of the impairment loss (if any). An impairment loss is recognized for the amount by which the asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount. If the recoverable amount of the cash-generating unit is less than the carrying amount of the unit, the impairment loss is allocated first to reduce the carrying amount of any goodwill allocated to the unit and then to the other assets of the unit pro rata on the basis of the carrying amount of each asset in the unit. The recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs to sell and value in use. In assessing value in use, the estimated future cash flows are discounted to their present value using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset for which the estimates of future cash flows have not been adjusted. Non-financial assets, other than goodwill, that have previously suffered an impairment loss are reviewed for possible reversal of the impairment at each reporting date.

Goodwill is allocated to cash-generating units or groups of cash-generating units for the purpose of impairment testing based on the level at which it is monitored by management, and not at a level higher than an operating segment. The allocation is made to those cash-generating units or groups of cash-generating units that are expected to benefit from the business combination in which the goodwill arose.
   
The company reviewed both long-lived assets to be held and used and identifiable intangible assets with finite lives whenever events or changes in circumstances indicated that the carrying amount of such assets might not have been fully recoverable. Determination of recoverability was based on an estimate of undiscounted future cash flows resulting from the use of the asset and its eventual disposition. Measurement of an impairment loss for long-lived assets and certain identifiable intangible assets that management expected to hold and use was based on the fair value of the assets, whereas such assets to be disposed of were reported at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less costs to sell. Reversal of previous impairments was not permitted. Changes resulting from the difference in these Canadian GAAP policies as compared to the corresponding policies under IFRS upon adoption of IFRS are described more fully in Note 13, Changes in Accounting Policies table, item (a).

Goodwill impairment was assessed at the reporting unit level at least annually (in April), or more frequently if events or circumstances indicated there might be an impairment. Reporting units comprised business operations with similar economic characteristics and strategies and might have represented either a business segment or a business unit within a business segment. Potential impairment was identified when the carrying value of a reporting unit, including the allocated goodwill, exceeded its fair value. Goodwill impairment was measured as the excess of the carrying amount of the reporting unit’s allocated goodwill over the implied fair value of the goodwill, based on the fair value of the assets and liabilities of the reporting unit. Upon adoption of IFRS, no changes resulted from the difference in these Canadian GAAP policies as compared to the corresponding policies under IFRS.

Other Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
Receivables      
       
Trade receivables are recognized initially at fair value and subsequently measured at amortized cost less provision for impairment of trade accounts receivable. A provision for impairment of trade accounts receivable is established when there is a reasonable expectation that the company will not be able to collect all amounts due. The carrying amount of the trade receivables is reduced through the use of the provision for impairment account, and the amount of any increase in the provision for impairment is recognized in the consolidated statements of income. When a trade receivable is uncollectible, it is written off against the provision for impairment account for trade accounts receivable. Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited to the consolidated statements of income.     Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       

8  PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q


Table of Contents

 
       
IFRS Accounting Policies     Comparison to Prior Canadian GAAP Policies
Inventories      
       
Inventories of finished products, intermediate products, raw materials and materials and supplies are valued at the lower of cost and net realizable value. Costs, allocated to inventory using the weighted average cost method, include direct acquisition costs, direct costs related to the units of production and a systematic allocation of fixed and variable production overhead, as applicable. Net realizable value for finished products, intermediate products and raw materials is generally considered to be the selling price of the finished product in the ordinary course of business less the estimated costs of completion and estimated costs to make the sale. In certain circumstances, particularly pertaining to the company’s materials and supplies inventories, replacement cost is considered to be the best available measure of net realizable value. Inventory is reviewed monthly to ensure the carrying value does not exceed net realizable value. If so, a writedown is recognized. The writedown may be reversed if the circumstances which caused it no longer exist.     Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
Prepaid Expenses      
       
The company has classified freight and other transportation and distribution costs incurred relating to product inventory stored at warehouse and terminal facilities as prepaid expenses.     Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
Financial Instruments      
       
Financial assets and financial liabilities are recognized initially at fair value, normally being the transaction price plus directly attributable transaction costs. Transaction costs related to financial assets or financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are recognized immediately in profit or loss. Regular way purchases and sales of financial assets are accounted for on the trade date.     Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       

PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q  9


Table of Contents

 
       
IFRS Accounting Policies     Comparison to Prior Canadian GAAP Policies
Fair Value      
       
Estimated fair values for financial instruments are designed to approximate amounts at which the instruments could be exchanged in a current arm’s-length transaction between knowledgeable willing parties. The fair value of derivative instruments traded in active markets (such as natural gas futures and exchange traded options) is based on the quoted market prices at the reporting date.     Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
The fair value of derivative instruments that are not traded in an active market (such as natural gas swaps, over-the-counter option contracts and foreign currency derivatives) is determined by using valuation techniques. The company uses a variety of methods and makes assumptions that are based on market conditions existing at each reporting date. Natural gas swap valuations are based on a discounted cash flows model. The inputs used in the model include contractual cash flows based on prices for natural gas futures contracts, fixed prices and notional volumes specified by the swap contracts, the time value of money, liquidity risk, the company’s own credit risk (related to instruments in a liability position) and counterparty credit risk (related to instruments in an asset position). Certain of the futures contract prices are supported by prices quoted in an active market and others are not based on observable market data. Over-the-counter option contracts are valued based on quoted market prices for similar instruments where available or an option valuation model. The fair value of foreign currency derivatives is determined using quoted forward exchange rates at the statement of financial position date.      
       
Fair value of investments designated as available-for-sale is based on the closing bid price of the common shares as of the statement of financial position date.      
       
The company’s fair value hierarchy prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value. The three levels of the fair value hierarchy are:      
       
Level 1  Values based on unadjusted quoted prices in active markets that are accessible at the measurement date for identical assets or liabilities.
     
Level 2  Values based on quoted prices in markets that are not active or model inputs that are observable either directly or indirectly for substantially the full term of the asset or liability.
     
Level 3  Values based on prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both unobservable and significant to the overall fair value measurement.
     
       
When the inputs used to measure fair value fall within more than one level of the hierarchy, the level within which the fair value measurement is categorized is based on the company’s assessment of the lowest level input that is the most significant to the fair value measurement.      
       

10  PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q


Table of Contents

 
       
IFRS Accounting Policies     Comparison to Prior Canadian GAAP Policies
Derivative Financial Instruments      
       
Derivative financial instruments are used by the company to manage its exposure to commodity price, exchange rate and interest rate fluctuations. The company recognizes its derivative instruments at fair value on the consolidated statements of financial position where appropriate. Contracts to buy or sell a non-financial item that can be settled net in cash or another financial instrument, or by exchanging financial instruments, as if the contracts were financial instruments (except contracts that were entered into and continue to be held for the purpose of the receipt or delivery of a non-financial item in accordance with expected purchase, sale or usage requirements), are accounted for as derivative financial instruments.     Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
The accounting for changes in the fair value (i.e., gains or losses) of a derivative instrument depends on whether it has been designated and qualifies as part of a hedging relationship. For instruments designated as fair value hedges, the effective portion of the change in the fair value of the derivative is offset in profit or loss against the change in fair value, attributed to the risk being hedged, of the underlying hedged asset, liability or firm commitment. For cash flow hedges, the effective portion of the change in the fair value of the derivative is accumulated in other comprehensive income until the variability in cash flows being hedged is recognized in profit or loss in future accounting periods. Ineffective portions of hedges are recorded in profit or loss in the current period. The change in fair value of derivative instruments not designated as hedges is recorded in profit or loss in the current period.      
       
The company’s policy is not to use derivative instruments for trading or speculative purposes, although it may choose not to designate an economic hedging relationship as an accounting hedge. The company formally documents all relationships between hedging instruments and hedged items, as well as its risk management objective and strategy for undertaking the hedge transaction. This process includes linking derivatives to specific assets and liabilities or to specific firm commitments or forecast transactions. The company also assesses, both at the hedge’s inception and on an ongoing basis, whether the derivatives used in hedging transactions are expected to be or were, as appropriate, highly effective in offsetting changes in fair values of hedged items. Hedge effectiveness related to the company’s natural gas hedges is assessed on a prospective and retrospective basis using regression analyses. A hedging relationship may be terminated because the hedge ceases to be effective; the underlying asset or liability being hedged is derecognized; or the derivative instrument is no longer designated as a hedging instrument. In such instances, the difference between the fair value and the accrued value of the hedging derivatives upon termination is deferred and recognized in profit or loss on the same basis that gains, losses, revenue and expenses of the previously hedged item are recognized. If a cash flow hedging relationship is terminated because it is no longer probable that the anticipated transaction will occur, then the net gain or loss accumulated in OCI is recognized in current period profit or loss.      
       
Significant recent derivatives include the following:      
•   Natural gas futures, swaps and option agreements to manage the cost of natural gas, generally designated as cash flow hedges of anticipated transactions. The portion of gain or loss on derivative instruments designated as cash flow hedges that is deferred in accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”) is reclassified into cost of goods sold when the product containing the hedged item impacts earnings. Any hedge ineffectiveness is recorded in cost of goods sold in the current period.
     
•   Foreign currency forward contracts for the primary purpose of limiting exposure to exchange rate fluctuations relating to expenditures denominated in currencies other than the US dollar and foreign currency swap contracts to limit exposure to exchange rate fluctuations relating to Canadian dollar-denominated commercial paper. These contracts are not designated as hedging instruments for accounting purposes. Accordingly, they are marked-to-market with changes in fair value recognized through foreign exchange gain (loss) in earnings.
     
•   Interest rate swaps designated as fair value hedges to manage the interest rate mix of the company’s total debt portfolio and related overall cost of borrowing. Hedge accounting treatment resulted in interest expense on the related debt being reflected at hedged rates rather than original contractual interest rates.
     
       

PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q  11


Table of Contents

 
       
IFRS Accounting Policies     Comparison to Prior Canadian GAAP Policies
Property, Plant and Equipment      
       
Property, plant and equipment (which include certain mine development costs, pre-stripping costs and assets in construction) are carried at cost less accumulated depreciation less any recognized impairment loss. Costs of additions, betterments, renewals and interest during construction are capitalized. Borrowing costs directly attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of assets that necessarily take a substantial period of time to ready for their intended use are added to the cost of those assets, until such time as the assets are substantially ready for their intended use. The capitalization rate is based on the weighted average interest rate on all of the company’s outstanding third-party debt. All other borrowing costs are charged through finance costs in the period in which they are incurred. Each part of an item of property, plant and equipment with a cost that is significant in relation to the total cost of the item is depreciated separately. When the cost of replacing part of an item of property, plant and equipment is capitalized, the carrying amount of the replaced part is derecognized. The cost of major inspections and overhauls is capitalized and depreciated over the period until the next major inspection or overhaul. Maintenance and repair expenditures that do not improve or extend productive life are expensed in the period incurred.    
The borrowing cost capitalization rate was based on the weighted average interest rate on the company’s outstanding third-party long-term debt. Changes resulting from the difference in this Canadian GAAP policy as compared to the corresponding policy under IFRS upon adoption of IFRS are described more fully in Note 13, Changes in Accounting Policies table, item (i).

Maintenance and repair expenditures that did not improve or extend productive life were expensed in the year incurred. Changes resulting from the difference in this Canadian GAAP policy as compared to the corresponding policy under IFRS upon adoption of IFRS are described more fully in Note 13, Changes in Accounting Policies table, item (g).

Other Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
Depreciation of assets in construction commences when the assets are ready for their intended use. The assets’ residual values and useful lives are reviewed, and adjusted if appropriate, at the end of each reporting period. Changes in the expected useful life or the expected pattern of consumption of future economic benefits embodied in the asset are accounted for by changing the depreciation period or method, as appropriate, and are treated as changes in accounting estimates.      
       
Any gain or loss arising on the disposal or retirement of an item of property, plant and equipment is determined as the difference between the sale proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset, and is recognized in the income statement.      
       
Investments      
       
Significant influence is the power to participate in the financial and operating policy decisions of an investee but is not control or joint control over those policies. Investments in which the company exercises significant influence (but does not control) are accounted for as investments in associates using the equity method. The company’s interest in jointly controlled entities is accounted for using the equity method. The proportionate share of any net income or losses from investments accounted for using the equity method, and any gain or loss on disposal, are recorded in profit or loss. The company’s share of its associates’ post-acquisition movements in other comprehensive income is recognized in the company’s other comprehensive income. The cumulative post-acquisition movements in profit or loss and in other comprehensive income are adjusted against the carrying amount of the investment. An impairment test is performed when there is objective evidence of impairment, such as significant adverse changes in the environment in which the associate operates or a significant or prolonged decline in the fair value of the investment below its cost. An impairment loss is recorded when the recoverable amount becomes lower than the carrying amount, recoverable amount being the higher of value in use and fair value less costs to sell. Impairment losses are reversed if the recoverable amount subsequently exceeds the carrying amount.    
The company’s interest in jointly controlled entities was accounted for using the proportionate consolidation method. Changes resulting from the difference in this Canadian GAAP policy as compared to the corresponding policy under IFRS upon adoption of IFRS are described more fully in Note 13, Changes in Accounting Policies table, item (o).

Other Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
The fair value of investments designated as available-for-sale is recorded in the consolidated statements of financial position, with unrealized gains and losses, net of related income taxes, recorded in AOCI. The cost of investments sold is based on the weighted average method. Realized gains and losses on these investments are removed from AOCI and recorded in profit or loss.      
       
The company assesses at the end of each reporting period whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or a group of financial assets is impaired. In the case of equity instruments classified as available-for-sale, a significant or prolonged decline in the fair value of the security below its cost would be evidence that the assets are impaired. Such impairment losses recognized in the consolidated statements of income on equity instruments are not reversed through the consolidated statements of income.      
       

12  PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q


Table of Contents

 
       
IFRS Accounting Policies     Comparison to Prior Canadian GAAP Policies
Other Assets      
       
The costs of certain ammonia catalysts are capitalized to other assets and are amortized, net of salvage value, on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives of 3 to 10 years.     Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
Upfront lease costs are capitalized to other assets and amortized over the life of the leases, the latest of which extends through 2038.      
       
Intangible Assets      
       
Intangible assets relate primarily to production and technology rights and computer software. Internally generated intangible assets relate to computer software and other developed projects.     Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
Costs associated with maintaining computer software programs are recognized as an expense as incurred. Development costs that are directly attributable to the design and testing of identifiable and unique software products controlled by the company are recognized as intangible assets when the following criteria are met:      
•   It is technically feasible to complete the software product so that it will be available for use;
     
•   Management intends to complete the software product and use or sell it;
     
•   There is an ability to use or sell the software product;
     
•   It can be demonstrated how the software product will generate probable future economic benefits;
     
•   Adequate technical, financial and other resources to complete the development and to use or sell the software product are available; and
     
•   The expenditure attributable to the software product during its development can be reliably measured.
     
       
Directly attributable costs that are capitalized as part of the software product include applicable employee costs. Other development expenditures that do not meet these criteria are recognized as an expense as incurred. Development costs previously recognized as an expense are not recognized as an asset in a subsequent period.      
       
Amortization expense is recognized in net income in the expense category consistent with the function of the intangible asset. The assets’ useful lives are reviewed, and adjusted if appropriate, at the end of each reporting period. Changes in the expected useful life or the expected pattern of consumption of future economic benefits embodied in the asset are accounted for by changing the amortization period or method, as appropriate, and are treated as changes in accounting estimates.      
       
Goodwill      
       
All business combinations are accounted for using the purchase method. Identifiable intangible assets are recognized separately from goodwill. Goodwill is carried at cost, is not amortized and represents the excess of the cost of an acquisition over the fair value of the company’s share of the net identifiable assets of the acquired subsidiary or equity method investee at the date of acquisition. Goodwill arising on business combinations before the date of transition to IFRS has been retained at the previous Canadian GAAP carrying amount, as allowed by the exemption in IFRS 1. Separately recognized goodwill is carried at cost less accumulated impairment losses. Gains and losses on the disposal of an entity include the carrying amount of goodwill relating to the entity sold.     Canadian GAAP policies were consistent, with the exception of the policy related to first-time adoption of IFRS as allowed under IFRS 1.
       

PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q  13


Table of Contents

 
       
IFRS Accounting Policies     Comparison to Prior Canadian GAAP Policies
Leases      
       
Leases entered into are classified as either finance or operating leases. Leases that transfer substantially all of the risks and rewards of ownership of property to the company are accounted for as finance leases. Finance leases are capitalized at the commencement of the lease at the lower of the fair value of the leased equipment and the present value of the minimum lease payments. Equipment acquired under a finance lease is depreciated over the shorter of the period of expected use on the same basis as other similar property, plant and equipment and the lease term.

Leases in which a significant portion of the risks and rewards of ownership are retained by the lessor are classified as operating leases. Rental payments under operating leases are expensed to profit or loss on a straight-line basis over the period of the lease.
   
Leases were classified as either capital or operating. Leases that transferred substantially all of the benefits and risks of ownership of property to the company were accounted for as capital leases in a manner generally consistent with the way finance leases are accounted for under IFRS.

Other Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
Long-Term Debt      
       
Issue costs of long-term debt obligations and gains and losses on interest rate swaps are capitalized to long-term obligations and are amortized to expense over the term of the related liability using the effective interest rate method.     Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
Pension and Other Post-Employment Benefits      
       
The company offers a number of benefit plans that provide pension and other post-retirement benefits to qualified employees. These plans include defined benefit pension plans, supplemental pension plans, defined contribution plans and health, disability, dental and life insurance plans.      
       
Defined Benefit Plans     Defined Benefit Plans
The company accrues its obligations under employee benefit plans and the related costs, net of plan assets. The cost of pensions and other retirement benefits earned by employees is generally actuarially determined using the projected unit credit method and management’s best estimate of expected plan investment performance, salary escalation, retirement ages of employees and expected health-care costs. Actuaries perform valuations on a regular basis to determine the actuarial present value of the accrued pension and other post-employment benefits. For the purpose of calculating the expected return on plan assets, such assets are valued at fair value. Prior service costs from plan amendments are deferred and amortized on a straight-line basis over the average period until the benefits become vested. However, to the extent that benefits are already vested, such prior service costs are recognized immediately.

Actuarial gains (losses) arise from the difference between the actual rate of return on plan assets for a period and the expected long-term rate of return on plan assets for that period, or from changes in actuarial assumptions used to determine the defined benefit obligation. All actuarial gains (losses) for defined benefit plans are recognized immediately in the period in which they arise through other comprehensive income.

When the restructuring of a benefit plan simultaneously gives rise to both a curtailment and a settlement of obligation, the curtailment is accounted for prior to the settlement.

Pension and other post-employment benefit expense includes, as applicable, the net of management’s best estimate of the cost of benefits provided, interest cost of projected benefits, expected return on plan assets, past service costs and the effect of any curtailments or settlements.
   
Prior service costs from plan amendments were deferred and amortized on a straight-line basis to income over the average remaining service period of employees active at the date of amendment.

The excess of the net accumulated actuarial gain (loss) over 10 percent of the greater of the benefit obligation and the fair value of plan assets was amortized to income over the average remaining service period of active employees.

Changes resulting from the difference in the above Canadian GAAP policies as compared to the corresponding policies under IFRS upon adoption of IFRS are described more fully in Note 13, Changes in Accounting Policies table, item (b).

Other Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
Defined Contribution Plans     Defined Contribution Plans
Defined contribution plan costs are recognized in profit or loss for services rendered by employees during the period.     Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       

14  PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q


Table of Contents

 
       
IFRS Accounting Policies     Comparison to Prior Canadian GAAP Policies
Provisions for Environmental and Other Costs      
       
Provisions are recognized when: the company has a present legal or constructive obligation as a result of past events; it is probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation; and the amount has been reliably estimated. Provisions are not recognized for costs that need to be incurred to operate in the future or expected future operating losses.

Provisions are measured at the present value of the expenditures expected to be required to settle the obligation, using a pre-tax risk-free discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the obligation.

Environmental costs that relate to current operations are expensed or capitalized as appropriate. Environmental costs may be capitalized if the costs extend the life of the property, increase its capacity, mitigate or prevent contamination from future operations, or relate to legal or constructive asset retirement obligations. Costs that relate to existing conditions caused by past operations and that do not contribute to current or future revenue generation are expensed. Provisions for estimated costs are recorded when environmental remedial efforts are likely and the costs can be reasonably estimated. In determining the provisions, the company uses the most current information available, including similar past experiences, available technology, regulations in effect, the timing of remediation and cost-sharing arrangements.

The company recognizes its decommissioning obligations (also known as asset retirement obligations). The present value of a liability for a decommissioning obligation is recognized in the period in which it is incurred if a reasonable estimate of present value can be made. The associated costs are: capitalized as part of the carrying amount of any related long-lived asset and then amortized over its estimated remaining useful life; capitalized as part of inventory; or expensed in the period. The best estimate of the amount required to settle the obligation is reviewed at the end of each reporting period and updated to reflect changes in the discount rate, foreign exchange rate and the amount or timing of the underlying cash flows. When there is a change in the best estimate, an adjustment is recorded against the carrying value of the provision and any related asset, and the effect is then recognized in profit or loss over the remaining life of the asset. The increase in the provision due to the passage of time is recognized as a finance cost. A gain or loss may be incurred upon settlement of the liability.
   
Liabilities were recognized when the company had a legal obligation as a result of past events; it was likely that an outflow of resources would be required to settle the obligation; and the amount could be reliably estimated.

Obligations to retire certain tangible long-lived assets were recognized with the associated costs capitalized as part of the carrying amount of the long-lived asset (and then amortized over its estimated useful life) or expensed in the period. In subsequent periods, the asset retirement obligation was adjusted for the passage of time by applying an interest method of allocation to the amount of the liability at the beginning of the period through charges to cost of goods sold. The asset retirement obligation was also adjusted for any changes in the amount or timing of the underlying future cash flows. Obligations were not updated for any future change in the discount rate. New discount rates were applied only to upwards adjustments to the company’s undiscounted obligation.

Changes resulting from the difference in the above Canadian GAAP policies as compared to the corresponding policies under IFRS upon adoption of IFRS are described more fully in Note 13, Changes in Accounting Policies table, item (d).

Other Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
Sales      
       
Sales revenue is recognized when the product is shipped, the sales price can be measured reliably, costs incurred or to be incurred can be measured reliably and collectibility is probable. Revenue is recorded based on the FOB mine, plant, warehouse or terminal price, except for certain vessel sales or specific product sales that are shipped on a delivered basis. Transportation costs are recovered from the customer through sales pricing. Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable, taking into account the amount of any trade discounts and volume rebates allowed.    
Sales revenue was recognized when the product was shipped, the sales price was determinable and collectibility was reasonably assured. Upon adoption of IFRS, no changes resulted from the difference in this Canadian GAAP policy as compared to the corresponding policy under IFRS.

Other Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
Cost of Goods Sold      
       
The primary components of cost of goods sold are labor, employee benefits, services, raw materials (including inbound freight and purchasing and receiving costs), operating supplies, energy costs, royalties, property and miscellaneous taxes, and depreciation and amortization.     Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
Selling and Administrative      
       
The primary components of selling and administrative are compensation, employee benefits, supplies, communications, travel, professional services, and depreciation and amortization.     Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       

PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q  15


Table of Contents

 
       
IFRS Accounting Policies     Comparison to Prior Canadian GAAP Policies
Income Taxes      
       
The tax expense for the period comprises current and deferred income tax. Taxation is recognized in the statement of income except to the extent that it relates to items recognized directly in equity, in which case the tax is recognized in equity.

Current income tax is generally the expected income tax payable on the taxable income for the year calculated using rates enacted or substantively enacted at the statement of financial position date in the countries where the company’s subsidiaries and associates operate and generate taxable income, and includes any adjustment to income tax payable or recoverable in respect of previous years. The realized and unrealized excess tax benefit from share-based payment arrangements is recognized in equity. When an asset is transferred between enterprises within the consolidated group, the difference between the tax rates of the two entities is recognized in tax expense in the period in which the transfer occurs. Current tax payable by the transferor is recognized for any taxes payable in the current period, and a deferred tax asset is recognized by the transferee for any temporary difference.

Uncertain income tax positions are accounted for using the standards applicable to current income tax assets and liabilities; i.e., both liabilities and assets are recorded when probable at the company’s best estimate of the amount.

Deferred income tax is recognized using the liability method, based on temporary differences between consolidated financial statement carrying amounts of assets and liabilities and their respective income tax bases. Deferred income tax is determined using tax rates that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the statement of financial position date and are expected to apply when the related deferred income tax asset is realized or the deferred income tax liability is settled. The tax effect of certain temporary differences is not recognized, principally with respect to temporary differences relating to investments in subsidiaries, jointly controlled entities and associates where the company is able to control the reversal of the temporary difference and the temporary difference is not expected to reverse in the foreseeable future. Deferred income tax is not accounted for if it arises from initial recognition of an asset or liability in a transaction other than a business combination that at the time of the transaction affects neither accounting nor taxable profit or loss. The amount of deferred income tax recognized is based on the expected manner and timing of realization or settlement of the carrying amount of assets and liabilities. Deferred income tax assets are recognized only to the extent that it is probable that future taxable profit will be available against which the temporary differences can be utilized. Deferred income tax assets are reviewed at each statement of financial position date and amended to the extent that it is no longer probable that the related tax benefit will be realized.

Current income tax assets and liabilities are offset when the company has a legally enforceable right to offset the recognized amounts and intends either to settle on a net basis, or to realize the asset and settle the liability simultaneously. Normally the company would only have a legally enforceable right to set off a current tax asset against a current tax liability when they relate to income taxes levied by the same taxation authority and the taxation authority permits the company to make or receive a single net payment. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are offset when the company has a legally enforceable right to set off current tax assets against current tax liabilities and the deferred tax assets and liabilities relate to income taxes levied by the same taxation authority on either: (1) the same taxable entity; or (2) different taxable entities which intend either to settle current tax liabilities and assets on a net basis, or to realize the assets and settle the liabilities simultane ously, in each future period in which significant amounts of deferred tax liabilities or assets are expected to be settled or recovered.
   
Taxation on earnings comprised current and future income tax (which is similar to deferred taxes under IFRS, except as otherwise described below).

The realized excess tax benefit from share-based payment arrangements was recognized as a reduction to tax expense.

When an asset was transferred between enterprises within the consolidated group, any income taxes paid or payable by the transferor as a result of the transfer were recorded as an asset in the consolidated financial statements until the gain or loss was recognized by the consolidated entity.

Uncertain income tax positions were accounted for using the standards applicable to contingent assets and contingent liabilities; i.e., liabilities were recorded when likely, and assets were recorded when realized.

Future income tax assets and liabilities were offset to the extent that they related to income taxes levied on the same taxable entity by the same taxation authority.

The current portion of the future income tax asset was presented with other current assets and the long-term portion was presented with other assets.

Changes resulting from the difference in the above Canadian GAAP policies as compared to the corresponding policies under IFRS upon adoption of IFRS are described more fully in Note 13, Changes in Accounting Policies table, item (e).

Other Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       

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IFRS Accounting Policies     Comparison to Prior Canadian GAAP Policies
Share-Based Compensation      
       
Grants under the company’s share-based compensation plans are accounted for in accordance with the fair value-based method of accounting. For stock option plans that will settle through the issuance of equity, the fair value of stock options is determined on their grant date using a valuation model and recorded as compensation expense over the period that the stock options vest, with a corresponding increase to contributed surplus. Forfeitures are estimated throughout the vesting period based on past experience and future expectations, and adjusted upon actual option vesting. When stock options are exercised, the proceeds, together with the amount recorded in contributed surplus, are recorded in share capital.

Share-based plans that are likely to settle in cash or other assets are accounted for as liabilities based on the fair value of the awards each period. The compensation expense is accrued over the vesting period of the award. Fluctuations in the fair value of the award will result in a change to the accrued compensation expense, which is recognized in the period in which the fluctuation occurs.
   
Stock-based plans that were likely to be settled in cash or other assets were accounted for as liabilities based on the intrinsic value of the awards. The compensation expense was accrued over the vesting period of the award, based on the difference between the market value of the underlying stock and the exercise price of the award, if any. Fluctuations in the market value of the underlying stock, as determined based on the closing price of the stock on the last day of each reporting period, would result in a change to the accrued compensation expense, which was recognized in the period in which the fluctuation occurred. Changes resulting from the difference in this Canadian GAAP policy as compared to the corresponding policy under IFRS upon adoption of IFRS are described more fully in Note 13, Changes in Accounting Policies table, item (c).

Other Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
Reportable Segments      
       
The company has three reportable operating segments: potash, phosphate and nitrogen. These operating segments are differentiated by the chemical nutrient contained in the product that each produces. Inter-segment sales are made under terms that approximate market value.     Canadian GAAP policies were consistent.
       
 
 
Critical Accounting Estimates and Judgments
 
Certain of the company’s policies involve critical accounting estimates and judgments because they require the company to make particularly subjective or complex judgments about matters that are inherently uncertain and because of the likelihood that materially different amounts could be reported under different conditions or using different assumptions.
 
The following section discusses the critical accounting estimates, judgments and assumptions that the company has made and how they affect the amounts reported in the consolidated financial statements.
 
Special Purpose Entities
 
In the normal course of business, the company may enter into arrangements that are created to accomplish a narrow and well-defined objective. Any such special purpose entities (“SPE”) must be consolidated when the substance of the relationship between the company and the SPE indicates that the SPE is controlled by the company. Assessing the substance of such a relationship involves considerable judgment. In addition to considering the general indicators of control, such as the company’s proportion of voting rights, power to govern the financial and operating policies of the entity and power to appoint or remove the majority of the board of directors, the company considers a number of additional factors to determine whether in substance it controls the SPE, even in cases where it controls less than half of the voting rights or owns little or none of the SPE’s equity.
 
Financial Instruments, Derivatives and Hedging
 
All financial instruments (assets and liabilities) and most derivative instruments are recorded on the statement of financial position, some at fair value. Those recorded at fair value must be remeasured at each reporting date and changes in the fair value will be recorded in either net income or other comprehensive income. Uncertainties, estimates and use of judgment inherent in applying the standards are: assessment of contracts as derivative instruments and for embedded derivatives; valuation of financial instruments and derivatives at fair value; and hedge accounting.
 
In determining whether a contract represents a derivative or contains an embedded derivative, the most significant area where judgment has been applied pertains to the determination as to whether the contract can be settled net, one of the criteria in determining whether a contract for a non-financial asset is considered a derivative and accounted for as such. Judgment is also applied in determining whether an embedded derivative is closely related to the host contract, in which case bifurcation and separate accounting are not necessary.
 
A number of the company’s financial instruments are recorded on the statement of financial position at fair value, as described in Note 12. Fair value represents point-in-time estimates that may

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change in subsequent reporting periods due to market conditions or other factors. Estimated fair values are designed to approximate amounts at which the financial instruments could be exchanged in a current transaction between willing parties. Multiple methods exist by which fair value can be determined, which can cause values (or a range of reasonable values) to differ. There is no universal model that can be broadly applied to all items being valued. Further, assumptions underlying the valuations may require estimation of costs/prices over time, discount rates, inflation rates, defaults and other relevant variables.
 
IFRS require the use of a three-level hierarchy for disclosing fair values for instruments measured at fair value on a recurring basis. Judgment and estimation are required to determine in which category of the hierarchy items should be included. When the inputs used to measure fair value fall within more than one level of the hierarchy, the level within which the fair value measurement is categorized is based on the company’s assessment of the lowest level input that is the most significant to the fair value measurement.
 
