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EX-32.1 - EX-32.1 - TRANSCAT INCl40013exv32w1.htm
EX-21.1 - EX-21.1 - TRANSCAT INCl40013exv21w1.htm
EX-31.2 - EX-31.2 - TRANSCAT INCl40013exv31w2.htm
EX-31.1 - EX-31.1 - TRANSCAT INCl40013exv31w1.htm
EX-23.1 - EX-23.1 - TRANSCAT INCl40013exv23w1.htm
EX-10.26 - EX-10.26 - TRANSCAT INCl40013exv10w26.htm
EX-10.24 - EX-10.24 - TRANSCAT INCl40013exv10w24.htm
EX-10.25 - EX-10.25 - TRANSCAT INCl40013exv10w25.htm
Table of Contents

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
 
 
 
FORM 10-K
 
         
    (Mark one)    
 
    þ   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended: March 27, 2010
or
    o   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from            to          
 
Commission File Number: 000-03905
 
TRANSCAT, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
     
Ohio   16-0874418
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
35 Vantage Point Drive, Rochester, New York 14624
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
 
(585) 352-7777
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
 
Securities registered pursuant to section 12(b) of the Act:
 
     
Title of each class   Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, $0.50 par value   NASDAQ Capital Market
 
Securities registered pursuant to section 12(g) of the Act:
None
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes  o  No  þ
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes  o  No  þ
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  þ  No  o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes  o  No  o
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
Large accelerated filer o Accelerated filer o Non-accelerated filer o Smaller reporting company þ
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes  o  No  þ
 
The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant on September 25, 2009 (the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter) was approximately $38 million. The market value calculation was determined using the closing sale price of the registrant’s Common Stock on September 25, 2009, as reported on the NASDAQ Capital Market.
 
The number of shares of Common Stock of the registrant outstanding as of June 16, 2010 was 7,290,108.


 

 
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
 
The information required by Part III, Items 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 of this report, to the extent not set forth herein, is incorporated herein by reference from the registrant’s definitive proxy statement relating to the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on September 14, 2010, which definitive proxy statement will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days of the end of the fiscal year to which this report relates.
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
         
        Page(s)
 
       
  Business   3-14
  Risk Factors   14-16
  Unresolved Staff Comments   16
  Properties   17
  Legal Proceedings   17
  Reserved   17
         
Part II        
  Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities   17-18
  Selected Financial Data   18-19
  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations   19-33
  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk   33
  Financial Statements and Supplementary Data   34-57
  Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure   58
  Controls and Procedures   58
  Other Information   58
         
Part III        
  Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance   59
  Executive Compensation   59
  Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters   59
  Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence   59
  Principal Accountant Fees and Services   60
         
Part IV        
  Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules   60
  61
  62-64
 EX-10.24
 EX-10.25
 EX-10.26
 EX-21.1
 EX-23.1
 EX-31.1
 EX-31.2
 EX-32.1


Table of Contents

 
PART I
 
ITEM 1.   BUSINESS
 
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
 
This report and, in particular, the Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations section of this report, contains forward-looking statements as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These include statements concerning expectations, estimates, and projections about the industry, management beliefs and assumptions of Transcat, Inc. (“Transcat”, “we”, “us”, or “our”). Words such as “anticipates”, “expects”, “intends”, “plans”, “believes”, “seeks”, “estimates”, and variations of such words and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to certain risks, uncertainties and assumptions that are difficult to forecast, including, among other things, the risks and uncertainties identified by us below under “Risk Factors” in Item IA of Part I of this report. Therefore, our actual results and outcomes may materially differ from those expressed or forecast in any such forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.
 
BUSINESS OVERVIEW
 
Transcat is a leading global distributor of professional grade handheld test and measurement instruments and accredited provider of calibration, repair and weighing system services. We are primarily focused on providing our products and services to the following markets:
 
  •  The pharmaceutical industry and FDA-regulated (such as food and beverage) businesses;
 
  •  Industrial manufacturing companies;
 
  •  The energy industry and power, natural gas and water utility companies;
 
  •  The chemical process industry; and
 
  •  Other industries which require accuracy in their processes and confirmation of the capabilities of their equipment.
 
We conduct our business through two segments: distribution products (“distribution products” or “Product”) and calibration services (“calibration services” or “Service”).
 
Through our distribution products segment, we market and distribute national and proprietary brand instruments to approximately 14,000 global customers. Our product catalog (“Master Catalog”) offers access to more than 25,000 test and measurement instruments, including calibrators, insulation testers, multimeters, pressure and temperature devices, oscilloscopes, recorders and related accessories. These products are available from over 300 of the industry’s leading manufacturers including Fluke, GE, Emerson, and Hart Scientific. In addition, we are the exclusive worldwide distributor for Transmation and Altek products. The majority of the instrumentation we sell requires expert calibration service to ensure that it maintains the most precise measurements.
 
Through our accredited calibration services segment, we offer precise, reliable, fast calibration, repair and weighting system services. As of our fiscal year ended March 27, 2010 (“fiscal year 2010”), we operated twelve calibration laboratories (“Calibration Centers of Excellence”) strategically located across the United States, Puerto Rico, and Canada servicing approximately 9,200 customers. In addition, our recent acquisition of United Scale & Engineering Corporation has also provided entry into both the distribution and service segments of the industrial scales and weighing systems marketplace in the Wisconsin, Northern Illinois and Upper Michigan areas. Each of our Calibration Centers of Excellence is ISO-9001:2000 registered and our scope of accreditation to ISO/IEC 17025 is believed to be one of the broadest in the industry. Our accreditation meets many international levels of quality, consistency and reliability. See “Calibration Services Segment — Quality” below in this Item 1 for more information.


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CalTrak® is our proprietary documentation and asset management system which is used to manage both the workflow at our Calibration Centers of Excellence and our clients’ assets. With CalTrak®, we are able to provide our customers with timely calibration service while optimizing our own efficiencies. Additionally, CalTrak-Online provides our customers direct access to calibration certificates, calibration data, and access to other key documents required in the calibration process. CalTrak® has been validated to U.S. federal regulation 21CFR 820.75, which is important to the pharmaceutical and FDA-regulated industries, where federal regulations can be particularly stringent. See the section entitled “Calibration Services Segment — CalTrak®” below in this Item 1 for more information.
 
Our attention to quality goes beyond the products and services we deliver. Our sales, customer service and support teams stand ready to provide expert advice, application assistance and technical support wherever and whenever our customers need it. Since calibration is an intangible service, our customers rely on us to uphold high standards and trust in the integrity of our people and processes.
 
Among our customers, and representing 31% of our consolidated revenue, are Fortune 500/Global 500 companies, including Wyeth, Johnson & Johnson, DuPont, Exxon Mobil, Dow Chemical, Nestle and Duke Energy. Transcat has focused on the pharmaceutical and FDA-regulated industries, industrial manufacturing, energy and utility, chemical process and other industries since its founding in 1964. We are the leading supplier of calibrators in the markets we serve. We believe our customers do business with us because of our integrity, commitment to quality service, our CalTrak® asset management system, and our broad range of product offerings.
 
Transcat was incorporated in Ohio in 1964. We are headquartered in Rochester, New York and employ more than 300 people. Our executive offices are located at 35 Vantage Point Drive, Rochester, New York 14624. Our telephone number is 585-352-7777.
 
OUR STRATEGY
 
Our strategy for growth is to expand both our distribution products and calibration services segments by leveraging these offerings to markets that value product breadth and availability. Our target customers are those that rely on accredited calibration services to maintain the integrity of their processes and/or operate in regulated environments. Our strategic focus is to serve a customer base that requires precise measurement capability for their manufacturing and testing processes in order to minimize risk, waste and defects. We do this by targeting customers who value superior quality, service and convenience associated with our multiple locations, broad capabilities and breadth of choice. We believe our combined offerings, experience, and integrity create a unique and compelling value proposition for our customers and prospects that is built upon trust and technical competence.
 
We strive to differentiate ourselves and build barriers to competitive entry by offering the best products, delivering high quality calibration and repair services, and integrating those products and services to benefit our customers’ operations and lower their costs.
 
ACQUISITIONS
 
On January 27, 2010, we acquired United Scale & Engineering Corporation (“United Scale”), a scale and weighing systems distributor and calibration and repair services provider based in Wisconsin. United Scale has approximately 2,000 customers located in Wisconsin, Northern Illinois and Upper Michigan and has been in business for almost 50 years meeting both ISO 9001 and ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation standards. United Scale had 26 employees as of March 27, 2010.
 
Our acquisition of United Scale broadens our calibration capabilities and expands our geographic footprint into the upper Midwest. Through this acquisition, we will also broaden our product offering to include scales and weighing systems which frequently require integration, installation and custom programming.
 
On August 14, 2008, we acquired Westcon, Inc. (“Westcon”), a test and measurement instruments distributor and calibration services provider based in Portland, Oregon.


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Our acquisition of Westcon established a west coast distribution center that enables us to provide faster service to a broader base of potential customers while adding a full-service calibration operation that geographically complements and expands our nationwide network of laboratories. Westcon has and will continue to serve the wind energy industry, which we see as a high-growth target market that fits well within our energy market focus.
 
SEGMENTS
 
We service our customers through two business segments: distribution products and calibration services. Note 8 of our Consolidated Financial Statements in this report presents financial information for these segments. We serve over 18,000 customers, with no customer or controlled group of customers accounting for 10% or more of our consolidated net revenue for any of the fiscal years 2008 through 2010. We are not dependent on any single customer, the loss of which would have a material adverse effect on our business, cash flows, balance sheet, or results of operations.
 
We market and sell to our customers through multiple sales channels consisting of direct catalog marketing, our website, a field sales organization, proactive outbound sales, and an inbound call center. Our field, outbound and inbound sales teams are each staffed with technically trained personnel. Our domestic and international inbound sales organization covers territories in North America, Latin America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. Our calibration and repair services are offered only in North America and Puerto Rico. We concentrate on attracting new customers and also on cross-selling to existing customers to increase our Product sales and Service revenue. Our revenue from customers in the following geographic areas during the periods indicated, expressed as a percentage of total revenue, is as follows:
 
                         
    FY 2010     FY 2009     FY 2008  
 
United States
    90 %     89 %     87 %
Canada
    7 %     7 %     9 %
Other International
    3 %     4 %     4 %
                         
Total
    100 %     100 %     100 %
                         
 
DISTRIBUTION PRODUCTS SEGMENT
 
Summary.  Our customers use test and measurement instruments to ensure that their processes, and ultimately their end products, are within specification. Utilization of such diagnostic instrumentation also allows for continuous improvement processes to be in place, increasing the accuracies of their measurements. The industrial distribution products industry for test and measurement instrumentation, in those geographic markets where we predominately operate, is serviced by broad-based national distributors and niche or specialty-focused organizations such as Transcat.
 
Most industrial customers find that maintaining an in-house inventory of back-up test and measurement instruments is cost prohibitive. As a result, the distribution of test and measurement instrumentation has traditionally been characterized by frequent, small quantity orders combined with a need for rapid, reliable, and complete order fulfillment. The decision to buy is generally made by plant engineers, quality managers, or their purchasing personnel. Products are generally obtained from more than one distributor.
 
The majority of our products are not consumables, but are purchased as replacements, upgrades, or for expansion of manufacturing and research and development facilities. Our catalog and sales activities are designed to maintain a constant presence in front of the customer to ensure we receive the order when they are ready to purchase. As a result, we evaluate revenue trends over a twelve-month rolling period as any individual month’s or quarter’s revenue can be impacted by numerous factors, many of which are unpredictable and potentially non-recurring.
 
We believe that a distribution products customer chooses a distributor based on a number of different criteria including the timely delivery and accuracy of orders, consistent product quality, the technical competence of the representative serving them, value added services, as well as price. Value added services include providing


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technical support to insure our customer receives the right product for their specific need through application knowledge and product compatibility. We also provide calibration of product purchases, on-line procurement, same day shipment of in-stock items, a variety of custom product offerings and training programs. Because of the breadth of products we offer and the services we provide, we are often a “one-stop shop” for our customers who gain the operational efficiency of dealing with just one distributor for most or all of their test and measurement equipment needs.
 
Our distribution products segment accounted for 66% of our consolidated revenue in fiscal year 2010. Within the distribution products segment, our routine business is comprised of customers who place orders to acquire or to replace specific instruments, which average approximately $1,560 per order. Items are regularly added to and deleted from our product lines on the basis of customer demand, market research, recommendations of suppliers, sales volumes and other factors.
 
Marketing and Sales.  Through our comprehensive Master Catalog, supplemental catalogs, website, e-newsletters, and other direct sales and marketing programs, we offer our customers a broad selection of highly recognized branded products at competitive prices. The instruments typically range in price from $250 to over $25,000.
 
During fiscal year 2010, we distributed approximately 1.1 million pieces of direct marketing materials including catalogs, brochures, supplements and other promotional materials, of which approximately 665,000 were distributed to customer contacts and approximately 450,000 were distributed to potential customer contacts. We also distributed approximately 180,000 e-newsletters to our list of customers and prospects. Some of the key factors that determine the number of catalogs and other direct marketing materials received by each customer include new product introductions, their market segments and the timing, frequency and monetary value of past purchases.
 
The majority of our product sales are derived from direct mail and on-line marketing. Our Master Catalog offers access to more than 25,000 test and measurement products and is used by customers, sales representatives and branch personnel to assist with customer product selection. During fiscal year 2010, approximately 85,000 copies of our Master Catalog were produced and distributed to existing and prospective customers in North America and Puerto Rico. The Master Catalog provides standard make/model and related product information and is also available in an electronic format upon request and on our website, transcat.com.
 
We use smaller catalog supplements that feature new products, promotions, or specific product categories to target prospects and acquire new customers. The catalog supplements are launched at varying periods throughout the year.
 
Customers can also purchase products through our website, transcat.com. Our website serves as a growing market channel for our products and services and provides product availability, detailed product information, advanced features such as product search and compare capabilities, as well as downloadable product specification sheets. We have optimized the website’s search engine, streamlined order entry and have the unique ability to supplement an order with an accredited calibration. Traffic to our website has grown more than 13% over the prior fiscal year and represented 8% of our Product segment sales in fiscal year 2010.
 
Competition.  The distribution products markets we serve are highly competitive. Competition for sales in distribution products is quite fragmented and ranges from large national distributors and manufacturers that sell directly to customers to small local distributors. Key competitive factors typically include customer service and support, quality, turn around time, inventory availability, brand recognition and price. To address our customers’ needs for technical support and product application assistance, and to differentiate ourselves from competitors, we employ a staff of highly-trained technical sales specialists. In order to maintain this competitive advantage, technical training is an integral part of developing our sales staff.
 
Suppliers and Purchasing.  We believe that effective purchasing is a key element to maintaining and enhancing our position as a provider of high quality test and measurement instruments. We frequently evaluate our purchase requirements and suppliers’ offerings to obtain products at the best possible cost. We obtain our products from nearly 400 suppliers of brand name and private-labeled equipment. In fiscal year 2010, our top 10 vendors accounted for approximately 65% of our aggregate business. Approximately 29% of our product


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purchases on an annual basis are from Fluke Electronics Corporation (“Fluke”), which we believe to be consistent with Fluke’s share of the markets we service.
 
We plan our product mix and inventory stock to best serve the anticipated needs of our customers whose individual purchases vary in size. We can usually ship to our customers our top selling products the same day they are ordered. During fiscal year 2010, approximately 94% of orders for our top selling products were filled with inventory items already in stock.
 
Operations.  Our distribution operations take place within an approximate 37,000 square-foot facility located in Rochester, New York and a 12,600 square-foot facility in Portland, Oregon. The Rochester location also serves as our corporate headquarters; houses our customer service, sales and administrative functions; and has a calibration laboratory. The Portland location also serves as a calibration laboratory. In fiscal year 2010, we shipped over 33,000 product orders in aggregate from both locations. In addition, we added two additional distribution facilities in Wisconsin through our acquisition of United Scale, which fulfill orders for scales.
 
Distribution.  We distribute our products throughout North America and internationally from our distribution centers. We maintain appropriate inventory levels in order to satisfy anticipated customer demand for prompt delivery and complete order fulfillment of their product needs. These inventory levels are managed on a daily basis with the aid of our sophisticated purchasing and stock management information system. Our automated laser bar code scanning facilitates prompt and accurate order fulfillment and freight manifesting.
 
In addition to our direct end-user customers, we also sell products to resellers who then sell to end-users. Our sales to resellers are typically at a lower gross margin than sales to direct customers and therefore the percentage of reseller sales to total revenue in any given period can have an impact on our overall gross profit margin. During fiscal year 2010, 24% of our distribution product sales were to resellers compared with 25% in fiscal year 2009 and 20% in fiscal year 2008. We believe that these resellers have access, through their existing relationships, to end-user customers to whom we do not market directly.
 
Exclusivity Agreement with Fluke.  We have been the exclusive worldwide distributor of Altek and Transmation branded products since fiscal year 2002. Annually, in exchange for exclusive distribution rights, we have committed to purchase a minimum amount of Altek and Transmation products from Fluke. Each year, we have exceeded this commitment. By its terms, the most recent exclusivity agreement with Fluke expired on December 31, 2008. We continue to be the exclusive worldwide distributor of these products on terms substantially similar to the agreement that expired on December 31, 2008.
 
