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EX-21 - ServisFirst Bancshares, Inc.v213846_ex21.htm
EX-24 - ServisFirst Bancshares, Inc.v213846_ex24.htm
EX-32.2 - ServisFirst Bancshares, Inc.v213846_ex32-2.htm
EX-31.2 - ServisFirst Bancshares, Inc.v213846_ex31-2.htm
EX-32.1 - ServisFirst Bancshares, Inc.v213846_ex32-1.htm
EX-31.1 - ServisFirst Bancshares, Inc.v213846_ex31-1.htm
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-K
 
(Mark One)
 
R
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2010

or

 
£
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 (NO FEE REQUIRED)
For the transition period from ____________ to ____________

Commission File Number 0-53149
 
 
SERVISFIRST BANCSHARES, INC.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

Delaware
26-0734029
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
(I.R.S. Employer
Incorporation or Organization)
Identification No.)
   
850 Shades Creek Parkway, Suite 200
35209
Birmingham, Alabama
(Zip Code)
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
 

(205) 949-0302
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
NONE
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
Common Stock, par value $.001 per share
(Titles of Class)

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
Yes  ¨     No  R
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.
Yes  ¨     No  R
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes R   No ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
Yes  ¨     No  £
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See definitions of “larger accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  (Check one):

Large accelerated filer ¨
Accelerated filer R
   
Non-accelerated filer  ¨
Smaller reporting company ¨
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company Yes  ¨     No  R

As of June 30, 2010, the aggregate market value of the voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, based on a price of $25.00 per share of Common Stock, was $122,542,000.

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock as of the latest practicable date: the number of shares outstanding as of February 28, 2011, of the registrant’s only issued and outstanding class of common stock, its $.001 per share par value common stock, was 5,527,482.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission in connection with its 2010 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference in Part III of this annual report on Form 10-K.

 
 

 
SERVISFIRST BANCSHARES, INC.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FORM 10-K

DECEMBER 31, 2010

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
1
   
PART I
2
   
ITEM 1.  BUSINESS
2
ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS
26
ITEM 1B.  UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
35
ITEM 2.   PROPERTIES
35
ITEM 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
35
ITEM 4.  SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS
36
   
PART II
36
   
ITEM 5.  MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
36
ITEM 6.  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
39
ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
41
ITEM 7A.  QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
63
ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
65
ITEM 9.  CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE
112
ITEM 9A.  CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
112
ITEM 9B.   OTHER INFORMATION
113
   
PART III
113
   
ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
113
ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
114
ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS
114
ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE
114
ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES
114
   
PART IV
115
   
ITEM 15.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND EXHIBITS
115
   
SIGNATURES
118
   
EXHIBIT INDEX
119

 
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CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
 
Some of our statements contained in this Form 10-K, including matters discussed under the caption “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” beginning on page 41, are “forward-looking statements” that are based upon our current expectations and projections about future events.  Forward-looking statements relate to future events or our future financial performance and include statements about the competitiveness of the banking industry, potential regulatory obligations, our entrance and expansion into other markets, our other business strategies and other statements that are not historical facts. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of performance or results.  When we use words like “may,” “plan,” “contemplate,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “intend,” “continue,” “expect,” “project,” “predict,” “estimate,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “will,” and similar expressions, you should consider them as identifying forward-looking statements, although we may use other phrasing.  These forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties and are based on our beliefs and assumptions, and on the information available to us at the time that these disclosures were prepared and may not be realized due to a variety of factors, including, but not limited to, the following:

 
the effects of the current economic recession and the possible continued deterioration of the United States economy, particularly deterioration of the economy in Alabama and the communities in which we operate;

 
the effects of continued deleveraging of United States citizens and businesses;

 
the current financial and banking crisis resulting in the massive devaluation of the assets and shareholders’ equity of many of the United States’ financial and banking institutions;

 
the effects of continued compression of the residential housing industry, the continued recession and recovery and rising unemployment;

 
credit risks, including credit risks resulting from the devaluation of collateralized debt obligations (CDOs) and/or structured investment vehicles to which we currently have no direct exposure;

 
the effects of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, including its Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and other governmental monetary and fiscal policies and legislative and regulatory changes;

 
the effect of changes in interest rates on the level and composition of deposits, loan demand and the values of loan collateral, securities and interest sensitive assets and liabilities;

 
the effects of terrorism and efforts to combat it;

 
the effects of competition from other commercial banks, thrifts, mortgage banking firms, consumer finance companies, credit unions, securities brokerage firms, insurance companies, money market and other mutual funds and other financial institutions operating in our market area and elsewhere, including institutions operating regionally, nationally and internationally, together with competitors offering banking products and services by mail, telephone and the Internet;

 
the effect of any merger, acquisition or other transaction to which we or our subsidiary may from time to time be a party, including our ability to successfully integrate any business that we acquire; and

 
failure of our assumptions underlying the establishment of our loan loss reserves.
 
All written or oral forward-looking statements attributable to us are expressly qualified in their entirety by this Cautionary Note.  Our actual results may differ significantly from those we discuss in these forward-looking statements.  For certain other factors, risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from estimates and projections contained in these forward-looking statements, please read the “Risk Factors” in Item 1A beginning on page 26.
 
 
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PART I
 
ITEM 1.  BUSINESS
 
Overview

We are a bank holding company within the meaning of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama. Through our wholly-owned subsidiary bank, we operate nine full service banking offices located in Jefferson, Shelby, Madison, Montgomery and Houston Counties in the metropolitan statistical areas (“MSAs”) of Birmingham-Hoover, Huntsville, Montgomery and Dothan, Alabama, and are in the process of establishing a new banking office in the Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent, Florida MSA (Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties).  As of December 31, 2010, we had total assets of approximately $1.94 billion, total loans of approximately $1.39 billion, total deposits of approximately $1.76 billion and total stockholders’ equity of approximately $117.1 million.

We were originally incorporated as a Delaware corporation in August 2007 for the purpose of acquiring all of the common stock of ServisFirst Bank, an Alabama banking corporation (separately referred to herein as the “Bank”), which was formed on April 28, 2005 and commenced operations on May 2, 2005.  On November 29, 2007, we became the sole shareholder of the Bank by virtue of a plan of reorganization and agreement of merger pursuant to which (i) a wholly-owned subsidiary formed for the purpose of the reorganization was merged with and into the Bank, with the Bank surviving, and (ii) each shareholder of the Bank exchanged their shares of the Bank’s common stock for an equal number of shares of our common stock.

We were organized to facilitate the Bank’s ability to serve its customers’ requirements for financial services.  The holding company structure provides flexibility for expansion of our banking business through the possible acquisition of other financial institutions, the provision of additional banking-related services which the traditional commercial bank may not provide under current law, and additional financing alternatives such as the issuance of trust preferred securities.  We have no current plans to acquire any operating subsidiaries in addition to the Bank, but we may make acquisitions in the future if we deem them to be in the best interest of our stockholders.  Any such acquisitions would be subject to applicable regulatory approvals and requirements.

Our principal business is to accept deposits from the public and to make loans and other investments.  Our principal sources of funds for loans and investments are demand, time, savings and other deposits (including negotiable orders of withdrawal, or NOW accounts) and the amortization and prepayment of loans and borrowings.  Our principal sources of income are interest and fees collected on loans, interest and dividends collected on other investments, and service charges.  Our principal expenses are interest paid on savings and other deposits (including NOW accounts), interest paid on our other borrowings, employee compensation, office expenses and other overhead expenses.

We are headquartered at 850 Shades Creek Parkway, Suite 200, Birmingham, Alabama 35209 (Jefferson County).  In addition to the Jefferson County headquarters, the Bank currently operates through three offices in the Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama MSA (two offices in Jefferson County and one office in North Shelby County), two offices in the Huntsville, Alabama MSA (Madison County), two offices in the Montgomery, Alabama MSA (Montgomery County) and two offices in the Dothan, Alabama MSA (Houston County) and are in the process of establishing an office in the Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent, Florida MSA (Escambia County).  These MSAs constitute our primary service areas, and we also serve certain areas adjacent to our primary service areas.

Markets

Service Areas

Birmingham is located in central Alabama approximately 90 miles northwest of Montgomery, Alabama, 146 miles west of Atlanta, Georgia, and 148 miles southwest of Chattanooga, Tennessee.  Birmingham is intersected by U.S. Interstates 20, 59 and 65.  Jefferson County includes the major business area of downtown Birmingham.  North Shelby County also encompasses a growing business community and affluent residential areas.  With two offices in Jefferson County and one in north Shelby County, we believe we are well positioned to access the most affluent areas of the Birmingham-Hoover MSA.
 
 
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We also operate in the Huntsville, Alabama MSA, the Montgomery, Alabama MSA and the Dothan, Alabama MSA.  We believe the Huntsville market offers substantial growth as one of the strongest technology economies in the nation, with over 300 companies performing sophisticated government, commercial and university research.  Huntsville has one of the highest concentrations of engineers in the United States, as well as one of the highest concentrations of Ph.D.s.  Huntsville is located in North Alabama off U.S. Interstate 65 between Birmingham and Nashville, Tennessee.  Montgomery is the capital and one of the largest cities in Alabama and home to the Hyundai Motor Manufacturing plant, which began production in May 2005.  Montgomery is located in central Alabama between Birmingham and Mobile, Alabama and is intersected by U.S. Interstates 65 (connecting Birmingham and Mobile, Alabama) and 85 (connecting Montgomery to Atlanta, Georgia).  Dothan is located in the southeastern corner of the State of Alabama near the Georgia and Florida state lines and is 35 miles from U.S. Interstate 10 which runs through the panhandle of Florida and connections Mobile, Alabama to Tallahassee, Florida.  Dothan is also intersected by U.S. Highways 231, 431 and 84, which are common trucking lanes, and has access to railroad and the Chattahoochee River.  With two offices in each of Madison, Montgomery and Houston Counties, we believe that we have a base of banking resources to serve such counties.

We are in the process of opening our first office outside the State of Alabama in Pensacola, Florida.  We have recruited an experienced team of veteran Pensacola bankers to help us establish this office.  Pensacola is located in the Florida panhandle approximately 50 miles east of Mobile, Alabama, and 40 miles west of Fort Walton, Florida, with easy access to U.S. Interstate 10 just minutes away.  Pensacola is a regional hub for healthcare and retail, with an important manufacturing sector, a strong tourism presence and a broadly diversified economy.

We conduct a general consumer and commercial banking business, emphasizing personal banking services to commercial firms, professionals and affluent consumers located in our service areas.  We believe the current market for financial services, as well as the prospects for the future, present opportunity for a locally owned and operated financial institution.  Specifically, we believe that our primary service areas will be in need of local institutions to respond to customer and deposit attrition resulting from the acquisitions during the last few years of Alabama-headquartered banks, including the acquisitions of SouthTrust Corporation by Wachovia Corporation (which has now been acquired by Wells Fargo & Company), AmSouth Bancorporation by Regions Financial Corporation, Compass Bancshares, Inc. by Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria and Alabama National Bancorporation (operating as First American Bank) by RBC Centura Banks.  We believe that a community-based bank such as the Bank can better identify and serve local relationship banking needs than can an office or subsidiary of such larger banking institutions.

Local Economy of Service Areas

Birmingham.  We believe that Jefferson and Shelby Counties offer us a growing and diverse economic base in which to operate.  Jefferson and Shelby Counties are the primary counties for the seven-county Birmingham Metropolitan Area.  With a 2010 population of 671,861, Jefferson County includes Birmingham, Alabama’s largest city, and is Alabama’s most populated county.  Shelby County has a population of 193,570 and is among the fastest growing counties in the U.S.  Between 2000 and 2010, Shelby County’s population increased more than 35%.

Jefferson and Shelby Counties have the highest population density in Metropolitan Birmingham and account for more than 75% of the population in the entire seven-county region.  In 2010, the combined population of Jefferson and Shelby Counties was 865,431 with 340,561 households.  Between 2000 and 2010, the counties grew by more than 60,000 residents or 7.5%.  The projected growth rate for the two counties between 2010 and 2015 is 4% or an additional 33,620 residents, which will bring the total population of the two counties to almost 900,000.

Serving as the core of Metropolitan Birmingham, Jefferson and Shelby Counties have an employment base of 459,938 – more than 88% of Metropolitan Birmingham’s total employment.   The counties combined 2010 average household income is $72,517, an almost 40% increase since 2000.  The counties’ 2000 to 2010 average household income growth rate is considerably higher than the U.S. average household income growth rate of 28%.
 
 
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The economic composition of Metropolitan Birmingham is a diverse mixture of traditional and emerging employment sectors.  Metals manufacturing is an important historical sector; finance and insurance, healthcare services and distribution are currently the region’s core economic sectors and biological and medical technology; entertainment and diverse manufacturing have been identified as the region’s emerging economic sectors.

Finance and insurance is among the most specialized economic sectors in Metropolitan Birmingham.  Several banks and insurance companies have corporate or regional headquarters in the region, including: Regions Financial Corporation, BBVA Compass, Protective Life, Infinity Insurance and State Farm.

Healthcare services is also a core economic sector of Metropolitan Birmingham.  The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) is Alabama’s largest employer, with more than 19,000 employees, and is among the elite healthcare centers in the U.S.  UAB’s annual economic impact is estimated at more than $4.6 billion; in 2009, UAB received $489 million in outside research funding.  Additionally, Birmingham is home to the largest nonprofit independent research laboratory in the Southeast – Southern Research Institute.  These two institutions form the foundation of the region’s growing biotechnology sector.

Diverse manufacturing is an emerging economic sector and is spearheaded by the presence of two major automotive manufacturing facilities, Mercedes Benz U.S. International and Honda Manufacturing of Alabama.  These automotive manufacturing facilities together employ more than 7,000 and serve as the basis for the region’s growth in transportation equipment manufacturing.

Other major corporations headquartered or with a major presence in Metropolitan Birmingham include: HealthSouth Corporation, Vulcan Materials and AT&T.  Moreover, Birmingham serves as the headquarters to six of the country’s top-performing private companies on the elite Forbes 500 list, including O’Neal Steel and Drummond Company.

Unless otherwise stated, the foregoing and other pertinent data can be found on the websites of the Birmingham Regional Chamber of Commerce and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”).

Huntsville. Huntsville, Madison County, is the life-center for North Alabama and has seen steady growth since the 1960's.  Today there are nearly one million people within a 50-mile radius of Huntsville.  The metropolitan population is diverse and rich in culture, with many residents moving into the area as a technology destination from all 50 states and numerous countries, including Japan, Switzerland, Korea, Germany and the U.K.  In 2009, the Huntsville, Alabama MSA (which includes Madison and Limestone Counties) had a population of 397,000 people, up 16.0% from the 2000 U.S. Census, and Madison County's population was 321,000, up 16.1% from the 2000 Census.  The Huntsville metro population grew at over twice the rate of the rest of Alabama and nearly twice the rate of the U.S. as a whole.  According to a 2008 estimate, the average household income was $71,267 for the Huntsville, Alabama MSA, $73,430 for Madison County and $65,159 for the City of Huntsville.  The City of Madison reported an average household income of $72,432 according to the 2000 U.S. Census.

We believe that Huntsville offers substantial growth as one of the strongest technology economies in the nation with one of the highest concentrations of engineers and Ph.D.s in the United States.  Huntsville has a number of major government programs, including NASA programs such as the Space Station and Space Shuttle Propulsion and U.S. Army programs such as the National Space and Missile Defense Command, Army Aviation and Foreign Military Sales.  Cummings Research Park in Huntsville is now the second largest research park in the United States and the fourth largest research park in the world.  Huntsville was ranked number one in the state for announced new and expanding jobs from 2004 to 2008, according to the Alabama Development Office.  Huntsville was named as Forbes magazine’s “Best Place to Live to Weather the Economy” in November 2008.  Further, Forbes named Huntsville one of its “Leading Cities for Business” six years in a row, including 2008, as well as one of the “10 Smartest Cities in the World” in 2009.  Fortune Small Business Magazine named Huntsville as the country’s “Top Mid-sized City to Launch and Grow a Business” and Kiplinger Magazine named Huntsville as the nation’s “Best City” in 2009.  Huntsville is home to the highest concentration of Inc. 500 Companies in the United States and also a number of offices of Fortune 500 companies.  Major employers in Huntsville include the U.S. Army/Redstone Arsenal, the Boeing Company, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Intergraph Corporation, Benchmark Electronics, ADTRAN, Inc., Northrop Grumman, Cinram, SAIC, DirecTV, LG Electronics, Inc., Lockheed Martin, and Toyota Motor Manufacturing of Alabama.  Job growth in the Huntsville metro area has been strong, with over 29,000 new workers added since 2000, accounting for 46% of the state’s net job growth during that same period of time.  The Huntsville metro area’s employment growth rate of 15.8% is almost four times the U.S. average. Professional and business service employment in the Huntsville metro area grew by 41.7% from 2000-2008, adding a total of 13,900 workers primarily in professional, scientific and technical fields.
 
 
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In September 2005, the Base Realignment and Closure Commission, or BRAC, approved the relocation of the majority of the United States Missile Defense Agency's development and management work, along with the headquarters of the U.S. Army Space & Missile Defense Command, the U.S. Army Materiel Command and the U.S. Army Security Assistance Command, to Huntsville.  The relocation of jobs to Huntsville began in 2007 and will bring up to 5,000 jobs.  All moves are scheduled to be completed by 2011.  In addition to these jobs, the move is expected to bring another 5,000 support jobs.