To obtain and maintain hedge accounting for its natural gas derivative instruments, the company must be able to establish that the hedging instrument is effective at offsetting the risk of the hedged item both retrospectively and prospectively, and ensure documentation meets stringent requirements. The process to test effectiveness requires the application of judgment and estimation, including the number of data points to test to ensure adequate and appropriate measurement to confirm or dispel hedge effectiveness and valuation of data within effectiveness tests where external existing data available do not perfectly match the company’s circumstances. Judgment and estimation are also used to assess credit risk separately in the company’s hedge effectiveness testing.
 
Pension and Other Post-Employment Costs
 
The company sponsors plans that provide pensions and other post-retirement benefits for most of its employees. The calculation of employee benefit plan expenses and obligations depends on several critical assumptions such as discount rates, expected rates of return on assets, health-care cost trend rates, projected salary increases, retirement age, mortality and termination rates. These assumptions are determined by management and are reviewed annually by the company’s actuaries.
 
The company’s discount rate assumption reflects the weighted average interest rate at which the pension and other post-retirement liabilities could be effectively settled at the measurement date. The rate varies by country. The company determines the discount rate using a yield curve approach. Based on the respective plans’ demographics, expected future pension benefits and medical claims payments are measured and discounted to determine the present value of the expected future cash flows. The cash flows are discounted using yields on high-quality AA-rated non-callable bonds with cash flows of similar timing. The resulting rates are used by the company to determine the final discount rate.
 
The expected rate of return on plan assets assumption is based on expected returns for the various asset classes.
 
Other assumptions are based on actual experience and the company’s best estimates. Actual results that differ from the assumptions are recognized immediately in other comprehensive income. These differences relate primarily to: (1) actual actuarial gains/losses incurred on the benefit obligation versus those expected and recognized in the consolidated financial statements; (2) actual versus expected return on plan assets; and (3) actual past service costs incurred as a result of plan amendments versus those expected and recognized in the consolidated financial statements.
 
For further details on the assumptions impacting the company’s annual expense and obligation, see Additional Annual Disclosures in Note 13.
 
Provisions for Asset Retirement Obligations and Environmental Costs
 
The company has recorded provisions relating to asset retirement obligations, environmental and other matters. Most of these costs will not be settled for a number of years, therefore requiring the company to make estimates over a long period. Environmental laws and regulations and interpretations by regulatory authorities could change or circumstances affecting the company’s operations could change, either of which could result in significant changes to its current plans. The recorded provisions are based on the company’s best estimate of costs required to settle the obligations, taking into account the nature, extent and timing of current and proposed reclamation and closure techniques in view of present environmental laws and regulations. It is reasonably possible that the ultimate costs could change in the future and that changes to these estimates could have a material effect on the company’s consolidated financial statements.
 
For further details on the assumptions impacting the company’s provisions, see Additional Annual Disclosures in Note 13.
 
Income Taxes
 
The company operates in a specialized industry and in several tax jurisdictions. As a result, its income is subject to various rates of taxation. The breadth of its operations and the global complexity of tax regulations require assessments of uncertainties and judgments in estimating the taxes the company will ultimately pay. The final taxes paid are dependent upon many factors, including negotiations with taxing authorities in various jurisdictions, outcomes of tax litigation and resolution of disputes arising from federal, provincial, state and local tax audits. The resolution of

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these uncertainties and the associated final taxes may result in adjustments to the company’s tax assets and tax liabilities.
 
The company estimates deferred income taxes based upon temporary differences between the assets and liabilities that it reports in its consolidated financial statements and the tax bases of its assets and liabilities as determined under applicable tax laws. The amount of deferred tax assets recognized is generally limited to the extent that it is probable that taxable profit will be available against which the related deductible temporary differences can be utilized. Therefore, the amount of the deferred income tax asset recognized and considered realizable could be reduced if projected income is not achieved.
 
Asset Impairment
 
The impairment process begins with the identification of the appropriate asset or cash-generating unit for purposes of impairment testing. Identification and measurement of any impairment is based on the asset’s recoverable amount, which is the higher of its fair value less costs to sell and value in use. Value in use is generally based on an estimate of discounted future cash flows. Judgment is required in determining the appropriate discount rate. Assumptions must also be made about future sales, margins and market conditions over the long-term life of the assets or cash-generating units.
 
The company cannot predict if an event that triggers impairment will occur, when it will occur or how it will affect reported asset amounts. Although estimates are reasonable and consistent with current conditions, internal planning and expected future operations, such estimates are subject to significant uncertainties and judgments. As a result, it is reasonably possible that the amounts reported for asset impairments could be different if different assumptions were used or if market and other conditions were to change. The changes could result in non-cash charges that could materially affect the company’s consolidated financial statements.
 
Contingent Assets and Contingent Liabilities
 
The company is exposed to possible losses and gains related to environmental matters and other various claims and lawsuits pending for and against it in the ordinary course of business. Prediction of the outcome of such uncertain events (i.e., being virtually certain, probable, remote or undeterminable), determination of whether accrual or disclosure in the consolidated financial statements is required and estimation of potential financial effects are matters for judgment. While the amount disclosed in the consolidated financial statements may not be material, the potential for large liabilities exists and therefore these estimates could have a material impact on the company’s consolidated financial statements.
 
Share-Based Compensation
 
Determining the fair value of equity-settled share-based compensation awards at the grant date requires judgment, including estimating the expected term of stock options, the expected volatility of the company’s stock and expected dividends. In addition, judgment is required to estimate the number of share-based awards that are expected to be forfeited.
 
The company uses a Monte Carlo simulation model to estimate the fair value of its cash-settled performance unit incentive plan liability at each reporting period, which requires judgment, including making assumptions about the stock price volatility of the company and the DAXglobal Agribusiness Index, as well as the correlation between those two amounts, over the three-year plan cycle.
 
For those awards with performance conditions that determine the number of options or units to which its employees will be entitled, measurement of compensation cost is based on the company’s best estimate of the outcome of the performance conditions. If actual results differ significantly from these estimates, stock-based compensation expense and results of operations could be impacted.
 
Restructuring Charges
 
Plant shutdowns, sales of business units or other corporate restructurings trigger incremental costs to the company (e.g., expenses for employee termination, contract termination and other exit costs). Because such activities are complex processes that can take several months to complete, they involve making and reassessing estimates.
 
Capitalization, Depreciation and Amortization
 
Property, plant and equipment are recognized initially at cost, which includes all expenditures directly attributable to bringing the asset to the location and installing it in working condition for its intended use. Determination of which costs are directly attributable (e.g., materials, labor, overhead) is a matter of judgment. Capitalization of carrying costs ceases when an item is substantially complete and in the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management. Determining when an asset, or a portion thereof, is substantially complete and in the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management requires consideration of the circumstances and the industry in which it is to be operated, normally predetermined by management with reference to such factors as productive capacity. This determination is a matter of judgment that can be complex and subject to differing interpretations and views, particularly when significant capital projects contain multiple phases over an extended period of time.

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An intangible asset is defined as being identifiable, able to bring future economic benefits to the company and controlled by the company. An asset meets the identifiability criterion when it is separable or arises from contractual rights. Judgment is necessary to determine whether expenditures made by the company on non-tangible items represent intangible assets eligible for capitalization. Finite-lived intangible assets are accounted for at cost and are amortized on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives as follows: production and technology rights 25 to 30 years and computer software up to 5 years.
 
Certain mining and milling assets are depreciated using the units-of-production method based on the shorter of estimates of reserves or service lives. Pre-stripping costs are amortized on a units-of-production basis over the ore mined from the mineable acreage stripped. Land is not depreciated. Other asset classes are depreciated on a straight-line basis as follows: land improvements 5 to 40 years, buildings and improvements 4 to 40 years and machinery and equipment (comprised primarily of plant equipment) 20 to 40 years.
 
The company performs assessments of its existing assets and depreciable lives in connection with the review of mine operating plans. When it is determined that assigned asset lives do not reflect the expected remaining period of benefit, prospective changes are made to their depreciable lives. A number of uncertainties are inherent in estimating reserve quantities, particularly as they relate to assumptions regarding future prices, the geology of the company’s mines, the mining methods used and the related costs incurred to develop and mine the company’s reserves. Changes in these assumptions could result in material adjustments to reserve estimates, which could result in changes to units-of-production depreciation expense in future periods, particularly if reserve estimates are reduced.
 
Leases
 
The company is party to various leases, including leases for railcars and vessels. Judgment is required in considering a number of factors to ensure that leases to which the company is party are classified appropriately as operating or financing. Such factors include whether the lease term is for the major part of the asset’s economic life and whether the present value of minimum lease payments amounts to substantially all of the fair value of the leased asset.
 
Substantially all of the leases to which the company is party have been classified as operating leases.
 
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
 
The following new standards and amendments or interpretations to existing standards have been published and are mandatory for periods beginning on or after January 1, 2011, or later:
 
IFRS 9, Financial Instruments
 
In November 2009, the IASB issued guidance relating to the classification and measurement of financial assets. Financial assets will generally be measured initially at fair value plus particular transaction costs. Financial assets will subsequently be measured at either amortized cost or fair value. In October 2010, the IASB issued additions to IFRS 9 relating to accounting for financial liabilities. Under the new requirements, an entity choosing to measure a financial liability at fair value will present the portion of any change in its fair value due to changes in the entity’s own credit risk in other comprehensive income, rather than within profit or loss. The standard must be applied retrospectively and is effective for periods commencing on or after January 1, 2013. The company is currently reviewing the standard to determine the potential impact, if any, on its consolidated financial statements.
 
Amendments to IFRIC 14, Prepayments of a Minimum Funding Requirement
 
In November 2009, the International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee (“IFRIC”) issued amendments to IFRIC 14 relating to the prepayments of a minimum funding requirement for an employee defined benefit plan. The amendments apply when an entity is subject to minimum funding requirements and makes an early payment of contributions to cover those requirements. The amendments permit such an entity to treat the benefit of such an early payment as an asset. The amendment must be applied from the beginning of the first comparative period presented in the first financial statements in which the amendment is applied and is effective for periods commencing on or after January 1, 2011. The company has applied these amendments in these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
Amendments to IFRS 7, Financial Instruments: Disclosures
 
In May 2010, the IASB issued amendments to IFRS 7 as part of its annual improvements process. The amendments addressed various requirements relating to the disclosure of financial instruments. They are effective for periods commencing on or after January 1, 2011, with earlier application permitted. The company has applied these amendments in these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements.

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Amendments to IFRS 7, Disclosures — Transfers of Financial Assets
 
In October 2010, the IASB issued amendments to IFRS 7, “Financial Instruments: Disclosures”. The amendments require entities to provide additional disclosures to assist users of financial statements in evaluating the risk exposures relating to transfer of financial assets which are not derecognized or for which the entity has a continuing involvement in the transferred asset. As the company does not typically retain any continuing involvement in financial assets once transferred, these amendments are not expected to have a significant impact. The amendments are effective for annual periods beginning on or after July 1, 2011, with earlier application permitted.
 
Amendments to IAS 1, Presentation of Financial Statements
 
In May 2010, the IASB issued amendments to IAS 1 as part of its annual improvements process. The amendments clarify that entities may present the required reconciliation of changes in each component of other comprehensive income either in the statement of changes in equity or in the notes to the financial statements. The amendments are effective for periods commencing on or after January 1, 2011, with earlier application permitted. The company has applied these amendments in these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
Amendments to IAS 34, Interim Financial Reporting
 
In May 2010, the IASB issued amendments to IAS 34 as part of its annual improvements process. The amendments provided clarification of the disclosures required by IAS 34 when considered against the disclosure requirements of other IFRS and are effective for periods commencing on or after January 1, 2011, with earlier application permitted. The company has applied these amendments in these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
2.  Receivables
 
                               
      March 31,
      December 31,
      January 1,
 
      2011       2010       2010  
Trade accounts — Canpotex Limited (“Canpotex”)
    $ 365       $ 298       $ 164  
             — Other
      667         448         264  
Less provision for impairment of trade accounts receivable
      (8 )       (8 )       (8 )
                               
        1,024         738         420  
Margin deposits on derivative instruments
      163         198         109  
Income taxes receivable
      28         46         363  
Provincial mining and other taxes receivable
      4                 235  
Other non-trade accounts
      37         77         87  
                               
      $ 1,256       $ 1,059       $ 1,214  
                               
 
3.  Inventories
 
                               
      March 31,
      December 31,
      January 1,
 
      2011       2010       2010  
Finished products
    $ 296       $ 255       $ 303  
Intermediate products
      113         127         159  
Raw materials
      61         65         51  
Materials and supplies
      127         123         111  
                               
      $ 597       $ 570       $ 624  
                               
 
4.  Share Capital
 
Authorized
The company is authorized to issue an unlimited number of common shares without par value and an unlimited number of first preferred shares. The common shares are not redeemable or convertible. The first preferred shares may be issued in one or more series with rights and conditions to be determined by the company’s Board of Directors. No first preferred shares have been issued.
 
Issued
 
                 
    Number of
       
    Common Shares     Consideration  
Balance — January 1, 2010
    887,926,650     $ 1,430  
Issued under option plans
    7,339,116       68  
Issued for dividend reinvestment plan
    46,947       2  
Repurchased
    (42,190,020 )     (69 )
                 
Balance — December 31, 2010
    853,122,693       1,431  
Issued under option plans
    1,635,538       18  
Issued for dividend reinvestment plan
    4,152        
                 
Balance — March 31, 2011
    854,762,383     $ 1,449  
                 
 

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5.  Segment Information
The company’s operating segments have been determined based on reports reviewed by the Chief Executive Officer that are used to make strategic decisions. The company has three reportable operating segments: potash, phosphate and nitrogen. These operating segments are differentiated by the chemical nutrient contained in the product that each produces. Inter-segment sales are made under terms that approximate market value. The accounting policies of the segments are the same as those described in Note 1.
 
                                         
    Three Months Ended March 31, 2011
    Potash   Phosphate   Nitrogen   All Others   Consolidated
Sales
  $ 1,109     $ 549     $ 546     $     $ 2,204  
Freight, transportation and distribution
    (83 )     (43 )     (23 )           (149 )
Net sales — third party
    1,026       506       523                
Cost of goods sold
    (283 )     (356 )     (320 )           (959 )
Gross margin
    743       150       203             1,096  
Depreciation and amortization
    (42 )     (47 )     (33 )     (2 )     (124 )
Inter-segment sales
                38              
                                         
 
                                         
    Three Months Ended March 31, 2010
    Potash   Phosphate   Nitrogen   All Others   Consolidated
Sales
  $ 892     $ 401     $ 421     $     $ 1,714  
Freight, transportation and distribution
    (96 )     (35 )     (24 )           (155 )
Net sales — third party
    796       366       397                
Cost of goods sold
    (266 )     (302 )     (262 )           (830 )
Gross margin
    530       64       135             729  
Depreciation and amortization
    (30 )     (48 )     (30 )     (2 )     (110 )
Inter-segment sales
                26              
                                         
 
                                         
Assets   Potash   Phosphate   Nitrogen   All Others   Consolidated
Assets at March 31, 2011
  $ 6,205     $ 2,492     $ 1,805     $ 5,463     $ 15,965  
Assets at December 31, 2010
  $ 5,773     $ 2,395     $ 1,808     $ 5,571     $ 15,547  
Assets at January 1, 2010
  $ 4,685     $ 2,250     $ 1,656     $ 4,251     $ 12,842  
Additions to property, plant and equipment (three months ended March 31, 2011)
  $ 347     $ 47     $ 18     $ 29     $ 441  
                                         
 
6.  Finance Costs
 
                     
      Three Months Ended March 31  
      2011       2010  
Interest expense on debt
                   
Short-term
    $ (5 )     $ (1 )
Long-term
      (64 )       (54 )
Unwinding of discount on asset retirement obligations
      (4 )       (3 )
Borrowing costs capitalized to property, plant and equipment
      19         18  
Interest income
      4         9  
                     
      $ (50 )     $ (31 )
                     

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7.  Income Taxes
A separate estimated average annual effective tax rate is determined for each taxing jurisdiction and applied individually to the interim period pre-tax income of each jurisdiction.
 
