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EX-32.1 - SECTION 1350 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT CERTIFICATION (CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER) - BANC OF CALIFORNIA, INC.dex321.htm
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D)

OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2011

 

 

FIRST PACTRUST BANCORP, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

000-49806

(Commission File Number)

Maryland

(State of incorporation)

04-3639825

(IRS Employer Identification No.)

610 Bay Boulevard, Chula Vista, California

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

91910

(ZIP Code)

(619) 691-1519

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its Corporate web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of regulation S-T (p232.405) of this chapter) during the proceeding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  ¨    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer; an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12B-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated Filer ¨   Accelerated Filer ¨   Non-accelerated Filer ¨   Smaller reporting company x

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.)    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock as of the latest practicable date.

As of April 27, 2010 the Registrant had 9,729,066 outstanding shares of common stock.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

FIRST PACTRUST BANCORP, INC.

Form 10-Q Quarterly Report

Index

 

          Page  

PART I - Financial Information

  

Item 1

   Financial Statements      4   

Item 2

   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations      29   

Item 3

   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk      36   

Item 4

   Controls and Procedures      36   
PART II - Other Information   

Item 1

   Legal Proceedings      37   

Item 1A

   Risk Factors      37   

Item 2

   Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds      38   

Item 3

   Defaults Upon Senior Securities      38   

Item 4

   Reserved      38   

Item 5

   Other Information      38   

Item 6

   Exhibits      38   
SIGNATURES      41   

 

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Table of Contents

Safe Harbor Statement Under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995

This report contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27a of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. (the Company) and Pacific Trust Bank (the Bank) intend such forward-looking statements to be covered by the safe harbor provisions for forward-looking statements contained in the Private Securities Reform Act of 1995, as amended, and are including this statement for purposes of these safe harbor provisions. Forward-looking statements, which are based on certain assumptions and describe future plans, strategies, and expectations of the Company and the Bank, are generally identifiable by use of the words such as “believe,” “expect,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “project,” or similar expressions. The ability of the Company and the Bank to predict results or the actual effect of future plans or strategies is inherently uncertain. Factors that could have a material adverse effect on the operations and future prospects of the Company, the Bank, and the Bank’s wholly owned subsidiaries include, but are not limited to, changes in: interest rates; the economic health of the local real estate market; general economic conditions; legislative/regulatory provisions; monetary and fiscal policies of the U.S. Government, including policies of the U.S. Treasury and the Federal Reserve Board; the quality or composition of the loan and securities portfolios; demand for loan products; deposit flows; competition; demand for financial services in the Bank’s market area; and impact of new accounting pronouncements. These risks and uncertainties should be considered in evaluating forward-looking statements and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements.

 

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Table of Contents

ITEM 1 – FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition

(In thousands of dollars except share data)

(Unaudited)

 

     March 31,
2011
    December 31,
2010
 
ASSETS     

Cash and due from banks

   $ 5,090      $ 5,371   

Interest-bearing deposits

     23,593        53,729   
                

Total cash and cash equivalents

     28,683        59,100   

Securities available-for-sale

     73,689        64,790   

Federal Home Loan Bank stock, at cost

     7,993        8,323   

Loans, net of allowance of $11,905 at March 31, 2011 and $14,637 at December 31, 2010

     670,579        678,175   

Accrued interest receivable

     3,465        3,531   

Real estate owned, net

     6,433        6,562   

Premises and equipment, net

     8,249        6,344   

Bank owned life insurance investment

     18,215        18,151   

Prepaid FDIC assessment

     3,156        3,521   

Other assets

     14,521        13,124   
                

Total assets

   $ 834,983      $ 861,621   
                
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY     

Deposits

    

Noninterest-bearing

   $ 18,066      $ 15,171   

Interest-bearing

     47,381        44,860   

Money market accounts

     88,287        89,708   

Savings accounts

     135,064        124,620   

Certificates of deposit

     345,612        371,949   
                

Total deposits

     634,410        646,308   

Advances from Federal Home Loan Bank

     60,000        75,000   

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

     4,923        4,304   
                

Total liabilities

     699,333        725,612   

Commitments and contingent liabilities

     —          —     
SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY     

Preferred stock, $.01 par value per share, $1,000 per share liquidation preference, 5,000,000 shares authorized, 19,300 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2010

     —          —     

Common stock, $.01 par value per share, 17,163,844 shares authorized; 9,863,390 shares issued and 9,729,066 shares outstanding at March 31, 2011; 9,863,390 shares issued and 8,693,228 shares outstanding at December 31, 2010

     99        99   

Class B non-voting non-convertible Common stock, $.01 par value per share, 2,836,156 shares authorized; 1,036,156 shares issued and outstanding at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010

     10        10   

Additional paid-in capital

     119,497        119,998   

Additional paid-in capital-warrants

     3,172        3,172   

Retained earnings

     35,448        35,773   

Treasury stock, at cost (March 31, 2011—1,170,480 shares, December 31, 2010—1,170,162 shares,)

     (25,139     (25,135

Unearned Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) shares (March 31, 2011—31,740 shares, December 31, 2010—42,320 shares)

     (381     (507

Accumulated other comprehensive income

     2,944        2,599   
                

Total shareholders’ equity

     135,650        136,009   
                

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

   $ 834,983      $ 861,621   
                

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

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Table of Contents

First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Income (Loss)

(In thousands of dollars except per share data)

(Unaudited)

 

     Three months ended
March 31,
 
     2011     2010  

Interest and dividend income

    

Loans, including fees

   $ 7,666      $ 9,165   

Securities

     1,244        1,330   

Dividends and other interest-earning assets

     39        24   
                

Total interest and dividend income

     8,949        10,519   

Interest expense

    

Savings

     90        242   

NOW

     16        32   

Money market

     66        173   

Certificates of deposit

     1,105        1,844   

Federal Home Loan Bank advances

     517        888   
                

Total interest expense

     1,794        3,179   
                

Net interest income

     7,155        7,340   

Provision for loan losses

     —          2,214   
                

Net interest income after provision for loan losses

     7,155        5,126   

Noninterest income

    

Customer service fees

     338        314   

Income from bank owned life insurance

     64        47   

Net gain on sales of securities available-for-sale

     319        —     

Other

     46        6   
                

Total noninterest income

     767        367   

Noninterest expense

    

Salaries and employee benefits

     3,381        1,628   

Occupancy and equipment

     664        488   

Advertising

     60        110   

Professional fees

     335        168   

Stationery paper, supplies, and postage

     115        86   

Data processing

     293        280   

ATM costs

     64        73   

FDIC expense

     383        380   

Loan servicing and foreclosure

     (76     568   

Operating loss on equity investment

     78        82   

Valuation allowance for OREO

     421        —     

Loss on sale of other real estate owned

     768        —     

Other general and administrative

     330        396   
                

Total noninterest expense

     6,816        4,259   
                

Income before income taxes

     1,106        1,234   

Income tax expense

     413        359   
                

Net income

     693        875   

Preferred stock dividends and discount accretion

     —          250   
                

Net income available to common shareholders

   $ 693      $ 625   
                

Basic earnings per share

   $ .07      $ .15   
                

Diluted earnings per share

   $ .07      $ .15   
                

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

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First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(In thousands of dollars)

(Unaudited)

 

     Three months ended
March 31,
 
     2011     2010  

Cash flows from operating activities

    

Net income

   $ 693      $ 875   

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities

    

Provision for loan losses

     —          2,214   

Net accretion of securities

     (240     (518

Depreciation and amortization

     130        97   

Employee stock ownership plan compensation expense

     183        71   

Stock option compensation expense

     164        3   

Stock award compensation expense

     32        6   

Bank owned life insurance income

     (64     (47

Operating loss on equity investment

     78        82   

Gain on sale of securities available-for-sale

     (319     —     

Loss on sale of real estate owned

     768        340   

Deferred income tax (benefit)/expense

     (1,018     314   

Decrease in valuation allowances on other real estate owned

     (170     —     

Net change in:

    

Deferred loan costs

     60        72   

Accrued interest receivable

     66        276   

Other assets

     2,749        2,778   

Accrued interest payable and other liabilities

     1,584        231   
                

Net cash provided by operating activities

     4,696        6,794   

Cash flows from investing activities

    

Proceeds from sales of securities available-for-sale

     6,478        —     

Proceeds from maturities, calls, and principal repayments of securities available-for-sale

     4,826        3,299   

Purchases of securities available-for-sale

     (20,342     (20,455

Loan originations and principal collections, net

     1,787        9,734   

Redemption of Federal Home Loan Bank stock

     330        —     

Proceeds from sale of real estate owned

     2,517        2784   

Additions to premises and equipment

     (2,035     (18
                

Net cash from investing activities

     (6,439     (4,656

Cash flows from financing activities

    

Repurchase of Warrants, TARP

     (1,003     —     

Net increase/(decrease) in deposits

     (11,898     33,218   

Repayments of Federal Home Loan Bank advances

     (15,000     (25,000

Net proceeds from stock issuance

     (45     —     

Purchase of treasury stock

     (4     (3

Tax benefit/(loss) from RRP shares vesting

     (1     (4

Tax Effect of ESOP

     148        —     

Tax Effect of Options redeemed

     147        —     

Dividends paid on preferred stock

     —          (241

Dividends paid on common stock

     (1,018     (208
                

Net cash from financing activities

     (28,674     7,762   
                

Net change in cash and cash equivalents

     (30,417     9,900   

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

     59,100        34,596   
                

Cash and cash equivalents at end of year

   $ 28,683      $ 44,496   
                

Supplemental cash flow information

    

Interest paid on deposits and borrowed funds

   $ 1,824      $ 3,197   

Income taxes paid

     0        0   

Supplemental disclosure of noncash activities

    