The Hudson-Alpha Institute for Biotechnology opened its 260,000-square foot facility in November 2007, housing 17 biotechnology companies representing the for-profit side of development focused on using the code generated by the Human Genome Project to produce drugs and treatment.  The institute has provided the Huntsville community with over 900 new jobs, and the new 22,000-square foot Jackson Conference Center was constructed there in 2008.  Verizon Wireless has built a 152,000-square foot Alabama headquarters and customer service center in Thornton Research Park, in which it has invested $44 million and created nearly 1,300 new jobs.  Expanding the plant at Toyota Manufacturing led to the creation of 240 jobs as well as total capital investment of $147 million.  Other notable expansions include Raytheon, DHS Systems, Aegis Technologies, System Studies and Simulation and Lockheed Martin.  In total, new and expanding industry in Huntsville/Madison County in 2009 amounted to 32 projects, 2,027 jobs, and over $219 million in capital investment.  Additionally, plans are underway to construct a $1 billion office park just outside of the gates at Redstone Arsenal, which will ultimately contain hotels, restaurants and 4 million square feet of office space.

The foregoing and other pertinent data are available on the Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce's and the FDIC's websites.

Montgomery.  Montgomery is Alabama’s second largest city and is the capital of Alabama.  We have identified Montgomery as a high-growth market for us, second in the state of Alabama only to Huntsville in the growth of new jobs from 2000-2007.  A recent competitive assessment conducted by Market Street Services on behalf of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce shows Montgomery outpacing the State of Alabama as a whole, as well as the benchmark cities of Richmond, Virginia, Little Rock, Arkansas, and Shreveport, Louisiana, with an 11.1% increase in net new jobs during the same period.  It is also noteworthy that, according to Market Street, Montgomery had more jobs in March 2010 than it did in March 2000, unlike Richmond, the State of Alabama, and the United States.

The Montgomery metro area comprises 366,401 residents, and is the fourth most populous county in Alabama. Over the past 15 years 16,500 jobs have been created in the metro area, an increase of 11%. The area’s wealth has more than doubled since 1990, with a total personal income of $13.2 billion for the Montgomery metro area in 2008. The average median family income grew 25% from 1990 to 2008, from $45,182 to $56,400. The area’s per capita income grew from $18,500 in 1990 to $35,973 in 2009, an increase of 94%.

Recent developments in Montgomery include the more than $1 billion that has been spent on the revitalization of downtown Montgomery and the Riverfront District, including over $200 million on a downtown four-star hotel, performing arts theatre, and convention center complex.   Downtown Montgomery also opened a new minor league baseball stadium in 2004, and the Montgomery Regional Airport completed a $40 million renovation and expansion project in 2006.

As its capital city, the State of Alabama employs approximately 9,500 persons in Montgomery, as well as numerous service providers.  Montgomery is also home to Maxwell Gunter Air Force Base, which employs more than 12,000 persons, including Air University, the worldwide center for U.S. Air Force leadership and education, in addition to global information technology support systems.  In 2010 a new Network Operations Squadron for Air Force Cyber Command and worldwide Air Force Enterprise Call Center created 370 new high-paying civilian and military jobs while strengthening the overall mission of Maxwell/Gunter.
 
 
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In May of 2005, Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama (HMMA) opened its Montgomery manufacturing plant, which was built with a capital investment of over $1.4 billion.  That plant, which now employs over 3,500 people and produces two Hyundai models, has been further expanded with the addition of a new engine plant.  That engine plant will also serve the new Kia manufacturing facility in West Point, Georgia.  The area has also benefited from the nearly 30 top-tier Hyundai suppliers who have invested over $550 million in new plant facilities, producing almost 8,000 additional jobs.  In 2010, HMMA announced an additional $50 million capital investment in order to prepare for the addition of the 2011 Elantra  production line.

In 2010, Montgomery led the state in announced new and expanding industries.  Hyundai Power Transformers USA will create 1,000 new jobs and invest more than $125 million in Montgomery, the largest project in the State of Alabama for 2010 and the company’s first American manufacturing facility.  In addition, approximately 400 new jobs and more than $150 million in capital investment were announced in 2010 as a result of existing industry expansions.  Two additional corporate headquarters announced their locations in Montgomery in 2010, Hausted Patient Handling Services and Community Newspaper Holdings Inc.

The foregoing and other pertinent data can be found on the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce’s and the FDIC’s websites and recent publications of the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, particularly the Montgomery Business Journal (complete archived editions available at montgomerychamber.com).

Dothan.  Dothan, in Houston County, is located in the southeastern corner of Alabama and is conveniently placed near the Florida panhandle and Georgia state line.  We believe that this market has great potential due to its central hub, its accessibility to large distribution centers, its home to several major corporations, and its lack of personalized banking services currently being provided.  According to the FDIC, Dothan’s deposit base has grown 28% during the past five years.  Furthermore, Dothan’s two largest deposit holders are Regions Bank and Wells Fargo Bank (formerly SouthTrust Bank and more recently Wachovia Bank), each of which has undergone substantial changes in recent years, which we believe provides an opportunity for a new bank such as us.  We believe the citizens of Dothan demand the personal service provided by the Bank, making it a more viable option for the current residents than local branches of larger regional competitors.  The Bank’s two offices are strategically located in the southeastern and western areas of Dothan, which are growing areas of business activity and development.

In 2009, the Dothan, Alabama MSA had a population of 142,000 people, a 9.8% increase from 2000.  Houston County had a population of 99,000, a 11.5% increase from 2000, while the city of Dothan has experienced a 16.8% increase in population since 2000.

We believe Dothan to be a growing market with greater needs considering the wide array of industries being serviced.  The Dothan area, while being known as the peanut capital, is also home to facilities of several major corporations, including Michelin, Pemco World Aviation, International Paper, Globe Motors, AAA Cooper-Headquarters, and many more.  Also, the strong presence of trucking and its strategic positioning in the Southeast market attracts distribution-related projects to the Dothan MSA.  For example, the development of the Houston County Distribution Park has allowed companies to take advantage of the 352-acre tract to serve consumers in the Southeast region of the United States.  Being only minutes from the Florida state line, the large lots can serve distribution-related projects up to 1.2 million square feet in size.

Dothan is a hub of healthcare for southeast Alabama, southwest Georgia and north Florida areas, with two regional hospitals, Southeast Alabama Regional Medical Center employing over 2,000 medical professionals and support staff, and Flowers Hospital employing 1,400 medical professionals and support staff.  The area also has a strong history in the expansion of aviation jobs in Alabama through Enterprise-Ozark Community College (avionics and aviation mechanic training) and Fort Rucker, the Army Aviation Center of the United States.  The highly specialized Dothan Airport Industrial Park offers the land and infrastructure to house aviation related projects with runway access to facilities. The existence of these industries and the constant growth allows an opportunity for the Bank to increase its presence and penetration in this market.
 
 
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The foregoing and other pertinent data can be found on the Dothan Chamber of Commerce’s and the FDIC’s websites.

Pensacola.  The Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent MSA (Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties) has a population of more than 450,000, up from 412,000 in 2000.  Population in the Pensacola city limits totals 53,752, down from 56,255 in 2000.  Pensacola is served by the Pensacola Gulf Coast Regional Airport, which transports over 1.5 million passengers per year, representing more traffic than the airports in Mobile and Fort Walton combined. 

     The Pensacola and Northwest Florida economies are driven by tourism, military, health services, and medical technologies industries.  Five major military bases are located in northwest Florida:  Eglin Air Force Base, Hurlburt Field, Pensacola Whiting Field, Pensacola Naval Air Station and Corry Station.  Pensacola, the cradle of naval aviation, is home to the U.S. Navy’s precision flight team, the Blue Angels, and has trained naval aviators for decades.  Defense spending by these bases totals nearly $5 billion annually.  Other major employers in the area include Sacred Heart Health System, Baptist Healthcare, West Florida Regional Hospital, Gulf Power Company (Southern Company), the University of West Florida, International Paper, Ascend Performance Materials (Solutia), GE Wind Energy, Armstrong World Industries, and Wayne Dalton Corporation.  The Pensacola Bay area is also home to the Andrews Institute for Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, a leading surgical and research center in the world for human performance enhancement.  A vibrant small business sector operates in all areas of the economy.

     According to the FDIC, Pensacola MSA market deposits as of June 30, 2010 totaled approximately $5.4 billion (not including credit union deposits) among 22 banks.  Top market share performers include Regions (19.5%), Synovus (17.74%), Wells Fargo (15.9%), Bank of America (7.18%) and Suntrust (5.27%).  Currently, only large regional or national banks dominate Pensacola’s market share.  We believe this creates the opportunity for a service-oriented community bank such as ServisFirst to not only establish itself but to flourish.

     Market deposit growth has been relatively flat over the last ten years, but we believe the opportunity presented by expansion into Pensacola is not necessarily from a growth market.  The three largest community banks are under public consent orders, and the national/regional banks are distracted by continued credit issues, recent mergers, and employee layoffs, and we believe that they are no longer able to give customers the personalized and responsive attention they deserve and demand.  The top regional banks have nonperforming asset ratios approaching 10%. Recent mergers in the market include AmSouth/Regions, Wachovia/Wells Fargo, and, most recently, Whitney/Hancock.  Synovus recently announced a $100 million expense reduction plan which we believe will inevitably affect the local division, Coastal Bank and Trust.  These factors have caused the “big” banks to lose focus on their customers and have essentially terminated any significant business development efforts.  As a result, we believe that a need has been created for a financially sound, community-focused bank such as ServisFirst, with motivated, experienced, and energized team members empowered to make timely, local decisions.  In addition to the higher level of service offered than mass-market retail banks offer, we also believe that ServisFirst offers more sophisticated products than community banks currently operating in the market.

The foregoing and other pertinent data can be found on the Pensacola Chamber of Commerce’s and the FDIC’s websites.

Deposit Growth in Our Markets

According to FDIC reports, total deposits in Jefferson and Shelby Counties grew from approximately $14.5 billion in June 2001 to approximately $25.1 billion in June 2010, representing a compound average annual growth rate of approximately 5.97% over the period.  Deposits in Madison County grew from approximately $3.2 billion in June 2001 to approximately $6.5 billion in June 2010, representing a compound average annual growth rate of approximately 8.19% over the period.  Deposits in Montgomery County grew from approximately $2.9 billion in June 2001 to approximately $4.6 billion in June 2010, representing a compound average annual growth rate of approximately 5.26% over the period.  Deposits in Houston County grew from approximately $1.3 billion in June 2001 to approximately $2.1 billion in June 2010, representing a compound average annual growth rate of approximately 6.18% over the period.  While our markets have been negatively affected by the current recession and credit crisis, we believe that each of our markets will continue to grow and believe that many local affluent professionals and small business customers will do their banking with local, autonomous institutions that offer a higher level of personalized service.
 
 
7

 
 
Competition

We are subject to intense competition from various financial institutions and other companies that offer financial services.  The Bank competes for deposits with other commercial banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions and issuers of commercial paper and other securities, such as money-market and mutual funds.  In making loans, the Bank competes with other commercial banks, savings and loan associations, consumer finance companies, credit unions, leasing companies and other lenders.

We currently conduct business principally through our nine banking offices (including our second office in the Dothan MSA, which opened in February 2011).  Based upon the latest data available on the FDIC’s website as of June 30, 2010, and our records, our total deposits in the Birmingham-Hoover MSA ranked 9th among 49 financial institutions and represented approximately 2.47% of the total deposits in the Birmingham-Hoover MSA.  Our total deposits in the Huntsville MSA ranked us 8th among 25 financial institutions and represented approximately 4.59% of the total deposits in the Huntsville MSA.  Our total deposits in the Montgomery MSA ranked us 7th among 22 financial institutions and represented approximately 5.14% of the total deposits in the Montgomery MSA. Our total deposits in the Dothan MSA, our newest service area other than Pensacola, ranked us 4th among 21 financial institutions and represented approximately 6.89% of the total deposits in the Dothan MSA.  Together, deposits for all institutions in Jefferson, Shelby, Montgomery, Madison, and Houston Counties represented approximately 46.60% of all the deposits in the State of Alabama at June 30, 2010.

The following table illustrates our market share, by insured deposits, in our primary service areas at June 30, 2010, as reported by the FDIC:

Market
 
  Number
  of
  Branches
   
Our Market
Deposits
   
Total
Market
Deposits
   
  Ranking
   
Market
Share
Percentage
 
         
(Dollar amounts in millions)
             
Alabama:
                             
Birmingham-Hoover MSA
    3     $ 686.3     $ 27,841.4       9       2.47 %
Montgomery MSA
    2       301.8       5,869.6       7       5.14 %
Huntsville MSA
    2       330.1       7,207.8       8       4.59 %
Dothan MSA
    1       195.9       2,845.0       4       6.89 %
 
Our retail and commercial divisions operate in highly competitive markets.  We compete directly in retail and commercial banking markets with other commercial banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, mortgage brokers and mortgage companies, mutual funds, securities brokers, consumer finance companies, other lenders and insurance companies, locally, regionally and nationally.  Many of our competitors compete by using offerings by mail, telephone, computer and/or the Internet. Interest rates, both on loans and deposits, and prices of services are significant competitive factors among financial institutions generally.  Office locations, types and quality of services and products, office hours, customer service, a local presence, community reputation and continuity of personnel are also important competitive factors that we emphasize.
 
Many other commercial or savings institutions currently have offices in our primary service areas.  These institutions include many of the largest banks operating in Alabama, including some of the largest banks in the country. Many of our competitors serve the same counties we serve.  Virtually every type of competitor for business of the type we serve has offices in each of our primary markets.  In our service areas, our five largest competitors are generally Regions Bank, Wells Fargo Bank, Compass Bank (now a subsidiary of Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria), BB&T and RBC Bank USA.  These institutions, as well as other competitors of ours, have greater resources, serve broader geographic markets, have higher lending limits, offer various services that we do not offer and can better afford and make broader use of media advertising, support services, and electronic technology than we can.  To offset these competitive disadvantages, we depend on our reputation for greater personal service, consistency, and flexibility and the ability to make credit and other business decisions quickly.
 
 
8

 
 
Business Strategy

Management Philosophy

Our philosophy is to operate as an urban community bank emphasizing prompt, personalized customer service to the individuals and businesses located in our primary service areas.  We believe this philosophy has attracted and will continue to attract customers and capture market share historically controlled by other financial institutions operating in our market.  Our management and employees focus on recognizing customers’ needs and delivering products and services to meet those targeted needs.  We aggressively market to businesses, professionals and affluent consumers that may be underserved by the large regional banks that operate in their service areas.  We believe that local ownership and control allows us to serve customers more efficiently and effectively and will aid in our growth and success.

Operating Strategy

In order to achieve the level of prompt, responsive service that we believe is necessary to attract customers and to develop our image as an urban bank with a community focus, we have employed the following operating strategies:

 
·
Quality Employees.  We strive to hire highly trained and seasoned staff.  Staff are trained to answer questions about all of our products and services, so that the first employee the customer encounters can usually resolve most questions the customer may have.

 
·
Experienced Senior Management.  Our senior management has extensive experience in the banking industry, as well as substantial business and banking contacts in our markets.

 
·
Relationship Banking.  We focus on cross-selling financial products and services to our customers.  Our customer-contact employees are highly trained to recognize customer needs and to meet those needs with a sophisticated array of products and services.  We view cross-selling as a means to leverage relationships and help provide useful financial services to retain customers, attract new customers and remain competitive.

 
·
Community-Oriented Directors.  The boards of directors for the holding company and the Bank currently consist of residents of Birmingham, but we also have a non-voting advisory board of directors in each of the Huntsville, Montgomery and Dothan markets.  These advisory directors represent a wide array of business experience and community involvement in the service areas where they live.  As residents of our primary service areas, they are sensitive and responsive to the needs of our customers and potential customers.  In addition, our directors and advisory directors bring substantial business and banking contacts to us.

 
·
Highly Visible Offices.  Our local headquarters buildings are highly visible in Birmingham’s south Jefferson County, downtown Huntsville, downtown Montgomery and downtown Dothan.  We believe that a highly visible headquarters building gives us a powerful presence in each local market.

 
·
Individual Customer Focus.  We focus on providing individual service and attention to our target customers, which include privately held businesses with $2 million to $250 million in sales, professionals, and affluent consumers.  As our employees, officers and directors become familiar with our customers on an individual basis, they are able to respond to credit requests quickly.

 
·
Market Segmentation and Advertising.  We utilize traditional advertising media, such as local periodicals and local event sponsorships, to increase our public visibility.  The majority of our marketing and advertising efforts, however, are focused on leveraging our management’s, directors’, advisory directors’ and stockholders’ existing relationship networks.

 
·
Telephone and Internet Banking Services.  We offer various banking services by telephone through a 24-hour voice response unit and through Internet banking arrangements.
 
 
9

 
 
Growth Strategy

Because we believe that growth and expansion of our operations are significant factors in our success, we have implemented the following growth strategies:

 
·
Capitalize on Community Orientation.  We seek to capitalize on the extensive relationships that our management, directors, advisory directors and stockholders have with businesses and professionals in our markets.  We believe that these market sectors are not adequately served by the existing banks in such areas.

 
·
Emphasize Local Decision-Making.  We emphasize local decision-making by experienced bankers.  We believe this helps us attract local businesses and service-minded customers.

 
·
Offer Fee-Generating Products and Services.  Our range of services, pricing strategies, interest rates paid and charged, and hours of operation are structured to attract our target customers and increase our market share.  We strive to offer the businessperson, professional, entrepreneur and consumer the best loan services available while pricing these services competitively.

 
·
Office Location Strategy.  We have opened our offices in each of our local markets in areas that we believe provide visibility, convenience and access to our target customers.

Lending Services

Lending Policy

Our lending policies have been established to support the banking needs of our primary market areas.  Consequently, we aggressively seek high-quality loans within a limited geographic area and in competition with other well-established financial institutions in our primary service areas that have greater resources and lending limits than we have.

Loan Approval and Review

Our loan approval policies provide for various levels of officer lending authority.  When the total amount of loans to a single borrower exceeds an individual officer’s lending authority, further approval must be obtained from the Regional CEO and/or our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Risk Officer or Chief Credit Officer, based on our loan policies.