For the three months ended March 31, 2011, the company’s income tax expense was $243. This compared to an expense of $191 for the same period last year. The actual effective tax rate including discrete items for the three months ended March 31, 2011 was 25 percent compared to 30 percent for the first three months of 2010. Total discrete tax adjustments that impacted the rate in the first quarter resulted in an income tax recovery of $23 compared to an income tax expense of $11 in the same period last year. Significant items recorded included the following:
 
•  In first-quarter 2011, a current tax recovery of $21 for previously paid withholding taxes.
 
•  In first-quarter 2010, a current tax expense of $18 to adjust the 2009 income tax provision to the income tax return filed that quarter.
 
•  In first-quarter 2010, a current tax recovery of $10 for an anticipated refund of taxes paid related to forward exchange contracts.
 
Income tax balances within the consolidated statements of financial position were comprised of the following:
 
                               
          March 31,
  December 31,
  January 1,
Income tax assets (liabilities)     Statements of Financial Position Location   2011   2010   2010
Current income tax assets:
                             
Current
    Receivables   $ 28     $ 46     $ 363  
Non-current
    Other assets     102       101       57  
Deferred income tax assets
    Other assets     36       38       31  
                               
Total income tax assets
        $ 166     $ 185     $ 451  
                               
Current income tax liabilities:
                             
Current
    Payables and accrued charges   $ (139 )   $ (160 )   $ (17 )
Non-current
    Other non-current liabilities and deferred credits     (82 )     (101 )     (71 )
Deferred income tax liabilities
    Deferred income tax liabilities     (799 )     (737 )     (643 )
                               
Total income tax liabilities
        $ (1,020 )   $ (998 )   $ (731 )
                               
 
8.  Net Income per Share
Basic net income per share for the quarter is calculated on the weighted average shares issued and outstanding for the three months ended March 31, 2011 of 854,033,000 (2010 — 888,357,000).
 
Diluted net income per share is calculated based on the weighted average number of shares issued and outstanding during the period. The denominator is: (1) increased by the total of the additional common shares that would have been issued assuming exercise of all stock options with exercise prices at or below the average market price for the period; and (2) decreased by the number of shares that the

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company could have repurchased if it had used the assumed proceeds from the exercise of stock options to repurchase them on the open market at the average share price for the period. For performance-based stock option plans, the number of contingently issuable common shares included in the calculation is based on the number of shares, if any, that would be issuable if the end of the reporting period were the end of the performance period and the effect is dilutive. The weighted average number of shares outstanding for the diluted net income per share calculation for the three months ended March 31, 2011 was 876,467,000 (2010 — 914,112,000).
 
Excluded from the calculation of diluted net income per share were weighted average options outstanding of 1,436,700 relating to the 2008 Performance Option Plan, as the options’ exercise prices were greater than the average market price of common shares for the period.
 
9.  Seasonality
The company’s sales of fertilizer can be seasonal. Typically, the second quarter of the year is when fertilizer sales will be highest, due to the North American spring planting season. However, planting conditions and the timing of customer purchases will vary each year and sales can be expected to shift from one quarter to another.
 
10.  Contingencies
 
Canpotex
 
PCS is a shareholder in Canpotex, which markets potash offshore. Should any operating losses or other liabilities be incurred by Canpotex, the shareholders have contractually agreed to reimburse it for such losses or liabilities in proportion to their productive capacity. There were no such operating losses or other liabilities during the first three months of 2011 or 2010.
 
Mining Risk
 
In common with other companies in the industry, the company is unable to acquire insurance for underground assets.
 
Legal and Other Matters
Significant environmental site assessment and/or remediation matters of note include the following:
 
•  The company, along with other parties, has been notified by the US Environmental Protection Agency (“USEPA”) of potential liability under the US Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (“CERCLA”) with respect to certain soil and groundwater conditions at a site in Lakeland, Florida that includes a former PCS Joint Venture fertilizer blending facility and certain surrounding properties. A Record of Decision (“ROD”) was issued in September 2007 and provides for a remedy that requires excavation of impacted soils and interim treatment of groundwater. The total remedy cost is estimated in the ROD to be $9. In September 2010, the USEPA approved the Remedial Design Report to address the soil contamination. Site preparation and mobilization has commenced for the soil remediation.
 
•  The USEPA has identified PCS Nitrogen, Inc. (“PCS Nitrogen”) as a potentially responsible party with respect to a former fertilizer blending operation in Charleston, South Carolina known as the Planters Property or Columbia Nitrogen site, formerly owned by a company from which PCS Nitrogen acquired certain other assets. The USEPA has requested reimbursement of $3 of previously incurred response costs and the performance or financing of future site investigation and response activities from PCS Nitrogen and other named potentially responsible parties. In September 2005, Ashley II of Charleston, L.L.C., the current owner of the Planters Property, filed a complaint in the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina seeking a declaratory judgment that PCS Nitrogen is liable to pay environmental response costs that Ashley II of Charleston, L.L.C. alleges it has incurred and will incur in connection with response activities at the site. After the Phase II trial, the district court allocated 30 percent of the liability for response costs at the site to PCS Nitrogen, as well as a proportional share of any costs that cannot be recovered from another responsible party. PCS Nitrogen has filed a motion for amendment of this decision. If that request is denied, the decision may be appealed, along with a previous decision imposing successor liability on PCS Nitrogen. The ultimate amount of liability for PCS Nitrogen, if any, depends upon the amount needed for remedial activities, the ability of other parties to pay and the availability of insurance.
 
•  PCS Phosphate has agreed to participate, on a non-joint and several basis, with parties to an Administrative Settlement Agreement with the USEPA (“Settling Parties”) in the performance of a removal action and the payment of certain other costs associated with PCB soil contamination at the Ward Superfund Site in Raleigh, North Carolina (“Site”), including reimbursement of the USEPA’s past costs. The removal activities commenced at the Site in August 2007. The cost of performing the removal action at the Site is estimated at $73. The Settling Parties have initiated CERCLA cost recovery litigation against PCS Phosphate and more than 100 other entities. PCS Phosphate filed crossclaims and counterclaims seeking cost recovery. In addition to the removal action at the Site, investigation of sediments downstream of the Site in what is called “Operable Unit 1” has occurred. In September 2008, the USEPA issued a final remedy for Operable Unit 1, with an estimated cost of $6. In response to a special notice letter from the USEPA, PCS Phosphate and the Settling Parties made a good-faith offer to perform and/or pay for certain actions described in the special notice letter. At this time, the

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company is unable to evaluate the extent of any exposure that it may have for the matters addressed in the special notice letter.
 
•  Pursuant to the 1996 Corrective Action Consent Order (the “Order”) executed between PCS Nitrogen Fertilizer, L.P., formerly known as Arcadian Fertilizer, L.P. (“PCS Nitrogen Fertilizer”) and Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division (“GEPD”) in conjunction with PCS Nitrogen Fertilizer’s purchase of real property located in Augusta, Georgia, PCS Nitrogen Fertilizer agreed to perform certain activities including a facility investigation and, if necessary, a corrective action. It has performed investigations of environmental site conditions and has documented its findings in several reports submitted to GEPD. PCS Nitrogen Fertilizer received written comments from GEPD and, to address certain of these comments, PCS Nitrogen Fertilizer is conducting additional groundwater investigation. PCS Nitrogen Fertilizer also has conducted a pilot study to evaluate the viability of in-situ bioremediation of groundwater at the site. In May 2009, PCS Nitrogen Fertilizer submitted a Corrective Action Plan (“CAP”) to GEPD proposing to utilize in-situ bioremediation of groundwater at the site. Pending review of the complete CAP and in accordance with the requirements of the Order, on March 31, 2011, PCS Nitrogen Fertilizer submitted to GEPD a proposed Interim Measure Work Plan that, if approved, will require implementation of a slightly modified version of the in-situ groundwater remedy for the source area originally proposed as a component of the CAP. PCS Nitrogen Fertilizer continues to perform the required additional groundwater investigation and is evaluating whether any additional modifications to the proposed groundwater remedy are necessary to comply with the Order.
 
•  In December 2009, during a routine inspection of a gypsum stack at the White Springs, Florida facility, a sinkhole was discovered that resulted in the loss of approximately 84 million gallons of water from the stack. The company is sampling production and monitoring wells on its property and drinking water wells on neighboring property to assess impacts. The company incurred costs of $11 to address the sinkhole between the time of discovery and March 31, 2011. In December 2010, the company entered into a consent order with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (“FDEP”) pursuant to which the company agreed to, among other things, remediate the sinkhole and perform additional monitoring of the groundwater quality and hydrogeologic conditions related to the sinkhole collapse. The company also entered into an order on consent with the USEPA. On May 2, 2011, the USEPA approved the company’s proposal to implement certain mitigation measures to meet the goals of the USEPA order on consent. The company remeasured the asset retirement obligation (“ARO”) for the White Springs gypsum stacks to account for the measures identified in the proposal. This remeasurement resulted in a $39 adjustment to the ARO, of which $33 was capitalized as an addition to the ARO and $6 was expensed in the first quarter of 2011. With the USEPA approval, the proposal will be presented to the Board of Directors with a request for authorization to proceed.
 
The company is also engaged in ongoing site assessment and/or remediation activities at a number of other facilities and sites. Based on current information, it does not believe that its future obligations with respect to these facilities and sites are reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on its consolidated financial position or results of operations.
 
Other significant matters of note include the following:
 
•  The USEPA has an ongoing initiative to evaluate implementation within the phosphate industry of a particular exemption for mineral processing wastes under the hazardous waste program. In connection with this industry-wide initiative, the USEPA conducted inspections at numerous phosphate operations and notified the company of various alleged violations of the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (“RCRA”) at its plants in Aurora, North Carolina; Geismar, Louisiana; and White Springs, Florida. The company has entered into RCRA 3013 Administrative Orders on Consent and has performed certain site assessment activities at all three plants. At this time, the company does not know the scope of corrective action, if any, that may be required. The company continues to participate in settlement discussions with the USEPA but is uncertain if any resolution will be possible without litigation, or, if litigation occurs, what the outcome would be. At this time, the company is unable to evaluate the extent of any exposure that it may have in these matters.
 
•  The USEPA has also begun an initiative to evaluate compliance with the Clean Air Act at sulfuric acid and nitric acid plants. In connection with this industry-wide initiative, the USEPA has sent requests for information to numerous facilities, including the company’s plants in Augusta, Georgia; Aurora, North Carolina; Geismar, Louisiana; Lima, Ohio; and White Springs, Florida. The USEPA has notified the company of various alleged violations of the Clean Air Act at its Geismar, Louisiana plant. The government has demanded process changes and penalties that would cost a total of approximately $27, but the company denies that it has any liability for the Geismar, Louisiana matter. Although the company is proceeding with planning and permitting for the process changes demanded by the government, the company is uncertain if any resolution will be possible without litigation, or, if litigation occurs, what the outcome would be. In July 2010, without alleging any specific violation of the Clean Air Act, the USEPA requested that the company meet and demonstrate compliance with the Clean Air Act for specified projects undertaken at the White Springs, Florida sulfuric acid plants. The company participated in such meeting but, at this time, is unable to evaluate if it has any exposure.

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•  Significant portions of the company’s phosphate reserves in Aurora, North Carolina are located in wetlands. Under the Clean Water Act, the company must obtain a permit from the US Army Corps of Engineers (the “Corps”) before mining in the wetlands. In January 2009, the Division of Water Quality of the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources issued a certification under Section 401 of the Clean Water Act that mining of phosphate in excess of 30 years from lands owned or controlled by the company, including some wetlands, would not degrade water quality. Thereafter, in June 2009, the Corps issued the company a permit that will allow the company to mine the phosphate deposits identified in the Section 401 certification. The USEPA decided not to seek additional review of the permit. In March 2009, four environmental organizations (Pamlico-Tar River Foundation, North Carolina Coastal Federation, Environmental Defense Fund and Sierra Club) filed a Petition for a Contested Case Hearing before the North Carolina Office of Administrative Hearings (“OAH”) challenging the Section 401 certification. The company has intervened in this proceeding. Cross motions for summary judgment by the Petitioners and the company have been filed, briefed and argued. The OAH has not issued a decision on them. At this time, the company is unable to evaluate the extent of any exposure that it may have in this matter.
 
•  In May 2009, the Canadian government announced that its new industrial greenhouse gas emissions policies will be coordinated with policies that may be implemented in the US. The Province of Saskatchewan is considering the adoption of greenhouse gas emission control requirements. Regulations pursuant to the Management and Reduction of Greenhouse Gases Act in Saskatchewan, which impose a type of carbon tax to achieve a goal of a 20 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 compared to 2006 levels, may become effective in 2012. There is no certainty as to the scope or timing of any final, effective provincial requirements. Although the US Congress has not passed any greenhouse gas emission control laws, the USEPA has adopted several rules to control greenhouse gas emissions using authority under existing environmental laws. In January 2011, the USEPA began phasing in requirements for all “stationary sources,” such as the company’s plants, to obtain permits incorporating the “best available control technology” for greenhouse gas emissions at a source if it is a new source that could emit 100,000 tons of greenhouse gases per year or if it is a modified source that increases such emissions by 75,000 tons per year. The company is not currently aware of any projects at its facilities that would be subject to these requirements. The company is monitoring these developments, and, except as indicated above, their effect on its operations cannot be determined with certainty at this time.
 
•  In December 2010, the USEPA issued a final rule to restrict nutrient concentrations in surface waters in Florida to levels below those currently permitted at the company’s White Springs, Florida plant. The revised nutrient criteria will become part of Florida’s water quality standards in March 2012. Projected capital costs resulting from the rule could be in excess of $100 for the company’s White Springs, Florida plant, and there is no guarantee that controls can be implemented that are capable of achieving compliance with the revised nutrient standards under all flow conditions. This estimate assumes that the rule survives court challenges and that none of the site-specific mechanisms for relief from the revised nutrient criteria are available to the White Springs, Florida plant. Various judicial challenges to the rule have been filed, including one lawsuit by The Fertilizer Institute and White Springs. The prospects for a rule to be implemented as issued by the USEPA and the availability of the site-specific mechanisms are uncertain.
 
•  The company, having been unable to agree with Mosaic Potash Esterhazy Limited Partnership (“Mosaic”) on the remaining amount of potash that the company is entitled to receive from Mosaic pursuant to the mining and processing agreement in respect of the company’s rights at the Esterhazy mine, issued a Statement of Claim in the Saskatchewan Court of Queen’s Bench (“Court”) against Mosaic on May 27, 2009 and the claim was amended on January 19, 2010. In the Amended Statement of Claim, the company has asserted that it has the right under the mining and processing agreement to receive potash from Mosaic until at least 2012 and potentially much later, and seeks an order from the Court declaring the amount of potash which the company has the right to receive. Mosaic, in its Statement of Defence, asserts that at a delivery rate of 1.24 million tons of product per year, the company’s entitlement to receive potash under the mining and processing agreement would terminate August 30, 2010.
 
In addition, at the time of filing its Statement of Defence, Mosaic commenced a counterclaim against the company, asserting that the company has breached the mining and processing agreement due to its refusal to take delivery of potash product under the agreement based on an event of force majeure.
 