Transfer from loans to loans provided for sales of other real estate owned

     0        0   

Transfer from loans to real estate owned, net

     3,232        6,902   

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

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First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of ShareHolder’s Equity

(In thousands of dollars, except share and per share data)

(Unaudited)

 

     Preferred
Stock
    Common
Stock
     Additional
Paid-in
Capital
    Retained
Earnings
    Treasury
Stock
    Unearned
ESOP
    Additional
Paid in
capital
Warrants
     Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income
     Total  

Balance at January 1, 2010

   $ 19,094      $ 54       $ 67,958      $ 35,515      $ (25,788   $ (1,015     —         $ 1,667       $ 97,485   

Net Income

     —          —           —          2,825        —          —          —           —           2,825   

Change in net unrealized gain (losses) on securities available-for-sale, net of reclassification and tax effects

     —          —           —          —          —          —          —           932         932   
                           

Total comprehensive income

                        3,757   
                           

Forfeiture and retirement of stock

     —          —           10        —          (10     —          —           —           —     

Stock option compensation expense

     —          —           94        —          —          —          —           —           94   

Stock awards earned

     —          —           29        —          —          —          —           —           29   

Amortization of preferred stock discount

     35        —           —          (35     —          —          —           —           —     

Repurchased of Preferred Stock

     (19,129     —           (171     —          —          —          —           —           (19,300

Issuance of stock awards

     —          —           (668     —          668        —          —           —           —     

Issuance of warrants

     —          —           —          —          —          —          3,172         —           3,172   

Purchase of 506 shares of treasury stock

     —          —           —          —          (5     —          —           —           (5

Employee stock ownership plan shares earned

     —          —           (53     —          —          508        —           —           455   

Tax benefit/(loss) of RRP shares vesting

     —          —           (6     —          —          —          —           —           (6

Dividends declared ($.25 per common share)

     —          —           —          (1,503     —          —          —           —           (1,503

Preferred stock dividends

     —          —           —          (925     —          —          —           —           (925

Warrant dividends

     —          —           —          (104     —          —          —           —           (104

Net proceeds from stock issuance

     —          55         52,805        —          —          —          —           —           52,860   
                                                                           

Balance at December 31, 2010

   $ —        $ 109       $ 119,998      $ 35,773      $ (25,135   $ (507   $ 3,172       $ 2,599       $ 136,009   
                                                                           
                     

Net Income

     —          —           —          693        —          —          —           —           693   

Change in net unrealized gain (losses) on securities available-for-sale, net of reclassification and tax effects

     —          —           —          —          —          —          —           345         345   
                           

Total comprehensive income

                        1,038   
                           

 

     Preferred
Stock
     Common
Stock
     Additional
Paid-in
Capital
    Retained
Earnings
    Treasury
Stock
    Unearned
ESOP
    Additional
Paid in
capital
Warrants
     Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income
     Total  

Stock option compensation expense

     —           —           164        —          —          —          —           —           164   

Stock awards earned

     —           —           32        —          —          —          —           —           32   

Purchase of 318 shares of treasury stock

     —           —           —          —          (4     —          —           —           (4

Employee stock ownership plan shares earned

     —           —           57        —          —          126        —           —           183   

Tax benefit/(loss) of RRP shares vesting

     —           —           (1     —          —          —          —           —           (1

Dividends declared ($.105 per common share)

     —           —           —          (1,018     —          —          —           —           (1,018

Repurchase of Warrants-TARP

     —           —           (1,003     —          —          —          —           —           (1,003 )

Tax Effect ESOP

     —           —           148        —          —          —          —           —           148   

Tax Effect Options Redeemed

     —           —           147        —          —          —          —           —           147   

Net proceeds from stock issuance

     —           —           (45     —          —          —          —           —           (45
                                                                            

Balance at March 31, 2011

   $ —         $ 109       $ 119,497      $ 35,448      $ (25,139   $ (381   $ 3,172       $ 2,944       $ 135,650   
                                                                            

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

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FIRST PACTRUST BANCORP, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

March 31, 2011

(Amounts in thousands of dollars, except share and per share data)

NOTE 1 – BASIS OF PRESENTATION

The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements include the accounts of First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. (the Company) and its wholly owned subsidiary Pacific Trust Bank (the Bank) as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 and for the three month periods ended March 31, 2011 and March 31, 2010. Significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

The accompanying unaudited interim consolidated financial statements have been prepared pursuant to the rules and regulations for reporting on Form 10-Q. Accordingly, certain disclosures required by U.S. generally accepted accounting principles are not included herein. These interim statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes included in the Annual Report on Form 10-K filed by the Company with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The December 31, 2010 balance sheet presented herein has been derived from the audited financial statements included in the Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, but does not include all of the disclosures required by U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

Interim statements are subject to possible adjustment in connection with the annual audit of the Company for the year ending December 31, 2011. In the opinion of management of the Company, the accompanying unaudited interim consolidated financial statements reflect all of the adjustments (consisting of normal recurring adjustments) necessary for a fair presentation of the consolidated financial position and consolidated results of operations for the periods presented.

The results of operations for the three month periods ended March 31, 2011 are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year.

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Principles of Consolidation: The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiary, the Bank. All significant intercompany transactions and balances are eliminated in consolidation.

Nature of Operations: The principal business of the Company is the ownership of the Bank. The Bank is a federally chartered stock savings bank and a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) system, which maintains insurance on deposit accounts with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.

The Bank is engaged in the business of retail banking, with operations conducted through its main office and eight branches located in San Diego and Riverside counties. In addition, the Bank opened a loan production office in Los Angeles, California during the first quarter of 2011. Loan production is expected to expand throughout southern California during the coming quarters. There are no significant concentrations of loans to any one industry or customer. However, the customer’s ability to repay their loans is dependent on the real estate market and general economic conditions in the area.

The accounting and reporting polices of the Company are based upon U.S. generally accepted accounting principles and conform to predominant practices within the banking industry. Significant accounting policies followed by the Company are presented below.

Use of Estimates in the Preparation of Financial Statements: The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions based on available information. These estimates and assumptions affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and disclosures provided, and actual results could differ. The allowance for loan losses, other real estate owned, realization of deferred tax assets, and the fair value of financial instruments are particularly subject to change.

Cash Flows: Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, deposits with other financial institutions under 90 days, and daily federal funds sold. Net cash flows are reported for customer loan and deposit transactions, interest bearing deposits in other financial institutions, and federal funds purchased, including overnight borrowings with the Federal Home Loan Bank.

Interest-bearing Deposits in Other Financial Institutions: Interest-bearing deposits in other financial institutions mature within one year and are carried at cost.

Securities: Debt securities are classified as held to maturity and carried at amortized cost when management has the positive intent and ability to hold them to maturity. Debt securities are classified as available-for-sale when they might be sold before maturity. Equity securities with readily determinable fair values are classified as available-for-sale. Securities available-for-sale are carried at fair value with unrealized holding gains and losses, net of taxes, reported in other comprehensive income, net of tax.

Interest income includes amortization of purchase premium or discount. Premiums and discounts on securities are amortized on the level-yield method without anticipating prepayments, except for mortgage backed securities where prepayments are anticipated. Gains and losses on sales are recorded on the trade date and determined using the specific identification method.

 

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Table of Contents

Management evaluates securities for other-than-temporary impairment (“OTTI”) on at least a quarterly basis, and more frequently when economic or market conditions warrant such an evaluation. See further discussion in Note 2- Securities.

Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) Stock: The Bank is a member of the FHLB system. Members are required to own a certain amount of stock based on the level of borrowings and other factors, and may invest in additional amounts. FHLB stock is carried at cost, classified as a restricted security, and periodically evaluated for impairment based on ultimate recovery of par value. Both cash and stock dividends are reported as income.

Affordable Housing Fund: The Company has a 19% equity investment in an affordable housing fund originally totaling $4.2 million for purposes of obtaining tax credits and for Community Reinvestment Act purposes. This investment is accounted for using the equity method of accounting. Under the equity method of accounting, the Company recognizes its ownership share of the profits and losses of the fund. The Company obtains tax credits from these investments which reduce income tax expense for a period of 10 years. This investment is regularly evaluated for impairment by comparing the carrying value to the remaining tax credits expected to be received. For the three months ending March 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009 our share of the fund’s operating loss was $78 thousand, $82 thousand and $87 thousand, respectively. The balance of the investment at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 was $1.8 million and $1.9 million, respectively, and is included in other assets.

Loans: Loans that management has the intent and ability to hold for the foreseeable future or until maturity or payoff are reported at the principal balance outstanding, net of unearned interest, deferred loan fees and costs, and an allowance for loan losses. Interest income is accrued on the unpaid principal balance and includes amortization of net deferred loan fees and costs over the loan term. Interest income on mortgage and commercial loans is discontinued at the time the loan is 91 days delinquent unless the loan is well secured and in process of collection. Consumer loans, other than those secured by real estate, are typically charged off no later than 180 days past due. Past due status is based on the contractual terms of the loan. In all cases, loans are placed on nonaccrual or charged-off at an earlier date if collection of principal or interest is considered doubtful.

All interest accrued but not received for loans placed on nonaccrual, is reversed against interest income. Interest received on such loans is accounted for on the cash-basis or cost-recovery method, until qualifying for return to accrual. Loans are returned to accrual status when all the principal and interest amounts contractually due are brought current and future payments are reasonably assured.

The Company’s single family residential mortgage portfolio is comprised of a combination of traditional, fully-amortizing loans and non-traditional and/or interest only loans. In 2005 the Company introduced a fully-transactional flexible mortgage product called the “Green Account.” The Green Account is a mortgage line of credit which is secured by a first-deed of trust and which provides an associated “clearing account” that allows all types of deposits and withdrawals to be performed, including direct deposit, check, debit card, ATM, ACH debits and credits, and internet banking and bill payment transactions.