Commercial Loans

Our commercial lending activity is directed principally toward businesses and professional service firms whose demand for funds falls within our legal lending limits.  We also make loans to small- to medium-sized businesses in our primary service areas for purposes such as new or upgraded plant and equipment, inventory acquisition and various working capital purposes.  Typically, targeted borrowers have annual sales between $2 million and $250 million.  This category of loans includes loans made to individual, partnership or corporate borrowers, and such loans are obtained for a variety of business purposes.  We offer a variety of commercial lending products to meet the needs of business and professional service firms in our service areas.  These commercial lending products include seasonal loans, bridge loans and term loans for working capital, expansion of the business, or acquisition of property, plant and equipment.  We also offer business lines of credit.  The repayment terms of our commercial loans will vary according to the needs of each customer.

Our commercial loans will usually be collateralized.  Generally, collateral consists of business assets, including any or all of general intangibles, accounts receivables, inventory, equipment, or real estate.  Collateral is subject to  the risk that we may have difficulty converting it to a liquid asset if necessary, as well as risks associated with degree of specialization, mobility and general collectibility in a default situation.  To mitigate this risk, we underwrite collateral to strict standards, including valuations and general acceptability based on our ability to monitor its ongoing health and value.

 
10

 
 
We underwrite our commercial loans primarily on the basis of the borrower’s cash flow, expected ability to service its debt from income and degree of management expertise.  As a general practice, we take as collateral a security interest in any available real estate, equipment or other personal property, although in limited circumstances we may make some commercial loans on an unsecured basis.  This type loan may be subject to many different types of risk, which will differ depending on the particular industry a borrower is engaged in, including fraud, bankruptcy, economic downturn, deteriorated or non-existent collateral, and changes in interest rates such as have occurred in the recent economic recession and credit market crisis.  General risks to an industry, such as the recent economic recession and credit market crisis, or to a particular segment of an industry are monitored by senior management on an ongoing basis.  When warranted, individual borrowers who may be at risk due to an industry condition may be more closely analyzed and reviewed at the credit review committee or board of directors level.  On a regular basis, commercial and industrial borrowers are required to submit statements of financial condition relative to their business to us for review.  We analyze these statements for trends and assign the loan a risk grade accordingly.  Based on this risk grade, the loan may receive an increased degree of scrutiny by management, up to and including additional loss reserves being required.

Real Estate Loans

We make commercial real estate loans, construction and development loans and residential real estate loans.
 
Commercial Real Estate.  Commercial real estate loans are generally limited to terms of five years or less, although payments are usually structured on the basis of a longer amortization.  Interest rates may be fixed or adjustable, although rates generally will not be fixed for a period exceeding five years.  In addition, we generally will require personal guarantees from the principal owners of the property supported by a review by our management of the principal owners’ personal financial statements.

Commercial real estate offers some risks not found in traditional residential real estate lending. Repayment is dependent upon successful management and marketing of properties and on the level of expense necessary to maintain the property.  Repayment of these loans may be adversely affected by conditions in the real estate market or the general economy.  Also, commercial real estate loans typically involve relatively large loan balances to a single borrower.  To mitigate these risks, we monitor our loan concentration.  This type loan generally has a shorter maturity than other loan types, giving us an opportunity to reprice, restructure or decline to renew the credit.  As with other loans, all commercial real estate loans are graded depending upon strength of credit and performance.  A higher risk grade will bring increased scrutiny by our management and the board of directors.
 
Construction and Development Loans. We make construction and development loans both on a pre-sold and speculative basis. If the borrower has entered into an agreement to sell the property prior to beginning construction, then the loan is considered to be on a pre-sold basis. If the borrower has not entered into an agreement to sell the property prior to beginning construction, then the loan is considered to be on a speculative basis. Construction and development loans are generally made with a term of 12 to 24 months, and interest is paid monthly. The ratio of the loan principal to the value of the collateral as established by independent appraisal typically will not exceed 80% of residential construction loans. Speculative construction loans will be based on the borrower’s financial strength and cash flow position. Development loans are generally limited to 75% of appraised value. Loan proceeds will be disbursed based on the percentage of completion and only after the project has been inspected by an experienced construction lender or third-party inspector. During times of economic stress, this type loan has typically had a greater degree of risk than other loan types, as has been evident in the current credit crisis.
 
During the period 2008 – 2010, there were numerous construction loan defaults among many commercial bank loan portfolios, including a number of Alabama-based banks such as Regions Financial Corporation and Colonial Bancgroup, Inc.  To mitigate that risk, our board of directors and management review the entire portfolio on a periodic basis and we internally track and monitor these loans closely.  On a quarterly basis, the portfolio is segmented by market area to allow analysis of exposure and a comparison to current inventory levels in these areas.  While total construction loans decreased $52.1 million in 2010, we increased our allocation slightly within our loan loss reserve for construction loans, from $6.3 million at the end of 2009 to $6.4 million at the end of 2010. Charge-offs for construction loans increased from $3.3 million for 2009 to $3.5 million for 2010.

 
11

 
 
Residential Real Estate Loans.  Our residential real estate loans consist primarily of residential second mortgage loans, residential construction loans and traditional mortgage lending for one-to-four family residences.  We will originate and maintain fixed rate mortgages with long-term maturity and balloon payments generally not exceeding five years.  The majority of our fixed-rate loans are sold in the secondary mortgage market.  All loans are made in accordance with our appraisal policy, with the ratio of the loan principal to the value of collateral as established by independent appraisal generally not exceeding 80%.  Risks associated with these loans are generally less significant than those of other loans and involve fluctuations in the value of real estate, bankruptcies, economic downturn and customer financial problems.  Real estate has recently experienced a period of declining prices which negatively affects real estate collateralized loans, but this negative effect has to date been more prevalent in regions of the United States other than our primary service areas; however, homes in our primary service areas may experience significant price declines in the future.  We have not made and do not expect to make any Alt-A or subprime loans.

Consumer Loans

We offer a variety of loans to retail customers in the communities we serve. Consumer loans in general carry a moderate degree of risk compared to other loans.  They are generally more risky than traditional residential real estate loans but less risky than commercial loans.  Risk of default is usually determined by the well-being of the local economies.  During times of economic stress, there is usually some level of job loss both nationally and locally, which directly affects the ability of the consumer to repay debt.  Risk on consumer-type loans is generally managed though policy limitations on debt levels consumer borrowers may carry and limitations on loan terms and amounts depending upon collateral type.

Our consumer loans include home equity loans (open- and closed-end); vehicle financing; loans secured by deposits; and secured and unsecured personal loans.  These various types of consumer loans all carry varying degrees of risk:

 
·
Loans secured by deposits carry little or no risk.

 
·
Home equity lines carry additional risk because of the increased difficulty of converting real estate to cash in the event of a default and have become particularly risky as housing prices decline, thereby reducing and in some cases eliminating a home owner’s equity relative to their primary mortgage.  To date, homes in our primary service areas have not experienced the severe price declines of homes in other regions of the United States; however, homes in our service areas have experienced some price declines in the past two years.  Our current underwriting policy allows home equity lines in amounts less than 90% of current market value.  Although this appears high, our historical losses for home equity lines have been less than losses on the loan portfolio as a whole (21 basis points for the year ended December 31, 2010).  We also require the customer to carry adequate insurance coverage to pay all mortgage debt in full if the collateral is destroyed.

 
·
Vehicle financing carries additional risks over loans secured by real estate in that the collateral is declining in value over the life of the loan and is mobile.  We manage the risks inherent in vehicle financing by matching the loan term with the age and remaining useful life of the collateral to try to ensure the customer always has an equity position and is never “upside down.”  To protect the collateral, we require the customer to carry insurance showing us as loss payee.  We also have a blanket policy that covers us in the event of a lapse in the borrower’s coverage and also provides assistance in locating collateral when necessary.

 
·
Secured personal loans carry additional risks over the other types identified above in that they are generally smaller and made to borrowers with somewhat limited financial resources and credit histories.  These loans are secured by a variety of collateral with varying degrees of marketability in the event of default.  Risk on these types of loans is managed primarily at the underwriting level with strict adherence to debt to income ratio limitations and conservative collateral valuations.  Unsecured personal loans carry the greatest degree of risk in the consumer portfolio.  Without collateral, we are completely dependent on the commitment of the borrower to repay and the stability of the borrower’s income stream.  Again, primary risk management occurs at the underwriting stage, with strict adherence to debt-to-income ratios, time in present job and in industry and policy guidelines relative to loan size as a percentage of net worth and liquid assets.
 
 
12

 
 
Commitments and Contingencies

As of December 31, 2010, we had commitments to extend credit beyond current fundings of approximately $538.7 million, had issued standby letters of credit in the amount of approximately $47.1 million, and had commitments for credit card arrangements of approximately $17.6 million.

Policy for Determining the Loan Loss Allowance

The allowance for loan losses represents our management’s assessment of the risk associated with extending credit and its evaluation of the quality of the loan portfolio.  In calculating the adequacy of the loan loss allowance, our management evaluates the following factors:

 
·
the asset quality of individual loans;

 
·
changes in the national and local economy and business conditions/development, including underwriting standards, collections, and charge-off and recovery practices;

 
·
changes in the nature and volume of the loan portfolio;

 
·
changes in the experience, ability and depth of our lending staff and management;

 
·
changes in the trend of the volume and severity of past-due loans and classified loans, and trends in the volume of non-accrual loans, troubled debt restructurings and other modifications, as has occurred in the residential mortgage markets and particularly for residential construction and development loans;

 
·
possible deterioration in collateral segments or other portfolio concentrations;

 
·
historical loss experience (when available) used for pools of loans (i.e. collateral types, borrowers, purposes, etc.);

 
·
changes in the quality of our loan review system and the degree of oversight by our board of directors; and

 
·
the effect of external factors such as competition and the legal and regulatory requirement on the level of estimated credit losses in our current loan portfolio
 
These factors are evaluated monthly, and changes in the asset quality of individual loans are evaluated as needed.

We assign all of our loans individual risk grades when they are underwritten.  We have established minimum general reserves based on the asset quality grade of the loan.  We also apply general reserve factors based on historical losses, management’s experience and common industry and regulatory guidelines.

After a loan is underwritten and booked, it is monitored or reviewed by the account officer, management, internal loan review, and external loan review personnel during the life of the loan.  Payment performance is monitored monthly for the entire loan portfolio; account officers contact customers during the regular course of business and may be able to ascertain if weaknesses are developing with the borrower; independent loan consultants perform a review annually; and federal and state banking regulators perform annual reviews of the loan portfolio.  If we detect weaknesses that have developed in an individual loan relationship, we downgrade the loan and assign higher reserves based upon management’s assessment of the weaknesses in the loan that may affect full collection of the debt.  We have established a policy to discontinue accrual of interest (non-accrual status) after the loan has become 90 days delinquent as to payment of principal or interest unless the loan is considered to be well collateralized and is in actively process of collection. In addition, a loan will be placed on non-accrual status before it becomes 90 days delinquent if management believes that the borrower’s financial condition is such that the collection of interest or principal is doubtful. Interest previously accrued but uncollected on such loans is reversed and charged against current income when the receivable is determined to be uncollectible. Interest income on non-accrual loans is recognized only as received. If a loan will not be collected in full, we increase the allowance for loan losses to reflect our management’s estimate of any potential exposure or loss.
 
 
13

 
 
Our net loan losses to average total loans decreased to 0.55% for the year ended December 31, 2010 from 0.60% for the year ended December 31, 2009, up from 0.41% for the year ended December 31, 2008.  Historical performance, however, is not an indicator of future performance, and our future results could differ materially, particularly in the current real estate environment and economic recession.  As of December 31, 2010, we had $14.3 million of non-accrual loans, of which 81% are secured real estate loans.  We have allocated approximately $6.4 million of our allowance for loan losses to real estate construction, acquisition and development, and lot loans and $5.2 million to commercial and industrial loans, and have a total loan loss reserve as of December 31, 2010 allocable to specific loan types of $13.2 million.  We also currently maintain a general reserve, which is not tied to any particular type of loan, in the amount of approximately $4.9 million as of December 31, 2010, resulting in a total loan loss reserve of $18.1 million.  Our management believes, based upon historical performance, known factors, overall judgment, and regulatory methodologies, that the current methodology used to determine the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses is reasonable, including after considering the effect of the current residential housing market defaults and business failures (particularly of real estate developers) plaguing financial institutions in general.

Our allowance for loan losses is also subject to regulatory examinations and determinations as to adequacy, which may take into account such factors as the methodology used to calculate the allowance for loan losses and the size of the allowance for loan losses in comparison to a group of peer banks identified by the regulators.  During their routine examinations of banks, regulatory agencies may require a bank to make additional provisions to its allowance for loan losses when, in the opinion of the regulators, credit evaluations and allowance for loan loss methodology differ materially from those of management.

While it is our policy to charge off in the current period loans for which a loss is considered probable, there are additional risks of future losses that cannot be quantified precisely or attributed to particular loans or classes of loans.  Because these risks include the state of the economy, our management’s judgment as to the adequacy of the allowance is necessarily approximate and imprecise.

Investments

In addition to loans, we make investments in securities, primarily in mortgage-backed securities and state and municipal securities.  No investment in any of those instruments will exceed any applicable limitation imposed by law or regulation.  Our board of directors reviews the investment portfolio on an ongoing basis in order to ensure that the investments conform to the policy as set by the board of directors.  Our investment policy provides that no more than 50% of our total investment portfolio may be composed of municipal securities.

All securities held are traded in liquid markets, and we have no auction-rate securities.  As of December 31, 2010, we owned certain restricted securities of the Federal Home Loan Bank with an aggregate book value of $3.3 million and certain restricted securities of First National Bankers Bank in which we invested $250,000.  Neither of these securities had contractual maturities or quoted fair values, and no ready market exists for either of these securities.  We had no investments in any one security, restricted or liquid, in excess of 10% of our stockholders’ equity at December 31, 2010.
 
 
14

 
 
Deposit Services
 
We seek to establish solid core deposits, including checking accounts, money market accounts, savings accounts and a variety of certificates of deposit and IRA accounts.  We currently have no brokered deposits.  To attract deposits, the Company employs an aggressive marketing plan throughout its service areas that features a broad product line and competitive services.  The primary sources of core deposits are residents of, and businesses and their employees located in, our market areas.  We have obtained deposits primarily through personal solicitation by our officers and directors, through reinvestment in the community, and through our stockholders, who have been a substantial source of deposits and referrals.  We make deposit services accessible to customers by offering direct deposit, wire transfer, night depository, banking by mail and remote capture for non-cash items.  The Bank is a member of the FDIC, and thus our deposits are FDIC-insured.  With regard to noninterest-bearing transaction accounts, the Bank opted into the Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program by which the FDIC guaranteed noninterest-bearing deposit transaction accounts and NOW accounts with interest rates less than or equal to 0.50% through June 30, 2010 (which was later extended to December 31, 2010), with the exception of NOW accounts, which were only covered if interest rates paid were less than or equal to 0.25%.  Under Section 343 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, the FDIC is required to provide full deposit insurance coverage for noninterest-bearing transaction accounts for a two-year period beginning December 31, 2010.  This section applies to all insured depository institutions and, unlike under the Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program, no opt-outs are permitted and low-interest NOW accounts are not covered.

The scheduled maturities of time deposits at December 31, 2010 are as follows:

Maturity
 
$100,000 or
more
   
Less than
$100,000
   
Total
 
   
(Dollars in Thousands)
 
Three months or less
  $ 46,891     $ 15,939     $ 62,830  
Over three through six months
    38,519       7,869       46,388  
Over six months through one year
    55,112       14,654       69,766  
Over one year
    82,384       17,121       99,505  
Total
  $ 222,906     $ 55,583     $ 278,489  

Other Banking Services
 
Given client demand for increased convenience and account access, we offer a range of products and services, including 24-hour telephone banking, direct deposit, Internet banking, traveler’s checks, safe deposit boxes, attorney trust accounts and automatic account transfers.  We also participate in a shared network of automated teller machines and a debit card system that our customers are able to use throughout Alabama and in other states and, in certain accounts subject to certain conditions, we rebate to the customer the ATM fees automatically after each business day.  Additionally, we offer Visa® credit card services through a correspondent bank as our agent.

Asset, Liability and Risk Management
 
We manage our assets and liabilities with the aim of providing an optimum and stable net interest margin, a profitable after-tax return on assets and return on equity, and adequate liquidity.  These management functions are conducted within the framework of written loan and investment policies.  To monitor and manage the interest rate margin and related interest rate risk, we have established policies and procedures to monitor and report on interest rate risk, devise strategies to manage interest rate risk, monitor loan originations and deposit activity and approve all pricing strategies.  We attempt to maintain a balanced position between rate-sensitive assets and rate-sensitive liabilities.  Specifically, we chart assets and liabilities on a matrix by maturity, effective duration, and interest adjustment period, and endeavor to manage any gaps in maturity ranges.
 
Seasonality and Cycles
 
We do not consider our commercial banking business to be seasonal.

Employees

We had 170 full-time equivalent employees as of December 31, 2010.  We consider our employee relations to be good, and we have no collective bargaining agreements with any employees.
 
Supervision and Regulation

Both we and the Bank are subject to extensive state and federal banking regulations that impose restrictions on and provide for general regulatory oversight of our operations. These regulations require compliance with various consumer protection provisions applicable to lending, deposits, brokerage and fiduciary activities. These guidelines also impose capital adequacy requirements and restrict our ability to repurchase stock or receive dividends from the Bank.   These laws generally are intended to protect depositors and not stockholders.  The following discussion describes the material elements of the regulatory framework that applies to us.
 
 
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Bank Holding Company Regulation

Since we own all of the capital stock of the Bank, we are a bank holding company under the federal Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (the “BHC Act”).  As a result, we are primarily subject to the supervision, examination and reporting requirements of the BHC Act and the regulations of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Federal Reserve”).

Acquisition of Banks

The BHC Act requires every bank holding company to obtain the Federal Reserve’s prior approval before:

 
·
acquiring direct or indirect ownership or control of any voting shares of any bank if, after the acquisition, the bank holding company will, directly or indirectly, own or control more than 5% of the bank’s voting shares;

 
·
acquiring all or substantially all of the assets of any bank; or

 
·
merging or consolidating with any other bank holding company.