The company was notified on May 2, 2011 that Mosaic believes that it has satisfied its obligations to produce potash at the Esterhazy mine for the company under the mining and processing agreement and as such it has no further obligation to deliver potash to the company from the Esterhazy mine, other than the company’s remaining inventory. The company disputes this interpretation and intends to take all necessary steps to enforce its rights under the agreement, pending determination of the matters currently in issue before the Court.
 
The company will continue to assert its position in these proceedings vigorously and it denies liability to Mosaic in connection with its counterclaim.

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•  Between September and October 2008, the company and PCS Sales (USA), Inc. were named as defendants in eight very similar antitrust complaints filed in US federal courts. Other potash producers are also defendants in these cases. Each of the separate complaints alleges conspiracy to fix potash prices, to divide markets, to restrict supply and to fraudulently conceal the conspiracy, all in violation of Section 1 of the Sherman Act. The company and PCS Sales (USA), Inc. believe each of these eight private antitrust lawsuits is without merit and intend to defend them vigorously.
 
In addition, various other claims and lawsuits are pending against the company in the ordinary course of business. While it is not possible to determine the ultimate outcome of such actions at this time, and there exist inherent uncertainties in predicting such outcomes, it is the company’s belief that the ultimate resolution of such actions is not reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on its consolidated financial position or results of operations.
 
The breadth of the company’s operations and the global complexity of tax regulations require assessments of uncertainties and judgments in estimating the taxes it will ultimately pay. The final taxes paid are dependent upon many factors, including negotiations with taxing authorities in various jurisdictions, outcomes of tax litigation and resolution of disputes arising from federal, provincial, state and local tax audits. The resolution of these uncertainties and the associated final taxes may result in adjustments to the company’s tax assets and tax liabilities.
 
The company owns facilities which have been either permanently or indefinitely shut down. It expects to incur nominal annual expenditures for site security and other maintenance costs at certain of these facilities. Should the facilities be dismantled, certain other shutdown-related costs may be incurred. Such costs are not expected to have a material adverse effect on the company’s consolidated financial position or results of operations and would be recognized and recorded in the period in which they are incurred.
 
11.  Related Party Transactions
The company sells potash from its Saskatchewan mines for use outside of North America exclusively to Canpotex, a potash export, sales and marketing company owned in equal shares by the three potash producers in the Province of Saskatchewan. Sales to Canpotex for the quarter ended March 31, 2011 were $481 (2010 — $268). Sales to Canpotex are at prevailing market prices and are settled on normal trade terms.
 
12.  Reconciliation of IFRS and United States Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
IFRS vary in certain significant respects from US GAAP. As required by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, the effect of these principal differences on the company’s unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements is described and quantified below.
 
(a) Inventories: Under IFRS, when the circumstances that previously caused inventories to be written down below cost no longer exist or when there is clear evidence of an increase in net realizable value because of changed economic circumstances, the amount of the writedown is reversed. The reversal is limited to the amount of the original writedown. Under US GAAP, the reversal of a writedown is not permitted unless the reversal relates to a writedown recorded in a prior interim period during the same fiscal year.
 
Under IFRS, interim price, efficiency, spending, and volume variances of a manufacturing entity are recognized in income at interim reporting dates to the same extent that those variances are recognized in income at year-end. Under IFRS, deferral of variances that are expected to be absorbed by year-end is not appropriate because such deferrals could result in reporting inventory at the interim date at more or less than its portion of the actual cost of manufacture. Under US GAAP, variances that are planned and expected to be absorbed by the end of the year are ordinarily deferred at the end of an interim period.
 
(b) Long-term investments: Certain of the company’s investments in international entities are accounted for under the equity method. Accounting principles generally accepted in those foreign jurisdictions may vary in certain important respects from IFRS and in certain other respects from US GAAP. The company’s share of earnings of these equity-accounted investees under IFRS has been adjusted for the significant effects of conforming to US GAAP.
 
(c) Property, plant and equipment: The net book value of property, plant and equipment under IFRS differs from that under US GAAP in certain respects, including the following:
 
Major repairs and maintenance, including turnarounds, are capitalized under IFRS and expensed under US GAAP unless costs represent a betterment, in which case capitalization under US GAAP is appropriate.
 
Borrowing costs under IFRS are capitalized to property, plant and equipment based on the weighted average interest rate on all of the company’s outstanding third-party debt; under US GAAP, only the weighted average interest rate on third-party long-term debt is used to determine the capitalized amount.
 
(d) Impairment of assets: Upon adopting IFRS, the company elected not to restate past business combinations, which resulted in the carrying amount of goodwill under IFRS being its carrying amount under previous Canadian GAAP at the date of transition to IFRS. Because past provisions for asset impairment were based on undiscounted cash flows from use under Canadian GAAP and on fair value under US GAAP, the carrying amount of goodwill is lower under US GAAP.

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In respect of oil and gas assets, US GAAP requires that writedowns be based on discounted cash flows, a prescribed discount rate and the unweighted average first-day-of-the-month resource prices for the prior 12 months; IFRS requires discounted cash flows using estimated future resource prices based on the best information available to the company.
 
Assets, except goodwill, that were previously impaired can be reversed in subsequent periods, under IFRS, if the conditions that led to the original impairment reversed. Reversals of asset impairments are prohibited under US GAAP.
 
(e) Depreciation and amortization: Depreciation and amortization under IFRS differ from that under US GAAP, as a result of differences in the carrying amounts of property, plant and equipment under IFRS and US GAAP, as described above.
 
(f) Exploration costs: Under IFRS, capitalized exploration costs are classified as exploration and evaluation assets. For US GAAP, these costs are generally expensed until such time as a final feasibility study has confirmed the existence of a commercially mineable deposit.
 
(g) Pension and other post-retirement benefits: Under US GAAP, the company recognizes the difference between the benefit obligation and the fair value of plan assets in the consolidated statements of financial position with the offset to OCI. Amounts in OCI are amortized to net income. Under IFRS, actuarial gains and losses are recognized directly in OCI without ever being amortized to net income. Unrecognized prior service costs are not recognized in OCI, but are amortized to net income over the average remaining vesting period.
 
(h) Offsetting of certain amounts: US GAAP requires an entity to adopt a policy of either offsetting or not offsetting fair value amounts recognized for derivative instruments and for the right to reclaim cash collateral or the obligation to return cash collateral against fair value amounts recognized for derivative instruments executed with the same counterparty under the same master netting arrangement. The company adopted a policy to offset such amounts. Under IFRS, offsetting of the margin deposits is not permitted.
 
(i) Share-based compensation: Under IFRS, stock options are recognized over the service period, which for PotashCorp is established by the option performance period. Under US GAAP, stock options are recognized over the requisite service period, which does not commence until the option plan is approved by the company’s shareholders and options are granted thereunder.
                     
Performance
    Service Period Commenced  
Option Plan Year     IFRS       US GAAP  
2008
      January 1, 2008         May 8, 2008  
2009
      January 1, 2009         May 7, 2009  
2010
      January 1, 2010         May 6, 2010  
                     
 
This difference impacts the stock-based compensation cost recorded and may impact diluted earnings per share.
 
Further, under IFRS the company has recognized an estimate of compensation cost in relation to performance options for which service has commenced but which have not yet been granted. Specifically, an estimate of compensation cost was recognized at the end of the first quarter of 2011 in relation to the 2011 Performance Option Plan expected to be approved on May 12, 2011 at the company’s annual meeting of shareholders for which service has commenced but for which performance options have not yet been granted. A corresponding estimate was made at the end of the first quarter of 2010 in relation to the 2010 Performance Option Plan. The compensation cost recognized will be trued up once options have been granted. Under US GAAP, no compensation cost is recognized until the option plans are approved.
 
(j) Stripping costs: Under IFRS, the company capitalizes and amortizes costs associated with the activity of removing overburden and other mine waste minerals in the production phase. US GAAP requires such stripping costs to be attributed to ore produced in that period as a component of inventory and recognized in cost of sales in the same period as related revenue.
 
(k) Provisions: Asset retirement obligations under IFRS are measured and remeasured each reporting period using a current risk-free discount rate. Under US GAAP, the obligation is initially measured using a credit-adjusted risk-free discount rate. Subsequent upward revisions are measured using the current discount rate while downward revisions are valued using the historical discount rate. Under IFRS, obligations incurred through the production of inventory are included in the cost of that inventory. Under US GAAP, obligations incurred through the production of inventory are added to the carrying amount of the related long-lived asset or charged to expense as incurred. Under IFRS, provisions for asset retirement obligations include constructive obligations. Under US GAAP, only legal obligations are recognized.
 
Under IFRS, a provision is recognized for either a legal or constructive obligation when the applicable criteria are otherwise met. Under US GAAP, constructive obligations are recognized only when required under a specific standard.
 
(l) Income taxes related to the above adjustments: The income tax adjustment reflects the impact on income taxes of the US GAAP adjustments described above. Accounting for income taxes under IFRS and US GAAP is similar, except that income tax

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rates of enacted or substantively enacted tax law must be used to calculate deferred income tax assets and liabilities under IFRS, whereas only income tax rates of enacted tax law can be used under US GAAP.
 
(m) Income taxes related to US GAAP effective income tax rate: As it relates to interim periods, under IFRS a separate estimated average annual effective income tax rate is determined for each taxing jurisdiction and applied individually to the interim period pre-tax income of each jurisdiction, whereas under US GAAP a weighted average of the annual rates expected across all jurisdictions is applied.
 
(n) Income tax consequences of share-based employee compensation: Under IFRS, the income tax benefit attributable to share-based compensation that is deductible in computing taxable income but is not recorded in the consolidated financial statements as an expense of any period includes the amount realized in the period (the “realized excess benefit”), as well as the amount of future tax deductions that the company expects to receive based on the current market price of the shares (the “unrealized excess benefit”). The unrealized excess benefit is recognized as a deferred income tax asset with the offset recorded in contributed surplus. Under US GAAP, only the realized excess benefit is recorded, in additional paid-in capital.
 
Under IFRS, the income tax benefit associated with share-based compensation that is recorded in the consolidated financial statements as an expense in the current or previous period is reviewed at each statement of financial position date and amended to the extent that it is no longer probable that the related tax benefit will be realized. Under US GAAP, this income tax benefit is calculated without estimating the income tax effects of anticipated share-based payment transactions.
 
(o) Uncertain income tax positions: US GAAP prescribes a comprehensive model for how a company should recognize, measure, present and disclose in its consolidated financial statements uncertain income tax positions that it has taken or expects to take on a tax return (including a decision whether to file or not to file a return in a particular jurisdiction). IFRS have no similar requirements related to uncertain income tax positions. The company accounts for uncertain income tax positions under IFRS using the standards applicable to current income tax assets and liabilities, i.e., both liabilities and assets are recorded when probable at the company’s best estimate of the amount.
 
(p) Income taxes related to intragroup transactions: Under IFRS, unrealized profits resulting from intragroup transactions are eliminated from the carrying amount of assets, but no equivalent adjustment is made for tax purposes. The difference between the tax rates of the two entities will result in an impact on net income. This differs from US GAAP, where the current tax payable in relation to such profits is recorded as a current asset until the transaction is realized by the group.
 
(q) Classification of deferred income taxes: Under IFRS, deferred income taxes are classified as long-term. Under US GAAP, deferred income taxes are separated between current and long-term on the consolidated statements of financial position.
 
(r) Cash flow statements: US GAAP requires the disclosure of income taxes paid. IFRS require the disclosure of income tax cash flows, which would include any income taxes recovered during the period. For the three months ended March 31, 2011, income taxes paid under US GAAP were $195 (2010 — $22). Under IFRS, interest paid is not reduced for the effects of capitalized interest whereas under US GAAP this amount is net of capitalized interest. Interest paid under US GAAP for the three months ended March 31, 2011 was $22 (2010 — $24).
 

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The application of US GAAP, as described above, would have had the following effects on net income, net income per share, total assets and shareholders’ equity.
 
                     
      Three Months Ended
 
      March 31  
      2011       2010  
Net income as reported — IFRS
    $ 732       $ 444  
Items increasing (decreasing) reported net income
                   
Manufacturing cost variances(a)
      (21 )       (9 )
Share of earnings of equity-accounted investees(b)
              (1 )
Major repairs and maintenance(c)
      (14 )        
Borrowing costs(c)
      4         3  
Asset impairment and asset writedowns (recoveries)(d)
      (1 )       (1 )
Depreciation and amortization(e)
      2         2  
Pension and other post-retirement benefits(g)
      (5 )       (6 )
Share-based compensation(i)
      13         12  
Stripping costs(j)
      4         (9 )
Asset retirement obligations(k)
      7         1  
Deferred income taxes relating to the above adjustments(l)
      3         3  
Income taxes related to US GAAP effective income tax rate(m)
      8         (4 )
Uncertain income tax positions(o)
      5         14  
Income taxes related to intragroup transactions(p)
      5         9  
                     
Net income — US GAAP
    $ 742       $ 458  
                     
Basic weighted average shares outstanding — US GAAP
      854,033,000         888,357,000  
                     
Diluted weighted average shares outstanding — US GAAP(i)
      876,461,000         914,112,000  
                     
Basic net income per share — US GAAP
    $ 0.87       $ 0.52  
                     
Diluted net income per share — US GAAP
    $ 0.85       $ 0.50  
                     
 
 
                     
      March 31,
      December 31,
 
      2011       2010  
Total assets as reported — IFRS
    $ 15,965       $ 15,547  
Items increasing (decreasing) reported total assets
                   
Investment in equity-accounted investees(b)
      44         40  
Property, plant and equipment(c, d)
      (107 )       (109 )
Major repairs and maintenance(c)
      (66 )       (52 )
Borrowing costs(c)
      29         25  
Goodwill(d)
      (47 )       (47 )
Asset impairment and asset writedowns (recoveries)(d)
      (6 )       (5 )
Exploration costs(f)
      (14 )       (14 )
Margin deposits associated with derivative instruments(h)
      (163 )       (198 )
Stripping costs(j)
      (58 )       (62 )
Asset retirement obligations(k)
      (81 )       (46 )
Uncertain income tax positions(o)
      (122 )       (122 )
Income taxes related to intragroup transactions(p)
      20         15  
Deferred income tax asset due to US GAAP adjustments
      (13 )       (13 )
Reclassification of deferred income taxes(q)
      28         28  
                     
Total assets — US GAAP
    $ 15,409       $ 14,987  
                     

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      March 31,
      December 31,
 
      2011       2010  
Total shareholders’ equity as reported — IFRS
    $ 7,180       $ 6,685  
Items increasing (decreasing) reported shareholders’ equity
                   
Manufacturing cost variances(a)
      (21 )        
Share of earnings of equity-accounted investees(b)
      43         42  
Major repairs and maintenance(c)
      (66 )       (52 )
Borrowing costs(c)
      29         25  
Asset impairment and asset writedown (recoveries)(d)
      (257 )       (256 )
Depreciation and amortization(e)
      97         95  
Exploration costs(f)
      (14 )       (14 )
Pension and other post-retirement benefits(g)
      13         13  
Stripping costs(j)
      (58 )       (62 )
Asset retirement obligations(k)
      86         79  
Constructive obligations(k)
      5         5  
Deferred income taxes relating to the above adjustments(l)
      15         12  
Income taxes related to US GAAP effective income tax rate(m)
      (39 )       (47 )
Deferred income taxes on share-based compensation(n)
      (175 )       (148 )
Uncertain income tax positions(o)
      38         33  
Income taxes related to intragroup transactions(p)
      11         6  
                     
Shareholders’ equity — US GAAP
    $ 6,887       $ 6,416  
                     
 
Supplemental US GAAP Disclosures
 
Disclosures About Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities
Derivative financial instruments are used by the company to manage its exposure to commodity, price, exchange rate and interest rate fluctuations. Further information, including strategies, is provided in Note 12 to the consolidated financial statements in the company’s 2010 Financial Review Annual Report.
 