Concentration of Credit Risk: Most of the Company’s business activity is with customers located within San Diego and Riverside Counties. Therefore, the Company’s exposure to credit risk is significantly affected by changes in the economy in San Diego and Riverside County area.

Allowance for Loan Losses: The allowance for loan losses is maintained at a level considered adequate by management to provide for probable incurred loan losses. The allowance is increased by provisions charged against income, while loan losses are charged against the allowance when management deems a loan balance to be uncollectible. Subsequent recoveries, if any, are credited to the allowance. The Company performs an analysis of the adequacy of the allowance on a monthly basis. Management estimates the allowance balance required using past loan loss experience, the nature and volume of the portfolio, information about specific borrower situations and estimated collateral values, economic conditions, and other factors. Allocations of the allowance may be made for specific loans, but the entire allowance is available for any loan that, in management’s judgment, should be charged off. The allowance consists of specific and general components. The specific component relates to loans that are individually classified as impaired. A loan is impaired when, based on current information and events, it is probable that the Company will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. The Company evaluates all impaired loans individually under the guidance of ASC 310, primarily through the evaluation of collateral values and cash flows. Loans, for which the terms have been modified, and for which the borrower is experiencing financial difficulties, are considered troubled debt restructurings and classified as impaired. If a loan is impaired, a portion of the allowance is allocated so that the loan is reported, net, at the present value of estimated future cash flows using the loan’s existing rate or at the fair value of collateral if repayment is expected solely from the collateral. Troubled debt restructurings are also measured at the present value of estimated future cash flows using the loan’s effective rate at inception or at the fair value of collateral if repayment is expected solely from the collateral. The general component covers loans that are not impaired and is determined by portfolio segment and is based on actual loss history experienced by the Company over the most recent 12 months. This actual loss experience is supplemented with other economic factors based on the risks present for each portfolio segment. These economic factors include consideration of the following: levels of and trends in delinquencies and impaired loans; levels of and trends in charge-offs and recoveries; trends in volume and terms of loans; effects of any changes in risk selection and underwriting standards; other changes in lending policies, procedures, and practices; experience, ability, and depth of lending management and other relevant staff; national and local economic trends and conditions; industry conditions; effects of changes in credit concentrations and other factors. The historical loss analysis is also combined with a comprehensive loan to value analysis to analyze the associated risks in the current loan portfolio. An updated loan to value analysis is obtained from an independent firm semi-annually, most recently in November, 2010. Management uses available information to recognize loan losses, however, future loan loss provisions may be necessary based on changes in the above mentioned factors. In addition, regulatory agencies, as an

 

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integral part of their examination process, periodically review the allowance for loan losses and may require the Bank to recognize additional provisions based on their judgment of information available to them at the time of their examination.

The following portfolio segments have been identified: one-to four- family-fully amortizing, one-to four- family-negatively amortizing, one-to four-family interest only, multi-family, multi-family-negative amortizing, condominium conversions, secured commercial, unsecured commercial, land, home equity lines of credit, Green account- 1st trust deeds, Green account- 2nd trust deeds, Green account- multi-family, Green account- land, Green account- commercial, auto and other consumer. The Company categorizes loans into risk categories based on relevant information about the ability of borrowers to service their debt such as: current financial information, historical payment experience, credit documentation, public information, and current economic trends, among other factors. The Company analyzes loans individually by classifying the loans as to credit risk. This analysis includes all loans delinquent over 60 days and non-homogenous loans such as commercial and commercial real estate loans. Classification of problem single-family residential loans is performed on a monthly basis while analysis of non-homogenous loans is performed on a quarterly basis.

Loans secured by multi-family and commercial real estate properties generally involve a greater degree of credit risk than one-to four- family residential mortgage loans. Because payments on loan secured by multi-family and commercial real estate properties are often dependent on the successful operation or management of the properties, repayment of these loans may be subject to adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy. Commercial business loans are also considered to have a greater degree of credit risk due to the fact these loans are typically made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayment from the cash flow of the borrower’s business. As a result, the availability of funds for the repayment of commercial business loans may be substantially dependent on the success of the business itself (which, in turn, is often dependent in part upon general economic conditions). Consumer and other real estate loans may entail greater risk than do one- to four- family residential mortgage loans given that collection of these loans is dependent on the borrower’s continuing financial stability and, thus, are more likely to be adversely affected by job loss, divorce, illness, or personal bankruptcy. Negatively amortizing and interest only loans are also considered to carry a higher degree of credit risk due to their unique cash flows. The Green Mortgages tend to have lower levels of delinquencies as a result of the borrower’s ability to meet their monthly payments obligations by increasing the level of their line. Credit risk on this asset class is also managed through the completion of regular re-appraisals of the underlying collateral. In cases where the property values have declined to levels less than the original loan-to-value, or other levels deemed prudent by the Bank, the Bank may freeze the line and/or require monthly payments or principal reductions to bring the loan in balance.

Classified Assets: Federal regulations provide for the classification of loans and other assets, such as debt and equity securities considered by the Office of Thrift Supervision to be of lesser quality, as “substandard,” “doubtful” or “loss.” An asset is considered “substandard” if it is inadequately protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or of the collateral pledged, if any. “Substandard” assets include those characterized by the “distinct possibility” that the insured institution will sustain “some loss” if the deficiencies are not corrected. The Bank includes in its classification of “Substandard Assets” loans that are performing under terms of a TDR, but where the borrower has yet to make six or more payments under the TDR, as well as loans where the borrower is current in his or her payments on the subject Classified Loan but may be a guarantor on another loan that is classified as a result of weakness in the credit or collateral (“Relationship”). As of March 31, 2011, the Bank had $6.3 million of loans classified as “substandard” that were performing under a TDR for less than six months, and $7.6 million of “substandard” loans where the borrower was current on all payments and the underlying collateral values left the Bank well secured, but where the Relationship was rated “Substandard” as result of the existence of personal guarantees. These two classes of “Substandard” loans represented 37.5% of the Bank’s substandard assets as of March 31, 2011. Assets classified as “doubtful” have all of the weaknesses inherent in those classified “substandard,” with the added characteristic that the weaknesses present make “collection or liquidation in full,” on the basis of currently existing facts, conditions, and values, “highly questionable and improbable.” Assets classified as “loss” are those considered “uncollectible” and of such little value that their continuance as assets without the establishment of a specific loss reserve is not warranted.

When an insured institution classifies problem assets as either substandard or doubtful, it may establish general or specific allowances for loan losses in an amount deemed prudent by management and approved by the Board of Directors. General allowances represent loss allowances which have been established to recognize the inherent risk associated with lending activities, but, unlike specific allowances, have not been allocated to particular problem assets. When an insured institution classifies problem assets as “loss,” it is required either to establish a specific allowance for losses equal to 100% of that portion of the asset so classified or to charge off such amount. An institution’s determination as to the classification of its assets and the amount of its valuation allowances is subject to review by the Office of Thrift Supervision and the FDIC, which may order the establishment of additional general or specific loss allowances.

In connection with the filing of our periodic reports with the Office of Thrift Supervision and in accordance with our classification of assets policy, we regularly review the problem assets in our portfolio to determine whether any assets require classification in accordance with applicable regulations.

Premises and Equipment: Land is carried at cost. Premises and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and are depreciated using the straight-line method with average useful lives ranging from five to forty years.

Building and leasehold improvements are depreciated using the straight-line method over estimated useful lives not to exceed the lease term. Lease terms range up to ten years. Furniture, fixtures, and equipment are depreciated using the straight-line method with useful lives ranging from five to seven years. Maintenance and repairs are charged to expense as incurred, and improvements that extend the useful lives of assets are capitalized.

 

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Real Estate Owned: Assets acquired through or instead of loan foreclosure are initially recorded at fair value less costs to sell when acquired, establishing a new cost basis. In general, the Bank assumes a 9% cost when recording fair value. If fair value declines subsequent to foreclosure, a valuation allowance is recorded through expense. Operating costs after acquisition are expensed.

Bank Owned Life Insurance: The Bank has purchased life insurance policies on certain key executives. Bank owned life insurance is recorded at its cash surrender value (or the amount that can be realized). Bank owned life insurance is recorded at the amount that can be realized under the insurance contract at the balance sheet date, which is the cash surrender value adjusted for other charges or other amounts due that are probable at settlement.

Long-term Assets: Premises and equipment and other long-term assets are reviewed for impairment when events indicate their carrying amount may not be recoverable from future undiscounted cash flows. If impaired, the assets are recorded at fair value.

Loan Commitments and Related Financial Statements: Financial instruments include off-balance sheet credit instruments, such as commitments to make loans and commercial letters of credit, issued to meet customer financing needs. The face amount for these items represents the exposure to loss, before considering customer collateral or ability to repay. Such financial instruments are recorded when they are funded.

Stock-Based Compensation: Compensation cost is recognized for stock options and restricted stock awards issued to employees, based on the fair value of these awards at the date of grant. A Black-Scholes model is utilized to estimate the fair value of stock options, while the market price of the Company’s common stock at the date of grant is used for restricted stock awards. Compensation cost is recognized over the required service period, generally defined as the vesting period. For awards with graded vesting, compensation cost is recognized on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period for the entire award.

Income Taxes: Income tax expense is the total of the current year income tax due or refundable and the change in deferred tax assets and liabilities. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are the expected future tax amounts for the temporary differences between carrying amounts and tax bases of assets and liabilities, computed using enacted tax rates. A valuation allowance, if needed, reduces deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized. A tax position is recognized as a benefit only if it is “more likely than not” that the tax position would be sustained in a tax examination, with a tax examination being presumed to occur. The amount recognized is the largest amount of tax benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized on examination. For tax positions not meeting the “more likely than not” test, no tax benefit is recorded.