Additionally, the BHC Act provides that the Federal Reserve may not approve any of these transactions if such transaction would result in or tend to create a monopoly or substantially lessen competition or otherwise function as a restraint of trade, unless the anti-competitive effects of the proposed transaction are clearly outweighed by the public interest in meeting the convenience and needs of the community to be served.  The Federal Reserve is also required to consider the financial and managerial resources and future prospects of the bank holding companies and banks concerned and the convenience and needs of the community to be served.  The Federal Reserve’s consideration of financial resources generally focuses on capital adequacy, which is discussed below.

Under the BHC Act, if adequately capitalized and adequately managed, we or any other bank holding company located in Alabama may purchase a bank located outside of Alabama.  Conversely, an adequately capitalized and adequately managed bank holding company located outside of Alabama may purchase a bank located inside Alabama.  In each case, however, restrictions may be placed on the acquisition of a bank that has only been in existence for a limited amount of time or will result in specified concentrations of deposits.

Change in Bank Control.

Subject to various exceptions, the BHC Act and the Change in Bank Control Act, together with related regulations, require Federal Reserve approval prior to any person’s or company’s acquiring “control” of a bank holding company.  Under a rebuttable presumption established by the Federal Reserve, the acquisition of 10% or more of a class of voting stock of a bank holding company with a class of securities registered under Section 12 of the Exchange Act would, under the circumstances set forth in the presumption, constitute acquisition of control of the bank holding company. In addition, any person or group of persons must obtain the approval of the Federal Reserve under the BHC Act before acquiring 25% (5% in the case of an acquirer that is already a bank holding company) or more of the outstanding common stock of a bank holding company, or otherwise obtaining control or a “controlling influence” over the bank holding company.

Permitted Activities

Under the BHC Act, a bank holding company is generally permitted to engage in or acquire direct or indirect control of more than 5% of the voting shares of any company engaged in the following activities:

 
·
banking or managing or controlling banks; and
 
 
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·
any activity that the Federal Reserve determines to be so closely related to banking as to be a proper incident to the business of banking.

Activities that the Federal Reserve has found to be so closely related to banking as to be a proper incident to the business of banking include:

 
·
factoring accounts receivable;

 
·
making, acquiring, brokering or servicing loans and usual related activities;

 
·
leasing personal or real property;

 
·
operating a non-bank depository institution, such as a savings association;

 
·
trust company functions;

 
·
financial and investment advisory activities;

 
·
discount securities brokerage activities;

 
·
underwriting and dealing in government obligations and money market instruments;

 
·
providing specified management consulting and counseling activities;

 
·
performing selected data processing services and support services;

 
·
acting as an agent or broker in selling credit life insurance and other types of insurance in connection with credit transactions; and

 
·
performing selected insurance underwriting activities.

Despite prior approval, the Federal Reserve may order a bank holding company or its subsidiaries to terminate any of these activities or to terminate its ownership or control of any subsidiary when it has reasonable cause to believe that the bank holding company’s continued ownership, activity or control constitutes a serious risk to the financial safety, soundness, or stability of it or any of its bank subsidiaries.

In addition to the permissible bank holding company activities listed above, a bank holding company may qualify and elect to become a financial holding company, permitting the bank holding company to engage in activities that are financial in nature or incidental or complementary to financial activity.  The BHC Act expressly lists the following activities as financial in nature:

 
·
lending, trust and other banking activities;

 
·
insuring, guaranteeing, or indemnifying against loss or harm, or providing and issuing annuities, and acting as principal, agent, or broker for these purposes, in any state;

 
·
providing financial, investment, or advisory services;

 
·
issuing or selling instruments representing interests in pools of assets permissible for a bank to hold directly;

 
·
underwriting, dealing in or making a market in securities;

 
·
other activities that the Federal Reserve may determine to be so closely related to banking or managing or controlling banks as to be a proper incident to managing or controlling banks;

 
·
foreign activities permitted outside of the United States if the Federal Reserve has determined them to be usual in connection with banking operations abroad;
 
 
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·
merchant banking through securities or insurance affiliates; and

 
·
insurance company portfolio investments.

For us to qualify to become a financial holding company, the Bank and any other depository institution subsidiary of ours must be well-capitalized and well-managed and must have a Community Reinvestment Act rating of at least “satisfactory”.  Additionally, we must file an election with the Federal Reserve to become a financial holding company and must provide the Federal Reserve with 30 days’ written notice prior to engaging in a permitted financial activity.  We have not elected to become a financial holding company at this time.

Support of Subsidiary Institutions

Under Federal Reserve policy, we are expected to act as a source of financial strength for the Bank and to commit resources to support the Bank.  This support may be required at times when we might not be inclined to provide it in the absence of this policy.  In addition, any capital loans made by us to the Bank will be repaid in full.  In the unlikely event of our bankruptcy, any commitment by us to a federal bank regulatory agency to maintain the capital of the Bank will be assumed by the bankruptcy trustee and entitled to a priority of payment.
 
Bank Regulation and Supervision

The Bank is subject to extensive state and federal banking regulations that impose restrictions on and provide for general regulatory oversight of our operations.  These laws are generally intended to protect depositors and not stockholders.  The following discussion describes the material elements of the regulatory framework that applies to the Bank.

Since the Bank is a commercial bank chartered under the laws of the State of Alabama, it is primarily subject to the supervision, examination and reporting requirements of the FDIC and the Alabama Department of Banking (the “Alabama Banking Department”).  The FDIC and the Alabama Banking Department regularly examine the Bank’s operations and have the authority to approve or disapprove mergers, the establishment of branches and similar corporate actions.  Both regulatory agencies have the power to prevent the development or continuance of unsafe or unsound banking practices or other violations of law.  Additionally, the Bank’s deposits are insured by the FDIC to the maximum extent provided by law.  The Bank is also subject to numerous state and federal statutes and regulations that affect its business, activities and operations.

Branching

Under current Alabama law, the Bank may open branch offices throughout Alabama with the prior approval of the Alabama Banking Department.  In addition, with prior regulatory approval, the Bank may acquire branches of existing banks located in Alabama.  While prior law imposed various limits on the ability of banks to establish new branches in states other than their home state, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act allows a bank to branch into a new state by acquiring a branch of an existing institution or by setting up a new branch, without merging with an existing institution in the target state, if, under the laws of the state in which the branch is to be located, a state bank chartered by that state would be permitted to establish the branch.  This makes it much simpler for banks to open de novo branches in other states. We are in the process of seeking to obtain necessary regulatory approvals to open our planned Pensacola branch using this new mechanism.

Prompt Corrective Action

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act of 1991 establishes a system of “prompt corrective action” to resolve the problems of undercapitalized financial institutions.  Under this system, the federal banking regulators have established five capital categories (well capitalized, adequately capitalized, undercapitalized, significantly undercapitalized and critically undercapitalized) into which all institutions are placed.  The federal banking agencies have also specified by regulation the relevant capital levels for each of the other categories.  At December 31, 2010, the Bank qualified for the well-capitalized category.
 
 
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Federal banking regulators are required to take various mandatory supervisory actions and are authorized to take other discretionary actions with respect to institutions in the three undercapitalized categories.  The severity of the action depends upon the capital category in which the institution is placed.  Generally, subject to a narrow exception, the banking regulator must appoint a receiver or conservator for an institution that is critically undercapitalized.

An institution that is categorized as undercapitalized, significantly undercapitalized, or critically undercapitalized is required to submit an acceptable capital restoration plan to its appropriate federal banking agency.  A bank holding company must guarantee that a subsidiary depository institution meets its capital restoration plan, subject to various limitations.  The controlling holding company’s obligation to fund a capital restoration plan is limited to the lesser of (i) 5% of an undercapitalized subsidiary’s assets at the time it became undercapitalized and (ii) the amount required to meet regulatory capital requirements.  An undercapitalized institution is also generally prohibited from increasing its average total assets, making acquisitions, establishing any branches or engaging in any new line of business, except under an accepted capital restoration plan or with FDIC approval.  The regulations also establish procedures for downgrading an institution to a lower capital category based on supervisory factors other than capital.

FDIC Insurance Assessments

The FDIC has adopted a risk-based assessment system for insured depository institutions that takes into account the risks attributable to different categories and concentrations of assets and liabilities.  The system assigns an institution to one of three capital categories: (1) well capitalized; (2) adequately capitalized; and (3) undercapitalized.  These three categories are substantially similar to the prompt corrective action categories described above, with the “undercapitalized” category including institutions that are undercapitalized, significantly undercapitalized, and critically undercapitalized for prompt corrective action purposes.  The FDIC also assigns an institution to one of three supervisory subgroups based on a supervisory evaluation that the institution’s primary federal regulator provides to the FDIC and information that the FDIC determines to be relevant to the institution’s financial condition and the risk posed to the deposit insurance funds.  Currently, annual deposit insurance assessments range from $.07 to $.77 per $100 of assessable deposits, depending on the institution’s capital group and supervisory subgroup.  This assessment rate is adjusted quarterly, and our rate has been set at $.0347, or $.1388 annually, per $100 of deposits for the fourth quarter of 2010.

As part of the Deposit Insurance Fund Restoration Plan adopted by the FDIC in October 2008, the FDIC adopted the final rule modifying risk-based assessment system in February 2009. The final rule set initial base assessment rates between 12 and 45 basis points beginning April 1, 2009.  The FDIC imposed an emergency special assessment on June 30, 2009, which was collected on September 30, 2009.  In addition, in September 2009, the FDIC adopted a final rule requiring prepayment of 13 quarters of FDIC premiums on December 30, 2009.  Our required prepayment aggregated $8.1 million in December 2009.

The FDIC also imposes Financing Corporation (“FICO”) assessments to help pay the $780 million in annual interest payments on the $8 billion of bonds issued in the late 1980s as part of the government rescue of the thrift industry.  For the fourth quarter of 2010, the FICO assessment is equal to $.0102 cents per $100 in assessable deposits.  These assessments will continue until the bonds mature in 2019.

The FDIC may terminate its insurance of deposits of a bank if it finds that the bank has engaged in unsafe or unsound practices, is in an unsafe or unsound condition to continue operations, or has violated any applicable law, regulation, rule, order or condition imposed by the FDIC.  Under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, an FDIC-insured depository institution can be held liable for any loss incurred by, or reasonably expected, to be incurred by, the FDIC in connection with (1) the default of a commonly controlled FDIC-insured depository institution or (2) any assistance provided by the FDIC to any commonly controlled FDIC-insured depository institution “in danger of default.” “Default” is defined generally as the appointment of a conservator or receiver, and “in danger of default” is defined generally as the existence of certain conditions indicating that a default is likely to occur in the absence of regulatory assistance.  The FDIC’s claim for damage is superior to claims of stockholders of the insured depository institution but is subordinate to claims of depositors, secured creditors, and holders of subordinated debt (other than affiliates) of the commonly controlled insured depository institution.
 
 
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In October 2008, the FDIC inaugurated the Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program (“TLG Program”).  The TLG Program consists of two basic components: (1) a guarantee of newly issued senior unsecured debt of banks, thrifts, and certain holding companies; and (2) a full guarantee of non-interest bearing deposit transaction accounts.  We opted into the transaction account guarantee portion of the TLG Program, which will insure all balances in non-interest bearing transaction accounts and NOW accounts with interest rates less than or equal to 0.50% through June 30, 2010 (which was later extended to December 31, 2010), with the exception of NOW accounts, which were only covered if interest rates paid were less than or equal to 0.25%.  The FDIC premiums paid by the Bank increased by the amount of assessment charged on the balances in such accounts that are in excess of the maximum insured balances under normal FDIC coverage.  We opted out of the senior unsecured debt guarantee portion of the TLG Program.

Community Reinvestment Act

The Community Reinvestment Act (“CRA”) requires that, in connection with examinations of financial institutions within their respective jurisdictions, the Federal Reserve or the FDIC will evaluate the record of each financial institution in meeting the credit needs of its local community, including low and moderate-income neighborhoods.  These factors are also considered in evaluating mergers, acquisitions, and applications to open an office or facility.  Failure to adequately meet these criteria could impose additional requirements and limitations on the Bank. Additionally, we must publicly disclose the terms of various CRA-related agreements.

Other Regulations

Interest and other charges collected or contracted for by the Bank are subject to state usury laws and federal laws concerning interest rates.

Federal Laws Applicable to Credit Transactions

The Bank’s loan operations are subject to federal laws applicable to credit transactions, including:

 
·
the Federal Truth-In-Lending Act, governing disclosures of credit terms to consumer borrowers;

 
·
the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act of 1975, requiring financial institutions to provide information to enable the public and public officials to determine whether a financial institution is fulfilling its obligation to help meet the housing needs of the community it serves;

 
·
the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, creed or other prohibited factors in extending credit;

 
·
the Fair Credit Reporting Act of 1978, governing the use and provisions of information to credit reporting agencies;

 
·
the Fair Debt Collection Act, governing the manner in which consumer debts may be collected by collection agencies;

 
·
the Service Members’ Civil Relief Act, which amended the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Act of 1940, governing the repayment terms of, and property rights underlying, secured obligations of persons in military service; and

 
·
Rules and regulations of the various federal agencies charged with the responsibility of implementing these federal laws.

Federal Laws Applicable to Deposit Transactions

The deposit operations of the Bank are subject to:

 
·
the Right to Financial Privacy Act, which imposes a duty to maintain confidentiality of consumer financial records and prescribes procedures for complying with administrative subpoenas of financial records; and
 
 
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·
the Electronic Funds Transfer Act and Regulation E issued by the Federal Reserve to implement that act, which govern automatic deposits to and withdrawals from deposit accounts and customers’ rights and liabilities arising from the use of automated teller machines and other electronic banking services.

Capital Adequacy

We and the Bank are required to comply with the capital adequacy standards established by the Federal Reserve (in the case of the holding company) and the FDIC (in the case of the Bank).  The Federal Reserve has established a risk-based and a leverage measure of capital adequacy for bank holding companies.  The Bank is also subject to risk-based and leverage capital requirements adopted by the FDIC, which are substantially similar to those adopted by the Federal Reserve for bank holding companies.

The risk-based capital standards are designed to make regulatory capital requirements more sensitive to differences in risk profiles among banks and bank holding companies, to account for off-balance-sheet exposure, and to minimize disincentives for holding liquid assets.  Assets and off-balance-sheet items, such as letters of credit and unfunded loan commitments, are assigned to broad risk categories, each with appropriate risk weights.  The resulting capital ratios represent capital as a percentage of total risk-weighted assets and off-balance-sheet items.

The minimum guideline for the ratio of total capital to risk-weighted assets is 8%.  Total capital consists of two components, Tier 1 Capital and Tier 2 Capital. Tier 1 Capital generally consists of common stock, minority interests in the equity accounts of consolidated subsidiaries, noncumulative perpetual preferred stock, and a limited amount of qualifying cumulative perpetual preferred stock, less goodwill and other specified intangible assets.  Tier 1 Capital must equal at least 4% of risk-weighted assets.  Tier 2 Capital generally consists of subordinated debt, other preferred stock, and a limited amount of loan loss reserves.  The total amount of Tier 2 Capital is limited to 100% of Tier 1 Capital.  At December 31, 2010, our consolidated ratio of total capital to risk-weighted assets was 11.82%, and our ratio of Tier 1 Capital to risk-weighted assets was 10.22%.

In addition, the Federal Reserve has established minimum leverage ratio guidelines for bank holding companies.  These guidelines provide for a minimum ratio of Tier 1 Capital to average assets, less goodwill and other specified intangible assets, of 3% for bank holding companies that meet specified criteria, including having the highest regulatory rating and implementing the Federal Reserve’s risk-based capital measure for market risk.  All other bank holding companies generally are required to maintain a leverage ratio of at least 4%.  At December 31, 2010, our leverage ratio was 7.77%.  The guidelines also provide that bank holding companies experiencing internal growth or making acquisitions will be expected to maintain strong capital positions substantially above the minimum supervisory levels without reliance on intangible assets.  The Federal Reserve considers the leverage ratio and other indicators of capital strength in evaluating proposals for expansion or new activities.

Failure to meet capital guidelines could subject a bank or bank holding company to a variety of enforcement remedies, including issuance of a capital directive, the termination of deposit insurance by the FDIC, a prohibition on accepting brokered deposits, and certain other restrictions on its business.  As described above, significant additional restrictions can be imposed on FDIC-insured depository institutions that fail to meet applicable capital requirements.

As of December 31, 2010, the Bank’s most recent notification from the FDIC categorized the Bank as well-capitalized under the regulatory framework for prompt corrective action.  To remain categorized as well-capitalized, the Bank must maintain minimum total risk-based, Tier 1 risk-based, and Tier 1 leverage ratios as disclosed in the table below.  Our management believes that the Bank is well-capitalized under the prompt corrective action provisions as of December 31, 2010.
 