Fair Values of Derivative Instruments in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Financial Position
 
                       
          March 31,
    December 31,
 
Derivative instrument assets (liabilities)(1)     Statements of Financial Position Location   2011     2010  
Derivatives designated as hedging instruments:
                     
Natural gas derivatives
    Prepaid expenses and other current assets   $ 2     $  
Natural gas derivatives
    Current portion of derivative instrument liabilities     (61 )     (75 )
Natural gas derivatives
    Derivative instrument liabilities     (175 )     (204 )
                       
Total derivatives designated as hedging instruments
          (234 )     (279 )
                       
Derivatives not designated as hedging instruments:
                     
Foreign currency derivatives
    Prepaid expenses and other current assets     4       5  
                       
Total derivatives not designated as hedging instruments
        $ 4     $ 5  
                       
 
(1)    All fair value amounts are gross and exclude netted cash collateral balances

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The Effect of Derivative Instruments on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income for the Three Months Ended March 31
 
                                                             
                                        Amount of Loss
 
                        Amount of Loss
        Recognized in
 
                        Reclassified
        Income
 
      Amount of Gain
        from
        (Ineffective
 
      (Loss)
        Accumulated
    Location of Loss
  Portion
 
      Recognized in
    Location of
  OCI
    Recognized in Income
  and Amount
 
      OCI
    Loss Reclassified
  into Income
    (Ineffective Portion
  Excluded from
 
Derivatives in Cash
    (Effective
    from Accumulated
  (Effective
    and Amount
  Effectiveness
 
Flow Hedging
    Portion)     OCI into Income
  Portion)     Excluded from
  Testing)  
Relationships     2011       2010     (Effective Portion)   2011     2010     Effectiveness Testing)   2011     2010  
Natural gas derivatives
    $ 21       $ (85 )   Cost of goods sold   $ (22 )   $ (15 )   Cost of goods sold   $     $  
                                                             
 
                       
          Amount of (Loss)
 
          Gain Recognized in
 
          Income  
Derivatives Not Designated as Hedging Instruments     Location of (Loss) Gain Recognized in Income   2011     2010  
Foreign currency derivatives
    Foreign exchange   $ 3     $ (2 )
                       
 
Financial Instruments and Related Risk Management
 
Financial Risks
The company is exposed in varying degrees to a variety of financial risks from its use of financial instruments: credit risk, liquidity risk and market risk. The source of risk exposure and how each is managed is described in Note 25 to the consolidated financial statements in the company’s 2010 Financial Review Annual Report.
 
Credit Risk
The company is exposed to credit risk on its cash and cash equivalents, receivables and derivative instrument assets. The maximum exposure to credit risk is represented by the carrying amount of the financial assets.
 
The company sells potash from its Saskatchewan mines for use outside Canada and the US exclusively to Canpotex. Sales to Canpotex are at prevailing market prices and are settled on normal trade terms. There were no amounts past due or impaired relating to amounts owing to the company from Canpotex.
 
Liquidity Risk
 
Liquidity risk arises from the company’s general funding needs and in the management of its assets, liabilities and optimal capital structure. It manages its liquidity risk to maintain sufficient liquid financial resources to fund its operations and meet its commitments and obligations in a cost-effective manner. In managing its liquidity risk, the company has access to a range of funding options.
 
Certain derivative instruments of the company contain provisions that require its debt to maintain specified credit ratings from two major credit rating agencies. If the company’s debt were to fall below the specified ratings, it would be in violation of these provisions, and the counterparties to the derivative instruments could request immediate payment or demand immediate and ongoing full overnight collateralization on derivative instruments in net liability positions. The aggregate fair value of all derivative instruments with credit risk-related contingent features that were in a liability position on March 31, 2011 was $234, for which the company has posted collateral of $163 in the normal course of business. If the credit risk-related contingent features underlying these agreements were triggered on March 31, 2011, the company would have been required to post an additional $71 of collateral to its counterparties.
 
Market Risk
 
Market risk is the risk that financial instrument fair values will fluctuate due to changes in market prices. The significant market risks to which the company is exposed are foreign exchange risk, interest rate risk and price risk (related to commodity and equity securities).
 

32  PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q


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Foreign Exchange Risk
 
At March 31, 2011, the company had entered into foreign currency forward contracts to sell US dollars and receive Canadian dollars in the notional amount of $250 (December 31, 2010 — $170, January 1, 2010 — $140) at an average exchange rate of 0.9860 (December 31, 2010 — 1.0170, January 1, 2010 — 1.0681) per US dollar with maturities in 2011. At March 31, 2011, the company had foreign currency swaps to sell US dollars and receive Canadian dollars in the notional amount of $NIL (December 31, 2010 — $69, January 1, 2010 — $263) at an average exchange rate of NIL (December 31, 2010 — 1.0174, January 1, 2010 — 1.0551) per US dollar.
 
Price Risk
 
At March 31, 2011, the company had natural gas derivatives qualifying for hedge accounting in the form of swaps for which it has price risk exposure; derivatives represented a notional amount of 74 million MMBtu with maturities in 2011 through 2019. At December 31, 2010, the notional amount of swaps was 103 million MMBtu with maturities in 2011 through 2019. At January 1, 2010, the notional amount of swaps was 123 million MMBtu with maturities in 2010 through 2019.
 
Fair Value
 
Fair value represents point-in-time estimates that may change in subsequent reporting periods due to market conditions or other factors.
 
Presented below is a comparison of the fair value of each financial instrument to its carrying value.
                                                       
      March 31, 2011       December 31, 2010     January 1, 2010  
      Carrying
      Fair
      Carrying
    Fair
    Carrying
    Fair
 
      Amount
      Value
      Amount
    Value
    Amount
    Value
 
      of Asset
      of Asset
      of Asset
    of Asset
    of Asset
    of Asset
 
      (Liability)       (Liability)       (Liability)     (Liability)     (Liability)     (Liability)  
Derivative instrument assets
                                                     
Natural gas derivatives
    $ 2       $ 2       $     $     $ 4     $ 4  
Foreign currency derivatives
      4         4         5       5       5       5  
Investments in ICL and Sinofert
      3,571         3,571         3,842       3,842       2,760       2,760  
Derivative instrument liabilities
                                                     
Natural gas derivatives
      (236 )       (236 )       (279 )     (279 )     (175 )     (175 )
Long-term debt
                                                     
Senior notes
      (4,350 )       (4,528 )       (4,350 )     (4,525 )     (3,350 )     (3,506 )
Other
      (8 )       (8 )       (8 )     (8 )     (8 )     (8 )
                                                       
 
Due to their short-term nature, the fair value of cash and cash equivalents, receivables, short-term debt, and payables and accrued charges is assumed to approximate carrying value. The fair value of the company’s senior notes at March 31, 2011 reflected the yield valuation based on observed market prices. Yield on senior notes ranged from 1.01 percent to 5.66 percent (December 31, 2010 — 1.08 percent to 5.66 percent, January 1, 2010 — 1.73 percent to 5.83 percent). The fair value of the company’s other long-term debt instruments approximated carrying value.
 
Interest rates used to discount estimated cash flows related to derivative instruments that were not traded in an active market at March 31, 2011 were between 0.42 percent and 4.29 percent (December 31, 2010 — between 0.47 percent and 4.31 percent, January 1, 2010 — between 0.23 percent and 4.67 percent) depending on the settlement date.

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The following table presents the company’s fair value hierarchy for those financial assets and financial liabilities carried at fair value at March 31, 2011.
 
                                       
              Fair Value Measurements at Reporting Date Using:  
              Quoted Prices in
            Significant
 
              Active Markets for
      Significant Other
    Unobservable
 
      Carrying Amount of
      Identical Assets
      Observable Inputs
    Inputs
 
Description     Asset (Liability)       (Level 1)       (Level 2)     (Level 3)  
March 31, 2011
                                     
Derivative instrument assets
                                     
Natural gas hedging derivatives
    $ 2       $       $     $ 2 (1)
Foreign currency derivatives
      4                 4 (1)      
Investments in ICL and Sinofert
      3,571         3,571 (1)              
Derivative instrument liabilities
                                     
Natural gas hedging derivatives
      (236 )               (42 )(1)     (194 )(1)
December 31, 2010
                                     
Derivative instrument assets
                                     
Foreign currency derivatives
    $ 5       $       $ 5     $  
Investments in ICL and Sinofert
      3,842         3,842                
Derivative instrument liabilities
                                     
Natural gas hedging derivatives
      (279 )               (55 )     (224 )
January 1, 2010
                                     
Derivative instrument assets
                                     
Natural gas derivatives
    $ 4       $       $ 1     $ 3  
Foreign currency derivatives
      5                 5        
Investments in ICL and Sinofert
      2,760         2,760                
Derivative instrument liabilities
                                     
Natural gas derivatives
      (175 )               (53 )     (122 )
                                       
 
(1)    During the period ending March 31, 2011, there were no transfers between Level 1 and Level 2, or into or out of Level 3. Company policy is to recognize transfers at the end of the reporting period.
 
Fair Value Measurements Using Significant Unobservable Inputs (Level 3)
 
                     
      Natural Gas Hedging Derivatives  
      Three Months
      Twelve Months
 
      Ended
      Ended
 
      March 31,
      December 31,
 
      2011       2010  
Balance, beginning of period
    $ (224 )     $ (119 )
Total losses (realized and unrealized) before income taxes
                   
Included in earnings (cost of goods sold)
      (26 )       (36 )
Included in other comprehensive income
      19         (126 )
Settlements
      39         46  
Transfers out of Level 3
              11  
                     
Balance, end of period
    $ (192 )     $ (224 )
                     

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Pension and Other Post-Retirement Expenses
 
                     
      Three Months
 
      Ended March 31  
Defined Benefit Pension Plans     2011       2010  
Service cost
    $ 6       $ 5  
Interest cost
      12         12  
Expected return on plan assets
      (13 )       (12 )
Net amortization
      6         7  
                     
Net expense
    $ 11       $ 12  
                     
 
                     
      Three Months
 
      Ended March 31  
Other Post-Retirement Plans     2011       2010  
Service cost
    $ 2       $ 2  
Interest cost
      4         4  
Net amortization
      (1 )       (1 )
                     
Net expense
    $ 5       $ 5  
                     
 
For the three months ended March 31, 2011, the company contributed $2 to its defined benefit pension plans, $10 to its defined contribution pension plans and $2 to its other post-retirement plans. Total 2011 contributions to these plans are not expected to differ significantly from the amounts previously disclosed in Note 14 to the consolidated financial statements in the company’s 2010 Financial Review Annual Report.
 
Uncertainty in Income Taxes
 
Unrecognized tax benefits decreased $7 during the first three months of 2011. It is reasonably possible that a reduction in a range of $35 to $37 of unrecognized income tax benefits may occur within 12 months as a result of projected resolutions of worldwide income tax disputes.
 
Guarantees
 
In the normal course of operations, the company provides indemnifications, which are often standard contractual terms, to counterparties in transactions such as purchase and sale contracts, service agreements, director/officer contracts and leasing transactions. These indemnification agreements may require the company to compensate the counterparties for costs incurred as a result of various events, including environmental liabilities and changes in (or in the interpretation of) laws and regulations, or as a result of litigation claims or statutory sanctions that may be suffered by the counterparty as a consequence of the transaction. The terms of these indemnification agreements will vary based upon the contract, the nature of which prevents the company from making a reasonable estimate of the maximum potential amount that it could be required to pay to counterparties. Historically, the company has not made any significant payments under such indemnifications and no amounts have been accrued in the accompanying unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements with respect to these indemnification guarantees (apart from any appropriate accruals relating to the underlying potential liabilities).
 
The company enters into agreements in the normal course of business that may contain features which meet the definition of a guarantee. Various debt obligations (such as overdrafts, lines of credit with counterparties for derivatives and back-to-back loan arrangements) and other commitments (such as railcar leases) related to certain subsidiaries and investees have been directly guaranteed by the company under such agreements with third parties. The company would be required to perform on these guarantees in the event of default by the guaranteed parties. No material loss is anticipated by reason of such agreements and guarantees. At March 31, 2011, the maximum potential amount of future (undiscounted) payments under significant guarantees provided to third parties approximated $562. It is unlikely that these guarantees will be drawn upon, and since the maximum potential amount of future payments does not consider the possibility of recovery under recourse or collateral provisions, this amount is not indicative of future cash requirements or the company’s expected losses from these arrangements. At March 31, 2011, no subsidiary balances subject to guarantees were outstanding in connection with the company’s cash management facilities, and it had no liabilities recorded for other obligations other than subsidiary bank borrowings of approximately $6.
 
The company has guaranteed the gypsum stack capping, closure and post-closure obligations of White Springs and PCS Nitrogen in Florida and Louisiana, respectively, pursuant to the financial assurance regulatory requirements in those states. In addition, it has guaranteed the performance of certain remediation obligations of PCS Joint Venture and PCS Nitrogen at the Lakeland, Florida and Augusta, Georgia sites, respectively. The USEPA has announced that it plans to adopt rules requiring financial assurance from a variety of mining operations, including phosphate rock mining. It is too early in the rulemaking process to determine what the impact, if any, on the company’s facilities will be when these rules are issued.
 
The environmental regulations of the Province of Saskatchewan require each potash mine to have decommissioning and reclamation plans. Financial assurances for these plans must be established within one year following their approval by the responsible provincial minister. The Minister of the Environment for Saskatchewan (“MOE”) has approved the plans submitted by the company. The company had previously provided a CDN $2 irrevocable letter of credit and a payment of CDN $3 into the agreed-upon trust fund. Under the regulations, the decommissioning and reclamation plans and financial assurances are to be reviewed at least once every five years, or as required by the MOE. The next scheduled review for the decommissioning and

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reclamation plans and financial assurances is currently underway. The MOE has indicated it is seeking an increase of the amount paid into the trust fund by the company. The company anticipates that all matters regarding the decommissioning and reclamation plans and financial assurances for this review will be completed by the end of 2011. Based on current information, the company does not believe that its financial assurance requirements or future obligations with respect to this matter are reasonably likely to have a material impact on its consolidated financial position or results of operations.
 
The company has met its financial assurance responsibilities as of March 31, 2011. Costs associated with the retirement of long-lived tangible assets have been accrued in the accompanying unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements to the extent that a legal liability to retire such assets exists.
 
During the period, the company entered into various other commercial letters of credit in the normal course of operations. As at March 31, 2011, $52 of letters of credit were outstanding.
 
The company expects that it will be able to satisfy all applicable credit support requirements without disrupting normal business operations.
 
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
 
Fair Value Disclosures
 
In January 2010, the FASB issued a new accounting standard aimed at improving disclosures about fair value measurements. As of January 1, 2010, the company was required to disclose information on significant transfers in and out of Levels 1 and 2 and the reasons for those transfers. The implementation of this guidance did not have a material impact on the company’s consolidated financial statements. Additional disclosures related to details of activity in Level 3 were required effective January 1, 2011. The company has applied these amendments in these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
13.  Transition to IFRS
 
The company adopted IFRS on January 1, 2011 with effect from January 1, 2010. The company’s financial statements for the year ending December 31, 2011 will be the first annual consolidated financial statements that comply with IFRS and these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements were prepared as described in Note 1, including the application of IFRS 1. Accordingly, the company will make an unreserved statement of compliance with IFRS beginning with its 2011 annual consolidated financial statements.
 
Initial Elections upon Adoption
 
Most adjustments required on transition to IFRS will be made retrospectively against opening retained earnings as of the date of the first comparative statements of financial position presented (i.e., January 1, 2010). IFRS 1 provides entities adopting IFRS for the first time with a number of optional exemptions and mandatory exceptions, in certain areas, to the general requirement for full retrospective application of IFRS. The most significant IFRS 1 exemptions that are expected to apply to the company upon adoption are summarized below.
 