The Company and its subsidiaries are subject to U.S. federal income tax as well as income tax of multiple state jurisdictions. The Company is no longer subject to examination by U.S. Federal taxing authorities for years before 2007 and for all state income taxes before 2006. The Company expects the total amount of unrecognized tax benefits to be recognized in 2011.

The Company recognizes interest and/or penalties related to income tax matters in income tax expense. The Company had $0 accrued for interest and penalties at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010.

Employee Stock Ownership Plan: The cost of shares issued to the ESOP but not yet allocated to participants is shown as a reduction of shareholders’ equity. Compensation expense is based on the average market price of shares as they are committed to be released to participant accounts. Dividends on allocated ESOP shares reduces retained earnings; dividends on unearned ESOP shares reduce debt and accrued interest. There were no shares forfeited for the three months ending March 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009.

Earnings Per Common Share: Basic earnings per common share is net income available to common shareholders divided by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. ESOP shares are considered outstanding for this calculation unless unearned. Diluted earnings per common share includes the dilutive effect of additional potential common shares issuable under stock options and stock awards. Dividends paid, and the accretion of discount on the Company’s preferred stock, reduce the earnings available to common shareholders.

Comprehensive Income: Comprehensive income consists of net income and other comprehensive income. Other comprehensive income includes unrealized gains and losses on securities available for sale, net of tax, which are also recognized as a separate component of equity.

Loss Contingencies: Loss contingencies, including claims and legal actions arising in the ordinary course of business, are recorded as liabilities when the likelihood of loss is probable and an amount or range of loss can be reasonably estimated. Management does not believe there now are such matters that will have a material effect on the financial statements.

Restrictions on Cash: Cash on hand or on deposit with the Federal Reserve Bank was required to meet regulatory reserve and clearing requirements.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments: Fair values of financial instruments are estimated using relevant market information and other assumptions, as more fully disclosed in a separate note. Fair value estimates involve uncertainties and matters of significant judgment regarding interest rates, credit risk, prepayments, and other factors, especially in the absence of broad markets for particular items. Changes in assumptions or in market conditions could significantly affect the estimates.

Operating Segments: While the chief decision-makers monitor the revenue streams of the various products and services, the identifiable segments are not material and operations are managed and financial performance is evaluated on a Company-wide basis.

 

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Operating segments are aggregated into one as operating results for all segments are similar. Accordingly, all of the financial service operations are considered by management to be aggregated in one reportable operating segment.

Adoption of New Accounting Standards: In July 2010, the FASB updated disclosure requirements with respect to the credit quality of financing receivables and the allowance for credit losses. According to the guidance, there are two levels of detail at which credit information must be presented—the portfolio segment level and class level. The portfolio segment level is defined as the level where financing receivables are aggregated in developing a Company’s systematic method for calculating its allowance for credit losses. The class level is the second level at which credit information will be presented and represents the categorization of financing related receivables at a slightly less aggregated level than the portfolio segment level. Companies will now be required to provide the following disclosures as a result of this update; a rollforward of the allowance for credit losses at the portfolio segment level with the ending balances further categorized according to impairment method along with the balance reported in the related financing receivables at period end; additional disclosure of nonaccrual and impaired financing receivables by class as of period end; credit quality and past due/aging information by class as of period end; information surrounding the nature and extent of loan modifications and troubled-debt restructurings and their effect on the allowance for credit losses during the period; and detail of any significant purchases or sales of financing receivables during the period. The increased period-end disclosure requirements become effective for periods ending on or after December 15, 2010, with the exception of the additional disclosures surrounding troubled-debt restructurings which were deferred in December 2010 and will be required for annual and interim reporting periods ending on or after June 15, 2011. The increased disclosures for activity within a reporting period became effective for periods beginning on or after December 15, 2010. The provisions of this update expanded the Company’s current disclosures with respect to the credit quality of our financing receivables in addition to our allowance for loan losses.

Newly Issued But Not Yet Effective Accounting Standards: In April 2011, the FASB issued an accounting standard updated to amend previous guidance with respect to troubled debt restructurings. This updated guidance is designed to assist creditors with determining whether or not a restructuring constitutes a troubled debt restructuring. In particular, additional guidance has been added to help creditors determine whether a concession has been granted and whether a debtor is experiencing financial difficulties. Both of these conditions are required to be met for a restructuring to constitute a troubled debt restructuring. The amendments in the update are effective for the first interim period beginning on or after June 15, 2011, and should be applied retrospectively to the beginning of the annual period of adoption. The provisions of this update are not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

NOTE 3 – EMPLOYEE STOCK COMPENSATION

The Company has two share based compensation plans as described below. Total compensation cost that has been charged against income for both plans was $195 and $9 thousand for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and March 31, 2010. The total income tax benefit and/or recovery was $1 thousand and $4 thousand, respectively.

Recognition and Retention Plan

A Recognition and Retention Plan (“RRP”) provides for the issuance of shares to directors, officers, and employees. Compensation expense is recognized over the vesting period of the shares based on the market value at date of grant. Pursuant to its 2003 stock-based incentive plan, total shares issuable under the plan are 211,600. At March 31, 2011, all 211,600 shares were issued. There were 9,598 shares granted during 2010 under the RRP. These shares vest over a five-year period. There were no shares issued or forfeited in 2011. Additionally, 21,500 one-time inducement restricted shares were granted during 2010 to newly hired executive officers. Of these shares, none were exercised during 2011. These one-time inducement shares vest over a three year period. Compensation expense for the restricted stock awards and inducement awards totaled approximately $32 thousand for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and $6 thousand for the three months ended March 31, 2010.

A summary of changes in the Company’s nonvested shares for the quarter ending March 31, 2011 follows:

 

Nonvested shares

   Shares      Weighted-Average
Grant-Date
Fair-Value
 

Nonvested at January 1, 2011

     12,378       $ 17.67   

Granted

     —           —     

Vested

     860         —     

Forfeited/expired

     —           —     
           

Nonvested at March 31, 2011

     11,518       $ 17.67   
           

A summary of changes in the Company’s nonvested shares for the quarter ending March 31, 2010 follows:

 

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Nonvested shares

   Shares      Weighted-Average
Grant-Date
Fair-Value
 

Nonvested at January 1, 2010

     206,800       $ 17.96   

Granted

     —           —     

Vested

     —           —     

Forfeited/expired

     —           —     
                 

Nonvested at March 31, 2010

     206,800       $ 17.96   
                 

During the fourth quarter of 2010, an additional 21,500 inducement shares were awarded to newly hired executives. These shares were awarded at an average fair value of $11.57. As of March 31, 2011, there was $186 thousand of total unrecognized compensation cost related to 21,500 nonvested inducement awards. The cost is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of less than 3 years.

A summary of changes related to the Company’s nonvested inducement awards for the quarter ending March 31, 2011 follows:

 

     Shares      Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
 

Nonvested at January 1, 2011

     21,500       $ 11.57   

Granted

     —           —     

Vested

     —           —     

Forfeited or expired

     —           —     
                 

Nonvested at March 31, 2011

     21,500       $ 11.57   
                 

Stock Options

A Stock Option Plan (“SOP”) provides for the issuance of options to directors, officers, and employees. The Company adopted the SOP during 2003 under the terms of which 529,000 shares of the Company’s common stock may be awarded. At March 31, 2011, the number of shares available for future awards was 16,500. The options become exercisable in equal installments over a five-year period from the date of grant. The options expire ten years from the date of grant. The fair value of options granted are computed using option pricing models, using the following weighted-average assumptions as of grant date. The fair value of each option award is estimated on the date of grant using a closed form option valuation (Black-Scholes) model that uses the assumptions noted in the table below. Expected volatilities are based on historical volatilities of the Company’s common stock. The Company uses historical data to estimate option exercise and post-vesting termination behavior. The expected term of options granted is based on historical data and represents the period of time that options granted are expected to be outstanding, which takes into account that the options are not transferable. The risk-free interest rate for the expected term of the option is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant. There were no options granted in 2011 or 2010 under the current SOP.

The following table represents stock option activity during the three months ended March 31, 2011:

 

     Shares     Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
 

Outstanding at Beginning of year

     482,386      $ 18.32   

Granted

     —          —     

Exercised

     —          —     

Forfeited or expired

     (482,386     —     
                

Outstanding at end of period

     —          —     
                

Fully vested and expected to vest

     —          —     
                

Options exercisable at March 31, 2011

     —          —     
                

 

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There were 770,000 one-time inducement options issued to newly hired executive officers during 2010 at an average fair value of $11.42. These one-time inducement options were granted outside of the existing SOP plan and are not a part of a new SOP plan. None of these options were exercised during 2011. These options have a three year vesting. As of March 31, 2011, there was $1.7 million of total unrecognized compensation cost related to nonvested stock options. The cost is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of less than 3 years.