 
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Actual
   
For Capital Adequacy 
Purposes
   
To Be Well-Capitalized 
Under Prompt Corrective 
Action Provisions
 
   
Amount
   
Ratio
   
Amount
   
Ratio
   
Amount
   
Ratio
 
               
(Dollars in Thousands)
             
As of December 31, 2010:
                                   
Total Capital to Risk-Weighted Assets:
                                   
Consolidated
  $ 166,850       11.82 %   $ 112,927       8.00 %     N/A       N/A  
ServisFirst Bank
    166,721       11.81 %     112,978       8.00 %   $ 141,222       10.00 %
Tier 1 Capital to Risk Weighted Assets:
                                               
Consolidated
    144,263       10.22 %     56,464       4.00 %     N/A       N/A  
ServisFirst Bank
    144,117       10.20 %     56,489       4.00 %     84,733       6.00 %
Tier 1 Capital to Average Assets:
                                               
Consolidated
    144,263       7.77 %     74,266       4.00 %     N/A       N/A  
ServisFirst Bank
    144,117       7.77 %     74,236       4.00 %     92,795       5.00 %

Potential Changes in Capital Adequacy Requirements

On December 15, 2010, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, a group representing the central banking authorities of 27 nations that formulates recommendations on banking supervisory policy, released its final framework for strengthening international capital and liquidity regulation, known as “Basel III”.  Although the Basel III framework is not directly binding on the U.S. bank regulatory agencies, it has been predicted that the regulatory agencies will likely implement changes to the capital adequacy standards applicable to the insured depository institutions and their holding companies in light of Basel III.  When fully phased in on January 1, 2019, Basel III will require banks to maintain the following new standards and introduces a new capital measure “Common Equity Tier 1”, or “CET1”. Basel III increases the CET1 to risk-weighted assets to 4.5%, and introduces a capital conservation buffer of an additional 2.5% of common equity to risk-weighted assets, raising the target CET1 to risk-weighted assets ratio to 7%. It requires banks to maintain a minimum ratio of Tier 1 capital to risk weighted assets of at least 6.0%, plus the capital conservation buffer effectively resulting in Tier 1 capital ratio of 8.5%. Basel III increases the minimum total capital ratio to 8.0% plus the capital conservation buffer, increasing the minimum total capital ratio to 10.5%. Basel III also introduces a non-risk adjusted tier 1 leverage ratio of 3%, based on a measure of total exposure rather than total assets, and new liquidity standards. The Basel III capital and liquidity standards will be phased in over a multi-year period, but the implementation of the new framework will commence January 1, 2013. On that date, to the extent the Basel III standards are adopted by the applicable regulatory agencies, banks will be required to meet the following minimum capital ratios: 3.5% CET1 to risk-weighted assets, 4.5% Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets and 8.0% total capital to risk-weighted assets.

Payment of Dividends

We are a legal entity separate and distinct from the Bank.  Our principal source of cash flow, including cash flow to pay dividends to our stockholders, is dividends the Bank pays to us as the Bank’s sole stockholder.  Statutory and regulatory limitations apply to the Bank’s payment of dividends to us as well as to our payment of dividends to our stockholders.  The policy of the Federal Reserve that a bank holding company should serve as a source of strength to its subsidiary banks also results in the position of the Federal Reserve that a bank holding company should not maintain a level of cash dividends to its stockholders that places undue pressure on the capital of its bank subsidiaries or that can be funded only through additional borrowings or other arrangements that may undermine the bank holding company’s ability to serve as such a source of strength.  Our ability to pay dividends is also subject to the provisions of Delaware corporate law.

The Alabama Banking Department also regulates the Bank’s dividend payments and must approve any dividends that would exceed 50% of the Bank’s net income for the prior year.  Under Alabama law, a state-chartered bank may not pay a dividend in excess of 90% of its net earnings until the bank’s surplus is equal to at least 20% of its capital.  As of December 31, 2010, the Bank’s surplus was equal to 54.0% of the Bank’s capital.  The Bank is also required by Alabama law to obtain the prior approval of the Superintendent of Banks (the “Superintendent”) for its payment of dividends if the total of all dividends declared by the Bank in any calendar year will exceed the total of (1) the Bank’s net earnings (as defined by statute) for that year, plus (2) its retained net earnings for the preceding two years, less any required transfers to surplus.  Based on this, the Bank would be limited to paying $39.1 million in dividends as of December 31, 2010.  In addition, no dividends, withdrawals or transfers may be made from the Bank’s surplus without the prior written approval of the Superintendent.
 
 
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The Bank’s payment of dividends may also be affected or limited by other factors, such as the requirement to maintain adequate capital above regulatory guidelines.  The federal banking agencies have indicated that paying dividends that deplete a depository institution’s capital base to an inadequate level would be an unsafe and unsound banking practice.  Under the FDIC Improvement Act of 1991, a depository institution may not pay any dividends if payment would cause it to become undercapitalized or if it already is undercapitalized. Moreover, the federal agencies have issued policy statements that provide that bank holding companies and insured banks should generally only pay dividends out of current operating earnings.  If, in the opinion of the federal banking regulators, the Bank were engaged in or about to engage in an unsafe or unsound practice, the federal banking regulators could require, after notice and a hearing, that the Bank stop or refrain from engaging in the questioned practice.

We have never paid any dividends and we do not plan to pay dividends in the near future.  We anticipate that our earnings, if any, will be held for purposes of enhancing our capital.

Restrictions on Transactions with Affiliates

We are subject to Section 23A of the Federal Reserve Act, which places limits on the amount of:

 
·
a bank’s loans or extensions of credit to affiliates;

 
·
a bank’s investment in affiliates;

 
·
assets a bank may purchase from affiliates, except for real and personal property exempted by the Federal Reserve;

 
·
loans or extensions of credit made by a bank to third parties collateralized by the securities or obligations of affiliates; and

 
·
a bank’s guarantee, acceptance or letter of credit issued on behalf of an affiliate.

The total amount of the above transactions is limited in amount, as to any one affiliate, to 10% of a bank’s capital and surplus and, as to all affiliates combined, to 20% of a bank’s capital and surplus.  In addition to the limitation on the amount of these transactions, each of the above transactions must also meet specified collateral requirements.  The Bank must also comply with other provisions designed to avoid the taking of low-quality assets.

We are also subject to Section 23B of the Federal Reserve Act, which, among other things, prohibits an institution from engaging in the above transactions with affiliates unless the transactions are on terms substantially the same, or at least as favorable to the institution or its subsidiaries, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with nonaffiliated companies.

The Bank is also subject to restrictions on extensions of credit to its executive officers, directors, principal shareholders and their related interests.  These extensions of credit (1) must be made on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with third parties and (2) must not involve more than the normal risk of repayment or present other unfavorable features.  There is also an aggregate limitation on all loans to insiders and their related interests.  These loans cannot exceed the institution’s total unimpaired capital and surplus, and the FDIC may determine that a lesser amount is appropriate.  Insiders are subject to enforcement actions for knowingly accepting loans in violation of applicable restrictions.  Alabama state banking laws also have similar provisions.

Privacy

Financial institutions are required to disclose their policies for collecting and protecting confidential information.  Customers generally may prevent financial institutions from sharing nonpublic personal financial information with nonaffiliated third parties except under narrow circumstances, such as the processing of transactions requested by the consumer or when the financial institution is jointly sponsoring a product or service with a nonaffiliated third party.  Additionally, financial institutions generally may not disclose consumer account numbers to any nonaffiliated third party for use in telemarketing, direct mail marketing or other marketing to consumers.
 
 
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Consumer Credit Reporting

On December 4, 2003, President Bush signed the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act, which amended the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (the “FCRA”).  These amendments to the FCRA (the “FCRA Amendments”) became effective in 2004.

The FCRA Amendments include, among other things:

 
·
requirements for financial institutions to develop policies and procedures to identify potential identity theft and, upon the request of a consumer, place a fraud alert in the consumer’s credit file stating that the consumer may be the victim of identity theft or other fraud;

 
·
for entities that furnish information to consumer reporting agencies (which would include the Bank), requirements to implement procedures and policies regarding the accuracy and integrity of the furnished information and regarding the correction of previously furnished information that is later determined to be inaccurate; and

 
·
a requirement for mortgage lenders to disclose credit scores to consumers.

The FCRA Amendments also prohibit a business that receives consumer information from an affiliate from using that information for marketing purposes unless the consumer is first provided a notice and an opportunity to direct the business not to use the information for such marketing purposes (the “opt-out”), subject to certain exceptions.  We do not share consumer information between us and the Bank for marketing purposes, except as allowed under exceptions to the notice and opt-out requirements.  Because we do not share consumer information between us and the Bank, the limitations on sharing of information for marketing purposes do not have a significant impact on us.

Anti-Terrorism and Money Laundering Legislation

The Bank is subject to the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act (the “USA PATRIOT Act”), the Bank Secrecy Act, and rules and regulations of the Office of Foreign Assets Control (the “OFAC”).  These statutes and related rules and regulations impose requirements and limitations on specified financial transactions and account relationships, intended to guard against money laundering and terrorism financing.  The Bank has established a customer identification program pursuant to Section 326 of the USA PATRIOT Act and the Bank Secrecy Act, and otherwise has implemented policies and procedures to comply with the foregoing rules.

Proposed Legislation and Regulatory Action

New regulations and statutes are regularly proposed that contain wide-ranging proposals for altering the structures, regulations and competitive relationships of financial institutions operating or doing business in the United States.  We cannot predict whether or in what form any proposed regulation or statute will be adopted or the extent to which our business may be affected by any new regulation or statute.

Effect of Governmental Monetary Policies

The Bank’s earnings are affected by domestic economic conditions and the monetary and fiscal policies of the United States government and its agencies.  The Federal Reserve’s monetary policies have had, and are likely to continue to have, an important impact on the operating results of commercial banks through its power to implement national monetary policy in order, among other things, to curb inflation or combat a recession.  The monetary policies of the Federal Reserve affect the levels of bank loans, investments and deposits through its control over the issuance of United States government securities, its regulation of the discount rate applicable to member banks and its influence over reserve requirements to which member banks are subject.  We cannot predict, and have no control over, the nature or impact of future changes in monetary and fiscal policies.
 
 
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Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
 
The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 represents a comprehensive revision of laws affecting corporate governance, accounting obligations and corporate reporting. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act is applicable to all companies with equity securities registered, or that file reports, under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.  In particular, the act established (i) requirements for audit committees, including independence, expertise and responsibilities; (ii) responsibilities regarding financial statements for the chief executive officer and chief financial officer of the reporting company and new requirements for them to certify the accuracy of periodic reports; (iii) standards for auditors and regulation of audits; (iv) disclosure and reporting obligations for the reporting company and its directors and executive officers; and (v) civil and criminal penalties for violations of the federal securities laws. The legislation also established a new accounting oversight board to enforce auditing standards and restrict the scope of services that accounting firms may provide to their public company audit clients.
 
 Recent Federal Legislation relating to Financial Institutions
 
On July 21, 2010, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) was signed into law. This new law will significantly change the current bank regulatory structure and affect the lending, deposit, investment, trading and operating activities of financial institutions and their holding companies. The Dodd-Frank Act requires various federal agencies to adopt a broad range of new implementing rules and regulations and to prepare numerous studies and reports for Congress. The federal agencies are given significant discretion in drafting the implementing rules and regulations, and consequently, many of the details and much of the impact of the Dodd-Frank Act may not be known for many months or years.
 
The Dodd-Frank Act will eliminate the federal prohibitions on paying interest on demand deposits effective one year after the date of its enactment, thus allowing businesses to have interest-bearing checking accounts. Depending on competitive responses, this significant change to existing law could have an adverse impact on our interest expense.
 
The Dodd-Frank Act also broadens the base for FDIC insurance assessments. Assessments will now be based on the average consolidated total assets less tangible equity capital of a financial institution. The Dodd-Frank Act permanently increases the maximum amount of deposit insurance for banks, savings institutions and credit unions to $250,000 per depositor. Noninterest-bearing transaction accounts and certain attorney’s trust accounts have unlimited deposit insurance through December 31, 2012.
 
The Dodd-Frank Act will require publicly traded companies to give stockholders a non-binding vote on executive compensation and golden parachute payments. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act authorizes the Securities and Exchange Commission to promulgate rules that would allow stockholders to nominate their own candidates using a company’s proxy materials and directs the federal banking regulators to issue rules prohibiting incentive compensation that encourages inappropriate risks.
 
The Dodd-Frank Act creates a new Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection with broad powers to supervise and enforce consumer protection laws. The Bureau will have broad rule-making authority for a wide range of consumer protection laws that apply to all banks, including the authority to prohibit “unfair, deceptive or abusive” acts and practices. The Bureau will have examination and enforcement authority over all banks with more than $10 billion in assets. Savings institutions with less than $10 billion in assets will continue to be examined for compliance with consumer laws by their primary bank regulator.
 
Many aspects of the Dodd-Frank Act are subject to rulemaking and will take effect over several years, making it difficult to anticipate the overall financial impact on us. However, compliance with this new law and its implementing regulations clearly will result in additional operating and compliance costs that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
Recent government efforts to strengthen the U.S. financial system, including the implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (“ARRA”), the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act (“EESA”), the Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program (“TLGP”) and special assessments imposed by the FDIC, subject us, to the extent applicable, to additional regulatory fees, corporate governance requirements, restrictions on executive compensation, restrictions on declaring or paying dividends, restrictions on stock repurchases, limits on tax deductions for executive compensation and prohibitions against golden parachute payments. These fees, requirements and restrictions, as well as any others that may be imposed in the future, may have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
 
 
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Available Information

Our corporate website is www.servisfirstbank.com.  We have direct links on this website to our Code of Ethics and the charters for our Audit, Compensation and Corporate Governance and Nominations Committees by clicking on the “Investor Relations” tab.  We also have direct links to our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), including, but not limited to, our first annual report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, proxy statements and any amendments to these reports.    You may also obtain a copy of any such report free of charge from us by requesting such copy in writing to 850 Shades Creek Parkway, Suite 200, Birmingham, Alabama 35209, Attention: Chief Financial Officer.  This annual report and accompanying exhibits and all other reports and filings that we file with the SEC will be available for the public to view and copy (at prescribed rates) at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, Washington, D.C. 20549.  You may also obtain copies of such information at the prescribed rates from the SEC’s Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330.  The SEC also maintains a website that contains such reports, proxy and information statements, and other information as we file electronically with the SEC by clicking on http://www.sec.gov.

ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS.
 
An investment in our common stock involves risks.  Before deciding to invest in our common stock, you should carefully consider the risks described below, together with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes and the other information included in this annual report.  The discussion below presents material risks associated with an investment in our common stock.  Our business, financial condition and results of operation could be harmed by any of the following risks or by other risks identified in this annual report, as well as by other risks we may not have anticipated or viewed as material.  In such a case, the value of our common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.  The risks discussed below also include forward-looking statements, and our actual results may differ substantially from those discussed in these forward-looking statements.  See also “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” on page 1.

Risks Related to Our Industry
 
Recently enacted financial reform legislation will, among other things, tighten capital standards, create a new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and result in new regulations that are likely to increase our costs of operations.
 
On July 21, 2010, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) was signed into law. This new law will significantly change the current bank regulatory structure and affect the lending, deposit, investment, trading and operating activities of financial institutions and their holding companies. The Dodd-Frank Act requires various federal agencies to adopt a broad range of new implementing rules and regulations and to prepare numerous studies and reports for Congress. The federal agencies are given significant discretion in drafting the implementing rules and regulations, and consequently, many of the details and much of the impact of the Dodd-Frank Act may not be known for many months or years.
 
The Dodd-Frank Act will eliminate the federal prohibitions on paying interest on demand deposits effective one year after the date of its enactment, thus allowing businesses to have interest-bearing checking accounts. Depending on competitive responses, this significant change to existing law could have an adverse impact on our interest expense.
 
The Dodd-Frank Act also broadens the base for FDIC insurance assessments. Assessments will now be based on the average consolidated total assets less tangible equity capital of a financial institution. The Dodd-Frank Act permanently increases the maximum amount of deposit insurance for banks, savings institutions and credit unions to $250,000 per depositor. Noninterest-bearing transaction accounts and certain attorney’s trust accounts have unlimited deposit insurance through December 31, 2012.
 
 
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The Dodd-Frank Act will require publicly traded companies to give stockholders a non-binding vote on executive compensation and golden parachute payments. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act authorizes the Securities and Exchange Commission to promulgate rules that would allow stockholders to nominate their own candidates using a company’s proxy materials and directs the federal banking regulators to issue rules prohibiting incentive compensation that encourages inappropriate risks.
 
The Dodd-Frank Act creates a new Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection with broad powers to supervise and enforce consumer protection laws. The Bureau will have broad rule-making authority for a wide range of consumer protection laws that apply to all banks, including the authority to prohibit “unfair, deceptive or abusive” acts and practices. The Bureau will have examination and enforcement authority over all banks with more than $10 billion in assets. Savings institutions with less than $10 billion in assets will continue to be examined for compliance with consumer laws by their primary bank regulator.
 
Many aspects of the Dodd-Frank Act are subject to rulemaking and will take effect over several years, making it difficult to anticipate the overall financial impact on us. However, compliance with this new law and its implementing regulations clearly will result in additional operating and compliance costs that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
Additional regulatory requirements especially those imposed under ARRA, EESA or other legislation intended to strengthen the U.S. financial system, could adversely affect us.
 
Recent government efforts to strengthen the U.S. financial system, including the implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (“ARRA”), the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act (“EESA”), the Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program (“TLGP”) and special assessments imposed by the FDIC, subject us, to the extent applicable, to additional regulatory fees, corporate governance requirements, restrictions on executive compensation, restrictions on declaring or paying dividends, restrictions on stock repurchases, limits on tax deductions for executive compensation and prohibitions against golden parachute payments. These fees, requirements and restrictions, as well as any others that may be imposed in the future, may have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
 
Current market conditions have adversely affected, and may continue to adversely affect, us, our customers and our industry.

Because our business is focused exclusively in the Southeastern United States, we are particularly exposed to downturns in the U.S. economy in general and in the Southeastern economy in particular. Dramatic declines in the housing market over the past three years, with falling home prices and increasing foreclosures, unemployment and under-employment, have negatively impacted the credit performance of mortgage loans and resulted in significant write-downs of asset values by financial institutions, including government-sponsored entities as well as major commercial and investment banks. These write-downs, initially of mortgage-backed securities but spreading to credit default swaps and other derivative and cash securities, in turn, have caused many financial institutions to seek additional capital, to merge with larger and stronger institutions and, in some cases, to fail. Reflecting concern about the stability of the financial markets generally and the strength of counterparties, many lenders and institutional investors have reduced or ceased providing funding to borrowers, including to other financial institutions. This market turmoil and tightening of credit has led to an increased level of commercial and consumer delinquencies, lack of consumer confidence, increased market volatility and widespread reduction of business activity generally. The resulting economic pressure on consumers and businesses and lack of confidence in the financial markets may adversely affect our customers and thus our business, financial condition, and results of operations. A worsening of these conditions would likely exacerbate any adverse effects of these difficult market conditions on us and others in the financial institutions industry.