Backlog.  Customer product orders include orders for instruments that we routinely stock in our inventory, customized products, and other products ordered less frequently, which we do not stock. Pending product shipments are primarily backorders, but also include products that are requested to be calibrated in our laboratories prior to shipment, orders required to be shipped complete, and orders required to be shipped at a future date.
 
At March 27, 2010, the value of our pending product shipments was approximately $1.8 million, compared with approximately $1.2 million and $1.4 million at March 28, 2009 and March 29, 2008, respectively. During the first three fiscal quarters of fiscal year 2010, our pending product shipments continued to increase when compared against the ending balance of the previous fiscal year. We believe that manufacturers reduced production during the economic downturn and then were slower to respond to increased market demand as the economy began to improve, leading to increased backorders. During the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2010, we reduced the outstanding balance of pending product shipments by $0.6 million, when compared to the end of the third quarter of fiscal 2010, by early recognition of the need to accelerate purchases to make up for extended lead times from manufacturers. The net decrease is inclusive of $0.2 million in incremental pending product shipments associated with United Scale, which was acquired during our fiscal fourth quarter. Our pending product shipments and total product backorders increased during the third quarter of fiscal year 2009 as a direct result of our integration of Westcon onto our order entry system. During the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2009, pending product shipments decreased 30%, when compared to the balance at the end of the third quarter of fiscal year 2009. We attribute this to decreased orders as a result of a decline in the general economy as demand from existing customers weakened despite aggressive pricing initiatives. During fiscal year 2010, the month-end level of pending product shipments varied between a low of $1.3 million and a high of $2.6 million.


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The following graph shows the quarter-end trend of pending product shipments and backorders for fiscal years 2009 and 2010.
 
(PERFORMANCE GRAPH)
 
CALIBRATION SERVICES SEGMENT
 
Summary.  Calibration is the act of comparing a unit or instrument of unknown value to a standard of known value and reporting the result in some rigorously defined form. After the calibration has been completed, a decision is made, again based on rigorously defined parameters, on what, if anything, is to be done to the unit to conform to the required standards or specifications. The decision may be to adjust, optimize or repair a unit; limit the use, range or rating of a unit; scrap the unit; or leave the unit as is. The purpose of calibration is to significantly reduce the risk of product or process failures caused by inaccurate measurements.
 
Within the calibration industry, there is a broad array of measurement disciplines making it costly and inefficient for any one provider to invest the needed capital for facilities, equipment and uniquely trained personnel necessary to address all measurement disciplines with in-house calibration capabilities. Our strategy, within our calibration services segment, has been to focus our investments in the core electrical, temperature, pressure and dimensional disciplines. We can address approximately 90% to 95% of the calibration requests we receive with our in-house capabilities. For customers’ calibration needs in less common and highly technical disciplines, we have historically subcontracted to third party vendors that can have unique or proprietary capabilities. These vendor relationships have enabled us to continue our pursuit of having the broadest calibration offerings to these targeted markets.
 
Strategy.  Our calibration services segment provides periodic calibration and repair services for our customers’ test and measurement instruments. We specifically target industries where quality calibrations are a critical operational component and believe calibration sourcing decisions are based on accreditation, reliability, trust, customer service, turn-around time, location, documentation, price and a one-source solution. Our success with customers is based on the trust they have in the integrity of our people and processes.
 
Transcat’s calibration services strategy encompasses two methods to manage a customer’s calibration and repair needs:
 
  1)  If a company wishes to outsource its calibration needs, we offer an “Integrated Calibration Services Solution” that provides a complete wrap-around service which includes:
  •  program management;
  •  calibration;
  •  logistics; and
  •  consultation services.
 
  2)  If a company has an in-house calibration operation, we can provide:
  •  calibration of primary standards;
  •  overflow capability either on-site or at one of our Calibration Centers of Excellence during periods of high demand; and
  •  consultation and training services.


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In either case, we strive to have the broadest accredited calibration offering to our targeted markets which includes certification of our technicians pursuant to the American Society for Quality (“ASQ”) standards, complete calibration management encompassing the entire metrology function, and access to our service offerings. We believe our calibration services are of the highest technical and quality levels, with broad ranges of accreditation and registration. Our quality systems are further detailed in the section entitled “Quality” below.
 
CalTrak®.  CalTrak® and CalTrak-Online are our proprietary metrology management systems that provide a comprehensive calibration quality program. Many of our customers have unique calibration service requirements to which we have tailored specific services. CalTrak-Online allows our customers to track calibration cycles via the Internet and provides the customer with a safe and secure off-site archive of calibration records that can be accessed 24 hours a day. Access to records data is managed through our secure password-protected website. Calibration assets are tracked with records that are automatically cross-referenced to the equipment that was used to calibrate. CalTrak® has also been validated to meet the most stringent requirements within the industry.
 
We perform over 145,000 in-house calibrations annually. These are performed at our twelve Calibration Centers of Excellence or at the customer’s location. During fiscal year 2010, services completed by our Calibration Centers of Excellence represented 76% of our calibration services segment revenue while approximately 21% of the revenue was derived from calibration services that were subcontracted to third party vendors. Our calibration services segment accounted for 34% of our total consolidated revenue in fiscal year 2010.
 
Marketing and Sales.  Calibration improves an operation’s maximum productivity and efficiency by assuring accurate, reliable instruments and processes. Through our calibration services segment, we perform periodic calibrations on new and used instruments as well as repair services for our customers. All of our Calibration Centers of Excellence provide accredited calibration of common measurement parameters.
 
We have sales teams that seek to acquire new customers in our targeted markets and account management teams to ensure continued relationships with existing customers. In addition, we employ our Master Catalog, supplements, mailings, journal advertising, trade shows, and the Internet to market our calibration services to customers and prospective customers with a strategic focus in the highly regulated industries including pharmaceutical, FDA-regulated, energy and utilities, and chemical processing. We also target industrial manufacturing and other industries that appreciate the value of quality calibrations. Due to growth in wind energy Service revenue in fiscal year 2010, the energy/utilities industry segment’s share of our Service business increased. Our quality process and standards are designed to meet the needs of companies that must address regulatory requirements and/or have a strong commitment to quality and a comprehensive calibration program.
 
The approximate percentage of our calibration services business by industry segment for the periods indicated is as follows:
 
                         
    FY 2010     FY 2009     FY 2008  
 
Pharmaceutical/FDA-Regulated
    37 %     38 %     37 %
Industrial Manufacturing
    22 %     25 %     27 %
Chemical Manufacturing
    8 %     9 %     11 %
Energy/Utilities
    20 %     15 %     14 %
Other
    13 %     13 %     11 %
                         
Total
    100 %     100 %     100 %
                         
 
Competition.  The calibration outsource industry is highly fragmented and is composed of companies ranging from internationally recognized and accredited corporations, such as Transcat, to non-accredited, sole proprietors as well as companies that perform their own calibrations in-house, resulting in a tremendous range of service levels and capabilities. A large percentage of calibration companies are small businesses that provide only basic measurements and service markets in which quality requirements may not be as demanding


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as the markets that we strategically target. Very few of these companies are structured to compete on the same scale and level of quality as us. There are also several companies with whom we compete who have national or regional operations. Certain of these competitors may have greater resources than us and some of them have accreditations that are similar to ours. We differentiate ourselves from our competitors by demonstrating our commitment to quality and by having a wide range of capabilities that are tailored to the markets we serve. Customers see the value in using our unique CalTrak-Online program to monitor their instrument’s status. We are fundamentally different from most of our competitors because we have the ability to bundle product, calibration and repair as a single source for our customers.
 
Quality.  The accreditation process is the only system currently in existence that assures measurement competence. Each of our laboratories is audited and reviewed by external accreditation bodies proficient in the technical aspects of the chemistry and physics that underlie metrology, ensuring that measurements are properly made. Accreditation also requires that all standards used for accredited measurements have a fully documented path, known as the traceability chain, either directly or through other accredited laboratories, back to the national or international standard for that measurement parameter. This ensures that our measurement process is consistent with the global metrology network that is designed to standardize measurements worldwide.
 
To ensure the quality and consistency of our calibrations for our customers, we have sought and achieved several international levels of quality and accreditation. Our calibration laboratories are ISO 9001:2000 registered through Underwriter’s Laboratories, which itself has international oversight from the ANAB-ANSI-ASQ National Accreditation Board. We believe our scope of accreditation to ISO/IEC 17025 to be the broadest for the industries we serve. The accreditation process also ensures that our calibrations are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or the National Research Council (these are the National Measurement Institutes for the United States and Canada, respectively), or to other national or international standards bodies, or to measurable conditions created in our laboratory, or accepted fundamental and/or natural physical constants, ratio type of calibration, or by comparison to consensus standards. Our laboratories are accredited to ISO/IEC 17025:2005 and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1-1994 using two of the accrediting bodies in the United States that are signatories to the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (“ILAC”). These two accrediting bodies are: National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) and American Association for Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA). These accrediting bodies provide an objective, third party, internationally accepted evaluation of the quality, consistency, and competency of our calibration processes.
 
The importance of this international oversight to our customers is the assurance that our documents will be accepted worldwide, removing one of the barriers to trade that they may experience if using a non-ILAC traceable calibration service provider.


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To provide the widest range of service to our customers in our target markets, our ISO/IEC 17025:2005 accreditations extend across many technical disciplines. The following table represents our capabilities for each of our Calibration Centers of Excellence as of March 27, 2010 (A=Accredited; N=Non-accredited):
 
WORKING-LEVEL CAPABILITIES:
 
                             
    Electrical Metrology Disciplines   Dimensional Metrology Disciplines
    Direct
                      Parts
    Current/
  High
                  Inspection
    Alternating
  Frequency/
                  (Geometric
    Current
  Ultra
  Radio
              Dimensioning
    - Low
  - High
  Frequency/
  Luminance/
          & Tolerancing/
    Frequency   Frequency   Microwave   Illuminance   Length   Optics   3-D Metrology)
 
Boston
  A   A   A       A        
Charlotte
  A   A           A        
Dayton
  A   A           A   A    
Ft. Wayne
                  A       A
Houston
  A   A   A       A   N    
Los Angeles
  A   A   A       A   N    
Ottawa
  A   A   A       A        
Philadelphia
  A   A   A   A   A   A    
Portland
  A   A           A       A
Rochester
  A   A   A       A   A   A
San Juan
  A   A           A        
St. Louis
  A   A           A        
 
                             
    Physical Metrology Disciplines
        Particle
      Gas
  Relative
  Mass
  Pressure,
    Flow   Counters   Force   Analysis   Humidity   Weight   Vacuum
 
Boston
          A       A   A   A
Charlotte
          A   N   A   A   A
Dayton
          A       A   A   A
Houston
          A           A   A
Los Angeles
          A       A   A   A
Ottawa
          A       A   A   A
Philadelphia
  A       A   N   A   A   A
Portland
          A       A   A   A
Rochester
      N   A       A   A   A
San Juan
          A       A   A   A
St. Louis
          A       A   A   A
Wisconsin(1)
          A           A    
 
                             
    Physical Metrology Disciplines (continued)   Life Sciences Disciplines
            Revolutions
               
            Per Minute,
  Vibration,
      Chemical/
   
    Torque   Temperature   Speed   Acceleration   Biomedical   Biological   Pharmaceutical
 
Boston
  A   A   A           N    
Charlotte
  A   A   A           N    
Dayton
  A   A   A           N    
Houston
  A   A   A           N    
Los Angeles
  A   A   A       N   N   N
Ottawa
  A   A   A                
Philadelphia
  A   A   A   A   N   N   N
Portland
  A   A   A           N    
Rochester
  A   A   A       N   N   N
San Juan
      A   A                
St. Louis
  A   A   A           N    


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REFERENCE-LEVEL CAPABILITIES:
 
                         
                    Pressure/
   
    Dimensional
  Electrical
  Humidity
  Mass
  Vacuum
  Temperature
    Standards   Standards   Standards   Standards   Standards   Standards
 
Charlotte
  A       A            
Dayton
  A                   A
Ft. Wayne
  A                    
Houston
      A           A    
Philadelphia
          A   A   A   A
Portland
  A       A            
Rochester
  A       A            
San Juan
          A   A        
 
 
(1) Wisconsin operations regionally headquartered in Milwaukee (New Berlin), with locations in Madison and Green Bay, includes calibration of legal for trade (NIST Handbook 44) and industrial scales (heavy capacity, medium capacity, small capacity, vehicle, livestock, hopper, belt, platform, bench, counting, laboratory balances, etc.)
 
CUSTOMER SERVICE AND SUPPORT
 
Our breadth of distribution products and calibration services along with our strong commitment to customer sales, service and support enable us to satisfy our customer needs through convenient selection and ordering; rapid, accurate, and complete order fulfillment; and on-time delivery.
 
Key elements of our customer service approach are our technically-trained field sales team, outbound sales team, account management team, inbound sales and customer service organization. Most customer orders are placed through our customer service organization which often provides technical assistance to our customers to facilitate the purchasing decision. To ensure the quality of service provided, we frequently monitor our customer service through customer surveys, interpersonal communication, and daily statistical reports.
 
Customers may place orders via:
 
•  Mail to Transcat, Inc., 35 Vantage Point Drive, Rochester, NY 14624;
•  Fax at 1-800-395-0543;
•  Telephone at 1-800-828-1470;
•  Email at sales@transcat.com; or
•  Our website at transcat.com.
 
INFORMATION REGARDING EXPORT SALES
 
Approximately 10% of our net revenue in fiscal year 2010 resulted from sales to customers outside the United States, compared with 11% and 13% in fiscal years 2009 and 2008, respectively. Of those sales in fiscal year 2010, 42% were denominated in U.S. dollars and the remaining 58% were in Canadian dollars. Our revenue is subject to the customary risks of operating in an international environment, including the potential imposition of trade or foreign exchange restrictions, tariff and other tax increases, fluctuations in exchange rates and unstable political situations, any one or more of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, cash flows, balance sheet or results of operations. See “Foreign Currency” in Item 7A of Part II of this report for further details.
 
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
 
We utilize a basic software platform, Application Plus, to manage our business and operations segments. We also utilize a turnkey enterprise software solution. This software includes a suite of fully integrated modules to manage our business functions, including customer service, warehouse management, inventory management, financial management, customer management, and business intelligence. This solution is a fully mature business package and has been subject to more than 20 years of refinement.


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SEASONALITY
 
We believe that our business has certain historical seasonal factors. Historically, our fiscal first and second quarters have been generally weaker and our fiscal third and fourth quarters have been stronger due to industrial operating cycles.
 
ENVIRONMENTAL MATTERS
 
We believe that compliance with federal, state, or local provisions relating to the protection of the environment will not have any material effect on our capital expenditures, earnings, or competitive position.
 
EMPLOYEES
 
At the end of fiscal year 2010, we had 303 employees, compared with 281 and 247 employees at the end of fiscal years 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
 
The following table presents certain information regarding our executive officers and certain key employees as of March 27, 2010:
 
             
Name   Age   Position
 
Charles P. Hadeed
    60     President, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Operating Officer
John J. Zimmer
    51     Vice President of Finance and Chief Financial Officer
Michael P. Craig
    56     Vice President of Human Resources
John P. Hennessy
    61     Vice President of Sales and Marketing
Rainer Stellrecht
    59     Vice President of Laboratory Operations
Lori L. Drescher
    50     Vice President of Business Process Improvement and Training
David D. Goodhead
    62     Vice President of Wind Energy Sales
Jay F. Woychick
    53     Vice President of Wind Energy Commercial Operations and Vendor Relations
Derek C. Hurlburt
    41     Corporate Controller
 
AVAILABLE INFORMATION
 
We are subject to the informational requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and, therefore, we file periodic reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC. Such reports may be read and copied at the Public Reference Room of the SEC at 100 F Street NE, Washington, D.C. 20549. Information on the operation of the Public Reference Room may be obtained by calling the SEC at (800) SEC-0330. Additionally, the SEC maintains a website (sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy statements and other information for registrants that file electronically.
 
We maintain an internet website at transcat.com. On our website, we make available, free of charge, documents we file with the SEC, including our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and any amendments to those reports filed with or furnished to the SEC. We make this information available as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such materials with, or furnish such information to, the SEC. Our SEC reports can be accessed in the investor relations section of our website. The other information found on our website is not part of this or any other report we file with, or furnish to, the SEC.
 
We also post on our website our board of directors’ committee charters (audit committee, compensation committee and corporate governance and nominating committee), and Code of Ethics. Copies of such charters


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are available in print at no charge to any shareholder who makes a request. Such requests should be made to our corporate secretary at our corporate headquarters, 35 Vantage Point Drive, Rochester, New York 14624.
 
ITEM 1A.   RISK FACTORS
 
You should consider carefully the following risks and all other information included in this report. The risks and uncertainties described below and elsewhere in this report are not the only ones facing our business. If any of the following risks were to actually occur, our business, financial condition or results of operations would likely suffer. In that case, the trading price of our common stock could fall and you could lose all or part of your investment.
 