The following table represents inducement option activity during the three months ended March 31, 2011:

 

     Shares      Weighted
Average
Exercise Price
 

Outstanding at Beginning of year

     770,000       $ 11.42   

Granted

     —           —     

Exercised

     —           —     

Forfeited or expired

     —           —     
                 

Outstanding at March 31, 2011

     770,000       $ 11.42   
                 

Fully vested and expected to vest

     —           —     
                 

Options exercisable at quarter-end

     —           —     
                 

Information related to the stock option plan during each year follows:

 

     2011      2010      2009  

Intrinsic value of options exercised

   $ —         $ —         $ —     

Cash received from option exercises

     —           —           —     

Tax benefit realized from option exercises

     —           —           —     

The intrinsic value for stock options is calculated based on the exercise price of the underlying awards and the market price of our common stock as of the reporting date. ASC 718 and 505 require the recognition of stock based compensation for the number of awards that are ultimately expected to vest. As a result, recognized stock compensation expense was reduced for estimated forfeitures prior to vesting primarily based on historical annual forfeiture rates of approximately 5% for senior management and the board of directors and 45% for all other employees. Estimated forfeitures will be reassessed in subsequent periods and may change based on new facts and circumstances. The Company recorded stock compensation expense of $164 thousand and $3 thousand as salary and employee benefits expense during the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

Warrants

On November 1, 2010, the Company issued warrants to TCW Shared Opportunity Fund V, L.P. for up to 240,000 shares of non-voting common stock at an exercise price of $11.00 per share, subject to anti-dilutive adjustments. These warrants are exercisable from the date of issuance through November 1, 2015. On November 1, 2010, the Company also issued warrants to COR Advisors LLC to purchase up to 1,395,000 shares of non-voting stock at an exercise price of $11.00 per share, subject to anti-dilutive adjustments. These warrants are exercisable with respect to 95,000 shares on January 1, 2011 and an additional 130,000 shares on the first day of each of the next ten calendar quarterly periods beginning with April 1, 2011, subject to earlier vesting upon a “change in control” of the Company or in the discretion of our board of directors. These warrants are exercisable with respect to each vesting tranche for five years after the tranche’s vesting date. The warrants are exercisable for voting common stock in lieu of non-voting common stock following the transfer of the warrants in a widely disbursed offering or in other limited circumstances.

 

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NOTE 4 – EARNINGS/(LOSS) PER SHARE

Basic earnings/(loss) per share were computed by dividing net income/(loss) by the weighted average number of shares outstanding. Diluted earnings/(loss) per share were computed by dividing net income/(loss) by the weighted average number of shares outstanding, adjusted for the dilutive effect of the outstanding stock options and restricted stock awards. Computations for basic and diluted earnings/(loss) per share are provided below.

 

     Three months ended
March 31,
 
     2011      2010  

Basic

     

Net income/(loss)

   $ 693       $ 875   

Less: Dividends on preferred stock

     —           (241

Less: Imputed dividends

     —           (9
                 

Net income/(loss) available to common shareholders

   $ 693       $ 625   
                 

Weighted average common shares outstanding

     9,661,447         4,181,073   
                 

Basic earnings/(loss) per share

   $ 0.07       $ 0.15   
                 

Diluted

     

Net income/(loss) available to common shareholders

   $ 693       $ 625   
                 

Weighted average common shares outstanding for basic earnings/(loss) per common share

     9,661,447         4,181,073   

Add: Dilutive effects of stock options

     —           —     

Add: Dilutive effects of stock awards

     3,826        —     
                 

Average shares and dilutive potential common shares

     9,665,273         4,181,073   
                 

Diluted earnings/(loss) per common share

   $ 0.07       $ 0.15   
                 

All outstanding options and 1,514 stock awards were not considered in computing diluted earnings per common share for the period ending March 31, 2011 and March 31, 2010 because they were anti-dilutive. They were anti-dilutive since the exercise prices were greater than the average market price of the common stock.

NOTE 5 – FAIR VALUES OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

Fair Value Hierarchy. ASC 820-10 establishes a fair value hierarchy which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The topic describes three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value:

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets that the entity has the ability to access as of the measurement date.

Level 2: Significant other observable inputs other than Level 1 prices such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data.

Level 3: Significant unobservable inputs that reflect a reporting entity’s own assumptions about the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing and asset or liability.

Investment Securities Available for Sale. The fair values of securities available for sale are determined by matrix pricing, which is a mathematical technique widely used in the industry to value debt securities without relying exclusively on quoted prices for the specific securities but rather by relying on the securities’ relationship to other benchmark quoted securities (Level 2 inputs). For securities where quoted prices or market prices of similar securities are not available, fair values are calculated using discounted cash flows or other market indicators (Level 3). The fair values of the Company’s Level 3 securities are by the Company and an independent third-party provider using a discounted cash flow methodology. The methodology uses discount rates that are based upon observed market yields for similar securities. Prepayment speeds are estimated based upon the prepayment history of each bond and a detailed analysis of the underlying collateral. Gross weighted average coupon, geographic concentrations, loan to value, FICO and seasoning are among the different loan attributes that are factored into our prepayment curve. Default rates and severity are estimated based upon geography of the collateral, delinquency, modifications, loan to value ratios, FICO scores, and past performance.

Impaired Loans. The fair value of impaired loans with specific allocations of the allowance for loan losses is generally based on recent real estate appraisals. These appraisals may utilize a single valuation approach or a combination of approaches including comparable sales and the income approach. Adjustments are routinely made in the appraisal process by the appraisers to adjust for

 

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differences between the comparable sales and income data available. Such adjustments are typically significant and result in a Level 3 classification of the inputs for determining fair value.

Real Estate Owned Assets. Real estate owned assets “OREO” are recorded at the lower of cost or fair value less estimated costs to sell at the time of foreclosure. The fair value of real estate owned assets is generally based on recent real estate appraisals adjusted for estimated selling costs. These appraisals may utilize a single valuation approach or a combination of approaches including comparable sales and the income approach. Adjustments are routinely made in the appraisal process by the appraisers to adjust for differences between the comparable sales and income data available. Such adjustments are typically significant and result in a Level 3 classification of the inputs for determining fair value.

Assets and Liabilities Measured on a Recurring and Non Recurring Basis

Available for sale securities are measured at fair value on a recurring basis, impaired loans and real estate owned are measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis.

 

.    Carrying
Value
     Fair Value Measurements at March 31, 2011 Using  
      Quoted Prices in
Active Markets
for Identical
Assets
(Level One)
     Significant Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level Two)
     Significant
Unobservable Inputs
(Level Three)
 

Assets

           

U.S. government sponsored entities and agency securities (recurring)

   $ 16,722       $ —         $ 16,722      $ —     

Private label residential mortgage-backed securities (recurring)

     52,097         —           —           52,097   

Federal National Mortgage Association securities (recurring)

     3         —           3         —     

Government National Mortgage Association securities (recurring)

     4,867         —           4,867         —     

Impaired loans (non recurring)

     22,226         —           —           22,226   

Real estate owned assets (non recurring)

     6,433         —           —           6,433   

The table below presents a reconciliation of all assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) for the period ended March 31, 2011 :

 

     Investment
Securities
Available-for-sale
 

Balance of recurring Level 3 assets at January 1, 2011

   $ 54,246   

Total gains or losses (realized/unrealized):

  

Included in earnings—realized

     319  

Included in earnings—unrealized

     —     

Included in other comprehensive income

     (2,282

Purchases

     20,342   

Sales, issuances and settlements

     (20,528

Net transfers in and/or out of Level 3

     —     

Balance of recurring Level 3 assets at March 31, 2011

   $ 52,097   

There were no significant transfers between Level 1 and Level 2 during the quarter ended March 31, 2011.

Impaired loans with specific valuation allowances are measured for impairment using the fair value of the collateral for collateral dependent loans. At March 31, 2011, impaired loans totaled $22.2 million and had a carrying amount of $18.4 million, net of a valuation allowance of $3.9 million at March 31, 2011. At March 31, 2011, these impaired loans consisted of $13.0 million of single-family residential loans, one land loan totaling $738 thousand and two multi-family loan totaling $8.5 million. Other real estate owned which is measured at the lower of carrying or fair value less costs to sell, had a net had a carrying amount of $6.4 million, which is made up of the outstanding balance of $6.4 million, net of a valuation allowance of $5 thousand at December 31, 2010, resulting in expense of $421 thousand for the quarter ending March 31, 2011.

 

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The table below presents a reconciliation of all assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) for the period ended December 31, 2010:

 

     Carrying
Value
     Fair Value Measurements at December 31, 2010 Using  
      Quoted Prices in
Active Markets
for Identical
Assets
(Level One)
     Significant Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level Two)
     Significant
Unobservable Inputs
(Level Three)
 

Assets

           

U.S. government sponsored entities and agency securities (recurring)

   $ 5,055       $ —         $ 5,055       $ —     

Private label residential mortgage-backed securities (recurring)

     54,246         —           —           54,246   

Federal National Mortgage Association securities (recurring)

     3         —           3         —     

Government National Mortgage Association securities (recurring)

     5,485         —           5,485         —     

Impaired loans (non recurring)

     23,936         —           —           23,936   

Real estate owned assets (non recurring)

     6,562         —           —           6,562   

The table below presents a reconciliation of all assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) for the period ended December 31, 2010:

 

     Investment
Securities
Available-for-sale
 

Balance of recurring Level 3 assets at January 1, 2010

   $ 47,131   

Total gains or losses (realized/unrealized):

     —     

Included in earnings—realized

     —     

Included in earnings—unrealized

     —     

Included in other comprehensive income

     1,590   

Purchases

     29,110   

Sales, issuances and settlements

     (23,585

Net transfers in and/or out of Level 3

     —     

Balance of recurring Level 3 assets at December 31, 2010

     54,246   

There were no significant transfers between Level 1 and Level 2 during 2010.

Impaired loans, with specific valuation allowances are measured for impairment using the fair value of the collateral for collateral dependent loans totaled $23.9 million and had a carrying amount of $19.6 million, net of a valuation allowance of $4.4 million at December 31, 2010. At December 31, 2010, these impaired loans consisted of $15.3 million single-family loans, $8.5 million multi-family loans and one HELOC totaling $108 thousand. During the year ended December 31, 2010, a provision of $4.4 million was made for these loans, net of charge-offs previously provided.