Current market volatility and industry developments may adversely affect our business and financial results.

The volatility in the capital and credit markets, along with the housing declines over the past three years, has resulted in significant pressure on the financial services industry.  We have experienced a higher level of foreclosures and higher losses upon foreclosure than we have historically.  If current volatility and market conditions continue or worsen, there can be no assurance that our industry, results of operations or our business will not be significantly adversely impacted.  We may have further increases in loan losses, deterioration of capital or limitations on our access to funding or capital, if needed.
 
 
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Further, if other, particularly larger, financial institutions continue to fail to be adequately capitalized or funded, it may negatively impact our business and financial results.  We routinely interact with numerous financial institutions in the ordinary course of business and are therefore exposed to operational and credit risk to those institutions.  Failures of such institutions may significantly adversely impact our operations.

Our profitability is vulnerable to interest rate fluctuations.
 
As a financial institution, our earnings can be significantly affected by changes in interest rates, particularly our net interest income, the rate of loan prepayments, the volume and type of loans originated or produced, the sales of loans on the secondary market and the value of our mortgage servicing rights.  Our profitability is dependent to a large extent on our net interest income, which is the difference between our income on interest-earning assets and our expense on interest-bearing liabilities.  We are affected by changes in general interest rate levels and by other economic factors beyond our control.
 
Changes in interest rates also affect the average life of loans and mortgage-backed securities.  The relatively lower interest rates in recent periods have resulted in increased prepayments of loans and mortgage-backed securities as borrowers have refinanced their mortgages to reduce their borrowing costs.  Under these circumstances, we are subject to reinvestment risk to the extent that we are not able to reinvest such prepayments at rates which are comparable to the rates on the prepaid loans or securities.

We are subject to extensive regulation that could limit or restrict our activities and impose financial requirements or limitations on the conduct of our business, which limitations or restrictions could have a material adverse effect on our profitability.
 
We operate in a highly regulated industry and are subject to examination, supervision and comprehensive regulation by various federal and state agencies including the Federal Reserve, the FDIC and the Alabama Banking Department. Regulatory compliance is costly and restricts certain of our activities, including payment of dividends, mergers and acquisitions, investments, loans and interest rates charged, and interest rates paid on deposits. We are also subject to capitalization guidelines established by our regulators, which require us to maintain adequate capital to support our growth. Violations of various laws, even if unintentional, may result in significant fines or other penalties, including restrictions on branching or bank acquisitions. Recently, banks generally have faced increased regulatory sanctions and scrutiny particularly with respect to the USA Patriot Act and other statutes relating to anti-money laundering compliance and customer privacy. The current recession has had major adverse effects on the banking and financial industry, many of which have lost well over 50% of their market capitalization during the past three years due to material and substantial losses in their loan portfolios and substantial write downs of their asset values. As described above, recent legislation has substantially changed, and increased, federal regulation of financial institutions, and there may be significant future legislation (and regulations under existing legislation) that could have a further material affect on banks and bank holding companies like us.
 
The laws and regulations applicable to the banking industry could change at any time, and we cannot predict the effects of these changes on our business and profitability.  Because government regulation greatly affects the business and financial results of all commercial banks and bank holding companies, our cost of compliance could adversely affect our ability to operate profitably.  As a relatively new public company, we are subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), and the related rules and regulations promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission.  These laws and regulations increase the scope, complexity and cost of corporate governance, reporting and disclosure practices.  Despite our conducting business in a highly regulated environment, these laws and regulations have different requirements for compliance than we have previously experienced.  Our expenses related to services rendered by our accountants, legal counsel and consultants will increase in order to ensure compliance with these laws and regulations that we will be subject to as a public company. In addition, it is possible that the sudden application of these requirements to our business will result in some cultural adjustments and strain our management resources.
 
 
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Changes in monetary policies may have a material adverse effect on our business.

Like all regulated financial institutions, we are affected by monetary policies implemented by the Federal Reserve and other federal instrumentalities.  A primary instrument of monetary policy employed by the Federal Reserve is the restriction or expansion of the money supply through open market operations.  This instrument of monetary policy frequently causes volatile fluctuations in interest rates, and it can have a direct, material adverse effect on the operating results of financial institutions including our business.  Borrowings by the United States government to finance government debt may also cause fluctuations in interest rates and have similar effects on the operating results of such institutions.

Risks Related To Our Business

 Our construction and land development loan portfolio and commercial and industrial loan portfolio are both subject to unique risks that could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

The severity of the decline in the U.S. economy has adversely affected the performance and market value of many of our loans.  Several years of decline and stagnation in the residential housing market have directly affected our construction and land development loans, while unemployment and general economic weakness have adversely affected parts of our commercial and industrial loan portfolio.  Our construction and land development loan portfolio was $172.1 million at December 31, 2010, comprising 12.3% of our total loans.  Our commercial and industrial loans were $536.6 million, or 38.5% of total loans at December 31, 2010.  Construction loans are often riskier than home equity loans or residential mortgage loans to individuals.  In the event of a general economic slowdown like the one we are currently experiencing, these loans sometimes represent higher risk due to slower sales and reduced cash flow that could negatively affect the borrowers’ ability to repay on a timely basis.  We, as well as our competitors, have experienced a significant increase in impaired and non-accrual construction and land development loans and commercial and industrial loans.  We believe we have established adequate reserves with respect to such loans, although there can be no assurance that our actual loan losses will not be greater or less than we have anticipated in establishing such reserves. Primarily as a result of the continued weakness in residential construction and overall poor economic conditions in our market areas, our total impaired loans increased to $51.5 million at December 31, 2010 compared to $21.5 million at December, 2009. Of this $51.5 million of impaired loans, $28.7 million were real estate construction and $11.5 million were commercial and industrial loans. We had an allowance for loan losses of $18.1 million, of which $6.4 million, or 35.4%, was allocated to real estate construction loans, and $5.2 million, or 28.8%, was allocated to commercial and industrial loans.

In addition, although regulations and regulatory policies affecting banks and financial services companies undergo continuous change and we cannot predict when changes will occur or the ultimate effect of any changes, there has been recent regulatory focus on construction, development and other commercial real estate lending. Recent changes in the federal policies applicable to construction, development or other commercial real estate loans subject us to substantial limitations with respect to making such loans, increase the costs of making such loans, and require us to have a greater amount of capital to support this kind of lending, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

If we fail to maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting or remediate any future material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting, we may be unable to accurately report our financial results or prevent fraud, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Our internal controls over financial reporting are designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of the financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.  Effective internal controls over financial reporting are necessary for us to provide reliable reports and prevent fraud.

 
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We believe that a control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met.  Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within a company have been detected.  We cannot guarantee that we will identify significant deficiencies and/or material weaknesses in our internal controls in the future, and our failure to maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Our decisions regarding credit risk could be inaccurate and our allowance for loan losses may be inadequate, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and future prospects.

Our earnings are affected by our ability to make loans, and thus we could sustain significant loan losses and consequently significant net losses if we incorrectly assess either the creditworthiness of our borrowers resulting in loans to borrowers who fail to repay their loans in accordance with the loan terms or the value of the collateral securing the repayment of their loans, or we fail to detect or respond to a deterioration in our loan quality in a timely manner.  Management makes various assumptions and judgments about the collectability of our loan portfolio, including the creditworthiness of our borrowers and the value of the real estate and other assets serving as collateral for the repayment of many of our loans.  We maintain an allowance for loan losses that we consider adequate to absorb losses inherent in the loan portfolio based on our assessment of the information available.  In determining the size of our allowance for loan losses, we rely on an analysis of our loan portfolio based on historical loss experience, volume and types of loans, trends in classification, volume and trends in delinquencies and non-accruals, national and local economic conditions and other pertinent information.  We target small and medium-sized businesses as loan customers.  Because of their size, these borrowers may be less able to withstand competitive or economic pressures than larger borrowers in periods of economic weakness.  Also, as we expand into new markets, our determination of the size of the allowance could be understated due to our lack of familiarity with market-specific factors.  Despite the effects of the ongoing economic decline, we believe our allowance for loan losses is adequate.  Our allowance for loan losses as of December 31, 2010 was $18.1 million, or 1.30% of total gross loans as of year-end.

If our assumptions are inaccurate, we may incur loan losses in excess of our current allowance for loan losses and be required to make material additions to our allowance for loan losses which could consequently materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and future prospects.

However, even if our assumptions are accurate, federal and state regulators periodically review our allowance for loan losses and could require us to materially increase our allowance for loan losses or recognize further loan charge-offs based on judgments different than those of our management.  Any material increase in our allowance for loan losses or loan charge-offs as required by these regulatory agencies could consequently materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and future prospects.

Our business strategy includes the continuation of our growth plans, and our financial condition and results of operations could be negatively affected if we fail to grow or fail to manage our growth effectively.

We intend to continue pursuing our growth strategy for our business through organic growth of our loan portfolio.  Our prospects must be considered in light of the risks, expenses and difficulties that can be encountered by financial service companies in rapid growth stages, which include the risks associated with the following:

 
·
maintaining loan quality;

 
·
maintaining adequate management personnel and information systems to oversee such growth;

 
·
maintaining adequate control and compliance functions; and

 
·
securing capital and liquidity needed to support anticipated growth.
 
 
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We may not be able to expand our presence in our existing markets or successfully enter new markets, and any expansion could adversely affect our results of operations.  Failure to manage our growth effectively could have a material adverse effect on our business, future prospects, financial condition or results of operations, and could adversely affect our ability to successfully implement our business strategy.  Our ability to grow successfully will depend on a variety of factors, including the continued availability of desirable business opportunities, the competitive responses from other financial institutions in our market areas and our ability to manage our growth.

Our continued pace of growth will require us to raise additional capital in the future to fund such growth, and the unavailability of additional capital or on terms acceptable to us could adversely affect our growth and/or our financial condition and results of operations.

We are required by federal and state regulatory authorities to maintain adequate levels of capital to support our operations.  To support our recent and ongoing growth, we have completed a series of capital transactions during the past two years, including:

 
·
the sale of $15,000,000 in 8.50% Trust Preferred Securities by our initial statutory trust, ServisFirst Capital Trust I, on September 2, 2008;
 
·
the sale of an aggregate of 400,000 shares of our common stock at $25 per share, or $10,000,000, in a private placement completed in part on December 31, 2008 and in part on March 13, 2009;
 
·
the sale of $5,000,000 aggregate principal amount of the Bank’s 8.25% Subordinated Notes due June 1, 2016 in a private placement to an institutional investor in June 2009; and
 
·
the sale of $15,000,000 in 6.0% Mandatory Convertible Trust Preferred Securities by our second statutory trust, ServisFirst Capital Trust II, on March 15, 2010.

After giving effect to these transactions, we believe that we will have sufficient capital to meet our capital needs for our immediate growth plans.  However, we will continue to need capital to support our longer-term growth plans.  If capital is not available on favorable terms when we need it, we will have to either issue common stock or other securities on less than desirable terms or reduce our rate of growth until market conditions become more favorable.  In either of such events, our financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected.

Competition from financial institutions and other financial service providers may adversely affect our profitability.

The banking business is highly competitive, and we experience competition in our markets from many other financial institutions.  We compete with commercial banks, credit unions, savings and loan associations, mortgage banking firms, consumer finance companies, securities brokerage firms, insurance companies, money market funds, and other mutual funds, as well as other community banks and super-regional and national financial institutions that operate offices in our service areas.

Additionally, we face competition in our service areas from de novo community banks, including those with senior management who were previously affiliated with other local or regional banks or those controlled by investor groups with strong local business and community ties.  These new, smaller competitors are likely to cater to the same small and medium-size business clientele and with similar relationship-based approaches as we do.  Moreover, with their initial capital base to deploy, they could seek to rapidly gain market share by under-pricing the current market rates for loans and paying higher rates for deposits.  These de novo community banks may offer higher deposit rates or lower cost loans in an effort to attract our customers, and may attempt to hire our management and employees.

We compete with these other financial institutions both in attracting deposits and in making loans.  In addition, we must attract our customer base from other existing financial institutions and from new residents.  We expect competition to increase in the future as a result of legislative, regulatory and technological changes and the continuing trend of consolidation in the financial services industry.  Our profitability depends upon our continued ability to successfully compete with an array of financial institutions in our service areas.
 
 
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Unpredictable economic conditions or a natural disaster in the State of Alabama or the State of Florida, particularly the Birmingham-Hoover, Huntsville, Montgomery and Dothan, Alabama MSAs or the Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent, Florida MSA, may have a material adverse effect on our financial performance.

The majority of our current borrowers and depositors are individuals and businesses located and doing business in Jefferson and Shelby Counties of the Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama MSA.  We also have added borrowers and depositors in Madison County in the Huntsville, Alabama MSA since opening offices in Huntsville in 2006; in Montgomery County in the Montgomery, Alabama MSA since opening offices in Montgomery in 2007, and in Houston County in the Dothan, Alabama MSA since opening our office in Dothan in 2008.  We are now in the process of opening an office in Escambia County in the Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent, Florida MSA (which also includes Santa Rosa County).  Therefore, our success will depend on the general economic conditions in the State of Alabama and the State of Florida, and more particularly in Jefferson, Shelby, Madison, Houston and Montgomery Counties in Alabama and Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties in Florida, which we cannot predict with certainty.  Unlike many of our larger competitors, the majority of our borrowers are commercial firms, professionals and affluent consumers located and doing business in such local markets.  As a result, our operations and profitability may be more adversely affected by a local economic downturn or natural disaster in Alabama or Florida, particularly in such markets, than those of larger, more geographically diverse competitors.  For example, a downturn in the economy of any of our MSAs could make it more difficult for our borrowers in those markets to repay their loans and may lead to loan losses that we cannot offset through operations in other markets until we can expand our markets further.  Similarly, our entry into the Pensacola market increases our potential exposure to losses associated with hurricanes and similar natural disasters that are more common on the Gulf Coast than in our historical markets.

We encounter technological change continually and have fewer resources than many of our competitors to invest in technological improvements.

The financial services industry is undergoing rapid technological changes, with frequent introductions of new technology-driven products and services. In addition to serving customers better, the effective use of technology increases efficiency and enables financial institutions to reduce costs.  Our success will depend in part on our ability to address our customers’ needs by using technology to provide products and services that will satisfy customer demands for convenience, as well as to create additional efficiencies in our operations.  Many of our competitors have substantially greater resources to invest in technological improvements than we have.  We may not be able to implement new technology-driven products and services effectively or be successful in marketing these products and services to our customers.  As these technologies are improved in the future, we may, in order to remain competitive, be required to make significant capital expenditures, which may increase our overall expenses and have a material adverse effect on our net income.

Lower lending limits than many of our competitors may limit our ability to attract borrowers.
 
During our early years of operation, and likely for many years thereafter, our legally mandated lending limits will be lower than those of many of our competitors because we will have less capital than such competitors.  Our lower lending limits may discourage borrowers with lending needs that exceed those limits from doing business with us.  While we may try to serve these borrowers by selling loan participations to other financial institutions, this strategy may not succeed.

We may not be able to successfully expand into new markets, including our planned expansion into the Pensacola, Florida market.

We have opened new offices and operations in three primary markets (Huntsville, Montgomery and Dothan, Alabama) in the past four years and now plan to open an office in the Pensacola, Florida market, our first market outside of Alabama, upon receipt of appropriate regulatory approvals.  We may not be able to successfully manage this growth with sufficient human resources, training and operational, financial and technological resources.  Any such failure could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition and our ability to expand into new markets.
 
 
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Our recent results may not be indicative of our future results, and may not provide guidance to assess the risk of an investment in our common stock.

We may not be able to sustain our historical rate of growth and may not even be able to expand our business at all.  In addition, our recent growth may distort some of our historical financial ratios and statistics.  In the future, we may not have the benefit of several factors that were favorable until late 2008, such as a rising interest rate environment, a strong residential housing market or the ability to find suitable expansion opportunities.  Various factors, such as economic conditions, regulatory and legislative considerations and competition, may also impede or prohibit our ability to expand our market presence.  As a small commercial bank, we have different lending risks than larger banks.  We provide services to our local communities; thus, our ability to diversify our economic risks is limited by our own local markets and economies.  We lend primarily to small to medium-sized businesses, which may expose us to greater lending risks than those faced by banks lending to larger, better-capitalized businesses with longer operating histories.  We manage our credit exposure through careful monitoring of loan applicants and loan concentrations in particular industries, and through our loan approval and review procedures.  Our use of historical and objective information in determining and managing credit exposure may not be accurate in assessing our risk.

We are dependent on the services of our management team and board of directors, and the unexpected loss of key officers or directors may adversely affect our operations.

If any of our or the Bank’s executive officers, other key personnel, or directors leaves us or the Bank, our operations may be adversely affected.  In particular, we believe that Thomas A. Broughton III is extremely important to our success and the Bank.  Mr. Broughton has extensive executive-level banking experience and is the President and Chief Executive Officer of us and the Bank.  If he leaves his position for any reason, our financial condition and results of operations may suffer.  The Bank is the beneficiary of a key man life insurance policy on the life of Mr. Broughton in the amount of $5 million.  Also, we have hired key officers to run our banking offices in each of the Huntsville, Montgomery and Dothan, Alabama markets and the Pensacola, Florida market, who are extremely important to our success in such markets.  If any of them leaves for any reason, our results of operations could suffer in such markets.  With the exception of the key officers in charge of our Huntsville, Montgomery and Dothan banking offices, we do not have employment agreements or non-competition agreements with any of our executive officers, including Mr. Broughton.  In the absence of these types of agreements, our executive officers are free to resign their employment at any time and accept an offer of employment from another company, including a competitor.  Additionally, our directors’ and advisory board members’ community involvement and diverse and extensive local business relationships are important to our success.  If the composition of our board of directors changes materially, our business may also suffer.  Similarly, if the composition of the respective advisory boards of the Bank change materially, our business may suffer in such markets.