IFRS 1 Exemption Options
 
Business Combinations
 
Choice: The company may elect, on transition to IFRS, to either restate all past business combinations in accordance with IFRS 3, “Business Combinations”, or to apply an elective exemption from applying IFRS 3 to past business combinations.
 
Policy selection: If the elective exemption is chosen, specific requirements must be met, such as maintaining the classification of the acquirer and the acquiree, recognizing or derecognizing certain acquired assets or liabilities as required under IFRS and remeasuring certain assets and liabilities at fair value. The company will elect, on transition to IFRS, to apply the elective exemption such that transactions entered into prior to the transition date will not be restated.
 
Expected transition impact: None.
 
Expected future impact: None.
 
Property, Plant and Equipment
Choice: The company may elect to report items of property, plant and equipment in its opening statement of financial position on the transition date at a deemed cost instead of the actual cost that would be determined under IFRS. The deemed cost of an item may be either its fair value at the date of transition to IFRS or an amount determined by a previous revaluation under Canadian GAAP (as long as that amount was close to its fair value, cost or adjusted cost). The exemption can be applied on an asset-by-asset basis.
 
Policy selection: The company will elect to use the fair values of a number of previously impaired items of property, plant and equipment (with a total carrying amount of zero) as their deemed costs. The aggregate of the fair values for these particular assets is zero. Therefore, no adjustment will result on transition to IFRS as a result of making this election.
 
Expected transition impact: None.
 
Expected future impact: None.

36  PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q


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Share-based Payments
Choice: The company may elect not to apply IFRS 2, “Share-Based Payments”, to equity instruments granted on or before November 7, 2002 or which vested before the company’s date of transition to IFRS. The company may also elect not to apply IFRS 2 to liabilities arising from share-based payment transactions which settled before the date of transition to IFRS.
 
Policy selection: The company will elect not to apply IFRS 2 to equity instruments granted on or before November 7, 2002 or which vested before its date of transition to IFRS. The company will also elect not to apply IFRS 2 to liabilities arising from share-based payment transactions which settled before the date of transition to IFRS.
 
Expected transition impact: None.
 
Expected future impact: None.
 
Employee Benefits
Choice: The company may elect to recognize all cumulative actuarial gains and losses through opening retained earnings at the date of transition to IFRS. Actuarial gains and losses would have to be recalculated under IFRS from the inception of each defined benefit plan if the exemption is not taken. The company’s choice must be applied to all defined benefit plans consistently.
 
Policy selection: As the company intends to adopt an ongoing policy of recognizing all actuarial gains and losses immediately in other comprehensive income, all cumulative actuarial gains and losses at the date of transition to IFRS will be recognized at the date of transition to IFRS. The company will make use of this exemption.
 
Expected transition impact: See Employee Benefits under “Changes in Accounting Policies” below.
 
Expected future impact: See Employee Benefits under “Changes in Accounting Policies” below.
 
Foreign Exchange
Choice: On transition, cumulative translation gains or losses in accumulated other comprehensive income can be reclassified to retained earnings at the company’s election. If not elected, all cumulative translation differences must be recalculated under IFRS from inception.
 
Policy selection: The company has recalculated the cumulative foreign exchange translation gains or losses in accumulated other comprehensive income under IFRS retrospectively.
 
Expected transition impact: None.
 
Expected future impact: None.
 
Decommissioning Liabilities
Choice: In accounting for changes in obligations to dismantle, remove and restore items of property, plant and equipment (asset retirement obligations), the guidance in IFRS requires changes in such obligations to be added to or deducted from the cost of the asset to which they relate. The adjusted depreciable amount of the asset is then depreciated prospectively over its remaining useful life. Rather than recalculating the effect of all such changes throughout the life of the obligation, the company may elect to measure the liability and the related depreciation effects at the date of transition to IFRS.
 
Policy selection: The company will elect to measure any asset retirement obligations and the related depreciation effects at the date of transition to IFRS.
 
Expected transition impact: See Provisions under “Changes in Accounting Policies” below.
 
Expected future impact: See Provisions under “Changes in Accounting Policies” below.
 
Oil and Gas Properties
Choice: For a first-time adopter that has previously employed the full cost method of accounting for oil and natural gas exploration and development expenditures, IFRS 1 provides an exemption which allows entities to measure those assets at the transition date at amounts determined under the entity’s previous GAAP.
 
Policy selection: The company will elect to measure its oil and gas assets at their Canadian GAAP carrying value at the date of transition to IFRS.
 
Expected transition impact: None.
 
Expected future impact: None.

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IFRS 1 Mandatory Exceptions
IFRS 1 prohibits retrospective application of some aspects of other IFRS. As a result, the following mandatory exceptions from full retrospective application of IFRS will be applied and relevant on transition to IFRS:
 
•  The company’s estimates in accordance with IFRS at the date of transition to IFRS will be consistent with estimates made for the same date in accordance with Canadian GAAP (after adjustments to reflect any difference in accounting policies).
 
•  The company will not reflect in its opening IFRS statements of financial position a hedging relationship of a type that did not qualify for hedge accounting in accordance with IFRS. No transactions entered into before the date of transition to IFRS will be retrospectively designated as hedges.
 
 
Changes in Accounting Policies
The key areas where the company has identified that accounting policies will differ or where accounting policy decisions were necessary that may impact its consolidated financial statements are set out in the following table. Note that this does not include impact of transition policy choices made under IFRS 1, described above.
 
       
Accounting
     
Policy Area     Impact of Policy Adoption
(a) Impairment of
Assets
   
Choices: There are no policy choices available under IFRS.

Differences from previous Canadian GAAP: IAS 36, “Impairment of Assets”, uses a one-step approach for both testing for and measurement of impairment, with asset carrying values compared directly with the higher of fair value less costs to sell and value in use (which uses discounted future cash flows). Canadian GAAP generally used a two-step approach to impairment testing, first comparing asset carrying values with undiscounted future cash flows to determine whether impairment exists, and then measuring any impairment by comparing asset carrying values with fair values. This difference may potentially result in more impairments where carrying values of assets were previously supported under Canadian GAAP on an undiscounted cash flow basis, but could not be supported on a discounted cash flow basis.
     
In addition, IAS 36 requires the reversal of any previous impairment losses (to the amounts the assets would now be carried at had depreciation continued) where circumstances have changed such that the impairments have been reduced. Canadian GAAP prohibited reversal of impairment losses.
     
Expected transition impact: The company has identified certain assets for which impairment losses have been previously recognized, but which are no longer impaired. The previously recognized impairment loss will need to be reversed on transition to IFRS, which will result in an increase in the carrying amount of property, plant and equipment at December 31, 2010 of $9 (January 1, 2010 — $10). Net income for 2010 will decrease by $1. The company has also identified items which are regarded as impaired under IFRS, but not under Canadian GAAP. As a result, equity at December 31, 2010 will decrease by $4 (January 1, 2010 — $2). Net income for 2010 will decrease by $2.
     
Expected future impact: Dependent upon future circumstances, as described above.
       

38  PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q


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Accounting
     
Policy Area     Impact of Policy Adoption
(b) Employee
Benefits
    Choices: Actuarial gains and losses are permitted under IAS 19, “Employee Benefits”, to be recognized directly in other comprehensive income rather than through profit or loss.
     
Policy selection: Actuarial gains and losses will be recognized in other comprehensive income.
     
Differences from previous Canadian GAAP: IAS 19 requires the past service cost element of defined benefit plans to be expensed on an accelerated basis, with vested past service costs expensed immediately and unvested past service costs recognized on a straight-line basis until the benefits become vested. Under Canadian GAAP, past service costs were generally amortized on a straight-line basis over the average remaining service period of active employees expected under the plan.
     
Under Canadian GAAP, certain gains and losses which were unrecognized at the time of adopting the current Canadian accounting standard were permitted to be amortized over a period under transitional provisions of the current standards. Those amounts must be recognized on transition to IFRS.
       
      Expected transition impact: Equity at December 31, 2010 will be reduced by $365 (January 1, 2010 — $352). Net income for 2010 will increase by $24.
     
Expected future impact: The effect of actuarial gains and losses will no longer affect net income under the company’s accounting policy choice. Shareholders’ equity is expected to be subject to greater variability as the effects of actuarial gains and losses will be recognized immediately, rather than being deferred and amortized over a period of time.
       
(c) Share-Based Payments
    Choices: There are no policy choices available under IFRS.
Differences from previous Canadian GAAP: IFRS 2, “Share-Based Payments”, requires that cash-settled share-based payments to employees be measured (both initially and at each reporting date) based on fair value of the awards. Canadian GAAP required that such payments be measured based on intrinsic value of the awards. This difference is expected to impact the accounting measurement of some of the company’s cash-settled employee incentive plans, such as its performance unit incentive plan.
     
IFRS 2 requires an estimate of compensation cost to be recognized in relation to performance options for which service has commenced but which have not yet been granted. The compensation cost recognized would then be trued up once options have been granted. Under Canadian GAAP, compensation cost was first recognized when the options were granted. This will create a timing difference between IFRS and Canadian GAAP in terms of when compensation cost relating to employee service provided in the first quarter of the year is recognized. In relation to stock option costs in 2010, net income will decrease in the first quarter and increase in the second quarter by $13. Net income and equity for annual periods are not affected.
     
Expected transition impact: In relation to the company’s cash-settled share-based payments, equity at December 31, 2010 will be increased by $1 (January 1, 2010 — $3). Net income for 2010 will decrease by $2.
     
Expected future impact: Any future significant difference between the fair value and intrinsic value of outstanding units under the company’s performance unit incentive plan will result in different measurements under IFRS and Canadian GAAP in any particular year; however, this will be a timing difference only. The total future compensation expense relating to these awards will be the same under IFRS and Canadian GAAP over the duration of each incentive plan cycle. In relation to stock option cost, a timing difference will exist between IFRS and Canadian GAAP, whereby net income under IFRS will decrease in the first quarter and increase in the second quarter of each year by offsetting amounts. Net income and equity for annual periods are not affected.
       

PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q  39


Table of Contents

 
       
Accounting
     
Policy Area     Impact of Policy Adoption
       
(d) Provisions
 (including
 Asset
 Retirement
 Obligations)
    Choices: There are no policy choices available under IFRS.
Differences from previous Canadian GAAP: IAS 37, “Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets”, requires a provision to be recognized when: there is a present obligation (legal or constructive) as a result of a past transaction or event; it is probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation; and a reliable estimate can be made of the obligation. “Probable” in this context means more likely than not. Under Canadian GAAP, constructive obligations were recognized only if required by a specific standard, and the criterion for recognition in the financial statements was “likely”, which is a higher threshold than “probable”. Therefore, it is possible that there may be some contingent liabilities not recognized under Canadian GAAP which would require a provision under IFRS.
     
Other differences between IFRS and Canadian GAAP exist in relation to the measurement of provisions, such as the methodology for determining the best estimate where there is a range of equally possible outcomes (IFRS uses the mid-point of the range whereas Canadian GAAP used the low end), and the requirement under IFRS for provisions to be discounted where material.
     
In relation to asset retirement obligations, measurement under IFRS will be based on management’s best estimate, while measurement under Canadian GAAP was based on the fair value of the obligation (which takes market assumptions into account). Under IFRS, the full asset retirement obligation is remeasured each period using the current discount rate. Under Canadian GAAP, cash flow estimates associated with asset retirement obligations were discounted using historical discount rates. Changes in the discount rate alone did not result in a remeasurement of the liability. Changes in estimates that decreased the liability were discounted using the discount rate applied upon initial recognition of the liability. When changes in estimates increased the liability, the additional liability was discounted using the current discount rate.
     
IFRS require the company’s asset retirement obligations to be discounted using a risk-free rate. Under Canadian GAAP, asset retirement obligations were discounted using a credit-adjusted risk-free rate.
     
Under IFRS, the increase in the measurement of an asset retirement obligation due to the passage of time (unwinding of the discount) is classified as a finance expense. Under Canadian GAAP, this amount was classified as an operating expense.
     
Expected transition impact: Equity at December 31, 2010 will be reduced by $84 (January 1, 2010 — $68). Net income for 2010 will decrease by $16.
     
Expected future impact: Measurement of provisions may fluctuate more under IFRS and a change in the discount rate will have a more significant impact on the obligation as well as the company’s assets and expenses. As well, provisions may be recognized earlier under IFRS than under Canadian GAAP.
       

40  PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q


Table of Contents

 
       
Accounting
     
Policy Area     Impact of Policy Adoption
(e) Income
 Taxes
    Choices: Where exchange rate differences on deferred income tax liabilities or assets are recognized in the income statement, such differences may be classified as either foreign exchange gains/losses or deferred tax expense/income under IFRS.
     
Policy selection: Exchange rate differences on deferred income tax liabilities or assets will be classified as foreign exchange gains/losses. This is consistent with the company’s accounting policy under Canadian GAAP.
     
Differences from previous Canadian GAAP, expected transition impact and expected future impact of each: Under IFRS, the guidance in IAS 12, “Income Taxes”, will be used to determine the benefit to be received in relation to uncertain tax positions. This differs from the methodology used under Canadian GAAP. Equity at December 31, 2010 will be increased by $48 (January 1, 2010 — $36). Net income for 2010 will increase by $12. Impacts in future periods will depend on the particular circumstances existing in those periods.
     
Under IFRS, deferred tax assets recognized in relation to share-based payment arrangements (for example, the company’s employee stock option plan in the US) are adjusted each period to reflect the amount of future tax deductions that the company expects to receive in excess of stock-based compensation recorded in the consolidated financial statements based on the current market price of the shares. The benefit of such amounts is recognized in contributed surplus and never impacts net income. Under the company’s Canadian GAAP policy, tax deductions for its employee stock option plan in the US were recognized as reductions to tax expense, within net income, in the period that the deduction was allowed. This difference will result in a decrease to net income in 2010 of $45. Equity at December 31, 2010 will increase by $143 (January 1, 2010 — $116). In future periods, current tax expense will be higher and the balance of the company’s deferred tax liability is expected to be more volatile under IFRS.
     
Under IFRS, deferred tax assets associated with share-based compensation that are recorded in the consolidated financial statements as an expense in the current or previous period should be reviewed at each statement of financial position date and amended to the extent that it is no longer probable that the related tax benefit will be realized. Under Canadian GAAP, this income tax benefit was calculated without estimating the income tax effects of anticipated share-based payment transactions. This difference will result in an increase to net income of $1. Equity at December 31, 2010 will decrease by $7 (January 1, 2010 — $8). In future periods, the balance in the company’s deferred tax liability is expected to be more volatile under IFRS.
     
Under IFRS, adjustments relating to a change in tax rates are recognized in the same category of comprehensive income in which the original amounts were recognized. Under Canadian GAAP, such adjustments were recognized in net income, regardless of the category in which the original amounts were recognized. In addition, foreign exchange gains on deferred income tax liabilities would be recorded in other comprehensive income under IFRS, but were recorded in net income under Canadian GAAP. In combination, these differences will result in $150 related to an internal restructuring that occurred in 2009 being re-categorized at the date of transition to IFRS from retained earnings to accumulated other comprehensive income. There will be no future impacts resulting from this item.
     
Under IFRS, deferred income taxes are classified as long-term. Under Canadian GAAP, future income taxes were separated between current and long-term on the statement of financial position. This will result in a decrease in 2010 of $28 (January 1, 2010 — $18) in current assets and non-current liabilities on the statement of financial position. This classification difference will continue to exist in future periods; however, the size and direction of the difference will depend on circumstances existing in those periods.
     