Other real estate owned which is measured at the lower of carrying or fair value less costs to sell, had a net had a carrying amount of $6.5 million, which is made up of the outstanding balance of $9.9 million, net of a valuation allowance of $3.4 million at December 31, 2009, resulting in expense of $2.7 million for the year ending December 31, 2010.

In accordance with ASC 825-10, the carrying amounts and estimated fair values of financial instruments, at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 were as follows:

 

     March 31, 2011      December 31, 2010  
     Carrying
Amount
     Estimated
Fair

Value
     Carrying
Amount
     Estimated
Fair

Value
 

Financial assets

           

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 28,683       $ 28,683       $ 59,100       $ 59,100   

Securities available-for-sale

     73,689         73,689         64,790         64,790   

FHLB stock

     7,993         N/A         8,323         N/A   

 

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Table of Contents
     March 31, 2011      December 31, 2010  
     Carrying
Amount
     Estimated
Fair Value
     Carrying
Amount
     Estimated
Fair Value
 

Loans receivable, net

     670,579         678,615         678,175         690,229   

Real estate owned, net

     6,433         6,433         6,562         6,562   

Accrued interest receivable

     3,465         3,465         3,531         3,531   

Financial liabilities

           

Deposits

   $ 634,410       $ 636,805       $ 646,308       $ 628,319   

Advances from the FHLB

     60,000         60,514         75,000         75,959   

Accrued interest payable

     195         195         225         225   

The methods and assumptions used to estimate fair value are described as follows:

Carrying amount is the estimated fair value for cash and cash equivalents, interest bearing deposits in other financial institutions, accrued interest receivable and payable, demand deposits, short-term debt, and variable rate loans or deposits that re-price frequently and fully. The methods for determining the fair values for securities were described previously. For fixed rate loans or deposits and for variable rate loans or deposits with infrequent re-pricing or re-pricing limits, fair value is based on discounted cash flows using current market rates applied to the estimated life and credit risk. Fair value of debt is based on current rates for similar financing. It was not practicable to determine the fair value of FHLB stock due to restrictions placed on its transferability. The fair value of off-balance-sheet items is not considered material (or is based on the current fees or cost that would be charged to enter into or terminate such arrangements).

NOTE 6 – SECURITIES

The following table summarizes the amortized cost and fair value of the available-for-sale securities investment securities portfolio at March 31, 2011 and the corresponding amounts of gross unrealized gains and losses recognized in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) were as follows:

 

     Amortized
Cost
     Gross
Unrealized
Gains
     Gross
Unrealized
Losses
    Fair
Value
 

2011

          

Available-for sale

          

U.S. government-sponsored entities and agencies

   $ 16,752       $ 6       $ (36 )   $ 16,722   

Private label residential mortgage-backed securities

     50,069         2,189         (161     52,097   

Federal National Mortgage Association

     3         —           —          3   

Government National Mortgage Association

     4,780         87         —          4,867   
                                  

Total securities available for sale

   $ 71,604       $ 2,282       $ (197   $ 73,689   
                                  

 

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Table of Contents
     Amortized
Cost
     Gross
Unrealized
Gains
     Gross
Unrealized
Losses
    Fair
Value
 

2010

          

Available-for sale

          

U.S. government-sponsored entities and agencies

   $ 5,036       $ 19       $ —        $ 5,055   

Private label residential mortgage-backed securities

     49,933         4,545         (232     54,246   

Federal National Mortgage Association

     3         —           —          3   

Government National Mortgage Association

     5,402         84         —          5,486   
                                  

Total securities available for sale

   $ 60,374       $ 4,648       $ (232   $ 64,790   
                                  

The amortized cost and fair value of the investment securities portfolio are shown by expected maturity. Expected maturities may differ from contractual maturities if borrowers have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without call or prepayment penalties.

 

     March 31, 2011  
     Amortized
Cost
     Fair
Value
 

Maturity

     

Available-for-sale

     

Within one year

   $ 5,010       $ 5,016   

One to five years

     11,745         11,709   

Five to ten years

     —           —     

Private label residential mortgage backed and agency securities

     54,849         56,964   
                 

Total

   $ 71,604       $ 73,689   
                 

At quarter-ending March 31, 2011 and March 31, 2010, there were no holdings of securities of any one issuer, other than the U.S. Government and its agencies, in an amount greater than 10% of shareholders’ equity.

The following table summarizes the investment securities with unrealized losses at March 31, 2011 by aggregated major security type and length of time in a continuous unrealized loss position:

 

     Less Than 12 Months     12 Months or Longer     Total  
     Fair
Value
     Unrealized
Losses
    Fair
Value
     Unrealized
Losses
    Fair
Value
     Unrealized
Losses
 

Available-for-sale

               

U.S. government-sponsored entities and agencies

   $ 11,706       $ (36   $ —         $ —        $ 11,706       $ (36

Private label residential mortgage-backed securities

     8,035         (106     40,515         (55     12,086         (161
                                                   

Total available-for-sale

   $ 19,741       $ (142   $ 40,515       $ (55   $ 23,792       $ (197
                                                   

The following table summarizes the investment securities with unrealized losses at December 31, 2010 by aggregated major security type and length of time in a continuous unrealized loss position:

 

     Less Than 12 Months     12 Months or Longer      Total  
     Fair
Value
     Unrealized
Losses
    Fair
Value
     Unrealized
Losses
     Fair
Value
     Unrealized
Losses
 

Available-for-sale

                

Private label residential mortgage-backed securities

   $ 11,547       $ (232   $ —         $ —         $ 11,547       $ (232
                                                    

Total available-for-sale

   $ 11,547       $ (232   $ —         $ —         $ 11,547       $ (232
                                                    

Other-Than-Temporary-Impairment. Management evaluates securities for other-than-temporary impairment (“OTTI”) on a quarterly basis, and more frequently when economic or market conditions warrant such an evaluation. The investment securities portfolio is evaluated for OTTI by segregating the portfolio into two general segments and applying the appropriate OTTI model. Investment securities classified as available for sale or held-to-maturity are generally evaluated for OTTI under Statement of Financial Accounting Standards ASC 320, Accounting for Certain Investments in Debt and Equity Securities. However, certain purchased beneficial interests, including non-agency mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, and collateralized debt obligations, that had credit ratings at the time of purchase of below AA are evaluated using the model outlined in ASC 325, Recognition of Interest Income and Impairment on Purchased Beneficial Interests and Beneficial Interests that Continue to be Held by a Transfer in Securitized Financial Assets.

In determining OTTI under the ASC 320 model, management considers many factors, including: (1) the length of time and the extent to which the fair value has been less than cost, (2) the financial condition and near-term prospects of the issuer, (3) whether the

 

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Table of Contents

market decline was affected by macroeconomic conditions, and (4) whether the entity has the intent to sell the debt security or more likely than not will be required to sell the debt security before its anticipated recovery. The assessment of whether an other-than-temporary decline exists involves a high degree of subjectivity and judgment and is based on the information available to management at a point in time.

The second segment of the portfolio uses the OTTI guidance provided by ASC 325 that is specific to purchased beneficial interests that, on the purchase date, were rated below AA. Under the ASC 325 model, the Company compares the present value of the remaining cash flows as estimated at the preceding evaluation date to the current expected remaining cash flows. An OTTI is deemed to have occurred if there has been an adverse change in the remaining expected future cash flows.

When OTTI occurs under either model, the amount of the OTTI recognized in earnings depends on whether an entity intends to sell the security or it is more likely than not it will be required to sell the security before recovery of its amortized cost basis, less any current-period credit loss. If an entity intends to sell or it is more likely than not it will be required to sell the security before recovery of its amortized cost basis, less any current-period credit loss, the OTTI shall be recognized in earnings equal to the entire difference between the investment’s amortized cost basis and its fair value at the balance sheet date. If an entity does not intend to sell the security and it is not more likely than not that the entity will be required to sell the security before recovery of its amortized cost basis less any current-period loss, the OTTI shall be separated into the amount representing the credit loss and the amount related to all other factors. The amount of the total OTTI related to the credit loss is determined based on the present value of cash flows expected to be collected and is recognized in earnings. The amount of the total OTTI related to other factors is recognized in other comprehensive income, net of applicable taxes. The previous amortized cost basis less the OTTI recognized in earnings becomes the new amortized cost basis of the investment.

As of March 31, 2011, the Company’s security portfolio consisted of twenty-seven securities, six of which were in an unrealized loss position. The unrealized losses are related to the Company’s private label residential mortgage-backed securities and the US government sponsored entities and agencies securities as discussed below.

The Company’s private label residential mortgage-backed securities that are in a loss position had a market value of $12.1 million with unrealized losses of approximately $161 thousand at March 31, 2011. These non-agency private label residential mortgage-backed securities were rated AAA at purchase and are not within the scope of ASC 325. The Company monitors to insure it has adequate credit support and as of March 31, 2011, the Company believes there is no OTTI and does not have the intent to sell these securities and it is likely that it will not be required to sell the securities before their anticipated recovery. Of the $73.7 million securities portfolio, $55.8 million were rated AAA or AA and $17.9 million were rated between B- to BBB based on the most recent credit rating as of March 31, 2011.

During the quarter ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, the Company determined that no securities were other-than-temporarily impaired due to current market conditions.