Our directors and executive officers own a significant portion of our common stock and can exert influence over our business and corporate affairs.

Our directors and executive officers, as a group, beneficially owned approximately 14.76% of our outstanding common stock as of December 31, 2010.  As a result of their ownership, the directors and executive officers will have the ability, by voting their shares in concert, to influence the outcome of all matters submitted to our stockholders for approval, including the election of directors.

We are subject to environmental liability risk associated with lending activities.

A significant portion of our loan portfolio is secured by real property.  During the ordinary course of business, we may foreclose on and take title to properties securing certain loans.  In doing so, there is a risk that hazardous or toxic substances could be found on these properties.  If hazardous or toxic substances are found, we may be liable for remediation costs, as well as for personal injury and property damage.  Environmental laws may require us to incur substantial expenses and may materially reduce the affected property’s value or limit our ability to use or sell the affected property.  The remediation costs and any other financial liabilities associated with an environmental hazard could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.  In addition, future laws or more stringent interpretations or enforcement policies with respect to existing laws may increase our exposure to environmental liability.  Although management has policies and procedures to perform an environmental review before the loan is recorded and before initiating any foreclosure action on real property, these reviews may not be sufficient to detect environmental hazards.

 
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Risks Related to Our Common Stock

We have no current plans to pay dividends on our common stock.

We have never declared or paid cash dividends on our common stock. We have no current intentions to pay dividends. In addition, our ability to pay dividends is subject to regulatory limitations.

Under Alabama law, a state bank may not pay a dividend in excess of 90% of its net earnings until the bank’s surplus is equal to at least 20% of its capital.  As of December 31, 2010, the Bank’s surplus was equal to 54.0% of the Bank’s capital.  The Bank is also required by Alabama law to obtain the prior approval of the Alabama Superintendent of Banks (the “Superintendent”) for its payment of dividends if the total of all dividends declared by the Bank in any calendar year will exceed the total of (1) the Bank’s net earnings (as defined by statute) for that year, plus (2) its retained net earnings for the preceding two years, less any required transfers to surplus.  In addition, no dividends, withdrawals or transfers may be made from the Bank’s surplus without the prior written approval of the Superintendent.

There are limitations on your ability to transfer your common stock.

There is no public trading market for the shares of our common stock, and we have no current plans to list our common stock on any exchange.  However, a brokerage firm may create a market for our common stock on the OTC/Bulletin Board or Pink Sheets without our participation or approval upon the filing and approval by the FINRA OTC Compliance Unit of a Form 211.  As a result, unless a Form 211 is filed and approved, stockholders who may wish or need to dispose of all or part of their investment in our common stock may not be able to do so effectively except by private direct negotiations with third parties, assuming that third parties are willing to purchase our common stock.

Alabama and Delaware law limit the ability of others to acquire the Bank, which may restrict your ability to fully realize the value of your common stock.

In many cases, stockholders receive a premium for their shares when one company purchases another.  Alabama and Delaware law makes it difficult for anyone to purchase the Bank or us without approval of our board of directors.  Thus, your ability to realize the potential benefits of any sale by us may be limited, even if such sale would represent a greater value for stockholders than our continued independent operation.

Our Certificate of Incorporation authorizes the issuance of preferred stock which could adversely affect holders of our common stock and discourage a takeover of us by a third party.

Our Certificate of Incorporation authorizes the board of directors to issue up to 1,000,000 shares of preferred stock without any further action on the part of our shareholders.  Our board of directors also has the power, without shareholder approval, to set the terms of any series of preferred stock that may be issued, including voting rights, dividend rights, and preferences over our common stock with respect to dividends or in the event of a dissolution, liquidation or winding up and other terms.  In the event that we issue preferred stock in the future that has preference over our common stock with respect to payment of dividends or upon our liquidation, dissolution or winding up, or if we issue preferred stock with voting rights that dilute the voting power of our common stock, the rights of the holders of our common stock or the market price of our common stock could be adversely affected.  In addition, the ability of our board of directors to issue shares of preferred stock without any action on the part of the shareholders may impede a takeover of us and prevent a transaction favorable to our shareholders.

An investment in our common stock is not an insured deposit.

Our common stock is not a bank deposit and, therefore, is not insured against loss by the FDIC, any deposit insurance fund or by any other public or private entity.  Investment in our common stock is inherently risky for the reasons described in this “Risk Factors” section and elsewhere in this Memorandum (including the documents incorporated herein by reference) and is subject to the same market forces that affect the price of common stock in any company.  As a result, an investor may lose some or all of such investor’s investment in our common stock.

 
34

 
     
ITEM 1B.  UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.
 
None.

ITEM 2.   PROPERTIES.
 
We operate through the following banking offices.  Our Shades Creek Parkway office also includes our corporate headquarters.  We believe that our banking offices are in good condition, are suitable to our needs and, for the most part, are relatively new.  The following table summarizes pertinent details of our banking offices, all of which are leased.
 
State
MSA
     
Zip
 
Owned
or
 
Date
 
Office Address
 
City
 
Code
 
Leased
 
Opened
 
Alabama:
                   
Birmingham-Hoover MSA:
                   
850 Shades Creek Parkway, Suite 200 (1)
 
Birmingham
    35209  
Leased
 
03/02/2005
 
324 Richard Arrington Jr. Boulevard North
 
Birmingham
    35203  
Leased
 
12/19/2005
 
5403 Highway 280, Suite 401
 
Birmingham
    35242  
Leased
 
08/15/2006
 
Total:
     
3 Offices
       
                 
Huntsville MSA:
                   
401 Meridian Street, Suite 100
 
Huntsville
    35801  
Leased
 
11/21/2006
 
1267 Enterprise Way, Suite A (1)
 
Huntsville
    35806  
Leased
 
08/21/2006
 
Total:
     
2 Offices
       
                 
Montgomery MSA:
                   
1 Commerce Street, Suite 200
 
Montgomery
    36104  
Leased
 
06/04/2007
 
8117 Vaughn Road, Unit 20
 
Montgomery
    36116  
Leased
 
09/26/2007
 
Total:
     
2 Offices
       
                     
     Dothan MSA:
                   
4801 West Main Street (1)
 
Dothan
    36305  
Leased
 
10/17/2008
 
1640 Ross Clark Circle
 
Dothan
    36301  
Leased
 
2/1/2011
 
Total:
       
2 Offices
         
                     
Total Offices in Alabama:
     
9 Offices
       

 
(1)
Office relocated to this address in 2009.  Original office opened on date indicated.

Since mid-2009, our corporate headquarters has been located in 28,900 square feet of leased space in a 50,000-square foot building near the intersection of Cahaba Road and Shades Creek Parkway.  This building was newly constructed by a joint venture between Protective Life Corp., whose home offices are adjacent to the land, and Birmingham-based construction company B.L. Harbert International and opened in 2009.

ITEM 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.
 
Neither we nor the Bank is currently subject to any material legal proceedings.  In the ordinary course of business, the Bank is involved in routine litigation, such as claims to enforce liens, claims involving the making and servicing of real property loans, and other issues incident to the Bank’s business. Management does not believe that there are any threatened proceedings against us or the Bank which, if determined adversely, would have a material effect on our or the Bank’s business, financial position or results of operations.

 
35

 
 
ITEM 4.  SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS.
 
No matter was submitted to a vote of security holders during the fourth quarter of 2010 through the solicitation of proxies or otherwise.

PART II
 
ITEM 5.  MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES.
 
There is no public market for our common stock, and we have no current plans to list our common stock on any public market.  Consequently, there have only been a very few secondary trades in our common stock.  The most recent sale of our common stock was at $25 per share on January 25, 2011.  We are in the process of offering shares of our common stock for sale in a private placement at an offering price of $30 per share.  As of December 31, 2010, we had approximately 1,072 stockholders of record holding 5,527,482 outstanding shares of our common stock, and we had 826,000 shares of our common stock currently subject to outstanding options to purchase such shares under the 2005 Amended and Restated Stock Incentive Plan, 26,000 shares issued with restrictions under our 2009 Stock Incentive Plan, 55,000 shares of common stock subject to other outstanding options, 60,000 shares of common stock currently subject to outstanding warrants to purchase such shares, 75,000 shares of common stock reserved for issuance upon conversion of outstanding mandatory convertible trust preferred securities and 15,000 shares of common stock currently reserved for issuance upon conversion of an outstanding convertible subordinated note.
 
Dividends

We have never declared or paid dividends and we do not expect to pay dividends to stockholders in the near future. We anticipate that our earnings, if any, will be held for purposes of enhancing our capital. Our payment of cash dividends is subject to the discretion of our Board of Directors and the Bank’s ability to pay dividends.  The principal source of our cash flow, including cash flow to pay dividends, comes from dividends that the Bank pays to us as its sole shareholder.  Statutory and regulatory limitations apply to the Bank’s payment of dividends to us, as well as our payment of dividends to our stockholders.  For a more complete discussion on the restrictions on dividends, see “Supervision and Regulation - Payment of Dividends” in Item 1.
 
Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

We had no sales of unregistered securities in 2010 other than those previously reported in our reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
 
Purchases of Equity Securities by the Registrant and Affiliated Purchasers

We made no repurchases of our equity securities, and no “affiliated purchasers” (as defined in Rule 10b-18(a) (3) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934) purchased any shares of our equity securities during the fourth quarter of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2010.

Equity Compensation Plan Information

The following table sets forth certain information as of December 31, 2010 relating to stock options granted under our 2005 Amended and Restated Stock Incentive Plan and our 2009 Stock Incentive Plan and other options or warrants issued outside of such plans.
Plan Category
 
Number of securities
issued/to be issued
upon exercise of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
   
Weighted-average
exercise price of
outstanding
options, warrants
and rights
   
Number of securities
remaining available for
future issuance under
equity compensation
plans
 
Equity compensation awards  plans approved  by security holders
    856,000     $ 15.87       594,000  
Equity compensation awards plans not approved by security holders
    55,000       17.27        
Total
    911,000     $ 15.95       594,000  

 
36

 
 
We grant stock options as incentive to employees, officers, directors, and consultants to attract or retain these individuals, to maintain and enhance our long-term performance and profitability, and to allow these individuals to acquire an ownership interest in our company.  Our compensation committee administers this program, making all decisions regarding grants and amendments to these awards.  All shares to be issued upon the exercise of these options must be authorized and unissued shares.  If an option holder terminates employment, we may provide for varying time periods for exercise of options after such termination provided, that an incentive stock option may not be exercised later than 90 days after an option holder terminates his or her employment with us unless such termination is a consequence of such option holder’s death or disability, in which case the option period may be extended for up to one year after termination of employment.  All of our issued options will vest immediately upon a transaction in which we merge or consolidate with or into any other corporation (unless we are the surviving corporation), or sell or otherwise transfer our property, assets or business substantially in its entirety to a successor corporation.  At that time, upon the exercise of an option, the option holder will receive the number of shares of stock or other securities or property, including cash, to which the holder of a like number of shares of common stock would have been entitled upon the merger, consolidation, sale or transfer if such option had been exercised in full immediately prior thereto.  All of our issued options have a term of 10 years.  This means the options must be exercised within 10 years from the date of the grant.  At December 31, 2010, we had issued and outstanding options to purchase 881,000 shares of our common stock.
 
Upon the formation of the Bank in May 2005, we issued to each of our directors warrants to purchase up to 10,000 shares of our common stock, or 60,000 in the aggregate, for a purchase price of $10.00 per share, expiring in ten years.  These warrants became fully vested in May 2008.
 
On September 2, 2008, we granted warrants to purchase up to 75,000 shares of our common stock for a purchase price of $25.00 per share in relation to the issuance of our Subordinated Deferrable Interest Debentures as more fully described in Note 10 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
On June 23, 2009, we granted warrants to purchase up to 15,000 shares of our common stock for a purchase price of $25.00 per share in relation to the issuance of our Subordinated Note due June 1, 2016 as more fully described in Note 12 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
We granted non-plan stock options to persons representing certain key business relationships to purchase up to an aggregate of 55,000 shares of our common stock at between $15.00 and $20.00 per share for 10 years.  These stock options are non-qualified and are not part of our stock incentive plan.  They vest 100% in a lump sum five years after their date of grant.
 
On October 26, 2009, we made a restricted stock award under the 2009 Stock Incentive Plan of 20,000 shares of common stock to Thomas A. Broughton III, President and Chief Executive Officer.  These shares vest in five equal installments commencing on the first anniversary of the grant date, subject to earlier vesting in the event of a merger, consolidation, sale or transfer as described in the first paragraph under the table above.
 
On February 9, 2010, we made restricted stock awards under the 2009 Stock Incentive Plan of 2,000 shares of common stock to each of five employees, for a total of 10,000 shares.  These shares vest five years from the date of grant, subject to earlier vesting in the event of a merger, consolidation, sale or transfer as described in the first paragraph under the table above.
 
Performance Graph
 
The information included under the caption “Performance Graph” in this Item 5 of this Form 10-K is not deemed to be “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the SEC or subject to Regulation 14A or 14C under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 or the liabilities of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and will not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any filings we make under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Securities Act of 1934, except to the extent we specifically incorporate it by reference into such a filing.
 
 
37

 
 
The following graph compares the change in cumulative total stockholder return on our common stock with the cumulative total return of the NASDAQ Banks Index and the S&P Stock Index from December 31, 2005 through December 31, 2010. This comparison assumes $100 invested on December 31, 2005 in (a) our common stock, (b) the NASDAQ Banks Index, and (c) the NASDAQ Composite Stock Index.  Our common stock is not traded on any exchange or national market system, and prices for our stock are determined based on actual prices at which our stock has been sold in arm’s-length private placements completed prior to each point in time represented in the graph.  Such prices are not necessarily indicative of the prices that would result from transactions conducted on an exchange.
 
 
   
Date
 
Index:
 
12/31/2005
   
12/31/2006
   
12/31/2007
   
12/31/2008
   
12/31/2009
   
12/31/2010
 
ServisFirst Bancshares, Inc.
    100.00       150.00       200.00       250.00       250.00       250.00  
NASDAQ Composite
    100.00       109.52       120.27       71.51       102.89       120.29  
NASDAQ Bank
    100.00       111.01       86.51       65.81       53.63       60.01  
 
 
38

 
 
ITEM 6.  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA.
 
The following table sets forth selected historical consolidated financial data from our consolidated financial statements and should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements including the related notes and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” which are included below.  Except for the data under “Selected Performance Ratios”, “Asset Quality Ratios”, “Liquidity Ratios”, “Capital Adequacy Ratios” and “Growth Ratios”, the selected historical consolidated financial data as of December 31, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, and 2006 and for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007 and 2006 are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements and related notes.

   
As of and for the years ended December 31,
 
       
   
2010
   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
   
2006
 
   
(Dollars in thousands except for share data)
 
Selected Balance Sheet Data:
                             
Total assets
  $ 1,935,166     $ 1,573,497     $ 1,162,272     $ 838,250     $ 528,545  
Total loans
    1,394,818       1,207,084       968,233       675,281       440,489  
Loans, net
    1,376,741       1,192,173       957,631       667,549       435,071  
Securities available for sale
    276,959       255,453       102,339       87,233       28,119  
Securities held to maturity
    5,234       645                    
Cash and due from banks
    27,454       26,982       22,844       15,756       15,706  
Interest-bearing balances with banks
    204,278       48,544       30,774       34,068       22  
Fed funds sold
    246       680       19,300       16,598       37,607  
Mortgage loans held for sale
    7,875       6,202       3,320       2,463       2,902  
Restricted equity securities
    3,510       3,241       2,659       1,202       805  
Premises and equipment, net
    4,450       5,088       3,884       4,176       2,605  
Deposits
    1,758,716       1,432,355       1,037,319       762,683       473,348  
Other borrowings
    24,937       24,922       20,000       73        
Trust preferred securities
    30,420       15,228       15,087              
Other liabilities
    3,993       3,370       3,082       2,465       2,353  
Stockholders’ equity
    117,100       97,622       86,784       72,247       52,288  
Selected Income Statement Data:
                                       
Interest income
  $ 78,146     $ 62,197     $ 55,450     $ 51,417     $ 30,610  
Interest expense
    15,260       18,337       20,474       25,872       13,335  
Net interest income
    62,886       43,860       34,976       25,545       17,275  
Provision for loan losses
    10,350       10,685       6,274       3,541       3,252  
Net interest income after provision for loan losses
    52,536       33,175       28,702       22,004       14,023  
Noninterest income
    5,169       4,413       2,704       1,441       911  
Noninterest expense
    30,969       28,930       20,576       14,796       8,674  
Income before income taxes
    26,736       8,658       10,830       8,649       6,260  
Income taxes expenses
    9,358       2,780       3,825       3,152       2,189  
Net income
    17,378       5,878       7,005       5,497       4,071  
Per Common Share Data:
                                       
Net income, basic
  $ 3.15     $ 1.07     $ 1.37     $ 1.19     $ 1.06  
Net income, diluted
    2.84       1.02       1.31       1.16       1.06  
Book value
    21.19       17.71       16.15       14.13       11.71  
Weighted average shares outstanding:
                                       
Basic
    5,519,151       5,485,972       5,114,194       4,631,047       3,831,881  
Diluted
    6,294,604       5,787,643       5,338,883       4,721,864       3,846,111  
Actual shares outstanding
    5,527,482       5,513,482       5,374,022       5,113,482       4,463,607  

 
39

 

   
As of and for the years ended December 31,
 
       
   
2010
   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
   
2006
 
                               
Selected Performance Ratios:
                             
Return on average assets
    1.04 %     0.43 %     0.71 %     0.78 %     1.02 %
Return on average stockholders’ equity
    15.86 %     6.33 %     9.28 %     9.40 %     9.96 %
Net interest margin(1)
    3.94 %     3.31 %     3.70 %     3.78 %     4.60 %
Efficiency ratio(2)
    45.51 %     59.57 %     54.61 %     54.83 %     50.67 %
Asset Quality Ratios:
                                       