The Economic Recession Could Have A Negative Impact On Our Major Customers And Suppliers Which In Turn Could Materially Adversely Affect Our Results Of Operations And Liquidity.  The economic recession has had a significant negative impact on businesses around the world. Although we believe that our cash provided by operations and available borrowing capacity under our current credit facility will provide us with sufficient liquidity through current economic conditions, the impact of this recession on our major customers and suppliers cannot be predicted and may be quite severe. The inability of major manufacturers to ship our products could impair our ability to meet the delivery date requirements of our customers. A disruption in the ability of our largest customers to access liquidity could cause serious disruptions or an overall deterioration of their businesses which could lead to a significant reduction in their future orders of our products and services and the inability or failure on their part to meet their payment obligations to us, any of which could have a negative effect on our results of operations and liquidity.
 
We Depend On Manufacturers To Supply Our Inventory And Rely On One Vendor Group To Supply A Significant Amount Of Our Inventory Purchases. If They Fail To Provide Desired Products To Us, Increase Prices, Or Fail To Timely Deliver Products, Our Revenue and Gross Profit Could Suffer.  A significant amount of our inventory purchases are made from one vendor, Fluke. Our reliance on this vendor leaves us vulnerable to having an inadequate supply of required products, price increases, late deliveries, and poor product quality. Like other distributors in our industry, we occasionally experience supplier shortages and are unable to purchase our desired volume of products. If we are unable to enter into and maintain satisfactory distribution arrangements with leading manufacturers, if we are unable to maintain an adequate supply of products, or if manufacturers do not regularly invest in, introduce to us, and/or make new products available to us for distribution, our sales could suffer considerably. Finally, we cannot provide any assurance that particular products, or product lines, will be available to us, or available in quantities sufficient to meet customer demand. This is of particular significance to our business because the products we sell are often only available from one source. Any limits to product access could materially and adversely affect our business.
 
Our Future Success May Be Affected By Future Indebtedness.  Under our revolving credit facility, as of March 27, 2010, we owed $2.5 million to our secured creditor. We may borrow additional funds in the future to support our growth and working capital needs. We are required to meet financial tests on a quarterly basis and comply with other covenants customary in secured financings. Although we believe that we will continue to be in compliance with such covenants, if we do not remain in compliance with such covenants, our lender may demand immediate repayment of amounts outstanding. Changes in interest rates may have a significant effect on our payment obligations and operating results. Furthermore, we are dependent on credit from manufacturers of our products to fund our inventory purchases. If our debt burden increases to high levels, such manufacturers may restrict our credit. Our cash requirements will depend on numerous factors, including the rate of growth of our revenues, the timing and levels of products purchased, payment terms, and credit limits from manufacturers, the timing and level of our accounts receivable collections and our ability to manage our business profitably. Our ability to satisfy our existing obligations, whether or not under our secured credit facility, will depend upon our future operating performance, which may be impacted by prevailing economic conditions and financial, business, and other factors described in this report, many of which are beyond our control.
 
If Existing Shareholders Sell Large Numbers Of Shares Of Our Common Stock, Our Stock Price Could Decline.  The market price of our common stock could decline if a large number of our shares are sold in the


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public market by our existing shareholders or holders of stock options or as a result of the perception that these sales could occur.
 
Our Stock Price Has Been, And May Continue To Be, Volatile.  The stock market, from time to time, has experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are both related and unrelated to the operating performance of companies. As our stock may be affected by market volatility, and by our own performance, the following factors, among others, may have a significant effect on the market price of our common stock:
  •  Developments in our relationships with current or future manufacturers of products we distribute;
  •  Announcements by us or our competitors of significant acquisitions, strategic partnerships, joint ventures or capital commitments;
  •  Litigation or governmental proceedings or announcements involving us or our industry;
  •  Economic and other external factors, such as disasters or other crises;
  •  Sales of our common stock or other securities in the open market;
  •  Period-to-period fluctuations in our operating results; and
  •  Our ability to satisfy our debt obligations.
 
We Expect That Our Quarterly Results Of Operations Will Fluctuate. Such Fluctuation Could Cause Our Stock Price To Decline.  A large portion of our expenses for calibration services, including expenses for facilities, equipment and personnel, are relatively fixed. Accordingly, if revenues decline or do not grow as we anticipate, we may not be able to correspondingly reduce our operating expenses in any particular quarter. Our quarterly revenues and operating results have fluctuated in the past and are likely to do so in the future. If our operating results in some quarters fail to meet the expectations of stock market analysts and investors, our stock price would likely decline. Some of the factors that could cause our revenues and operating results to fluctuate include:
  •  Fluctuations in industrial demand for products we sell and/or services we provide; and
  •  Fluctuations in geographic conditions, including currency and other economic conditions.
 
Changes In Accounting Standards, Legal Requirements And The NASDAQ Stock Market Listing Standards, Or Our Ability To Comply With Any Existing Requirements Or Standards, Could Adversely Affect Our Operating Results.  Extensive reforms relating to public company financial reporting, corporate governance and ethics, the NASDAQ Stock Market listing standards and oversight of the accounting profession have been implemented over the past several years and continue to evolve. Compliance with these rules, regulations and standards that have resulted from such reforms has increased our accounting and legal costs and has required significant management time and attention. In the event that additional rules, regulations or standards are implemented or any of the existing rules, regulations or standards to which we are subject undergoes additional material modification, we could be forced to spend significant financial and management resources to ensure our continued compliance, which could have an adverse affect on our results of operations. In addition, although we believe we are in full compliance with all such existing rules, regulations and standards, should we be or become unable to comply with any of such rules, regulations and standards, as they presently exist or as they may exist in the future, our results of operations could be adversely effected and the market price of our common stock could decline.
 
The Distribution Products Industry Is Highly Competitive, And We May Not Be Able To Compete Successfully.  We compete with numerous companies, including several major manufacturers and distributors. Some of our competitors have greater financial and other resources than we do, which could allow them to compete more successfully. Most of our products are available from several sources and our customers tend to have relationships with several distributors. Competitors could obtain exclusive rights to market particular products, which we would then be unable to market. Manufacturers could also increase their efforts to sell directly to end-users and bypass distributors like us. Industry consolidation among product distributors, the unavailability of products, whether due to our inability to gain access to products or interruptions in supply from manufacturers, or the emergence of new competitors could also increase competition and adversely affect our business or results of operations. In the future, we may be unable to compete successfully and competitive pressures may reduce our sales.


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If We Fail To Attract And Retain Qualified Personnel, We May Not Be Able To Achieve Our Stated Corporate Objectives.  Our ability to manage our anticipated growth, if realized, effectively depends on our ability to attract and retain highly qualified executive officers and technical personnel. If we fail to attract and retain qualified individuals, we will not be able to achieve our stated corporate objectives.
 
Our Revenue Depends On Retaining Capable Sales Personnel As Well As Our Relationships With Key Customers, Vendors And Manufacturers Of The Products That We Distribute.  Our future operating results depend on our ability to maintain satisfactory relationships with qualified sales personnel who appreciate the value of our services as well as key customers, vendors and manufacturers. If we fail to maintain our existing relationships with such persons or fail to acquire relationships with such key persons in the future, our business and results of operations may be adversely affected.
 
Our Future Success Is Substantially Dependent Upon Our Senior Management.  Our future success is substantially dependent upon the efforts and abilities of members of our existing senior management. Competition for senior management is intense, and we may not be successful in attracting and retaining key personnel, the inability of which could have an adverse affect on our business and results of operations.
 
Our Acquisitions Or Future Acquisition Efforts, Which Are Important To Our Growth, May Not Be Successful, Which May Limit Our Growth Or Adversely Affect Our Results Of Operations And Financial Condition.  Acquisitions have been an important part of our development to date. During the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2010, we acquired United Scale. As part of our business strategy, we may make additional acquisitions of companies that could complement or expand our business, augment our market coverage, provide us with important relationships or otherwise offer us growth opportunities. If we identify an appropriate acquisition candidate, we may not be able to negotiate successfully the terms of or finance the acquisition. In addition, we cannot assure you that we will be able to integrate the operations of our acquisitions without encountering difficulties, including unanticipated costs, possible difficulty in retaining customers and supplier or manufacturing relationships, failure to retain key employees, the diversion of our management’s attention or failure to integrate our information and accounting systems. As a result of our acquisition of United Scale and future acquisitions, we may not realize the revenues and cost savings that we expect to achieve or that would justify the investments, and we may incur costs in excess of what we anticipate. To effectively manage our expected future growth, we must continue to successfully manage our integration of the companies that we acquire and continue to improve our operational systems, internal procedures, accounts receivable and management, financial and operational controls. If we fail in any of these areas, our business growth and results of operations could be adversely affected.
 
The Financing Of Any Future Acquisitions We Make May Result In Dilution To Your Stock Ownership And/Or Could Increase Our Leverage And Our Risk Of Defaulting On Our Bank Debt.  Our business strategy includes expansion into new markets and enhancement of our position in existing markets, including through acquisitions. In order to successfully complete targeted acquisitions we may issue additional equity securities that could dilute your stock ownership. We may also incur additional debt if we acquire another company, which could significantly increase our leverage and our risk of default under our existing credit facility.
 
Tax Legislation Initiatives Could Adversely Affect The Company’s Net Earnings And Tax Liabilities.  We are subject to the tax laws and regulations of the United States federal, state and local governments, as well as foreign jurisdictions. From time to time, various legislative initiatives may be proposed that could adversely affect our tax positions. There can be no assurance that our effective tax rate will not be adversely affected by these initiatives. In addition, tax laws and regulations are extremely complex and subject to varying interpretations. Although we believe that our historical tax positions are sound and consistent with applicable laws, regulations and existing precedent, there can be no assurance that our tax positions will not be challenged by relevant tax authorities or that we would be successful in any such challenge.
 
ITEM 1B.   UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
 
Not applicable.


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ITEM 2.   PROPERTIES
 
We lease the following properties:
 
             
        Approximate
Property   Location   Square Footage
 
Corporate Headquarters, Product Distribution Center and Calibration Laboratory
  Rochester, NY     37,250  
Calibration Laboratory
  Anaheim, CA     4,000  
Calibration Laboratory
  Boston, MA     4,000  
Calibration Laboratory
  Charlotte, NC     4,860  
Calibration Laboratory
  Cherry Hill, NJ     8,550  
Calibration Laboratory
  Dayton, OH     9,000  
Calibration Laboratory(1)
  Fort Wayne, IN     5,000  
Calibration Laboratory
  Houston, TX     8,780  
Calibration Laboratory
  Ottawa, ON     3,990  
Calibration Laboratory and Product Distribution Center
  Portland, OR     12,600  
Calibration Laboratory
  San Juan, PR     1,560  
Calibration Laboratory
  St. Louis, MO     4,000  
Service and Distribution Center
  New Berlin, WI     16,000  
Service Center
  Green Bay, WI     3,320  
Service and Distribution Center
  Madison, WI     7,670  
 
 
(1) Subsequent to March 27, 2010, we have decided to move the operations of the Fort Wayne, IN calibration laboratory to our Houston, TX location.
 
We believe that our properties are generally in good condition, are well maintained, and are generally suitable and adequate to carry on our business in its current form.
 
ITEM 3.   LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
 
None.
 
ITEM 4.   RESERVED
 
PART II
 
ITEM 5.  MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
 
Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “TRNS.” As of June 16, 2010, we had approximately 643 shareholders of record.


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PRICE RANGE OF COMMON STOCK
 
The following table presents, on a per share basis, for the periods indicated, the high and low reported sales prices of our common stock as reported on the NASDAQ Capital Market for each quarterly period in fiscal years 2010 and 2009.
 
                                 
    First
  Second
  Third
  Fourth
    Quarter   Quarter   Quarter   Quarter
 
Fiscal Year 2010:
                               
High
  $ 6.20     $ 7.87     $ 7.21     $ 8.55  
Low
  $ 4.12     $ 4.40     $ 4.09     $ 5.51  
Fiscal Year 2009:
                               
High
  $ 7.00     $ 8.96     $ 9.24     $ 8.90  
Low
  $ 5.00     $ 6.10     $ 5.58     $ 3.81  
 
DIVIDENDS
 
We have not declared any cash dividends since our inception and do not intend to pay any dividends in the foreseeable future.
 
ITEM 6.   SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
 
The following table provides selected financial data for fiscal year 2010 and the previous four fiscal years (in thousands, except per share data). Certain reclassifications of financial information for prior fiscal years have been made to conform to the presentation for the current fiscal year.
 
                                         
    FY 2010     FY 2009     FY 2008     FY 2007     FY 2006  
 
Statements of Operations Data:
                                       
Net Revenues
  $ 81,061     $ 75,419     $ 70,453     $ 66,473     $ 60,471  
Cost of Products and Services Sold
    61,767       56,671       51,912       49,860       45,372  
                                         
Gross Profit
    19,294       18,748       18,541       16,613       15,099  
Operating Expenses
    16,913       16,062       15,258       14,264       13,581  
Gain on TPG Divestiture(1)
                      (1,544 )      
                                         
Operating Income
    2,381       2,686       3,283       3,893       1,518  
Interest Expense
    63       100       101       334       427  
Other Expense, net
    35       67       437       283       162  
                                         
Income Before Income Taxes
    2,283       2,519       2,745       3,276       929  
Provision for (Benefit from) Income Taxes
    832       963       382       1,217       (2,648 )
                                         
Net Income
  $ 1,451     $ 1,556     $ 2,363     $ 2,059     $ 3,577  
                                         
Share Data:
                                       
Basic Earnings Per Share
  $ 0.20     $ 0.21     $ 0.33     $ 0.30     $ 0.54  
Basic Average Shares Outstanding
    7,352       7,304       7,132       6,914       6,647  
Diluted Earnings Per Share
  $ 0.19     $ 0.21     $ 0.32     $ 0.28     $ 0.50  
Diluted Average Shares Outstanding
    7,549       7,469       7,272       7,335       7,176  
Closing Price Per Share
  $ 7.14     $ 4.90     $ 5.50     $ 5.25     $ 5.00  
 


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    As of or for the Fiscal Years Ended March  
    27, 2010     28, 2009     29, 2008     31, 2007     25, 2006  
 
Balance Sheets and Working Capital Data:
                                       
Inventory, net
  $ 5,906     $ 4,887     $ 5,442     $ 4,336     $ 3,952  
Property and Equipment, net
    4,163       4,174       3,211       2,814       2,637  
Goodwill
    10,038       7,923       2,967       2,967       2,967  
Total Assets
    35,713       29,391       24,344       22,422       21,488  
Depreciation and Amortization
    2,080       1,897       1,761       1,622       1,401  
Capital Expenditures
    1,128       1,775       1,505       1,194       914  
Long-Term Debt
    2,532       3,559       302       2,900       4,272  
Shareholders’ Equity
    20,257       18,619       15,117       11,229       8,647  
 
 
(1) In fiscal year 2007, we recognized a previously deferred pre-tax gain of $1.5 million from the sale of Transmation Products Group to Fluke in March 2002.
 
ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
OVERVIEW
 
Operational Overview.  We are a leading global distributor of professional grade handheld test and measurement instruments and accredited provider of calibration, repair and weighing system services across a wide array of measurement disciplines.
 
We operate our business through two reportable business segments that offer different products and services to the same customer base. Those two segments are distribution products and calibration services.
 
In our Product segment, our Master Catalog is widely recognized by both original equipment manufacturers and customers as the ultimate source for test and measurement instruments. Additionally, because we specialize in handheld test and measurement instruments, as opposed to a wide array of industrial products, our sales and customer service personnel can provide value-added technical assistance to our customers to aid them in determining what product best meets their particular application requirements.
 
Sales in our Product segment can be heavily impacted by changes in the economic environment. As customers increase or decrease capital and discretionary spending, our product sales will typically be directly impacted. The majority of our products are not consumables, but are purchased as replacements, upgrades, or for expansion of manufacturing and research and development facilities. Year-over-year sales growth in any one quarter can be impacted by a number of factors including the addition of new product lines or channels of distribution.
 
Our strength in our Service segment is based upon our wide range of disciplines and our investment in the quality systems that are required in our targeted market segments. Our services range from the calibration and repair of a single unit to managing a customer’s entire calibration program. We believe our Service segment offers an opportunity for long-term growth and the potential for continuing revenue from established customers with regular calibration cycles.
 
We evaluate revenue growth in both of our business segments against a four quarter trend analysis, and not by analyzing any single quarter.
 
Financial Overview.  In evaluating our results for fiscal year 2010, the following factors should be taken into account:
 
  •  Fiscal year 2010 operating results include those of United Scale, a Wisconsin based supplier and servicer of industrial scales and weighing systems, from the date of acquisition on January 27, 2010.

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  •  Fiscal year 2010 operating results include a full year of operations from Westcon, whereas, fiscal year 2009 operating results include those of Westcon from the date of acquisition on August 14, 2008.
 
  •  Fiscal year 2008 net income includes a $0.8 million reversal of a deferred tax asset valuation allowance. We reversed the allowance after an evaluation of the status of our foreign tax credits and the likelihood that these credits would be utilized prior to their expiration.
 
Net revenue for fiscal year 2010 was $81.1 million, a 7.5% increase compared with net revenue of $75.4 million for fiscal year 2009. Product segment sales increased 3.2% to $53.1 million, or 65.6% of total net revenue, in fiscal year 2010. Of our Product segment sales in fiscal year 2010, 75% were sold directly to end-user customers while 24% were to resellers compared with 74% and 25%, respectively, in fiscal year 2009. Domestic sales comprised 90% of the total Product segment sales in fiscal year 2010, while 7% were to Canada and 3% were to other international markets.
 