Under IFRS, unrealized profits resulting from intragroup transactions are eliminated from the carrying amount of assets, but no equivalent adjustment is made for tax purposes. The difference between the tax rates of the two entities will impact net income. This differs from Canadian GAAP, where the current tax payable in relation to such profits was recorded as a current asset until the transaction was realized by the group. As a result, 2010 net income will decrease by $14. Equity at December 31, 2010 will increase by $6 (January 1, 2010 — $20). In future periods, the tax impact of intragroup transactions will be recognized earlier under IFRS; however, the size and direction of the difference will depend on circumstances existing in those periods.
     
Interest and penalties on income tax deficiencies are classified as financing expenses or operating expenses, respectively, under IFRS. Penalties on all income tax deficiencies will be classified as operating expenses. All interest expense related to income taxes (whether cash taxes or uncertain tax positions) will be disclosed as finance costs. Under Canadian GAAP, these were classified as either operating expenses or income tax expense depending on their nature. In future periods, finance costs and interest payable will be higher under IFRS.
       

PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q  41


Table of Contents

 
       
Accounting
     
Policy Area     Impact of Policy Adoption
(f) Consolidation     Choices: There are no policy choices available under IFRS.
     
Differences from previous Canadian GAAP: The IFRS approach to consolidation is principles-based whereby consolidation is required for all entities which are controlled. Unlike the Canadian GAAP two-step model, which first required consideration as to whether an entity was a VIE, the IFRS guidance on consolidation is a single-step model — the control model. IFRS do bring in the concepts of risk and rewards where the existence of control is not apparent, although not in the same rules-based manner as under Canadian GAAP.
     
Expected transition impact: None.
     
Expected future impact: None.
       
(g) Property,
 Plant and
 Equipment
    Choices: Either a historical cost model or a revaluation model can be used to value property, plant and equipment.
Policy selection: The company will value property, plant and equipment using the historical cost model.

Differences from previous Canadian GAAP: Under IFRS, where part of an item of property, plant and equipment has a cost that is significant in relation to the cost of the item as a whole, it must be depreciated separately from the remainder of the item. Canadian GAAP was similar in this respect; however, the componentization concept was not often applied to the same extent due to practicality and/or materiality.
     
Under IFRS, the cost of major overhauls on items of property, plant and equipment is capitalized as a component of the related item of property, plant and equipment and amortized over the period until the next major overhaul. Under Canadian GAAP, these costs were expensed in the year incurred.
     
Expected transition impact: Equity at December 31, 2010 will be increased by $52 (January 1, 2010 — $18). Net income for 2010 will increase by $34.
     
Expected future impact: The cost of future replacement of components of property, plant and equipment (including the cost of major overhauls) will be capitalized and amortized over several years rather than being expensed in the year incurred. This will result in a difference in timing between IFRS and Canadian GAAP in terms of when such costs are recognized as expenses.
       
(h) Inventories     Choices: Either first-in, first-out (FIFO) or weighted average can be used to value inventories.
     
Policy selection: The weighted average method will be used to value inventories.
     
Differences from previous Canadian GAAP: None, as it relates to annual periods.
     
Under IFRS, at interim periods, price, efficiency, spending, and volume variances of a manufacturing entity are recognized in income to the same extent that those variances are recognized in income at financial year-end. Under IFRS, deferral of variances that are expected to be absorbed by year-end is not appropriate because it could result in reporting inventory at the interim date at more or less than its portion of the actual cost of manufacture. Under Canadian GAAP, variances that were planned and expected to be absorbed by the end of the year were ordinarily deferred at the end of an interim period. In relation to manufacturing cost variances, 2010 net income will increase in the first quarter by $9 and in the second quarter by $6, decrease in the third quarter by $48 and increase in the fourth quarter by $33. Equity will increase at March 31, 2010 by $9, increase at June 30, 2010 by $15 and decrease at September 30, 2010 by $33. Net income and equity for annual periods are not affected.
     
Expected transition impact: None, as it relates to annual periods.
     
Expected future impact: None, as it relates to annual periods. Manufacturing cost variances that were deferred at interim periods will no longer be deferred. This will result in a difference in timing during the year between IFRS and Canadian GAAP in terms of when such costs are recognized as expenses.
       

42  PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q


Table of Contents

 
       
Accounting
     
Policy Area     Impact of Policy Adoption
(i) Borrowing Costs
    Choices: There are no policy choices available under IFRS.
Differences from previous Canadian GAAP: Under IFRS, borrowing costs will be capitalized to assets which take a substantial time to develop or construct using a capitalization rate based on the weighted average interest rate on all of the company’s outstanding third-party debt. Under the company’s Canadian GAAP policy, the interest capitalization rate was based only on the weighted average interest rate on third-party long-term debt.
     
Expected transition impact: Equity at December 31, 2010 will be reduced by $25 (January 1, 2010 — $14). Net income for 2010 will decrease by $11.
     
Expected future impact: There will be an ongoing difference based on the difference in capitalization rates.
       
(j) Financial
Instruments
    Choices: Trade date or settlement date can be used.
Policy selection: The company will recognize regular-way purchases and sales of financial assets at the trade date.
     
Differences from previous Canadian GAAP: None.
     
Expected transition impact: None.
     
Expected future impact: None.
       
(k) Definition of a Derivative
    Choices: There are no policy choices available under IFRS.
Differences from previous Canadian GAAP: Derivatives usually have a notional amount (that is, an amount of currency, a number of shares or other number of units specified in the contract). Under IFRS, the definition of a derivative does not specifically require an instrument to have a notional amount, and the lack of a notional amount does not result in an exemption from treatment of the contract as a derivative. Under Canadian GAAP, when the quantity of a non-financial asset or liability to be purchased or sold was not specified and was not otherwise determinable (for example, by reference to anticipated quantities to be used in the calculation of penalty amounts in the event of non-performance), the contract was not accounted for as a derivative since the standard setters concluded its fair value would not be reliably determinable. As a result, a notional amount was also required implicitly for such a contract to meet the definition of a derivative under Canadian GAAP. Whereas under Canadian GAAP such an instrument would not be accounted for as a derivative, under IFRS it is necessary to analyze all other features to determine whether the contract is a derivative. If so, it is necessary to determine a reasonable estimation of what a notional amount could be, and measure the instrument at fair value as a derivative or embedded derivative based on such.
     
Expected transition impact: None.
     
Expected future impact: More contracts may be categorized as derivatives (either assets or liabilities) than under Canadian GAAP.
       
(l) Embedded
Derivatives
    Choices: There are no policy choices available under IFRS.
Differences from previous Canadian GAAP: For transitional purposes under Canadian GAAP, the company elected to record embedded derivatives only for contracts entered into or substantively modified on or after January 1, 2003. This transitional option does not exist under IFRS and therefore additional potential embedded derivatives will be considered within contracts previously not reviewed in this context to conclude whether bifurcation and recording will be necessary.
     
Expected transition impact: None.
     
Expected future impact: None.
       

PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q  43


Table of Contents

 
       
Accounting
     
Policy Area     Impact of Policy Adoption
(m) Hedge
Accounting
    Choices: There are no policy choices available under IFRS.
Differences from previous Canadian GAAP: Under Canadian GAAP, a short-cut method for assessing hedge effectiveness was permitted if the critical terms of the hedged item and hedging instrument matched. This method is not permitted under IFRS. The company had certain deferred amounts related to the previous use of this method under Canadian GAAP pertaining to interest rate swaps. However, because the previously designated hedging relationship was of a type that would have qualified for hedge accounting under IFRS, the provisions of IFRS 1, “First-Time Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards”, allow the company to discontinue hedge accounting prospectively. Because hedge accounting had already been discontinued prospectively under Canadian GAAP, no adjustment will be necessary as a result of adopting IFRS.
     
Expected transition impact: None.
     
Expected future impact: None.
       
(n) Statement of Cash Flows
    Choices: Either the direct or indirect method may be presented. Dividends paid, interest paid, interest received and dividends received can be presented as operating, investing or financing activities.
     
Policy selection: The company will use the indirect method. Dividends paid will be presented as financing activities. Interest and dividends received will be presented as operating activities. Interest paid will be presented as operating activities except where it has been capitalized to property, plant and equipment, in which case it will be presented as investing activities.
     
Differences from previous Canadian GAAP: None.
     
Expected transition impact: None.
     
Expected future impact: None.
       
(o) Investments
    Choices: Jointly controlled entities may be accounted for either by using proportionate consolidation or the equity method.
     
Policy selection: The equity method will be used to account for joint ventures.
     
Differences from previous Canadian GAAP: Under Canadian GAAP, joint ventures were accounted for using proportionate consolidation.
     
Certain of the company’s equity-accounted investees adopted IFRS earlier than PotashCorp, resulting in certain IFRS 1 elections being made, particularly related to use of fair value as deemed cost on certain items of property, plant and equipment and related to the use of the business combinations exemption. As a result, the company will recognize its share of such elections as an adjustment to its opening retained earnings and its investments in equity-accounted investees.
     
Expected transition impact: Equity at December 31, 2010 will be reduced by $45 (January 1, 2010 — $45). Net income for 2010 will be unaffected.
     
Expected future impact: One joint venture will be accounted for using the equity method, rather than proportionate consolidation method. The impact is expected to be minimal.
       

44  PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q


Table of Contents

 
Reconciliations from Canadian GAAP to IFRS
 
Reconciliation of Net Income
 
                   
      Year to Date Period Ended  
      December 31,
    March 31,
 
      2010     2010  
Net Income — Canadian GAAP
    $ 1,806     $ 449  
IFRS adjustments to net income:
                 
Policy choices
                 
Employee benefits  — Actuarial gains and losses(b)
      26       6  
Other
                 
Provisions  — Changes in asset retirement obligations(d)
      (13 )     (1 )
Property, plant and equipment(g)
      34        
Borrowing costs(i)
      (11 )     (2 )
Employee benefits  — Past service costs(b)
      (2 )      
Impairment of assets(a)
      (3 )     1  
Constructive obligations(d)
      (3 )      
Share-based payments(c)
      (2 )     (15 )
Manufacturing cost variances at interim periods(h)
            9  
Income taxes  — Tax effect of above differences
      (10 )      
Income tax-related differences(e)
      (47 )     (3 )
                   
Net Income — IFRS
    $ 1,775     $ 444  
                   
 
References above relate to items described in the Changes in Accounting Policies table above.
 
Reconciliation of Shareholders’ Equity
 
                           
      December 31,
    March 31,
    January 1,
 
      2010     2010     2010  
Shareholders’ Equity  — Canadian GAAP
    $ 6,804     $ 6,952     $ 6,440  
IFRS adjustments to shareholders’ equity:
                         
Policy choices
                         
Employee benefits  — Actuarial gains and losses(b)
      (375 )     (358 )     (365 )
Other
                         
Provisions  — Changes in asset retirement obligations(d)
      (79 )     (67 )     (66 )
Property, plant and equipment(g)
      52       18       18  
Investments(o)
      (45 )     (45 )     (45 )
Borrowing costs(i)
      (25 )     (16 )     (14 )
Employee benefits  — Past service costs and Canadian GAAP transition amounts(b)
      10       12       13  
Impairment of assets(a)
      5       9       8  
Constructive obligations(d)
      (5 )     (2 )     (2 )
Share-based payments(c)
      1       1       3  
Manufacturing cost variances at interim periods(h)
            9        
Income taxes  — Tax effect of above differences
      154       152       152  
Income tax-related differences(e)
      188       178       163  
                           
Shareholders’ Equity  — IFRS
    $ 6,685     $ 6,843     $ 6,305  
                           
 
References above relate to items described in the Changes in Accounting Policies table above.

PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q  45


Table of Contents

 
Reconciliation of Comprehensive Income
 
                   
      Year to Date Period Ended  
      December 31,
    March 31,
 
      2010     2010  
Comprehensive Income  — Canadian GAAP
    $ 2,402     $ 530  
IFRS adjustments to comprehensive income:
                 
Policy choices
                 
Employee benefits  — Actuarial gains and losses(b)
      (36 )      
Tax effect of employee benefits  — Actuarial gains and losses
      11        
Other
                 
Differences in net income
      (31 )     (5 )
                   
Comprehensive Income  — IFRS
    $ 2,346     $ 525  
                   
 
References above relate to items described in the Changes in Accounting Policies table above.

46  PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q


Table of Contents

 
Adjusted Financial Statements
The following tables show the adjustments to the company’s consolidated statements of financial position and consolidated statements of income.
 
Adjustments to Consolidated Statement of Financial Position  — as at December 31, 2010
 
                                           
            IFRS
        IFRS
           
      Canadian
    Adjust-
    Ref-
  Reclass-
           
Canadian GAAP Accounts     GAAP     ments     erence   ifications     IFRS     IFRS Accounts
Assets
                                        Assets
Current assets
                                       
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents
    $ 412     $         $     $ 412    
Cash and cash equivalents
Receivables
      1,044       15     (e)           1,059    
Receivables
Inventories
      570                       570    
Inventories
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
      114       (60 )   (e)           54    
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
                                           
        2,140       (45 )               2,095      
                                         
Non-current assets
Property, plant and equipment
      8,063       78     (a,d,g,i)           8,141    
Property, plant and equipment
Investments
      4,938       (45 )   (o)     (4,893 )          
                        1,051       1,051    
Investments in equity-accounted investees
                        3,842       3,842    
Available-for-sale investments
Other assets
      363       (60 )   (b,e)           303    
Other assets
Intangible assets
      18                 97       115    
Intangible assets
Goodwill
      97                 (97 )          
                                           
      $ 15,619     $ (72 )       $     $ 15,547     Total Assets
                                           
Liabilities
                                        Liabilities
Current liabilities
                                       
Current liabilities
Short-term debt and current portion of
long-term debt
    $ 1,871     $         $     $ 1,871    
Short-term debt and current portion of long-term debt
Payables and accrued charges
      1,246       (48 )   (c,d,e)           1,198    
Payables and accrued charges
Current portion of derivative instrument
liabilities
      75                       75    
Current portion of derivative instrument liabilities
                                           
        3,192       (48 )               3,144      
                                         
Non-current liabilities
Long-term debt
      3,707                       3,707    
Long-term debt
Derivative instrument liabilities
      204                       204    
Derivative instrument liabilities
Future income tax liabilities
      1,078       (341 )   (e)           737    
Deferred income tax liabilities
Accrued pension and other post-retirement
benefits
      299       169     (b)           468    
Accrued pension and other post-retirement benefits
Accrued environmental costs and asset
retirement obligations
      330       125     (d)           455    
Asset retirement obligations and accrued environmental costs
Other non-current liabilities and deferred
credits
      5       142     (e)           147    
Other non-current liabilities and deferred credits
                                           
        8,815       47                 8,862     Total Liabilities
                                           
Shareholders’ Equity
                                        Shareholders’ Equity
Share capital
      1,431                       1,431    
Share capital
Contributed surplus
      160       148     (e)           308    
Contributed surplus
Accumulated other comprehensive income
      2,244       150     (e)           2,394    
Accumulated other comprehensive income
Retained earnings
      2,969       (417 )               2,552    
Retained earnings
                                           
        6,804       (119 )               6,685     Total Shareholders’ Equity
                                           
      $ 15,619     $ (72 )       $     $ 15,547     Total Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
                                           
 
References above relate to items described in the Changes in Accounting Policies table above.

PotashCorp 2011 First Quarter Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q  47


Table of Contents

 
Adjustments to Consolidated Statement of Financial Position  — as at January 1, 2010
 
                                           
            IFRS
        IFRS
           
      Canadian
    Adjust-
    Ref-
  Reclass-
           
Canadian GAAP Accounts     GAAP     ments     erence   ifications     IFRS     IFRS Accounts
Assets
                                        Assets
Current assets
                                       
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents
    $ 385     $         $     $ 385    
Cash and cash equivalents
Receivables
      1,138       76     (e)           1,214    
Receivables
Inventories
      624                       624    
Inventories
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
      125