Net charge-offs to average loans outstanding
    0.55 %     0.60 %     0.41 %     0.23 %     0.28 %
Non-performing loans to total loans
    1.03 %     1.01 %     1.02 %     0.66 %     0.00 %
Non-performing assets to total assets
    1.10 %     1.57 %     1.74 %     0.73 %     0.11 %
Allowance for loan losses to total gross loans
    1.30 %     1.24 %     1.09 %     1.15 %     1.23 %
Allowance for loan losses to total non-performing loans
    126.00 %     122.34 %     108.17 %     173.94 %     5,418.00 %
Liquidity Ratios:
                                       
Net loans to total deposits
    78.28 %     83.23 %     92.32 %     87.53 %     91.91 %
Net average loans to average earning assets
    78.04 %     80.06 %     85.84 %     77.19 %     89.34 %
Noninterest-bearing deposits to total deposits
    14.24 %     14.75 %     11.71 %     11.15 %     15.05 %
Capital Adequacy Ratios:
                                       
Stockholders’ equity to total assets
    6.05 %     6.20 %     7.47 %     8.62 %     9.89 %
Total risked-based capital(3)
    11.82 %     10.48 %     11.25 %     11.22 %     11.58 %
Tier I capital(4)
    10.22 %     8.89 %     10.18 %     10.12 %     10.49 %
Leverage ratio(5)
    7.77 %     6.97 %     9.01 %     8.40 %     10.32 %
Growth Ratios:
                                       
Percentage change in net income
    195.64 %     -16.1 %     27.43 %     35.00 %     373.93 %
Percentage change in diluted net income per share
    178.43 %     -22.5 %     12.93 %     13.21 %     352.38 %
Percentage change in assets
    22.99 %     35.38 %     38.65 %     58.59 %     90.15 %
Percentage change in net loans
    15.46 %     24.49 %     45.45 %     53.43 %     76.76 %
Percentage change in deposits
    22.78 %     38.08 %     36.00 %     61.13 %     93.96 %
Percentage change in equity
    19.95 %     12.49 %     20.12 %     38.18 %     56.23 %

(1)
Net interest margin is the net yield on interest earning assets and is the difference between the interest yield earned on interest-earning assets and interest rate paid on interest-bearing liabilities, divided by average earning assets.
(2)
Efficiency ratio is the result of noninterest expense divided by the sum of net interest income and noninterest income.
(3)
Total stockholders’ equity excluding unrealized gains/(losses) on securities available for sale, net of taxes, and intangible assets plus allowance for loan losses (limited to 1.25% of risk-weighted assets) divided by total risk-weighted assets.  The FDIC required minimum to be well-capitalized is 10%.
(4)
Total stockholders’ equity excluding unrealized gains/(losses) on securities available for sale, net of taxes, and intangible assets divided by total risk-weighted assets.  The FDIC required minimum to be well-capitalized is 6%.
(5)
Total stockholders’ equity excluding unrealized losses on securities available for sale, net of taxes, and intangible assets divided by average assets less intangible assets.  The FDIC required minimum to be well-capitalized is 5%; however, the Alabama Banking Department has required that the Bank maintain a Tier 1 capital leverage ratio of 7%.
 
 
40

 
 
ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.
 
The following is a narrative discussion and analysis of significant changes in our results of operations and financial condition.  The purpose of this discussion is to focus on information about our financial condition and results of operations that is not otherwise apparent from the audited financial statements.  Analysis of the results presented should be made with an understanding of our relatively short history.  This discussion should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and selected financial data included elsewhere in this document.

Forward-Looking Statements

We may from time to time make written or oral forward-looking statements, including statements contained in our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission and reports to stockholders.  Statements made in this annual report, other than those concerning historical information, should be considered forward-looking and subject to various risks and uncertainties.  Such forward-looking statements are made based upon our management’s belief as well as assumptions made by, and information currently available to, our management.  Our actual results may differ materially from the results anticipated in forward-looking statements due to a variety of factors, including governmental monetary and fiscal policies, deposit levels, loan demand, loan collateral values, securities portfolio values, interest rate risk management, the effects of competition in the banking business from other commercial banks, thrifts, mortgage banking firms, consumer finance companies, credit unions, securities brokerage firms, insurance companies, money market funds and other financial institutions operating in our market area and elsewhere, including institutions operating through the Internet, changes in governmental regulation relating to the banking industry, including regulations relating to branching and acquisitions, failure of assumptions underlying the establishment of reserves for loan losses, including the value of collateral underlying delinquent loans, and other factors.  We caution that such factors are not exclusive.  We do not undertake to update any forward-looking statement that may be made from time to time by, or on behalf of, us.  See also “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward Looking Statements” on page 1.

Overview

We are a bank holding company within the meaning of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama. Through our wholly-owned subsidiary bank, we operate nine full service banking offices located in Jefferson, Shelby, Madison, Montgomery and Houston Counties in the Birmingham-Hoover, Huntsville, Montgomery and Dothan, Alabama MSAs, respectively, and are in the process of opening a tenth office in Escambia County, Florida, in the Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent MSA.  Our principal business is to accept deposits from the public and to make loans and other investments. Our principal source of funds for loans and investments are demand, time, savings, and other deposits and the amortization and prepayment of loans and borrowings. Our principal sources of income are interest and fees collected on loans, interest and dividends collected on other investments and service charges. Our principal expenses are interest paid on savings and other deposits, interest paid on our other borrowings, employee compensation, office expenses and other overhead expenses.

Critical Accounting Policies

Our consolidated financial statements are prepared based on the application of certain accounting policies, the most significant of which are described in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements. Certain of these policies require numerous estimates and strategic or economic assumptions that may prove inaccurate or subject to variation and may significantly affect our reported results and financial position for the period or in future periods. The use of estimates, assumptions, and judgments are necessary when financial assets and liabilities are required to be recorded at, or adjusted to reflect, fair value. Assets carried at fair value inherently result in more financial statement volatility. Fair values and information used to record valuation adjustments for certain assets and liabilities are based on either quoted market prices or are provided by other independent third-party sources, when available. When such information is not available, management estimates valuation adjustments. Changes in underlying factors, assumptions or estimates in any of these areas could have a material impact on our future financial condition and results of operations.

 
41

 
 
Allowance for Loan Losses

The allowance for loan losses, sometimes referred to as the “ALLL”, is established through periodic charges to income. Loan losses are charged against the ALLL when management believes that the future collection of principal is unlikely. Subsequent recoveries, if any, are credited to the ALLL. If the ALLL is considered inadequate to absorb future loan losses on existing loans for any reason, including but not limited to, increases in the size of the loan portfolio, increases in charge-offs or changes in the risk characteristics of the loan portfolio, then the provision for loan losses is increased.

Impairment of Assets

Loans are considered impaired when, based on current information and events, it is probable that the Bank will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the original terms of the loan agreement. The collection of all amounts due according to contractual terms means that both the contractual interest and principal payments of a loan will be collected as scheduled in the loan agreement. Impaired loans are measured based on the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, or, as a practical expedient, at the loan’s observable market price, or the fair value of the underlying collateral. The fair value of collateral, reduced by costs to sell on a discounted basis, is used if a loan is collateral-dependent.

Investment Securities Impairment

Periodically, we may need to assess whether there have been any events or economic circumstances to indicate that a security on which there is an unrealized loss is impaired on other-than-temporary basis. In any such instance, we would consider many factors, including the severity and duration of the impairment, our intent and ability to hold the security for a period of time sufficient for a recovery in value, recent events specific to the issuer or industry, and for debt securities, external credit ratings and recent downgrades. Securities on which there is an unrealized loss that is deemed to be other-than-temporary are written down to fair value, with the write-down recorded as a realized loss in securities gains (losses).
 
Results of Operations

Net Income

Net income for the year ended December 31, 2010 was $17.4 million, compared to net income of $5.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2009.  This increase in net income is primarily attributable to a significant increase in net interest income, which increased $19.0 million, or 43.4%, to $62.9 million in 2010 from $43.9 million in 2009.  Noninterest income increased $756,000, or 17.1%, to $5.2 million in 2010 from $4.4 million in 2009.  Noninterest expense increased by $2.1 million, or 7.1%, to $31.0 million in 2010 from $28.9 million in 2009.  Basic and diluted net income per common share were $3.15 and $2.84, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2010, compared to $1.07 and $1.02, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2009.  Return on average assets was 1.04% in 2010, compared to 0.43% in 2009, and return on average stockholders’ equity was 15.86% in 2010, compared to 6.33% in 2009.

Net income for the year ended December 31, 2009 was $5.9 million, compared to net income of $7.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2008. This decrease in net income is primarily attributable to a significant increase in deposit insurance assessments by the FDIC, and an increase in provision for loan losses. The expense of FDIC insurance assessments increased $2.2 million, or 266.7%, to $2.7 million in 2009 from $568,000 in 2008. This increase was attributable to increases in both the assessment rates determined by the FDIC and our assessable deposits, as a result of the Company’s growth in deposits. Also, during the fourth quarter of 2009, the Company expensed the first installment of the 13-quarter prepaid assessment adopted by the FDIC in November 2009. The provision for loan losses increased $4.6 million, or 73.1%, from $6.3 million in 2008 to $10.9 million in 2009. The increase in provision for loan losses was the result of funding the loan loss reserve to match growth in the loan portfolio and loan charge-offs. These negative effects were partially offset by higher net interest income, which was due to significant growth of our deposits and loan portfolio resulting from continued core growth in Birmingham, Huntsville and Montgomery and our expansion into Dothan in late 2008. Also positively impacting net income in 2009 was an increase of $1.7 million in noninterest income, up 63.2%, from $2.7 million in 2008 to $4.4 million in 2009. Basic and diluted net income per common share were $1.07 and $1.02, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to $1.37 and $1.31, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2008. Return on average assets was 0.43% in 2009, compared to 0.71% in 2008, and return on average stockholders’ equity was 6.33% in 2009, compared to 9.28% in 2008.

 
42

 

 
   
Year Ended
December 31,
   
Change from the
 
    
2010
   
2009
   
Prior Year
 
    
(Dollars in Thousands)
       
Interest income
  $ 78,146     $ 62,197       25.64 %
Interest expense
    15,260       18,337       (16.78 )%
Net interest income
    62,886       43,860       43.38 %
Provision for loan losses
    10,350       10,685       (3.14 )%
Net interest income after provision for loan losses
    52,536       33,175       58.36 %
Noninterest income
    5,169       4,413       17.13 %
Noninterest expense
    30,969       28,930       7.05 %
Net income before taxes
    26,736       8,658       208.80 %
Provisions for income taxes
    9,358       2,780       236.62 %
Net income
  $ 17,378     $ 5,878       195.64 %

   
Year Ended
December 31,
    Change from the  
    
2009
   
2008
   
Prior Year
 
    
(Dollars in Thousands)
       
Interest income
  $ 62,197     $ 55,450       12.17 %
Interest expense
    18,337       20,474       (10.44 )%
Net interest income
    43,860       34,976       25.40 %
Provision for loan losses
    10,685       6,274       70.31 %
Net interest income after provision for loan losses
    33,175       28,702       15.58 %
Noninterest income
    4,413       2,704       63.20 %
Noninterest expense
    28,930       20,576       40.60 %
Net income before taxes
    8.658       10,830       (20.06 )%
Provisions for income taxes
    2,780       3,825       (27.32 )%
Net income
  $ 5,878     $ 7,005       (16.09 )%
 
Net Interest Income

Net interest income is the difference between the income earned on interest-earning assets and interest paid on interest-bearing liabilities used to support such assets.  The major factors which affect net interest income are changes in volumes, the yield on interest-earning assets and the cost of interest-bearing liabilities.  Our management’s ability to respond to changes in interest rates by effective asset-liability management techniques is critical to maintaining the stability of the net interest margin and the momentum of our primary source of earnings.

Beginning in mid-2004, the Federal Reserve Open Market Committee, or FOMC, increased interest rates 400 basis points through mid-2006, where interest rates remained constant until September 2007.  In September 2007, the FOMC started dropping market rates in an effort to stabilize a declining real estate market and to ease recessionary pressures.  Over the next five quarters, the FOMC would drop rates a total of 500 basis points.  Rates have remained extremely low since bottoming out in December 2008.  During this time of falling market rates, our management maintained a moderately liability-sensitive balance sheet position, meaning that more liabilities are scheduled to reprice within the next year than assets, thereby taking advantage of the decreasing rates.

Net interest income increased $19.0 million, or 43.4%, to $62.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2010 from $43.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2009.  This was due to an increase in total interest income of $15.9 million, or 25.6%, and a decrease in total interest expense of $3.1 million, or 16.8%.  The increase in total interest income was primarily attributable to a 17.9% increase in average loans outstanding from 2009 to 2010, which was the result of growth in all four of our markets, but primarily market share expansion in our younger markets of Montgomery and Dothan.
Net interest income increased $8.9 million, or 25.4%, to $43.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2009 from $35.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2008.  This was due to an increase in total interest income of $6.7 million, or 12.2%, and a decrease in total interest expense of $2.1 million, or 10.4%.  The increase in total interest income was primarily attributable to loan growth as a result of significant continued core growth in Birmingham, Huntsville and Montgomery and the relocation of our Dothan office following our expansion into that market in 2008.
 
 
43

 
 
Investments

We view the investment portfolio as a source of income and liquidity.  Our investment strategy is to accept a lower immediate yield in the investment portfolio by targeting shorter term investments.  Our investment policy provides that no more than 40% of our total investment portfolio should be composed of municipal securities.

The investment portfolio at December 31, 2010 was $282.2 million, compared to $256.1 million at December 31, 2009.  The interest earned on investments rose to $8.8 million in 2010 from $6.0 million in 2009.  That was a result of higher average portfolio balances due to our growth.  The average taxable-equivalent yield on the investment portfolio decreased from 5.06% in 2009 to 4.08% in 2010, or 98 basis points.

The investment portfolio at December 31, 2009 was $256.1 million, compared to $102.3 million at December 31, 2008.  The interest earned on investments rose to $6.0 million in 2009 from $4.8 million in 2008.  That was a result of higher average portfolio balances due to our growth.  The average taxable-equivalent yield on the investment portfolio decreased from 5.60% in 2008 to 5.06% in 2009, or 54 basis points.

Net Interest Margin Analysis

The net interest margin is impacted by the average volumes of interest-sensitive assets and interest-sensitive liabilities and by the difference between the yield on interest-sensitive assets and the cost of interest-sensitive liabilities (spread).  Loan fees collected at origination represent an additional adjustment to the yield on loans.  Our spread can be affected by economic conditions, the competitive environment, loan demand, and deposit flows.  The net yield on earning assets is an indicator of effectiveness of our ability to manage the net interest margin by managing the overall yield on assets and cost of funding those assets.

The following table shows, for the twelve months ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, the average balances of each principal category of our assets, liabilities and stockholders’ equity, and an analysis of net interest revenue, and the change in interest income and interest expense segregated into amounts attributable to changes in volume and changes in rates.  This table is presented on a taxable equivalent basis, if applicable.
 
 
44

 

Average Consolidated Balance Sheets and Net Interest Analysis
On a Fully Taxable-Equivalent Basis
For the Years Ended December 31
(Dollars in Thousands)

    
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
   
Average
 Balance
   
Interest
Earned/
 Paid
   
Average
Yield/
 Rate
   
Average
 Balance
   
Interest
Earned/
 Paid
   
Average
Yield/
 Rate
   
Average
Balance
   
Interest
Earned
/Paid
   
Average
Yield/ 
Rate
 
Assets
                                                     
Interest-earning assets:
                                                     
Loans, net of unearned income(1)
  $ 1,283,204     $ 68,889       5.37 %   $ 1,088,437     $ 55,625       5.11 %   $ 826,957     $ 49,852       6.03 %
Mortgage loans held for sale
    6,275       226       3.60 %     6,195       265       4.28 %     2,469       145       5.87 %
Investment securities:
                                                                       
Taxable
    180,045       6,482       3.60 %     92,903       4,517       4.86 %     68,683       3,840       5.59 %
Tax-exempt(2)
    59,812       3,314       5.72 %     38,834       2,151       5.54 %     23,384       1,318       5.64 %
Total investment securities(3)
    239,857       9,796       4.08 %     131,737       6,668       5.06 %     92,067       5,158       5.60 %
Federal funds sold
    47,581       104       0.22 %     88,651       257       0.29 %     29,474       548       1.86 %
Restricted equity securities
    3,448       56       1.62 %     3,101       10       0.32 %     2,454       90       3.67 %
Interest -bearing balances with banks
    42,675       115       0.27 %     24,987       24       0.10 %     3,141       58       1.85 %
Total interest-earning assets
  $ 1,623,040     $ 79,186       4.88 %   $ 1,343,108     $ 62,849       4.68 %   $ 956,562     $ 55,851       5.84 %
Non-interest earning assets:
                                                                       
Cash and due from banks
    24,837                       18,337                       18,247                  
Net fixed assets and equipment
    4,914                       4,503                       3,998                  
Allowance for loan losses, accrued interest and other assets
      23,087                       10,534                       4,514                  
Total assets
  $ 1,675,878                     $ 1,376,482                     $ 983,321                  
Liabilities and stockholders’ equity
                                                                       
Interest-bearing liabilities:
                                                                       
Interest -bearing demand deposits
  $ 264,591     $ 1,253       0.47 %   $ 178,232     $ 1,599       0.90 %   $ 92,717     $ 1,522       1.64 %
Savings deposits
    2,978       15       0.50 %     972       5       0.51 %     455       3       0.66 %
Money market accounts
    775,544       5,994       0.77 %     704,112       8,859       1.26 %     558,313       12,411       2.22 %
Time deposits
    255,326       4,679       1.83 %     218,087       5,624       2.58 %     135,128       5,439       4.03 %
Fed funds purchased
    4,901       31       0.63 %                       4,729       119       2.52 %
Other borrowings
    52,186       3,288