Service segment revenue increased 16.6% to $27.9 million, or 34.4% of total net revenue, in fiscal year 2010. Of our Service segment revenue in fiscal year 2010, 76% was generated by our Calibration Centers of Excellence while 21% was generated through subcontracted third party vendors, compared with 80% and 17%, respectively, in fiscal year 2009.
 
Gross margin for fiscal year 2010 was 23.8%, a 110 basis point decline compared with gross margin of 24.9% in fiscal year 2009. Product segment gross margin was 23.4% in fiscal year 2010 compared with 25.4% in fiscal year 2009, while Service segment gross margin improved to 24.5% in fiscal year 2010 compared with 23.7% in fiscal year 2009.
 
Operating expenses were $16.9 million, or 20.9% of total net revenue, in fiscal year 2010 compared with $16.1 million, or 21.3% of total net revenue, in fiscal year 2009. Operating income was $2.4 million in fiscal year 2010 compared with $2.7 million in fiscal year 2009.
 
CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES
 
The following is a summary of our most critical accounting policies. See Note 1 of our Consolidated Financial Statements for a complete discussion of the significant accounting policies and methods used in the preparation of our Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Use of Estimates.  The preparation of our Consolidated Financial Statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires that we make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Significant estimates and assumptions are used for, but not limited to, allowance for doubtful accounts and returns, depreciable lives of fixed assets, estimated lives of our major catalogs and intangible assets, and deferred tax asset valuation allowances. Future events and their effects cannot be predicted with certainty; accordingly, our accounting estimates require the exercise of judgment. The accounting estimates used in the preparation of our Consolidated Financial Statements will change as new events occur, as more experience is acquired, as additional information is obtained, and as our operating environment changes. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Such changes and refinements in estimation methodologies are reflected in reported results of operations in the period in which the changes are made and, if material, their effects are disclosed in the Notes to our Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Accounts Receivable.  Accounts receivable represent amounts due from customers in the ordinary course of business. These amounts are recorded net of the allowance for doubtful accounts and returns in the Consolidated Balance Sheets. The allowance for doubtful accounts is based upon the expected collectability of accounts receivable. We apply a specific formula to our accounts receivable aging, which may be adjusted on a specific account basis where the formula may not appropriately reserve for loss exposure. After all attempts to collect a receivable have failed, the receivable is written-off against the allowance for doubtful accounts. The returns reserve is calculated based upon the historical rate of returns applied to revenues over a specific timeframe. The returns reserve will increase or decrease as a result of changes in the level of revenues and/or the historical rate of returns.


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Inventory.  Inventory consists of products purchased for resale and is valued at the lower of cost or market. Costs are determined using the average cost method of inventory valuation. Inventory is reduced by a reserve for items not saleable at or above cost by applying a specific loss factor, based on historical experience, to specific categories of our inventory. We evaluate the adequacy of the reserve on a quarterly basis.
 
Property and Equipment, Depreciation and Amortization.  Property and equipment are stated at cost. Depreciation and amortization are computed primarily under the straight-line method over the following estimated useful lives:
 
         
    Years  
 
Machinery, Equipment, and Software
    2 - 6  
Furniture and Fixtures
    3 - 10  
Leasehold Improvements
    2 - 10  
 
Property and equipment determined to have no value are written off at their then remaining net book value. We capitalize certain costs incurred in the procurement and development of computer software used for internal purposes. Leasehold improvements are amortized under the straight-line method over the estimated useful life or the lease term, whichever is shorter. Maintenance and repairs are expensed as incurred. See Note 2 of our Consolidated Financial Statements for further information.
 
Goodwill and Intangible Assets.  We estimate the fair value of our reporting units using the fair market value measurement requirement, rather than the undiscounted cash flows approach. We test goodwill and intangible assets for impairment on an annual basis, or immediately if conditions indicate that such impairment could exist. The evaluation of our reporting units on a fair value basis indicated that no impairment existed as of March 27, 2010 and March 28, 2009.
 
Catalog Costs.  We capitalize the cost of each Master Catalog mailed and amortize the cost over the respective catalog’s estimated productive life. We review response results from catalog mailings on a continuous basis; and if warranted, modify the period over which costs are recognized. We amortize the cost of each Master Catalog over an eighteen month period and amortize the cost of each catalog supplement over a three month period. Total unamortized catalog costs in prepaid expenses and other current assets on the Consolidated Balance Sheets were $0.4 million as of March 27, 2010 and March 28, 2009.
 
Deferred Taxes.  We account for certain income and expense items differently for financial reporting purposes than for income tax reporting purposes. Deferred taxes are provided in recognition of these temporary differences. If necessary, a valuation allowance on deferred tax assets is provided for items for which it is more likely than not that the benefit of such items will not be realized based on an assessment of both positive and negative evidence. See “Taxes” below in this section and Note 4 of our Consolidated Financial Statements for further details.
 
Stock-Based Compensation.  We measure the cost of services received in exchange for all equity awards granted, including stock options, warrants and restricted stock, based on the fair market value of the award as of the grant date. We record compensation cost related to unvested stock awards by recognizing, on a straight line basis, the unamortized grant date fair value over the remaining service period of each award. Excess tax benefits from the exercise of stock awards are presented in the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows as a financing activity. Excess tax benefits are realized benefits from tax deductions for exercised awards in excess of the deferred tax asset attributable to stock-based compensation costs for such awards. We did not capitalize any stock-based compensation costs as part of an asset. We estimate forfeiture rates based on our historical experience.
 
Options generally vest over a period of up to four years, using either a graded schedule or on a straight-line basis, and expire ten years from the date of grant. Beginning in the second quarter of fiscal year 2008, options granted to executive officers vest using a graded schedule of 0% in the first year, 20% in each of the second and third years, and 60% in the fourth year. Prior options granted to executive officers vested equally over three years. The expense relating to these executive officer options is recognized on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period for the entire award.


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During the first quarter of fiscal years 2010 and 2009, we granted performance-based restricted stock awards in place of options as a primary component of executive compensation. The performance-based restricted stock awards vest after three years subject to certain cumulative diluted earnings per share growth targets over the eligible three-year period. During the second quarter of fiscal year 2009 and in conjunction with the acquisition of Westcon, we modified these awards by increasing the cumulative diluted earnings per share growth performance condition. The modification did not have an impact on our Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Compensation cost ultimately recognized for these performance-based restricted awards will equal the grant-date fair market value of the award that coincides with the actual outcome of the performance conditions. On an interim basis, we record compensation cost based on an assessment of the probability of achieving the performance conditions. At March 27, 2010, we estimated the probability of achievement for these performance-based awards granted in fiscal year 2010 and 2009 to be 75% and 0% of the target level, respectively.
 
See Note 7 of our Consolidated Financial Statements for further disclosure regarding our stock-based compensation.
 
Revenue Recognition.  Product sales are recorded when a product’s title and risk of loss transfers to the customer. We recognize the majority of our service revenue based upon when the calibration or other activity is performed and then shipped and/or delivered to the customer. Some of our service revenue is generated from managing customers’ calibration programs in which we recognize revenue in equal amounts at fixed intervals. We generally invoice our customers for freight, shipping, and handling charges. Provisions for customer returns are provided for in the period the related revenues are recorded based upon historical data.
 
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements.  We do not maintain any off-balance sheet arrangements.
 
Reclassification of Amounts.  Certain reclassifications of financial information for prior fiscal years have been made to conform to the presentation for the current fiscal year. In addition, certain reclassifications of financial information for prior fiscal quarters have been made to conform to the presentation for the current fiscal quarters.


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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
The following table sets forth, for the prior three fiscal years, the components of our Consolidated Statements of Operations.
 
                         
    FY 2010     FY 2009     FY 2008  
 
Gross Profit Percentage:
                       
Product Gross Profit
    23.4 %     25.4 %     27.8 %
Service Gross Profit
    24.5 %     23.7 %     23.3 %
Total Gross Profit
    23.8 %     24.9 %     26.3 %
As a Percentage of Total Net Revenue:
                       
Product Sales
    65.6 %     68.3 %     67.5 %
Service Revenue
    34.4 %     31.7 %     32.5 %
                         
Total Net Revenue
    100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %
                         
Selling, Marketing and Warehouse Expenses
    13.2 %     13.2 %     12.9 %
Administrative Expenses
    7.7 %     8.1 %     8.8 %
                         
Total Operating Expenses
    20.9 %     21.3 %     21.7 %
                         
Operating Income
    2.9 %     3.6 %     4.6 %
                         
Interest Expense
    0.1 %     0.1 %     0.1 %
Other Expense
          0.1 %     0.6 %
                         
Total Other Expense
    0.1 %     0.2 %     0.7 %
                         
Income Before Income Taxes
    2.8 %     3.4 %     3.9 %
Provision for Income Taxes
    1.0 %     1.3 %     0.5 %
                         
Net Income
    1.8 %     2.1 %     3.4 %
                         
 
FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 27, 2010 COMPARED TO FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 28, 2009 (dollars in thousands):
 
Revenue:
 
                 
    For the Years Ended  
    March 27,
    March 28,
 
    2010     2009  
 
Net Revenue:
               
Product
  $ 53,143     $ 51,480  
Service
    27,918       23,939  
                 
Total
  $ 81,061     $ 75,419  
                 
 
Net revenue increased $5.6 million, or 7.5%, from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010.
 
Our products net sales accounted for 65.6% of our total net revenue in fiscal year 2010 and 68.3% of our total net revenue in fiscal year 2009. Year-over-year product net sales increased $1.7 million, or 3.2%. Our fiscal years 2010 and 2009 product sales in relation to prior fiscal year quarter comparisons were as follows:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2010       FY 2009  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Product Sales Growth (Decline)
    20.5 %     8.5 %     (7.6 )%     (8.5 )%       (1.4 )%     7.6 %     15.5 %     12.7 %
 
Product net sales per day declined in both the first and second quarter of fiscal year 2010 when compared against the same quarter in the prior fiscal year, a direct result of the economy. As the economy began to improve in the second half of fiscal year 2010, we experienced growth in daily sales volume for both the third


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and fourth quarters of fiscal year 2010 when compared against the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year 2009. Our product sales per business day for each fiscal quarter during fiscal years 2010 and 2009 were as follows:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2010       FY 2009  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Product Sales Per Business Day
  $ 230     $ 249     $ 190     $ 176       $ 191     $ 226     $ 206     $ 192  
 
The increase in product net sales was primarily due to increased sales in the wind energy industry. During fiscal year 2010, product sales to the wind energy industry were $4.7 million, or 8.8% of net product sales. The sales growth achieved in the wind energy industry was partially offset by a decline in sales to non-wind energy customers within our direct channel as a result of the economic climate experienced during fiscal year 2010. As economic conditions improved in the latter part of fiscal year 2010, the second half year-over-year sales growth did not fully offset the sales decline from the first half. During the first half of fiscal 2010, non-wind sales to our direct channel declined 17.3%, when compared to the first half of fiscal year 2009. During the second half of fiscal year 2010, non-wind sales to our direct channel increased 6.0%, when compared to the same period in the prior fiscal year. Sales to our reseller channel were relatively consistent from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010. The following table presents the percent of net sales for our significant product distribution channels for each fiscal quarter during fiscal years 2010 and 2009:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2010       FY 2009  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Percent of Net Sales:
                                                                 
Direct
    75.2 %     70.8 %     77.5 %     75.2 %       77.0 %     72.7 %     71.1 %     74.1 %
Reseller
    23.2 %     27.8 %     21.1 %     23.3 %       21.6 %     26.1 %     27.3 %     24.3 %
Freight Billed to Customer
    1.6 %     1.4 %     1.4 %     1.5 %       1.4 %     1.2 %     1.6 %     1.6 %
                                                                   
      100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %       100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %
                                                                   
 
Customer product orders include orders for instruments that we routinely stock in our inventory, customized products, and other products ordered less frequently, which we do not stock. Pending product shipments are primarily backorders, but also include products that are requested to be calibrated in our laboratories prior to shipment, orders required to be shipped complete, and orders required to be shipped at a future date. Our total pending product shipments at the end of fiscal year 2010 increased by approximately $0.6 million, or 49.2% from the balance at the end of fiscal year 2009. The increase in pending product shipments was primarily attributable to increased backorders, as well as $0.2 million in incremental pending product shipments associated with United Scale, which was acquired during our fiscal fourth quarter. As the economy improved and customer demand in the marketplace quickly increased, manufacturers were slower to respond, thus resulting in longer lead times for many of the products we sell. The following table reflects the percentage of total pending product shipments that were backorders at the end of each fiscal quarter in 2010 and 2009 and our historical trend of total pending product shipments:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2010     FY 2009
    Q4   Q3   Q2   Q1     Q4   Q3   Q2   Q1
Total Pending Product Shipments
  $ 1,576     $ 2,351     $ 1,904     $ 1,445       $ 1,189     $ 1,701     $ 1,398     $ 1,366  
% of Pending Product Shipments that are Backorders
    89.5 %     82.8 %     78.9 %     72.2 %       81.0 %     84.1 %     70.7 %     74.7 %
 
Calibration services revenue, which accounted for 34.4% of our total net revenue in fiscal year 2010 and 31.7% of our total net revenue in fiscal year 2009, increased 16.6% from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010. The growth in revenue is primarily a result of the expansion of our traditional service customer base through


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new customer acquisition as well as increased in-house and outsourced services provided to the wind energy industry. Service revenue with the wind-energy industry in fiscal year 2010 was $2.1 million, or 7.6% of total service revenue. Also, within any year, while we add new customers, we also have customers from the prior year whose calibrations may not repeat for any number of factors. Among those factors are the variations in the timing of customer periodic calibrations on instruments and other services, customer capital expenditures and customer outsourcing decisions. Because of the timing of calibration orders and segment expenses can vary on a quarter-to-quarter basis, we believe a trailing twelve month trend provides a better indication of the progress of this segment. Our fiscal years 2010 and 2009 calibration service revenue in relation to prior fiscal year quarter comparisons, were as follows:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2010       FY 2009  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Service Revenue Growth (Decline)
    30.6 %     10.7 %     15.5 %     7.2 %       (0.9 )%     10.3 %     4.5 %     5.3 %
 
Within the calibration industry, there is a broad array of measurement disciplines making it costly and inefficient for any one provider to invest the needed capital for facilities, equipment and uniquely trained personnel necessary to address all measurement disciplines with in-house calibration capabilities. Our strategy has been to focus our investments in the core electrical, temperature, pressure and dimensional disciplines. Accordingly, we have historically outsourced 15% to 20% of Service segment revenue to third party vendors for calibration beyond our chosen scope of capabilities. During fiscal year 2010, we outsourced 21.1% of our total service revenue. The slight increase in the percentage of outsourced revenue is attributable to specific services provided to the wind energy industry, which fall outside our current scope of business. We will continue to evaluate the need for capital investments that could provide more in-house capabilities for our staff of technicians and reduce the need for third party vendors in certain instances. The following table presents the percent of Service segment revenue for the significant sources for each fiscal quarter during fiscal years 2010 and 2009:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2010       FY 2009  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Percent of Service Revenue:
                                                                 
Depot/Onsite
    75.9 %     73.5 %     77.3 %     79.3 %       81.2 %     78.5 %     78.6 %     80.8 %
Outsourced
    21.6 %     24.0 %     20.2 %     18.2 %       15.8 %     18.2 %     18.8 %     16.4 %
Freight Billed to Customers
    2.5 %     2.5 %     2.5 %     2.5 %       3.0 %     3.3 %     2.6 %     2.8 %
                                                                   
      100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %       100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %
                                                                   
 
Gross Profit:
 
                 
    For the Years Ended  
    March 27,
    March 28,
 
    2010     2009  
 
Gross Profit:
               
Product
  $ 12,442     $ 13,070  
Service
    6,852       5,678  
                 
Total
  $ 19,294     $ 18,748  
                 
 
Total gross profit dollars in fiscal year 2010 increased by $0.5 million, or 2.9%, from fiscal year 2009. As a percentage of total net revenue, total gross profit declined 110 basis points over the same time period.
 
We evaluate product gross profit from two perspectives. Channel gross profit includes net sales less the direct cost of inventory sold. Our total product gross profit includes channel gross profit as well as the impact of vendor rebates, cooperative advertising income, freight billed to customers, freight expenses and direct shipping costs. In general, our total product gross profit can vary based upon price discounting; the mix of


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sales to our reseller channel, which have lower margins than our direct customer base; and the timing of periodic vendor rebates and cooperative advertising income received from suppliers.
 