NOTE 7 – LOANS

Loans receivable consist of the following:

 

     2011     2010  

One-to four-family- fully amortizing

   $ 189,174      $ 177,360   

One-to four-family- negatively amortizing

     29,389        29,733   

One-to four-family- interest only

     122,858        147,914   

Multi-family

     17,112        17,207   

Condominium conversions

     11,675        12,038   

Commercial real estate- secured

     34,080        32,820   

Commercial real estate- unsecured

     6,215        6,215   

Land

     8,985        10,660   

Real estate secured-first trust deeds (Green acct)

     221,168        214,509   

Real estate secured-second trust deeds (Green acct)

     9,037        9,260   

Commercial real estate secured (Green acct)

     14,263        13,749   

Multi-family (Green acct)

     3,808        3,795   

Land (Green acct)

     1,460        4,168   

HELOCs

     8,994        9,383   

Other consumer

     1,548        1,583   

Auto

     50        65   

Commercial non-real estate

     904        529   
                

Total

     680,720        690,988   

Allowance for loan losses

     (11,905     (14,637

Net deferred loan costs

     1,764        1,824   
                

Loans receivable, net

   $ 670,579      $ 678,175   
                

 

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Table of Contents

At March 31, 2011, the Company has a total of $402.9 million in interest only mortgage loans (including Green Account loans) and $31.6 million in loans with potential for negative amortization. At December 31, 2010, the Company has a total of $423.4 million in interest only mortgage loans (including Green Account loans) and $29.7 million in loans with potential for negative amortization. These loans pose a potentially higher credit risk because of the lack of principal amortization and potential for negative amortization. However, management believes the risk is mitigated through the Company’s loan terms and underwriting standards, including its policies on loan-to-value ratios.

Activity in the allowance for loan losses is summarized as follows:

 

     2011     2010     2009  

Balance at beginning of year

   $ 14,637      $ 13,079      $ 18,286   

Loans charged off

     (2,735     (7,531     (22,505

Recoveries of loans previously charged off

     3        132        2   

Provision for loan losses

     —          8,957        17,296   
                        

Balance at end of year

   $ 11,905      $ 14,637      $ 13,079   
                        

Loans charged off in 2011 primarily included specific valuation charge offs for various one to-four- family properties and one land loan totaling $2.7 million.

 

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The following table presents the activity in the allowance for loan losses and the recorded investment in loans by portfolio segment and is based on impairment method as of March 31, 2011:

 

     One-to
four-
Family
Fully
Amortizing
     Negatively
Amortizing
One-to
four-
Family
    Interest
Only
One-to
four-
Family
    Multi-
Family
     Condominium
Conversions
    Commercial      Unsecured
Commercial
     Land  

Allowance for loan losses:

                    

Balance as of December 31, 2010

   $ 2,445       $ 923      $ 4,164      $ 1,854       $ 528      $ 236       $ 47       $ 208   

Charge-offs

     —           —          1,053        —           —          —           —           1,674   

Recoveries

     —           —          —          —           —          —           —        

Provision

     312         (11     (421     —           (33     9            1,690   
                                                                    

Balance as of March 31, 2011

   $ 2,757       $ 912      $ 2,690      $ 1,854       $ 495      $ 245       $ 47       $ 224   
                                                                    

Individually evaluated for impairment

     560         70        842        1,811         272        —           —           169   

Collectively evaluated for impairment

     2,197         842        1,848        43         223        245         47         55   
                                                                    

Total ending allowance balance

   $ 2,757       $ 912      $ 2,690      $ 1,854       $ 495      $ 245       $ 47       $ 224   
                                                                    

Loans:

                    

Loans individually evaluated for impairment

   $ 5,068       $ 2,279      $ 14,592      $ —         $ 10,458      $ 1,385       $ —         $ 4,373   

Loans collectively evaluated for impairment

     184,106         27,110        108,267        17,112         1,217        32,694         6,215         4,612   
                                                                    

Total ending loans balance

   $ 189,174       $ 29,389      $ 122,859      $ 17,112       $ 11,675      $ 34,079       $ 6,215       $ 8,985   
                                                                    

 

     HELOCS     Green-
1st Trust
Deeds
    Green-
2nd  Trust
Deeds
    Green-
Multi-1st
TD’s
     Green-
Land
    Green-
Comm-1st
TDs
     Auto     Other
Consumer
     Commercial-
non real
estate
     TOTAL  

Allowance for loan losses:

                        

Balance as of December 31, 2010

   $ 274      $ 2,043      $ 258      $ 9       $ 859      $ 96       $ 3      $ 73       $ 4       $ 14,024   

Charge-offs

     —          —          —          —           —          —           —          8         —           2,735   

Recoveries

     3        —          —          —           —          —           —          —           —           3   

Provision

     (119     (505     (70     1         (823     4         (1     8         2         43   
                                                                                    

Balance as of March 31, 2011

   $ 158      $ 1,538      $ 188      $ 10       $ 36      $ 100       $ 2      $ 73       $ 6       $ 11,335   
                                                                                    

Allowance for loans losses:

                        

Ending allowance balance attributable to loans

   $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —         $ —        $ —         $ —        $ —         $ —         $ —     

Individually evaluated for impairment

     —          132        —          —           —          —           —          —           —           3,856   

Collectively evaluated for impairment

     158        1,406        188        10         36        100         2        73         6         7,479   

Acquired with deteriorated credit quality

     —          —          —          —           —          —           —          —           —           —     
                                                                                    

Total ending loans balance

   $ 158      $ 1,538      $ 188      $ 10       $ 36      $ 100       $ 2      $ 73       $ 6       $ 11,335   
                                                                                    

Loans:

                        

Loans individually evaluated for impairment

   $ 1,101      $ 9,222      $ —        $ —         $ —        $ 901       $ —        $ 2       $ 38       $ 49,419   

Loans collectively evaluated for impairment

     7,893        211,946        9,038        3,808         1,460        13,361         50        1,546         866         631,301   
                                                                                    

Total ending loans balance

   $ 8,994      $ 221,168      $ 9,038      $ 3,808       $ 1,460      $ 14,262       $ 50      $ 1,548       $ 904       $ 680,720   
                                                                                    

 

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The following table presents the activity in the allowance for loan losses and the recorded investment in loans by portfolio segment and is based on impairment method as of December 31, 2010:

 

    One-to
four-
Family
Fully
Amortizing
    Negatively
Amortizing
One-to
four-
Family
    Interest
Only
One-to
four-
Family
    Multi-
Family
    Condominium
Conversions
    Commercial     Unsecured
Commercial
    Land  

Allowance for loans losses:

               

Ending allowance balance attributable to loans

  $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —     

Individually evaluated for impairment

    114        69        1,677        1,811        272        —          —          —     

Collectively evaluated for impairment

    2,331        854        2,487        43        256        236        47        208   
                                                               

Total ending allowance balance

  $ 2,445      $ 923      $ 4,164      $ 1,854      $ 528      $ 236      $ 47      $ 208   
                                                               

Loans:

               

Loans individually evaluated for impairment

  $ 3,214      $ 2,418      $ 14,191      $ —        $ 10,466      $ 1,394      $ —        $ 9,715   

Loans collectively evaluated for impairment

    174,147        27,315        133,722        17,207        1,572        31,426        6,215        945   
                                                               

Total ending loans balance

  $ 177,361      $ 29,733      $ 147,913      $ 17,207      $ 12,038      $ 32,820      $ 6,215      $ 10,660   
                                                               

 

    HELOCS     Green-
1st Trust
Deeds
    Green-
2nd  Trust
Deeds
    Green-
Multi-1st
TD’s
    Green-
Land
    Green-
Comm-1st
TDs
    Auto     Other
Consumer
    Commercial-
non real
estate
    TOTAL  

Allowance for loans losses:

                   

Ending allowance balance attributable to loans

  $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —     

Individually evaluated for impairment

    44        375        —          —          —          —          —          —            4,362   

Collectively evaluated for impairment

    230        1,668        258        9        859        96        3        73        4        9,662   

Acquired with deteriorated credit quality

    —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —     

Total ending allowance balance

  $ 274      $ 2,043      $ 258      $ 9      $ 859      $ 96      $ 3      $ 73      $ 4      $ 14,024   
                                                                               

Loans:

                   

Loans individually evaluated for impairment

  $ 108      $ 7,473      $ —        $ —        $ —        $ 916      $ —        $ 5      $ 14      $ 49,915   

Loans collectively evaluated for impairment

    9,275        207,036        9,260        3,795        4,168        12,833        65        1,578        515        641,073   
                                                                               

Total ending loans balance

  $ 9,383      $ 214,509      $ 9,260      $ 3,795      $ 4,168      $ 13,749      $ 65      $ 1,583      $ 529      $ 690,988   
                                                                               

 

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Table of Contents

Individually impaired loans were as follows:

 

     March 2011      December 2010  

Year-end loans with no allocated allowance for loan losses

   $ 31,598       $ 25,979   

Year-end loans with allocated allowance for loan losses

     22,226         23,936   
                 

Total

     53,824         49,915   
                 

Amount of the allowance for loan losses allocated

   $ 3,857       $ 4,363   
                 

 

     2011      2010      2009  

Average of individually impaired loans during the period

   $ 24,019       $ 33,662       $ 47,214   

Interest income recognized during impairment

     112         1,785         820   

Cash-basis interest income recognized

     90         1,555         595   

The following table presents loans individually evaluated for impairment by class of loans as of March 31, 2011. The recorded investment included represents customer balances net of any partial charge-offs recognized on the loans, net of any deferred fees and costs and accrued interest.