Total product gross profit in fiscal year 2010 was 23.4% of total product sales and declined 200 basis points when compared with 25.4% of total product sales in fiscal year 2009. Product gross profit declined $0.6 million in fiscal year 2010 compared to fiscal year 2009. Despite increased product sale volume, an increase in price discounting drove the decrease. The gross profit percentage in our direct and reseller channels declined 140 basis points and 240 basis points, respectively, from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010. Pricing in the marketplace remained competitive during both the downturn and recovery phases of the economy, and as a result, we increased discounting accordingly. In addition, total product gross profit was negatively impacted by approximately $0.2 million less in combined vendor rebate and cooperative advertising income in fiscal year 2010, when compared to fiscal year 2009. The key driver of this decline in fiscal year 2010 was lower point-of-sale rebates achieved from Fluke. The following table reflects the quarterly historical trend of our product gross profit as a percent of total product sales:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2010       FY 2009  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Channel Gross Profit % — Direct(1)
    24.7 %     23.1 %     23.2 %     24.3 %       24.0 %     24.6 %     26.5 %     25.8 %
Channel Gross Profit % — Reseller(1)
    16.0 %     15.0 %     15.6 %     17.0 %       18.7 %     17.8 %     18.3 %     18.2 %
Channel Gross Profit % — Combined(2)
    22.6 %     20.8 %     21.6 %     22.6 %       22.8 %     22.8 %     24.2 %     23.9 %
Other Items %(3)
    3.1 %     1.2 %     0.6 %     0.9 %       1.2 %     1.6 %     1.8 %     3.4 %
                                                                   
Total Product Gross Profit %
    25.7 %     22.0 %     22.2 %     23.5 %       24.0 %     24.4 %     26.0 %     27.3 %
                                                                   
 
 
(1) Channel gross profit% calculated as net sales less purchase costs divided by net sales.
 
(2) Represents aggregate gross profit% for direct and reseller channels, calculated as net sales less purchase cost divided by net sales
 
(3) Includes vendor rebates, cooperative advertising income, freight billed to customers, freight expenses, and direct shipping costs.
 
Calibration services gross profit increased $1.2 million, or 20.7%, from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010. As a percent of service revenue, calibration services gross profit increased 80 basis points from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010. Despite this increase, margin expansion was somewhat limited during fiscal year 2010 due to the volume of revenue growth attributed to third-party vendor repairs and calibrations, primarily to wind energy customers, and incremental performance-based management bonus and profit sharing expense in fiscal year 2010. The following table reflects our calibration services gross profit growth in relation to prior fiscal year quarters:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2010       FY 2009  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Service Gross Profit Dollar Growth (Decline)
    25.4 %     15.0 %     25.5 %     2.9 %       5.7 %     16.8 %     4.8 %     (0.3 %)
 
Operating Expenses:
 
                 
    For the Years Ended  
    March 27,
    March 28,
 
    2010     2009  
 
Operating Expenses:
               
Selling, Marketing and Warehouse
  $ 10,682     $ 9,935  
Administrative
    6,231       6,127  
                 
Total
  $ 16,913     $ 16,062  
                 


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Operating expenses were $16.9 million, or 20.9% of total net revenue, in fiscal year 2010 compared with $16.1 million, or 21.3% of total net revenue, in fiscal year 2009. Increased performance-based management bonus and profit sharing expenses contributed $0.6 million, or 73.4% of the overall annual increase. Exclusive of this increase, the remaining year-over-year increase in operating expense was 1.4%, an indication of our continued commitment to control costs.
 
Other Expense:
 
                 
    For the Years Ended  
    March 27,
    March 28,
 
    2010     2009  
 
Other Expense:
               
Interest Expense
  $ 63     $ 100  
Other Expense, net
    35       67  
                 
Total
  $ 98     $ 167  
                 
 
Total other expense decreased by less than $0.1 million from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010. Lower interest expense was a result of reduced debt balances and lower interest rates, while other expense decreases were due to reductions in foreign currency losses. We have a program in place to hedge the majority of our risk from fluctuations in the value of the U.S. dollar relative to the Canadian dollar.
 
Taxes:
 
                 
    For the Years Ended  
    March 27,
    March 28,
 
    2010     2009  
 
Provision for Income Taxes
  $ 832     $ 963  
 
Our effective tax rates for fiscal years 2010 and 2009 were 36.4% and 38.2%, respectively.
 
FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 28, 2009 COMPARED TO FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 29, 2008 (dollars in thousands):
 
Revenue:
 
                 
    For the Years Ended  
    March 28,
    March 29,
 
    2009     2008  
 
Net Revenue:
               
Product
  $ 51,480     $ 47,539  
Service
    23,939       22,914  
                 
Total
  $ 75,419     $ 70,453  
                 
 
Net revenue increased $5.0 million, or 7.0%, from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009.
 
Our distribution products net sales accounted for 68.3% of our total net revenue in fiscal year 2009 and 67.5% of our total net revenue in fiscal year 2008. Year-over-year product net sales increased 8.3%, primarily due to incremental sales associated with our acquisition of Westcon and increased reseller sales to expand our market reach. We believe that the overall economic environment, specifically the conditions experienced in the second half of our fiscal year, negatively impacted our overall sales performance for the year. This belief stems, in part, from the number of notices we have received from our suppliers and customers regarding plant shut downs, closures and workforce reductions. In the first half of fiscal year 2009, we experienced 14.1% growth in product net sales compared with the first half of fiscal year 2008; while in the second half of fiscal year 2009, we grew only 3.2% compared with the second half of fiscal year 2008, including incremental sales from


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Westcon. Our fiscal years 2009 and 2008 product sales in relation to prior fiscal year quarter comparisons were as follows:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2009       FY 2008  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4(1)     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Product Sales (Decline) Growth
    (1.4 )%     7.6 %     15.5 %     12.7 %       (2.4 )%     5.8 %     13.6 %     3.7 %
 
 
(1) The fourth quarter of fiscal year 2008 was a 13-week period compared to a 14-week period in the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2007.
 
Product net sales per day increased in each quarter of fiscal year 2009 as compared with the same period of fiscal year 2008, except for our fourth quarter of fiscal year 2009. We believe this was primarily due to a decline in the general economy. Our product sales per business day for each fiscal quarter during fiscal years 2009 and 2008 were as follows:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2009       FY 2008  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Product Sales Per Business Day
  $ 191     $ 226     $ 206     $ 192       $ 197     $ 213     $ 178     $ 171  
 
Overall product sales from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009 reflect 1.8% growth in our direct distribution channel. The direct distribution channel experienced a 5.8% growth in the first half of fiscal year 2009, due primarily to a combination of increased prices, new product introductions by strategic suppliers, increased customer response to our sales and marketing efforts, and growing sales through our website. Direct distribution channel’s sales in the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year 2009 declined 1.5% and 1.9%, respectively, compared to those in the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year 2008. We attribute this decline to the general weakness in the economy as demand from customers decreased despite aggressive pricing. For fiscal year 2009, our direct distribution channel gross profit percentage decreased 160 basis points, primarily as a result of more competitive pricing in both our U.S. and Canadian markets. While our direct distribution channel grew modestly in fiscal year 2009, our reseller distribution channel increased 34.0%, when compared to fiscal year 2008. We believe resellers continue to utilize us for our extensive availability to a broad range of new and existing products from within our inventory. While sales increased significantly, our continued use of a volume-based pricing structure allowed us to improve our reseller gross profit percentage by 70 basis points in fiscal year 2009 when compared to the fiscal year 2008. The following table presents the percent of net sales for our significant product distribution channels for each fiscal quarter during fiscal years 2009 and 2008:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2009       FY 2008  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Percent of Net Sales:
                                                                 
Direct
    77.0 %     72.7 %     71.1 %     74.1 %       77.4 %     79.5 %     77.4 %     79.1 %
Reseller
    21.6 %     26.1 %     27.3 %     24.3 %       21.1 %     19.1 %     21.0 %     19.3 %
Freight Billed to Customer
    1.4 %     1.2 %     1.6 %     1.6 %       1.5 %     1.4 %     1.6 %     1.6 %
                                                                   
      100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %       100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %
                                                                   
 
Customer product orders include orders for instruments that we routinely stock in our inventory, customized products, and other products ordered less frequently, which we do not stock. Pending product shipments are primarily backorders, but also include products that are requested to be calibrated in our laboratories prior to shipment, orders required to be shipped complete, and orders required to be shipped at a future date. Our total pending product shipments at the end of fiscal year 2009 decreased by approximately $0.2 million, or 16.2% from the balance at the end of fiscal year 2008. We believe this decrease was a result of a decline in the general economy. The following table reflects the percentage of total pending product shipments that were


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backorders at the end of each fiscal quarter in 2009 and 2008 and our historical trend of total pending product shipments:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2009       FY 2008  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Total Pending Product Shipments
  $ 1,189     $ 1,701     $ 1,398     $ 1,366       $ 1,419     $ 1,411     $ 1,689     $ 1,678  
% of Pending Product Shipments that are Backorders
    81.0 %     84.1 %     70.7 %     74.7 %       81.5 %     78.1 %     74.1 %     81.0 %
 
Calibration services revenue, which accounted for 31.7% of our total net revenue in fiscal year 2009 and 32.5% of our total net revenue in fiscal year 2008, increased 4.5% from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009. Incremental revenue achieved through new customer acquisition, resulting from our sales and marketing efforts and our acquisition of Westcon, was partially offset by declines in our existing customer base. Within any year, while we add new customers, we also have customers from the prior year whose calibrations may not repeat for any number of factors. Among those factors are the variations in the timing of customer periodic calibrations on instruments and other services, customer capital expenditures and customer outsourcing decisions. Because of the timing of calibration orders and segment expenses can vary on a quarter-to-quarter basis, we believe a trailing twelve month trend provides a better indication of the progress of this segment. Our fiscal years 2009 and 2008 calibration service revenue in relation to prior fiscal year quarter comparisons, were as follows:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2009       FY 2008  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Service Revenue (Decline) Growth
    (0.9 )%     10.3 %     4.5 %     5.3 %       10.6 %     9.9 %     8.6 %     5.6 %
 
Within the calibration industry, there is a broad array of measurement disciplines making it costly and inefficient for any one provider to invest the needed capital for facilities, equipment and uniquely trained personnel necessary to address all measurement disciplines with in-house calibration capabilities. Our strategy has been to focus our investments in the core electrical, temperature, pressure and dimensional disciplines. Accordingly, 15% to 20% of Service segment revenue is generated from outsourcing customer equipment to third party vendors for calibration beyond our chosen scope of capabilities. The following table presents the percent of Service segment revenue for the significant sources for each fiscal quarter during fiscal years 2009 and 2008:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2009       FY 2008  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Percent of Service Revenue:
                                                                 
Depot/Onsite
    81.2 %     78.5 %     78.6 %     80.8 %       81.0 %     78.8 %     78.9 %     79.2 %
Outsourced
    15.8 %     18.2 %     18.8 %     16.4 %       16.4 %     18.6 %     18.4 %     18.2 %
Freight Billed to Customers
    3.0 %     3.3 %     2.6 %     2.8 %       2.6 %     2.6 %     2.7 %     2.6 %
                                                                   
      100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %       100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %     100.0 %
                                                                   
 
Gross Profit:
 
                 
    For the Years Ended  
    March 28,
    March 29,
 
    2009     2008  
 
Gross Profit:
               
Product
  $ 13,070     $ 13,205  
Service
    5,678       5,336  
                 
Total
  $ 18,748     $ 18,541  
                 


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Gross profit, as a percent of total net revenue, decreased from 26.3% in fiscal year 2008 to 24.9% in fiscal year 2009.
 
Distribution products gross profit decreased $0.1 million, or 1.0%, from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009. Contributing to this decline was a greater mix of sales into our lower margin reseller channel, a decrease of $0.3 million in income from our rebate programs, and increased pricing discounts. These same factors led to a decline in product profit margin from 27.8% in fiscal year 2008 to 25.4% in fiscal year 2009.
 
Our product gross profit may be influenced by a number of factors that can impact quarterly comparisons. Among those factors are sales to our reseller channel which have lower margins than our direct customer base, periodic rebates on purchases, and cooperative advertising received from suppliers. The following table reflects the quarterly historical trend of our product gross profit as a percent of product net sales:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2009       FY 2008  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Channel Gross Profit % — Direct(1)
    24.0 %     24.6 %     26.5 %     25.8 %       26.2 %     26.7 %     27.8 %     26.6 %
Channel Gross Profit % — Reseller(1)
    18.7 %     17.8 %     18.3 %     18.2 %       16.4 %     18.3 %     18.4 %     16.7 %
Channel Gross Profit % — Combined(2)
    22.8 %     22.8 %     24.2 %     23.9 %       24.1 %     25.1 %     25.8 %     24.6 %
Other Items %(3)
    1.2 %     1.6 %     1.8 %     3.4 %       3.0 %     3.0 %     2.1 %     3.4 %
                                                                   
Total Product Gross Profit %
    24.0 %     24.4 %     26.0 %     27.3 %       27.1 %     28.1 %     27.9 %     28.0 %
                                                                   
 
 
(1) Channel gross profit% calculated as net sales less purchase costs divided by net sales.
 
(2) Represents aggregate gross profit% for direct and reseller channels, calculated as net sales less purchase cost divided by net sales
 
(3) Includes vendor rebates, cooperative advertising income, freight billed to customers, freight expenses, and direct shipping costs.
 
Calibration services gross profit increased $0.3 million, or 6.4%, from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009. As a percent of service revenue, calibration services gross profit increased 40 basis points from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009. The improvement in calibration services gross profit and margin is a direct result of reduced performance-based bonus and profit sharing expense. The following table reflects our calibration services gross profit growth in relation to prior fiscal year quarters:
 
                                                                   
    FY 2009       FY 2008  
    Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1       Q4     Q3     Q2     Q1  
Service Gross Profit Dollar Growth (Decline)
    5.7 %     16.8 %     4.8 %     (0.3 )%       32.5 %     14.0 %     5.0 %     3.8 %
 
Operating Expenses:
 
                 
    For the Years Ended  
    March 28,
    March 29,
 
    2009     2008  
 
Operating Expenses:
               
Selling, Marketing and Warehouse
  $ 9,935     $ 9,056  
Administrative
    6,127       6,202  
                 
Total
  $ 16,062     $ 15,258  
                 
 
Operating expenses were $16.1 million, or 21.3% of total net revenue, in fiscal year 2009 compared with $15.3 million, or 21.7% of total net revenue, in fiscal year 2008. Included in fiscal year 2009 operating expenses were $1.1 million in Westcon expenses, of which $0.3 million related to non-recurring administrative expenses associated with integration. Exclusive of incremental Westcon expenses, our organic operating expenses decreased 1.8% in fiscal year 2009 compared with fiscal year 2008, primarily due to reductions in


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employee stock-based compensation, performance-based management bonus and employee profit sharing expense, partially offset by investments in our sales and marketing for the Service segment.
 
Other Expense:
 
                 
    For the Years Ended  
    March 28,
    March 29,
 
    2009     2008  
 
Other Expense:
               
Interest Expense
  $ 100     $ 101  
Other Expense, net
    67       437  
                 
Total
  $ 167     $ 538  
                 
 
Interest expense of $0.1 million in fiscal year 2009 was consistent with interest expense in fiscal year 2008. Other expense decreased $0.4 million from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009 due to reduced foreign exchange losses. We have a program in place to hedge the majority of our risk to fluctuations in the value of the U.S. dollar relative to the Canadian dollar.
 
Taxes:
 
                 
    For the Years Ended
    March 28,
  March 29,
    2009   2008
 
Provision for Income Taxes
  $ 963     $ 382  
 
In fiscal year 2009, we recognized a $1.0 million provision for income taxes, compared with a $0.4 million provision in fiscal year 2008. Fiscal year 2008 included a $0.8 million benefit from a reduction in our deferred tax asset valuation allowance relating to our U.S. foreign tax credit carryforwards.
 
LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
 
We believe that amounts available under our current credit facility and our cash on hand are sufficient to satisfy our expected working capital and capital expenditure needs as well as our lease commitments for the foreseeable future.
 
Cash Flows.  The following table is a summary of our Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (dollars in thousands):
 
                 
    For the Years Ended  
    March 27,
    March 28,
 
    2010     2009  
 
Cash Provided by (Used in):
               
Operating Activities
  $ 5,649     $ 3,816  
Investing Activities
    (4,139 )     (7,416 )
Financing Activities
    (1,469 )     3,472  
 
Operating Activities:  Cash provided by operating activities for fiscal year 2010 was $5.6 million compared to $3.8 million in fiscal year 2009. Significant working capital fluctuations were as follows:
 
  •  Inventory/Accounts Payable:  Inventory balance at March 27, 2010 was $5.9 million, an increase of $1.0 million when compared to the $4.9 million on-hand on March 28, 2009. The increase was partly due to inventory acquired in the acquisition of United Scale as well as a strategic decision we made to maintain higher inventory levels of specific, higher-volume products, in support of greater sales growth and in an effort to reduce future backorder issues similar to those experienced at times during fiscal year 2010. The timing of inventory receipts impacted the accounts payable balance and is the primary reason for the $3.6 million increase in accounts payable in fiscal year 2010, compared to a $1.6 million


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  decrease in fiscal year 2009. In general, our accounts payable balance increases or decreases as a result of timing of vendor payments for inventory receipts.
 
  •  Receivables:  We continue to generate positive operating cash flows and maintain strong collections on our accounts receivable.
 
The following table illustrates our days sales outstanding from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010:
 
                 
    March 27,
  March 28,
    2010   2009
 
Net Sales, for the last two fiscal months
  $ 17,824     $ 14,226  
Accounts Receivable, net
  $ 11,439     $ 8,981  
Days Sales Outstanding
    39       38  
 
  •  Accrued Compensation and Other Liabilities:  Lower payments for employee profit sharing and performance-based management bonuses during fiscal year 2010, while accruing for future payments at March 27, 2010, contributed to the $1.5 million of cash provided during fiscal year 2010 compared with $0.8 million of cash used in fiscal year 2009.
 
Investing Activities:  In fiscal year 2010, we used $4.1 million of cash in investing activities. The primary uses of the cash were $1.9 million for the acquisition of United Scale, $1.1 million in contingent consideration relating to our acquisition of Westcon and $1.1 million to purchase property and equipment, primarily for additional lab capabilities and information technology. In fiscal year 2009, we used $7.4 million of cash in investing activities, of which approximately $5.6 million was associated with the purchase of Westcon. In addition, during fiscal year 2009, we used $1.8 million of cash for the purchase of property and equipment primarily for the expansion of capabilities in our calibration laboratories which included improvements to our facilities and infrastructure.
 
Financing Activities:  During fiscal year 2010, we used $1.5 million in cash for financing activities, including $1.0 million to reduce our debt. In addition, we used $0.6 million of cash for the repurchase of 143,000 shares of common stock from beneficiaries of a former Board member’s estate at a price of $4.45 per share. This use of cash was offset by $0.2 million of cash generated primarily from the issuance of common stock through the exercise of stock options and warrants. Financing activities provided $3.5 million in cash during fiscal year 2009. Net borrowings from our revolving line of credit provided $3.2 million during fiscal year 2009, primarily due to borrowings used to acquire Westcon. In addition, $0.2 million of cash was generated in fiscal year 2009 primarily from the issuance of common stock through the exercise of stock options and warrants.
 
Contractual Obligations and Commercial Commitments.  The table below contains aggregated information about future payments related to contractual obligations and commercial commitments such as debt and lease agreements (in millions):
 
                                         
    Payments Due By Period        
    Less than
    1-3
    3-5
    More than
       
    1 Year     Years     Years     5 Years     Total  
 
Revolving Line of Credit(1)
  $     $ 2.5     $     $     $ 2.5  
Operating Leases
    1.1       1.6       0.7       1.4       4.8  
                                         
Total Contractual Cash Obligations
  $ 1.1     $ 4.1     $ 0.7     $ 1.4     $ 7.3  
                                         
 
 
(1) Due to the uncertainty of forecasting expected variable rate interest payments, this amount excludes interest portion of the debt obligation.


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OUTLOOK
 
With an expanded service capability and product portfolio, we are strategically positioned to further capitalize on our customers’ requirements for high quality calibration and repair services and a convenient, cost-competitive source for a broad inventory of handheld test and measurement equipment. Looking ahead to fiscal year 2011, we anticipate that our quarterly performance should result in strong first half year-over-year comparisons that will moderate in the second half to be more in line with our previously communicated organic growth rates of low-to-mid single digit growth in our Product segment and low double digit growth in our Service segment. More significantly, we expect that as our top line expands, we will continue to realize the significant leverage available in our Service segment and our bottom line should expand at an appreciably greater rate. Capital spending, excluding any acquisitions, is expected to be in the range of $1.5 million to $2.0 million in fiscal year 2011.
 
ITEM 7A.   QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
 
INTEREST RATES
 
Our exposure to changes in interest rates results from borrowing activities. In the event interest rates were to move by 1%, our yearly interest expense would increase or decrease by less than $0.1 million assuming our average-borrowing levels remained constant. As of March 27, 2010, $13.8 million was available under our credit facility, subject to the maximum borrowing restriction based on a 2.75 multiple of earnings before income taxes, depreciation and amortization for the preceding four consecutive fiscal quarters, of which $2.5 million was outstanding.
 
Under our credit facility described in Note 3 of our Consolidated Financial Statements, interest is adjusted on a quarterly basis based upon our calculated leverage ratio. We mitigate our interest rate risk by electing the lower of the base rate available under the credit facility and the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”). As of March 27, 2010, the base rate and the LIBOR rate were 3.3% and 0.2%, respectively. Our interest rate for fiscal year 2010 ranged from 1.1% to 2.8%. On March 27, 2010 and March 28, 2009, we had no hedging arrangements in place to limit our exposure to upward movements in interest rates.
 
FOREIGN CURRENCY
 
Over 90% of our net revenues for fiscal years 2010 and 2009 were denominated in United States dollars, with the remainder denominated in Canadian dollars. A 10% change in the value of the Canadian dollar to the United States dollar would impact our net revenues by less than 1%. We monitor the relationship between the United States and Canadian currencies on a continuous basis and adjust sales prices for products and services sold in Canadian dollars as we believe to be appropriate.
 
We periodically enter into foreign exchange forward contracts to reduce the risk that our earnings would be adversely affected by changes in currency exchange rates. We do not apply hedge accounting and therefore, the change in the fair value of the contracts, which totaled less than $0.1 million in each of fiscal years 2010 and 2009 was recognized as a component of other expense in the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income. The change in the fair value of the contracts is offset by the change in fair value on the underlying receivables denominated in Canadian dollars being hedged. On March 27, 2010, we had a foreign exchange contract set to mature in April 2010, outstanding in the notional amount of $0.4 million. On March 28, 2009, we had foreign exchange contracts outstanding in the notional amount of $0.3 million. We do not use hedging arrangements for speculative purposes.


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ITEM 8.   FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
 
INDEX
 
                 
    Page(s)    
 
    35          
Consolidated Financial Statements
               
    36          
    37          
    38          
    39          
    40-56          
Schedule II — Valuation and Qualifying Accounts for the Years Ended March 27, 2010, March 28, 2009 and March 29, 2008     57          


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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
 
Board of Directors and Shareholders
Transcat, Inc.
Rochester, New York
 
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Transcat, Inc. and its subsidiaries (“the Company”) as of March 27, 2010 and March 28, 2009 and the related consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income, shareholders’ equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended March 27, 2010. In connection with our audits of the financial statements, we have also audited the schedule listed in the accompanying index. These financial statements and schedule are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and schedule based on our audits.
 
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements and schedule. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
 
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Transcat, Inc. and its subsidiaries at March 27, 2010 and March 28, 2009, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended March 27, 2010, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.
 
As discussed in Note 10 to the consolidated financial statements, effective March 29, 2009 the Company adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 (revised 2007), Business Combinations, now codified as Accounting Standards Codification Topic 805, Business Combinations.
 
Also, in our opinion, the financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic consolidated financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein.
 
/s/ BDO Seidman, LLP
BDO Seidman, LLP
 
New York, New York
June 24, 2010


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    For the Years Ended  
    March 27,
    March 28,
    March 29,
 
    2010     2009     2008  
 
Product Sales
  $ 53,143     $ 51,480     $ 47,539  
Service Revenue
    27,918       23,939       22,914  
                         
Net Revenue
    81,061       75,419       70,453  
                         
Cost of Products Sold
    40,701       38,410       34,334  
Cost of Services Sold
    21,066       18,261       17,578  
                         
Total Cost of Products and Services Sold
    61,767       56,671       51,912  
                         
Gross Profit
    19,294       18,748       18,541  
                         
Selling, Marketing and Warehouse Expenses
    10,682       9,935       9,056  
Administrative Expenses
    6,231       6,127       6,202  
                         
Total Operating Expenses
    16,913       16,062       15,258  
                         
Operating Income
    2,381       2,686       3,283  
                         
Interest Expense
    63       100       101  
Other Expense, net
    35       67       437  
                         
Total Other Expense
    98       167       538  
                         
Income Before Income Taxes
    2,283       2,519       2,745  
Provision for Income Taxes
    832       963       382  
                         
Net Income
    1,451       1,556       2,363  
Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
    62       (116 )     393  
                         
Comprehensive Income
  $ 1,513     $ 1,440     $ 2,756  
                         
Basic Earnings Per Share
  $ 0.20     $ 0.21     $ 0.33  
Average Shares Outstanding
    7,352       7,304       7,132  
Diluted Earnings Per Share
  $ 0.19     $ 0.21     $ 0.32  
Average Shares Outstanding
    7,549       7,469       7,272  
 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.


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TRANSCAT, INC.
(In thousands, Except Share and Per Share Amounts)
 
                 
    March 27,
    March 28,
 
    2010     2009  
 
ASSETS
               
Current Assets:
               
Cash
  $ 123     $ 59  
Accounts Receivable, less allowance for doubtful accounts of $82 and $75 as of March 27, 2010 and March 28, 2009, respectively
    11,439       8,981  
Other Receivables
    418       119  
Inventory, net
    5,906       4,887  
Prepaid Expenses and Other Current Assets
    915       774  
Deferred Tax Asset
    566       380  
                 
Total Current Assets
    19,367       15,200  
Property and Equipment, net
    4,163       4,174  
Goodwill
    10,038       7,923  
Intangible Assets, net
    1,234       1,091  
Deferred Tax Asset
    533       635  
Other Assets
    378       368  
                 
Total Assets
  $ 35,713     $ 29,391  
                 
                 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY                
Current Liabilities:
               
Accounts Payable
  $ 8,798     $ 4,748  
Accrued Compensation and Other Liabilities
    3,171       1,757  
Income Taxes Payable
    251       215  
                 
Total Current Liabilities
    12,220       6,720  
Long-Term Debt
    2,532       3,559  
Other Liabilities
    704       493  
                 
Total Liabilities
    15,456       10,772  
                 
Shareholders’ Equity:
               
Common Stock, par value $0.50 per share, 30,000,000 shares authorized;
               
7,698,450 and 7,656,358 shares issued as of March 27, 2010 and March 28, 2009, respectively; 7,279,668 and 7,380,576 shares outstanding as of March 27, 2010 and March 28, 2009, respectively
    3,849       3,828  
Capital in Excess of Par Value
    9,357       8,606  
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income
    382       320  
Retained Earnings
    8,304       6,853  
Less: Treasury Stock, at cost, 418,782 and 275,782 shares as of March 27, 2010 and March 28, 2009, respectively
    (1,635 )     (988 )
                 
Total Shareholders’ Equity
    20,257       18,619  
                 
Total Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
  $ 35,713     $ 29,391  
                 
 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.


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TRANSCAT, INC.
(In thousands)
 
                         
    For the Years Ended  
    March 27,
    March 28,
    March 29,
 
    2010     2009     2008  
 
Cash Flows from Operating Activities:
                       
Net Income
  $ 1,451     $ 1,556     $ 2,363  
Adjustments to Reconcile Net Income to Net Cash Provided by
                       
Operating Activities:
                       
Deferred Income Taxes
    35       246       40  
Depreciation and Amortization
    2,080       1,897       1,761  
Provision for (Recovery of) Accounts Receivable and Inventory Reserves
    133       304       (23 )
Stock-Based Compensation Expense
    579       666       780  
Changes in Assets and Liabilities, net of acquisitions:
                       
Accounts Receivable and Other Receivables
    (2,453 )     1,418       (186 )
Inventory
    (669 )     836       (1,039 )
Prepaid Expenses and Other Assets
    (707 )     (694 )     (662 )
Accounts Payable
    3,639       (1,585 )     640  
Accrued Compensation and Other Liabilities
    1,529       (789 )     (15 )
Income Taxes Payable
    32       (39 )     (66 )
                         
Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities
    5,649       3,816       3,593  
                         
Cash Flows from Investing Activities:
                       
Purchase of Property and Equipment
    (1,128 )     (1,775 )     (1,505 )
Payments of Contingent Consideration
    (1,094 )            
Business Acquisitions, net of cash acquired
    (1,917 )     (5,641 )      
                         
Net Cash Used in Investing Activities
    (4,139 )     (7,416 )     (1,505 )
                         
Cash Flows from Financing Activities:
                       
Revolving Line of Credit, net
    (1,001 )     3,199       (2,598 )
Payments on Other Debt Obligations
    (26 )     (10 )      
Issuance of Common Stock
    201       239       266  
Repurchase of Common Stock
    (647 )            
Excess Tax Benefits Related to Stock-Based Compensation
    4       44       86  
                         
Net Cash (Used in) Provided by Financing Activities
    (1,469 )     3,472       (2,246 )
                         
Effect of Exchange Rate Changes on Cash
    23       (21 )     9  
                         
Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash
    64       (149 )     (149 )
Cash at Beginning of Period
    59       208       357  
                         
Cash at End of Period
  $ 123     $ 59     $ 208  
                         
Supplemental Disclosures of Cash Flow Activity:
                       
Cash paid during the period for:
                       
Interest
  $ 74     $ 91     $ 114  
Income Taxes, net
  $ 741     $ 715     $ 253  
Supplemental Disclosure of Non-Cash Investing and Financing Activities:
                       
Contingent Consideration Related to Business Acquisition
  $ 207     $     $  
Stock Issued in Connection with Business Acquisition
  $     $ 1,113     $  
Capital Lease Obligation
  $     $ 49     $  
Expiration of Warrants from Debt Retirement
  $     $     $ 329  
 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.


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                Capital
                                     
    Common Stock
    In
          Accumulated
          Treasury Stock
       
    Issued
    Excess
          Other
          Outstanding
       
    $0.50 Par Value     of Par
          Comprehensive
    Retained
    at Cost        
    Shares     Amount     Value     Warrants     Income     Earnings     Shares     Amount     Total  
 
Balance as of March 31, 2007
    7,286     $ 3,643     $ 5,268     $ 329     $ 43     $ 2,934       276     $ (988 )   $ 11,229  
Issuance of Common Stock
    130       65       201                                               266  
Stock-Based Compensation
                    608                                               608  
Tax Benefit from Stock-Based Compensation
                    86                                               86  
Restricted Stock
    30       15       157                                               172  
Expired Warrants
                    329       (329 )                                      
Comprehensive Income:
                                                                       
Currency Translation Adjustment
                                    385                               385  
Unrecognized Prior Service Cost, net of tax
                                    8                               8  
Net Income
                                            2,363                       2,363  
                                                                         
Balance as of March 29, 2008
    7,446     $ 3,723     $ 6,649     $     $ 436     $ 5,297       276     $ (988 )   $ 15,117  
Issuance of Common Stock
    210       105       1,247                                               1,352  
Stock-Based Compensation
                    666                                               666  
Tax Benefit from Stock-Based Compensation
                    44                                               44  
Comprehensive Income:
                                                                       
Currency Translation Adjustment
                                    (104 )                             (104 )
Unrecognized Prior Service Cost, net of tax
                                    (12 )                             (12 )
Net Income
                                            1,556                       1,556  
                                                                         
Balance as of March 28, 2009
    7,656     $ 3,828     $ 8,606     $     $ 320     $ 6,853       276     $ (988 )   $ 18,619  
Issuance of Common Stock
    42       21       180                                               201  
Repurchase of Common Stock
                                                    143       (647 )     (647 )
Stock-Based Compensation
                    579                                               579  
Tax Expense from Stock-Based Compensation
                    (8 )                                             (8 )
Comprehensive Income:
                                                                       
Currency Translation Adjustment
                                    101                               101  
Unrecognized Prior Service Cost, net of tax
                                    (39 )                             (39 )
Net Income
                                            1,451                       1,451  
                                                                         
Balance as of March 27, 2010
    7,698     $ 3,849     $ 9,357     $     $ 382     $ 8,304       419     $ (1,635 )   $ 20,257  
                                                                         
 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.


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TRANSCAT, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(In Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
 
NOTE 1 — GENERAL
 
Description of Business:  Transcat, Inc. (“Transcat” or the “Company”) is a leading global distributor of professional grade handheld test and measurement instruments and accredited provider of calibration, repair and weighing system services primarily for the pharmaceutical and FDA-regulated, industrial manufacturing, energy and utilities, chemical process, and other industries.
 
Basis of Presentation:  During the second quarter of the fiscal year ended March 27, 2010, the Company adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“SFAS”) No. 168, The FASB Accounting Standards Codification and the Hierarchy of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. This statement, now codified as Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 105, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, did not change accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”), but established the ASC as the single source of authoritative accounting principles recognized by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”). The adoption of this statement did not have an impact on the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Principles of Consolidation:  The Consolidated Financial Statements of Transcat include the accounts of Transcat, Inc. and the Company’s wholly-owned subsidiaries, Transmation (Canada) Inc., Westcon, Inc. (“Westcon”) and USEC Acquisition Corp. (“USEC Acquisition”). All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.
 
On January 27, 2010, Transcat, through its wholly-owned subsidiary USEC Acquisition acquired United Scale & Engineering Corporation (“United Scale”), a Wisconsin corporation, pursuant to a Stock Purchase Agreement. See Note 10 for more information on this acquisition.
 
On March 29, 2009, the Company adopted SFAS No. 160, Noncontrolling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements — an amendment of ARB No. 51, now codified within ASC Topic 810, Consolidation. This statement applies to the accounting for noncontrolling interests (previously referred to as minority interests) in a subsidiary and for the deconsolidation of a subsidiary and requires noncontrolling interests to be reported as a component of equity, which changes the accounting for transactions with noncontrolling interest holders. Since the Company does not have any noncontrolling interests, the adoption of this statement did not have an impact on the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Use of Estimates:  The preparation of Transcat’s Consolidated Financial Statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) requires that the Company make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Significant estimates and assumptions are used for, but not limited to, allowance for doubtful accounts and returns, depreciable lives of fixed assets, estimated lives of major catalogs and intangible assets, and deferred tax asset valuation allowances. Future events and their effects cannot be predicted with certainty; accordingly, accounting estimates require the exercise of judgment. The accounting estimates used in the preparation of the Consolidated Financial Statements will change as new events occur, as more experience is acquired, as additional information is obtained, and as the operating environment changes. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Such changes and refinements in estimation methodologies are reflected in reported results of operations in the period in which the changes are made and, if material, their effects are disclosed in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Fiscal Year:  Transcat operates on a 52/53 week fiscal year, ending the last Saturday in March. In a 52-week fiscal year, each of the four quarters is a 13-week period. In a 53-week fiscal year, the last quarter is a 14-week period. The fiscal years ended March 27, 2010 (“fiscal year 2010”), March 28, 2009 (“fiscal year 2009”) and March 29, 2008 (“fiscal year 2008”) consisted of 52 weeks.