 

     Unpaid
Principal
Balance
     Recorded
Investment
     Allowance
for Loan
Losses
Allocated
     Average
Recorded
Investment
YTD
     Interest
Income
Recognized
YTD
 

With no related allowance recorded:

              

One-to four-family

   $ 11,455       $ 11,992       $ —         $ 12,676       $ 41   

Multi-family

     —           —           —           —           —     

Commercial real estate

     1,385         1,385         —           1,389         12   

Land

     8,041         10,306         —           8,130         —     

Construction loans

     —           —           —           —           —     

Real estate secured-first trust deeds (Green acct)

     8,675         8,693         —           8,662         29   

Real estate secured-second trust deeds (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           —     

Commercial real estate (Green acct)

     901         905         —           910         10   

Multi-family (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           —     

Land (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           —     

Consumer

     1,103         1,120         —           1,109         1   

Commercial business

     38         38         —           47         —     

With an allowance recorded:

              

One-to four-family

     10,483         9,258         1,472         10,509         —     

Multi-family

     10,458         8,523         2,084         10,552         19   

Commercial real estate

     —           —           —           —           —     

Land

     738         580         169         741         —     

Construction loans

     —           —           —           —           —     

Real estate secured-first trust deeds (Green acct)

     547         415         132         548         —     

Real estate secured-second trust deeds (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           —     

Commercial real estate (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           —     

Multi-family (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           —     

Land (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           —     

Consumer

     —           —           —           —           —     

Commercial business

     —           —           —           —           —     
                                            

Total

   $ 53,824       $ 53,220       $ 3,857       $ 55,273       $ 112   
                                            

The following table presents loans individually evaluated for impairment by class of loans as of December 31, 2010:

 

     Unpaid
Principal
Balance
     Recorded
Investment
     Allowance
for Loan
Losses
Allocated
     Average
Recorded
Investment
YTD
     Interest
Income
Recognized
YTD
 

With no related allowance recorded:

              

One-to four-family

   $ 7,807       $ 8,196       $ —         $ 9,537       $ 131   

Multi-family

     —           —           —           32         3   

Commercial real estate

     1,394         1,398         —           1,520         27   

Land

     9,715         10,625         —           4,952         171   

Construction loans

     —           —           —           —           —     

Real estate secured-first trust deeds (Green acct)

     6,127         6,447         —           7,174         142   

Real estate secured-second trust deeds (Green acct)

     —           —           —           161         —     

Commercial real estate (Green acct)

     916         961         —           681         —     

Multi-family (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           —     

Land (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           —     

Consumer

     5         5         —           15         2   

Commercial business

     15         16         —           25         1   

With an allowance recorded:

              

One-to four-family

     12,016         10,369         1,860         14,337         196   

Multi-family

     10,466         8,421         2,084         8,696         808   

Commercial real estate

     —           —           —           —           —     

Land

     —           —           —           7,240         250   

Construction loans

     —           —           —           —           —     

Real estate secured-first trust deeds (Green acct)

     1,346         1,046         375         2,078         41   

Real estate secured-second trust deeds (Green acct)

     —           —           —           8         —     

Commercial real estate (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           —     

Multi-family (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           —     

Land (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           —     

Consumer

     108         74         44         100         14   

Commercial business

     —           —           —           —           —     
                                            

Total

   $ 49,915       $ 47,558       $ 4,363       $ 56,556       $ 1,786   
                                            

Nonaccrual loans and loans past due 90 days still on accrual were as follows:

 

     2011      2010  

Loans past due over 90 days still on accrual

   $ —         $ —     

Nonaccrual loans

   $ 38,357       $ 38,830   

 

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Table of Contents

Nonaccrual loans consist of the following:

 

     March 2011      December 2010  

One-to-four-family

   $ 17,689       $ 16,921   

Multi-family

     5,450         8,501   

Land

     8,779         9,715   

Real estate secured-first trust deeds (Green acct)

     5,446         3,691   

Consumer

     993         2   
                 

Total

   $ 38,357       $ 38,830   
                 

Of the $38.4 million in nonaccrual loans, $15.5 million represents trouble debt restructured loans that are nonaccrual due to the fact that these loans are currently in the first six months of payment.

Troubled Debt Restructurings:

The Company has allocated $2.4 million and $3.1 million of specific reserves to customers whose loan terms have been modified in troubled debt restructurings as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively. The Company did not have any commitments to lend additional amounts to customers with outstanding loans that are classified as troubled debt restructurings at March 31, 2011 or December 31, 2010.

Credit Quality Indicators:

The Company categorizes loans into risk categories based on relevant information about the ability of borrowers to service their debt such as: current financial information, historical payment experience, credit documentation, public information, and current economic trends, among other factors. The Company performs an historical loss analysis that is combined with a comprehensive loan to value analysis to analyze the associated risks in the current loan portfolio. The Company analyzes loans individually by classifying the loans as to credit risk. This analysis includes all loans delinquent over 60 days and non-homogenous loans such as commercial and commercial real estate loans. Classification of problem single family residential loans is performed on a monthly basis while analysis of non-homogenous loans is performed on a quarterly basis. The Company uses the following definitions for risk ratings:

Special Mention. Loans classified as special mention have a potential weakness that deserves management’s close attention. If left uncorrected, these potential weaknesses may result in deterioration of the repayment prospects for the loan or of the institution’s credit position at some future date.

Substandard. Loans classified as substandard are inadequately protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or of the collateral pledged, if any. Loans so classified have a well-defined weakness or weaknesses that jeopardize the liquidation of the debt. They are characterized by the distinct possibility that the institution will sustain some loss if the deficiencies are not corrected.

Doubtful. Loans classified as doubtful have all the weaknesses inherent in those classified as substandard, with the added characteristic that the weaknesses make collection or liquidation in full, on the basis of currently existing facts, conditions, and values, highly questionable and improbable.

Loans not meeting the criteria above that are analyzed individually as part of the above described process are considered to be pass rated loans. Loans not rated are evaluated based on payment history.

 

     Pass      Special
Mention
     Substandard      Doubtful      Not Rated      TOTAL  

Real Estate:

                                         

One-to four-family

   $ 25,563       $ 16,936       $ 16,668       $ —         $ 282,255       $ 341,422   

Multi-family

     969         —           10,458         —           17,360         28,787   

Commercial real estate

     6,977         —           1,385         —           31,932         40,294   

Land

     —           334         4,039         —           4,612         8,985   

Construction

     —           —           —           —           —           —     

Real estate secured-first trust deeds (Green acct)

     15,030         9,082         6,290         —           190,766         221,168   

Real estate secured-second trust deeds (Green acct)

     946         863         —           —           7,228         9,037   

Commercial real estate (Green acct)

     —           3,766         901         —           9,596         14,263   

Multi-family (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           3,808         3,808   

Land (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           1,460         1,460   

Consumer

     478         117         993         —           9,004         10,592   

Commercial business

     9         523         —           —           372         904   
                                                     

Total

   $  49,972       $  31,621       $  40,734       $  —      $  558,393       $  680,720   
                                                     

 

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Table of Contents

The following table presents the aging of the principal balances in past due loans as of March 31, 2011 by class of loans:

 

     30-59 Days
Past Due
     60-89 Days
Past Due
     Greater than
90 Days

Past Due
     Total
Past Due
     Current      Total
Financing
Receivables
     Total Carrying
Amount > 90
Days and
Accruing
     Considered
Current That
Have been
Modified in
Previous Year
 

March 31, 2011

                       

One-to four-family

   $ 16,912       $ —         $ 12,757       $ 29,669       $ 311,752       $ 341,421       $ —         $ 2,902   

Multi-family

     1,956         —           5,412         7,368         21,419         28,787         —           3,090   

Non-Residential

     659         —           —           659         39,636         40,295         —           —     

Land

     —           —           8,445         8,445         540         8,985         —           —     

Construction loans

     —           —           —           —           —           —           —           —     

Real estate secured-first trust deeds (Green acct)

     5,441         1,000         2,765         9,206         211,962         221,168         —           798   

Real estate secured-second trust deeds (Green acct)

     698         —           —           698         8,339         9,037         —           —     

Commercial real estate (Green acct)

     —           485         —           485         13,778         14,263         —           —     

Multi-family (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           3,808         3,808         —           —     

Land (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           1,460         1,460         —           —     

Consumer

     2         —           992         995         9,597         10,592         —           110   

Commercial business

     —           —           —           —           904         904         —           —     
                                                                       

Total

   $ 25,668       $ 1,485       $ 30,371       $ 57,525       $ 623,195       $ 680,720         —         $ 6,900   
                                                                       

The following table displays the Company’s non-performing and performing substandard loan portfolio. *The Impaired TDR loan on accrual status has reverted back to the loans original terms and has adequate debt service coverage.

 

     # of Loans      Balance  

Substandard Loans:

     

Non-Performing

     35       $ 23,213   

Performing:

     

TDR on non-accrual (not yet made 6 consecutive payments)

     6         3,312   

Impaired TDR on accrual

     1         3,014

Rated Sub due to borrower relationship to distress loan

     13         7,614   
                 

Total Performing:

     20       $ 13,939   
                 

The following table presents the aging of the principal balances in past due loans as of December 31, 2010 by class of loans:

 

     30-59 Days
Past Due
     60-89 Days
Past Due
     Greater than
90 Days

Past Due
     Total
Past Due
     Current      Total
Financing
Receivables
     Total
Carrying
Amount >  90
Days and
Accruing
     Considered
Current That
Have been
Modified in
Previous Year
 

December 2010

                       

One-to four-family

   $ 10,653       $ 7,189       $ 13,518       $ 31,360       $ 323,647       $ 355,007       $ —         $ 2,903   

Multi-family

     540         —           —           540         28,705         29,245         —           —     

Non-Residential

     665         —           —           665         38,370         39,035         —           —     

Land

     2,538         —           7,582         10,120         540         10,660         —           —     

Construction loans

     —           —           —           —           —           —           —           —     

Real estate secured-first trust deeds (Green acct)

     6,472         2,756         —           9,228         205,281         214,509         —           799   

Real estate secured-second trust deeds (Green acct)

     698         —           —           698         8,562         9,260         —           —     

Commercial real estate (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —           13,749         13,749         —           —     

Multi-family (Green acct)

     —           —           —           —