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Accounts Receivable:  Accounts receivable represent amounts due from customers in the ordinary course of business. These amounts are recorded net of the allowance for doubtful accounts and returns in the Consolidated Balance Sheets. The allowance for doubtful accounts is based upon the expected collectability of accounts receivable. Transcat applies a specific formula to its accounts receivable aging, which may be adjusted on a specific account basis where the formula may not appropriately reserve for loss exposure. After all attempts to collect a receivable have failed, the receivable is written-off against the allowance for doubtful accounts. The returns reserve is calculated based upon the historical rate of returns applied to revenues over a specific timeframe. The returns reserve will increase or decrease as a result of changes in the level of revenue and/or the historical rate of returns.
 
Inventory:  Inventory consists of products purchased for resale and is valued at the lower of cost or market. Costs are determined using the average cost method of inventory valuation. Inventory is reduced by a reserve for items not saleable at or above cost by applying a specific loss factor, based on historical experience, to specific categories of inventory. The Company evaluates the adequacy of the reserve on a quarterly basis.
 
Property and Equipment, Depreciation and Amortization:  Property and equipment are stated at cost. Depreciation and amortization are computed primarily under the straight-line method over the following estimated useful lives:
 
     
    Years
 
Machinery, Equipment and Software
  2 - 6
Furniture and Fixtures
  3 - 10
Leasehold Improvements
  2 - 10
 
Property and equipment determined to have no value are written off at their then remaining net book value. Transcat capitalizes certain costs incurred in the procurement and development of computer software used for internal purposes. Leasehold improvements are amortized under the straight-line method over the estimated useful life or the lease term, whichever is shorter. Maintenance and repairs are expensed as incurred. See Note 2 for further information on property and equipment.
 
Goodwill and Intangible Assets:  Goodwill represents costs in excess of fair values assigned to the underlying net assets of an acquired business. Other intangible assets, namely customer base, represent an allocation of purchase price to identifiable intangible assets of an acquired business.
 
Transcat estimates the fair value of the Company’s reporting units using the fair market value measurement requirement, rather than the undiscounted cash flows approach. The Company tests goodwill and intangible assets for impairment on an annual basis, or immediately if conditions indicate that such impairment could exist. The evaluation of the Company’s reporting units on a fair value basis indicated that no impairment existed as of March 27, 2010 and March 28, 2009.
 
A summary of changes in the Company’s goodwill and intangible assets is as follows:
 
                                                 
    Goodwill     Intangible Assets  
    Product     Service     Total     Product     Service     Total  
 
Net Book Value as of March 29, 2008
  $ 1,524     $ 1,443     $ 2,967     $     $     $  
Additions (see Note 10)
    3,965       991       4,956       480       726       1,206  
Amortization
                      (45 )     (70 )     (115 )
                                                 
Net Book Value as of March 28, 2009
  $ 5,489     $ 2,434     $ 7,923     $ 435     $ 656     $ 1,091  
Additions (see Note 10)
    1,283       832       2,115       17       324       341  
Amortization
                      (79 )     (119 )     (198 )
                                                 
Net Book Value as of March 27, 2010
  $ 6,772     $ 3,266     $ 10,038     $ 373     $ 861     $ 1,234  
                                                 
 
The intangible assets are being amortized on an accelerated basis over their estimated useful life of 10 years. Amortization expense relating to intangible assets is expected to be $0.2 million in fiscal year 2011,


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$0.3 million in fiscal year 2012, $0.2 million in each of the fiscal years 2013 and 2014, and $0.1 million in fiscal year 2015.
 
Catalog Costs:  Transcat capitalizes the cost of each Master Catalog mailed and amortizes the cost over the respective catalog’s estimated productive life. The Company reviews response results from catalog mailings on a continuous basis, and if warranted, modifies the period over which costs are recognized. The Company amortizes the cost of each Master Catalog over an eighteen month period and amortizes the cost of each catalog supplement over a three month period. Total unamortized catalog costs included as a component of prepaid expenses and other current assets on the Consolidated Balance Sheets were $0.4 million as of March 27, 2010 and March 28, 2009.
 
Deferred Taxes:  Transcat accounts for certain income and expense items differently for financial reporting purposes than for income tax reporting purposes. Deferred taxes are provided in recognition of these temporary differences. If necessary, a valuation allowance on net deferred tax assets is provided for items for which it is more likely than not that the benefit of such items will not be realized based on an assessment of both positive and negative evidence. See Note 4 for further discussion on income taxes.
 
Fair Value Measurements:  Transcat has determined the fair value of debt and other financial instruments using a valuation hierarchy. The hierarchy, which prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value, consists of three levels. Level 1 uses observable inputs such as quoted prices in active markets; Level 2 uses inputs other than quoted prices in active markets that are either directly or indirectly observable; and Level 3, which is defined as unobservable inputs in which little or no market data exists, requires the Company to develop its own assumptions. The carrying amount of debt on the Consolidated Balance Sheets approximates fair value due to variable interest rate pricing, and the carrying amounts for cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities approximate fair value due to their short-term nature.
 
During fiscal year 2010, the Company adopted Financial Statement of Position (“FSP”) No. 157-2, Partial Deferral of the Effective Date of Statement 157, and FSP No. 157-4, Determining Fair Value When the Volume and Level of Activity for the Asset or Liability Have Significantly Decreased and Identifying Transactions That Are Not Orderly, now codified within ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements (“ASC 820”). The adoption of these pronouncements did not have a material impact on the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Stock-Based Compensation:  The Company measures the cost of services received in exchange for all equity awards granted, including stock options, warrants and restricted stock, based on the fair market value of the award as of the grant date. The Company records compensation cost related to unvested stock awards by recognizing, on a straight line basis, the unamortized grant date fair value over the remaining service period of each award. Excess tax benefits from the exercise of stock awards are presented in the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows as a financing activity. Excess tax benefits are realized benefits from tax deductions for exercised awards in excess of the deferred tax asset attributable to stock-based compensation costs for such awards. The Company did not capitalize any stock-based compensation costs as part of an asset. The Company estimates forfeiture rates based on its historical experience. During fiscal years 2010, 2009 and 2008, the Company recorded non-cash stock-based compensation cost in the amount of $0.6 million, $0.7 million and $0.8 million, respectively, in the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income.
 
The estimated fair value of options granted was calculated using the Black-Scholes-Merton pricing model (“Black-Scholes”), which produced a weighted average fair value granted of $3.67 per share in fiscal year 2010, $4.02 per share in fiscal year 2009 and $4.59 per share in fiscal year 2008.
 
The following are the weighted average assumptions used in the Black-Scholes model:
 
             
    FY 2010   FY 2009   FY 2008
 
Expected life
  6 years   6 years   6 years
Annualized volatility rate
  57.3%   61.3%   68.3%
Risk-free rate of return
  2.8%   3.3%   4.5%
Dividend rate
  0.0%   0.0%   0.0%


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The Black-Scholes model incorporates assumptions to value stock-based awards. The risk-free rate of return for periods within the contractual life of the award is based on a zero-coupon U.S. government instrument over the contractual term of the equity instrument. Expected volatility is based on historical volatility of the Company’s stock. The expected option term represents the period that stock-based awards are expected to be outstanding based on the simplified method, which averages an award’s weighted-average vesting period and expected term for “plain vanilla” share options. Options are considered to be “plain vanilla” if they have the following basic characteristics: granted “at-the-money”; exercisability is conditioned upon service through the vesting date; termination of service prior to vesting results in forfeiture; limited exercise period following termination of service; and options are non-transferable and non-hedgeable. The Company will continue to use the simplified method until it has the historical data necessary to provide a reasonable estimate of expected life. For the expected term, the Company has “plain vanilla” stock options, and therefore used a simple average of the vesting period and the contractual term for options granted subsequent to January 1, 2006.
 
Revenue Recognition:  Product sales are recorded when a product’s title and risk of loss transfers to the customer. The Company recognizes the majority of its service revenue based upon when the calibration or repair activity is performed and then shipped and/or delivered to the customer. Some service revenue is generated from managing customers’ calibration programs in which the Company recognizes revenue in equal amounts at fixed intervals. The Company generally invoices its customers for freight, shipping, and handling charges. Provisions for customer returns are provided for in the period the related revenue is recorded based upon historical data.
 
Vendor Rebates:  Vendor rebates are based on a specified cumulative level of purchases and incremental product sales and are recorded as a reduction of cost of products sold. Purchase rebates are calculated and recorded quarterly based upon our volume of purchases with specific vendors during the quarter. Point of sale rebate programs are based upon annual year-over-year sales performance on a calendar year basis and are recorded as earned, on a quarterly basis, based upon the expected level of annual achievement.
 
Cooperative Advertising Income:  Transcat records cash consideration received from a vendor as a reduction of cost of products sold as the related inventory is sold. The Company recorded, as a reduction of cost of products sold, consideration in the amount of $1.1 million in each of the fiscal years 2010, 2009 and 2008.
 
Shipping and Handling Costs:  Freight expense and direct shipping costs are included in cost of products and services sold. These costs were approximately $1.4 million, $1.5 million and $1.4 million for fiscal years 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Direct handling costs, the majority of which represent direct compensation of employees who pick, pack, and otherwise prepare, if necessary, merchandise for shipment to customers, are reflected in selling, marketing, and warehouse expenses. These costs were $0.7 million in fiscal year 2010, $0.5 million in fiscal year 2009 and $0.4 million in fiscal year 2008.
 
Foreign Currency Translation and Transactions:  The accounts of Transmation (Canada) Inc. are maintained in the local currency and have been translated to United States dollars. Accordingly, the amounts representing assets and liabilities, except for equity, have been translated at the period-end rates of exchange and related revenue and expense accounts have been translated at average rates of exchange during the period. Gains and losses arising from translation of Transmation (Canada) Inc.’s balance sheets into United States dollars are recorded directly to the accumulated other comprehensive income component of shareholders’ equity.
 
Transcat records foreign currency gains and losses on Canadian business transactions. The net foreign currency loss was less than $0.1 million in each of the fiscal years 2010 and 2009 and $0.4 million in fiscal year 2008. Beginning in the third quarter of fiscal year 2008, the Company began utilizing foreign exchange forward contracts to reduce the risk that future earnings would be adversely affected by changes in currency exchange rates. The Company does not apply hedge accounting and therefore, the change in the fair value of the contracts, which totaled less than $0.1 million in each of the fiscal years 2010 and 2009 and $0.2 million in fiscal year 2008, was recognized as a component of other expense in the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income. The change in the fair value of the contracts is offset by the change in fair value on the underlying receivables denominated in Canadian dollars being hedged. On March 27, 2010,


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the Company had a foreign exchange contract set to mature in April 2010, outstanding in the notional amount of $0.4 million. On March 28, 2009, the Company had foreign exchange contracts outstanding in the notional amount of $0.3 million. The Company does not use hedging arrangements for speculative purposes.
 
On March 29, 2009, the Company adopted SFAS No. 161, Disclosures about Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities, now codified within ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging. This statement intends to improve financial reporting about derivative instruments and hedging activities by requiring enhanced disclosures to enable investors to better understand their effects on an entity’s financial position, financial performance, and cash flows. The adoption of this pronouncement did not have a material impact on the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Comprehensive Income:  Other comprehensive income is comprised of net income, currency translation adjustments and unrecognized prior service costs, net of tax. At March 27, 2010, accumulated other comprehensive income consisted of cumulative currency translation gains of $0.6 million and unrecognized prior service costs, net of tax, of $0.2 million. At March 28, 2009, accumulated other comprehensive income consisted of cumulative currency translation gains of $0.5 million and unrecognized prior service costs, net of tax, of $0.2 million.
 
Earnings Per Share:  Basic earnings per share of common stock are computed based on the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per share of common stock reflect the assumed conversion of stock options, warrants, and unvested restricted stock awards using the treasury stock method in periods in which they have a dilutive effect. In computing the per share effect of assumed conversion, funds which would have been received from the exercise of options, warrants, and unvested restricted stock are considered to have been used to purchase shares of common stock at the average market prices during the period, and the resulting net additional shares of common stock are included in the calculation of average shares of common stock outstanding.
 
For fiscal year 2010, the net additional common stock equivalents had a $.01 per share effect on the calculation of dilutive earnings per share. For fiscal years 2009 and 2008, the net additional common stock equivalents had no effect and a $0.01 per share effect, respectively, on the calculation of dilutive earnings per share. The average shares outstanding used to compute basic and diluted earnings per share are as follows:
 
                         
    For the Years Ended  
    March 27,
    March 28,
    March 29,
 
    2010     2009     2008  
 
Average Shares Outstanding — Basic
    7,352       7,304       7,132  
Effect of Dilutive Common Stock Equivalents
    197       165       140  
                         
Average Shares Outstanding — Diluted
    7,549       7,469       7,272  
                         
Anti-dilutive Common Stock Equivalents
    644       616       615  
                         
 
On March 29, 2009, the Company adopted FASB Staff Position No. EITF 03-6-1, Determining Whether Instruments Granted in Share-Based Payment Transactions Are Participating Securities, now codified within ASC Topic 260, Earnings Per Share (“ASC 260”). This pronouncement addresses whether instruments granted in share-based payment transactions are participating securities prior to vesting, and therefore, need to be included in the computation of earnings per share under the two-class method as described in ASC 260. The adoption of this pronouncement did not have a material impact on the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Subsequent Events:  In May 2009, the FASB issued SFAS No. 165, Subsequent Events, now codified as ASC Topic 855, Subsequent Events (“ASC 855”). This statement established general standards of accounting and disclosures of events that occur after the balance sheet date but before financial statements are issued or are available to be issued. It is effective for financial periods ending after June 15, 2009 and is to be applied prospectively. In February 2010, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2010-09, Subsequent Events, which amended ASC 855 by clarifying that Securities and Exchange Commission filers need not


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disclose the date through which subsequent events have been evaluated and that reissuances for which a subsequent events evaluation is required are limited to “revised” financial statements, as defined in the ASU.
 
The Company has evaluated all events and transactions that occurred subsequent to March 27, 2010. No material subsequent events have occurred that require recognition or disclosure in the Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Reclassification of Amounts:  Certain reclassifications of financial information for prior fiscal years have been made to conform to the presentation for the current fiscal year.
 
NOTE 2 — PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT
 
Property and equipment consist of:
 
                 
    March 27,
    March 28,
 
    2010     2009  
 
Machinery, Equipment and Software
  $ 16,608     $ 15,475  
Furniture and Fixtures
    1,710       1,688  
Leasehold Improvements
    904       657  
                 
Total Property and Equipment
  $ 19,222     $ 17,820  
Less: Accumulated Depreciation and Amortization
    (15,059 )     (13,646 )
                 
Total Property and Equipment, net
  $ 4,163     $ 4,174  
                 
 
Total depreciation and amortization expense amounted to $1.3 million in fiscal year 2010 and $1.1 million in each of the fiscal years 2009 and 2008.
 
NOTE 3 — DEBT
 
Description.  Transcat, through a credit agreement (the “Credit Agreement”) with JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. maturing in August 2011, has a revolving credit facility in the amount of $15.0 million (the “Revolving Credit Facility”), subject to the maximum borrowing restriction based on a 2.75 multiple of earnings before income taxes, depreciation and amortization for the preceding four consecutive fiscal quarters. As of March 27, 2010, $13.8 million was available under the Credit Agreement, of which $2.5 million was outstanding and included in long-term debt on the Consolidated Balance Sheet.
 
Interest and Other Costs.  Interest on the Revolving Credit Facility accrues, at Transcat’s election, at either a base rate (defined as the highest of prime, a three month certificate of deposit plus 1%, or the federal funds rate plus 1/2 of 1%) (the “Base Rate”) or the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), in each case, plus a margin. Commitment fees accrue based on the average daily amount of unused credit available on the Revolving Credit Facility. Interest and commitment fees are adjusted on a quarterly basis based upon the Company’s calculated leverage ratio, as defined in the Credit Agreement. The Base Rate and the LIBOR rates as of March 27, 2010 were 3.3% and 0.2%, respectively. The Company’s interest rate for fiscal year 2010 ranged from 1.1% to 2.8%. Loan costs associated with the Chase Credit Agreement, totaling less than $0.1 million, are being amortized over the term of the agreement.
 
Covenants.  The Credit Agreement has certain covenants with which the Company has to comply, including a fixed charge ratio covenant and a leverage ratio covenant. The Company was in compliance with all loan covenants and requirements throughout fiscal year 2010.
 
Other Terms.  The Company has pledged all of its U.S. tangible and intangible personal property and the common stock of its wholly-owned subsidiaries, Transmation (Canada) Inc. and Westcon as collateral security for the loans made under the Revolving Credit Facility.


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NOTE 4 — INCOME TAXES
 
Transcat’s net income before income taxes on the Consolidated Statements of Operations is as follows:
 
                         
    FY 2010     FY 2009     FY 2008  
 
United States
  $ 2,289     $ 2,544     $ 2,695  
Foreign
    (6 )     (25 )     50  
                         
Total
  $ 2,283     $ 2,519     $ 2,745  
                         
 
The net provision for income taxes for fiscal years 2010, 2009 and 2008 is as follows:
 
                         
    FY 2010     FY 2009     FY 2008  
 
Current Tax Provision:
                       
Federal
  $ 710     $ 631     $ 236  
State
    87       86       106  
                         
    $ 797     $ 717     $ 342  
                         
Deferred Tax Provision (Benefit):
                       
Federal
  $ 34     $ 225     $ 69  
State
    1       21       (29 )
                         
    $ 35     $ 246     $ 40  
                         
Provision for Income Taxes
  $ 832     $ 963     $ 382  
                         
 
A reconciliation of the income tax provision computed by applying the statutory United States federal income tax rate and the income tax provision reflected in the Consolidated Statements of Operations is as follows:
 
                         
    FY 2010     FY 2009     FY 2008  
 
Federal Income Tax at Statutory Rate
  $ 776     $ 856     $ 933  
State Income Taxes, net of Federal benefit
    91       101       110  
Valuation Allowance(1)
                (784 )
Other, net
    (35 )     6       123  
                         
Total
  $ 832     $ 963     $ 382  
                         
 
 
(1) In fiscal year 2008, after assessing all available evidence, the Company determined that it was more likely than not that the benefits associated with its U.S. foreign tax credit carryforwards would be realized. As a result, the Company reduced its deferred tax valuation allowance by $0.8 million and recorded the reduction as a benefit from income taxes in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.


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The components of the net deferred tax assets are as follows:
 
                 
    March 27,
    March 28,
 
    2010     2009  
 
Current Deferred Tax Assets:
               
Accrued Liabilities
  $ 263     $ 231  
Other
    303       149  
                 
Total Current Deferred Tax Assets
  $ 566     $ 380  
                 
Non-Current Deferred Tax Assets (Liabilities):
               
Stock-Based Compensation
  $ 708     $ 511  
Foreign Tax Credits (expiring through March 2018)
    494       614  
Depreciation
    (524 )     (536 )
Intangible Assets
    (469 )     (414 )
Other
    324       460  
                 
Total Non-Current Deferred Tax Assets
  $ 533     $ 635  
                 
Net Deferred Tax Assets
  $ 1,099     $ 1,015  
                 
 
Deferred U.S. income taxes have not been recorded for basis differences related to the investments in the Company’s foreign subsidiary, which consist primarily of undistributed earnings. During fiscal year 2008, the Company’s foreign subsidiary declared and paid dividends to Transcat in the amount of $2.6 million (in U.S. dollars), of which $1.3 million was previously taxed. The Company incurred additional tax of $0.4 million on the remaining dividend, which was fully offset by the utilization of a portion of the Company’s available foreign tax credits, as a component of the provision for income taxes in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. The remaining earnings of the Company’s foreign subsidiary are considered permanently reinvested in the subsidiary, therefore, the determination of the deferred tax liability on unremitted earnings is not practicable because such liability, if any, depends on circumstances existing if and when remittance occurs.
 
The Company files income tax returns in the U.S. federal jurisdiction, various states and Canada. During fiscal year 2010, the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) commenced an examination of the Company’s U.S. federal income tax returns for the tax years ended March 28, 2009 and March 29, 2008. Subsequent to March 27, 2010, the IRS completed its examination with no material adjustments being proposed. The Company is no longer subject to examination by U.S. federal income tax authorities for the tax years 2009 and prior, by state tax authorities for the tax years 2006 and prior, and by Canadian tax authorities for the tax years 2002 and prior. There are no tax years currently under examination by state or Canadian tax authorities.
 
During fiscal years 2010, 2009 and 2008, the Company recognized no adjustments for material uncertain tax benefits and expects no material changes to unrecognized tax positions within the next twelve months. The Company recognizes interest and penalties, if any, related to uncertain tax positions in the provision for income taxes. No interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions were recognized in fiscal years 2010, 2009 and 2008 or were accrued at March 27, 2010 and March 28, 2009.
 
NOTE 5 — DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLAN
 
All of Transcat’s United States based employees are eligible to participate in a defined contribution plan, the Long-Term Savings and Deferred Profit Sharing Plan (the “Plan”), provided certain qualifications are met.
 
In the long-term savings portion of the Plan (the “401K Plan”), plan participants are entitled to a distribution of their vested account balance upon termination of employment or retirement. Plan participants are fully vested in their contributions while Company contributions vest over a three year period. The Company temporarily suspended matching contributions to the 401K Plan for fiscal year 2010. The Company’s matching contributions to the 401K Plan were $0.3 million in each of the fiscal years 2009 and 2008.


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In the deferred profit sharing portion of the Plan, Company contributions are made at the discretion of the Board of Directors. The Company made no profit sharing contributions in fiscal years 2010, 2009 and 2008.
 
NOTE 6 — POSTRETIREMENT HEALTH CARE PLANS
 
The Company has two defined benefit postretirement health care plans. One plan provides limited reimbursement to eligible non-officer participants for the cost of individual medical insurance coverage purchased by the participant following qualifying retirement from employment with the Company (the “Non-Officer Plan”). The other plan provides long-term care insurance benefits, medical and dental insurance benefits and medical premium reimbursement benefits to eligible retired corporate officers and their eligible spouses (the “Officer Plan”).
 
The change in the postretirement benefit obligation is as follows:
 
                 
    FY 2010     FY 2009  
 
Postretirement benefit obligation, at beginning of fiscal year
  $ 458     $ 359  
Service cost
    85       50  
Interest cost
    33       24  
Benefits paid
    (7 )     (6 )
Actuarial loss
    82       31  
                 
Postretirement benefit obligation, at end of fiscal year
    651       458  
Fair value of plan assets, at end of fiscal year
           
                 
Funded status, at end of year
  $ (651 )   $ (458 )
                 
Accumulated postretirement benefit obligation, at end of fiscal year
  $ 651     $ 458  
                 
 
The accumulated postretirement benefit obligation is included as a component of other liabilities (non-current) in the Consolidated Balance Sheets. The components of net periodic postretirement benefit cost and other amounts recognized in other comprehensive income are as follows:
 
                         
    FY 2010     FY 2009     FY 2008  
 
Net periodic postretirement benefit cost:
                       
Service cost
  $ 85     $ 50     $ 34  
Interest cost
    33       24       16  
Amortization of prior service cost
    13       13       13  
                         
      131       87       63  
                         
Benefit obligations recognized in other comprehensive income:
                       
Amortization of prior service cost
    (13 )     (13 )     (13 )
Net loss
    77       31        
                         
      64       18       (13 )
                         
Total recognized in net periodic benefit cost and other comprehensive income
  $ 195     $ 105     $ 50  
                         
Amount recognized in accumulated other comprehensive income, at end of fiscal year:
                       
Unrecognized prior service cost
  $ 327     $ 263     $ 245  
                         
 
The prior service cost is amortized on a straight-line basis over the average remaining service period of active participants for the Non-Officer Plan and over the average remaining life expectancy of active participants for the Officer Plan. The estimated prior service cost that will be amortized from accumulated other comprehensive gain into net periodic postretirement benefit cost during the fiscal year 2011 is less than $0.1 million.


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The postretirement benefit obligation was computed by an independent third party actuary. Assumptions used to determine the postretirement benefit obligation and the net periodic benefit cost were as follows:
 
                         
    March 27,
    March 28,
    March 29,
 
    2010     2009     2008  
 
Weighted average discount rate
    6.1 %     7.4 %     6.7 %
Medical care cost trend rate:
                       
Trend rate assumed for next year
    8.5 %     9.0 %     9.5 %
Ultimate trend rate
    5.0 %     5.0 %     5.0 %
Year that rate reaches ultimate trend rate
    2018       2018       2018  
Dental care cost trend rate:
                       
Trend rate assumed for next year and remaining at that level thereafter
    5.0 %     5.0 %     5.0 %
 
Benefit payments are funded by the Company as needed. Payments toward the cost of a retiree’s medical and dental coverage, which are initially determined as a percentage of a base coverage plan in the year of retirement as defined in the plan document, are limited to increase at a rate of no more than 3% per year. The following benefit payments, which reflect expected future service, as appropriate, are expected to be paid as follows:
 
         
Fiscal Year
  Amount
 
2011
  $ 26  
2012
    29  
2013
    43  
2014
    64  
2015
    77  
2016-2020
    397  
 
Increasing the assumed health care cost trend rate by one percentage point would increase the accumulated postretirement benefit obligation and the annual net periodic cost by less than $0.1 million. A one percentage point decrease in the healthcare cost trend would decrease the accumulated postretirement benefit obligation and the annual net periodic cost by less than $0.1 million.
 
NOTE 7 — STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION
 
The Transcat, Inc. 2003 Incentive Plan, as amended (the “2003 Plan”), provides for, among other awards, grants of restricted stock and stock options to directors, officers and key employees to purchase common stock at no less than the fair market value at the date of grant. At March 27, 2010, the number of shares available for future grant under the 2003 Plan totaled 0.2 million.
 
In addition, Transcat maintains a warrant plan for directors (the “Directors’ Warrant Plan”). Under the Directors’ Warrant Plan, as amended, warrants have been granted to non-employee directors to purchase common stock at the fair market value at the date of grant. All warrants authorized for issuance pursuant to the Directors’ Warrant Plan have been granted and were fully vested as of August 2009.
 
Restricted Stock:  During the first quarter of fiscal years 2010 and 2009, the Company granted performance-based restricted stock awards in place of options as a primary component of executive compensation. These performance-based restricted stock awards vest after three years subject to certain cumulative diluted earnings per share targets over the eligible three-year period.
 
Compensation cost ultimately recognized for these performance-based restricted stock awards will equal the grant-date fair market value of the award that coincides with the actual outcome of the performance conditions. On an interim basis, the Company records compensation cost based on an assessment of the probability of achieving the performance conditions. At March 27, 2010, the Company estimated the probability of achievement for the performance-based restricted stock awards granted in fiscal year 2010 to be


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75% of the target level. During the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2010, based on an assessment of achieving the performance condition, the Company adjusted the estimated probability of achievement for the performance-based restricted stock awards granted in fiscal year 2009 from 50% to 0%. As a result, cumulative compensation cost relating to these awards was reduced by $0.1 million and reflected as a reduction of expense in the Consolidated Statement of Operations in fiscal year 2010. Total expense relating to performance-based restricted stock awards, based on grant-date fair market value and the estimated probability of achievement, was less than $0.1 million during each of fiscal years 2010 and 2009. Unearned compensation totaled $0.2 million as of March 27, 2010.
 
Restricted stock awards granted in fiscal year 2008 vested immediately and as such, the Company realized total expense, based on fair market value, in the amount of $0.2 million in fiscal year 2008.
 
Stock Options:  Options generally vest over a period of up to four years, using either a graded schedule or on a straight-line basis, and expire ten years from the date of grant. Beginning in the second quarter of fiscal year 2008, options granted to executive officers vest using a graded schedule of 0% in the first year, 20% in each of the second and third years, and 60% in the fourth year. Prior options granted to executive officers vested equally over three years. The expense relating to these executive officer options is recognized on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period for the entire award.
 
The following table summarizes the Company’s options for fiscal years 2010, 2009 and 2008:
 
                                 
          Weighted
             
          Average
    Weighted Average
       
    Number
    Exercise
    Remaining
    Aggregate
 
    of
    Price per
    Contractual
    Intrinsic
 
    Shares     Share     Term (in Years)     Value  
 
Outstanding as of March 31, 2007
    329     $ 3.11                  
Granted
    407       6.90                  
Exercised
    (71 )     1.37                  
Cancelled/Forfeited
    (9 )     4.12                  
                                 
Outstanding as of March 29, 2008
    656       5.64                  
Granted
    19       6.75                  
Exercised
    (6 )     2.69                  
Cancelled/Forfeited
    (4 )     6.35                  
                                 
Outstanding as of March 28, 2009
    665       5.70                  
Granted
    10       6.55                  
Cancelled/Forfeited
    (1 )     2.89                  
                                 
Outstanding as of March 27, 2010
    674       5.72       6     $ 1,106  
                                 
Exercisable as of March 27, 2010
    417       4.84       6       1,004  
                                 
 
The aggregate intrinsic value in the table above represents the total pre-tax intrinsic value (the difference between the Company’s closing stock price on the last trading day of fiscal year 2010 and the exercise price, multiplied by the number of in-the-money stock options) that would have been received by the option holders had all option holders exercised their options on March 27, 2010. The amount of aggregate intrinsic value will change based on the fair market value of the Company’s stock.
 
Total unrecognized compensation cost related to non-vested stock options as of March 27, 2010 was $0.5 million, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of one year. In fiscal year 2010, there were no stock options exercised. The aggregate intrinsic value of stock options exercised in fiscal year 2009 was less than $0.1 million and was $0.3 million in fiscal year 2008. Cash receipts from the exercise of options in fiscal year 2009 were less than $0.1 million and were $0.1 million in fiscal year 2008.


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The following table presents options outstanding and exercisable as of March 27, 2010:
 
                                           
    Options Outstanding       Options Exercisable  
          Weighted
    Weighted
            Weighted
 
          Average
    Average
            Average
 
          Remaining
    Exercise
            Exercise
 
    Number
    Contractual
    Price
      Number
    Price
 
    of
    Term
    per
      of
    per
 
    Shares     (in Years)     Share       Shares     Share  
Range of Exercise Prices:
                                         
$2.20-$3.50
    133       4     $ 2.51         133     $ 2.51  
$3.51-$5.00
    55       5       4.31         55       4.31  
$5.01-$6.50
    204       7       5.58         147       5.57  
$6.51-$7.72
    282       7       7.61         82       7.72  
                                           
Total
    674       6       5.72         417       4.84  
                                           
 
Warrants:  Warrants expire in five years from the date of grant. The following table summarizes warrants for fiscal years 2010, 2009 and 2008:
 
                                 
          Weighted
             
          Average
    Weighted Average
       
    Number
    Exercise
    Remaining
    Aggregate
 
    of
    Price per
    Contractual
    Intrinsic
 
    Shares     Share     Term (in years)     Value  
 
Outstanding as of March 31, 2007
    153     $ 3.27                  
Exercised
    (43 )     1.82                  
Cancelled/Forfeited
    (11 )     4.51                  
                                 
Outstanding as of March 29, 2008
    99       3.75                  
Exercised
    (32 )     2.57                  
Cancelled/Forfeited
    (4 )     5.25                  
                                 
Outstanding as of March 28, 2009
    63       4.28                  
Exercised
    (18 )     3.19                  
Cancelled/Forfeited
    (4 )     2.88                  
                                 
Outstanding as of March 27, 2010
    41       4.89       1     $ 92  
                                 
Exercisable as of March 27, 2010
    41       4.89       1       92  
                                 
 
The aggregate intrinsic value in the table above represents the total pre-tax intrinsic value (the difference between the Company’s closing stock price on the last trading day of fiscal year 2010 and the exercise price, multiplied by the number of in-the-money warrants) that would have been received by the warrant holders had all warrant holders exercised their warrants on March 27, 2010. The amount of aggregate intrinsic value will change based on the fair market value of the Company’s stock. The aggregate intrinsic value of warrants exercised was $0.1 million in each of the fiscal years 2010 and 2009, and $0.2 million in fiscal year 2008. Cash received from the exercise of warrants was less than $0.1 million in each of fiscal years 2010, 2009 and 2008.


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The following table presents warrants outstanding and exercisable as of March 27, 2010:
 
                           
    Warrants Outstanding          
          Remaining
         
    Number
    Contractual
      Warrants
 
    of
    Life
      Exercisable
 
    Shares     (in Years)       (in Shares)  
Exercise Prices:
                         
$4.26
    24               24  
$5.80
    17       1         17  
                           
Total
    41       1         41  
                           
 
NOTE 8 — SEGMENT AND GEOGRAPHIC DATA
 
Transcat has two reportable segments: Distribution Products (“Product”) and Calibration Services (“Service”). The accounting policies of the reportable segments are the same as those described above in Note 1 of the Consolidated Financial Statements. The Company has no inter-segment revenues. The following table presents segment and geographic data for fiscal years 2010, 2009 and 2008:
 
                         
    FY 2010     FY 2009     FY 2008  
 
Net Revenue:
                       
Product
  $ 53,143     $ 51,480     $ 47,539  
Service
    27,918       23,939       22,914  
                         
Total
    81,061       75,419       70,453  
                         
Gross Profit:
                       
Product
    12,442       13,070       13,205  
Service
    6,852       5,678       5,336  
                         
Total
    19,294       18,748       18,541  
                         
Operating Expenses:
                       
Product(1)
    10,155       9,622       9,392  
Service(1)
    6,758       6,440       5,866  
                         
Total
    16,913       16,062       15,258