Attached files

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EX-21.1 - EX-21.1 - VISTEON CORPk48891exv21w1.htm
EX-31.1 - EX-31.1 - VISTEON CORPk48891exv31w1.htm
EX-32.2 - EX-32.2 - VISTEON CORPk48891exv32w2.htm
EX-31.2 - EX-31.2 - VISTEON CORPk48891exv31w2.htm
EX-32.1 - EX-32.1 - VISTEON CORPk48891exv32w1.htm
EX-24.1 - EX-24.1 - VISTEON CORPk48891exv24w1.htm
EX-23.1 - EX-23.1 - VISTEON CORPk48891exv23w1.htm
EX-10.23 - EX-10.23 - VISTEON CORPk48891exv10w23.htm
EX-10.23.1 - EX-10.23.1 - VISTEON CORPk48891exv10w23w1.htm
EX-10.21 - EX-10.21 - VISTEON CORPk48891exv10w21.htm
Table of Contents

 
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington D.C. 20549
 
 
 
 
FORM 10-K
 
     
(Mark One)    
þ
 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
    For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2009, or
     
o
  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
    For the transition period from            to           
 
Commission file number 1-15827
 
 
 
 
VISTEON CORPORATION
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
     
Delaware
  38-3519512
(State of incorporation)   (I.R.S. employer
identification no.)
One Village Center Drive,
Van Buren Township, Michigan
(Address of principal executive offices)
  48111
(Zip code)
     
 
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (800)-VISTEON
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
 
 
(Title of class)
 
Common Stock, par value $1.00 per share
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes       No   ü  
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.  Yes       No   ü  
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes   ü    No     
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (Section 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes       No     
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.   ü  
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filer       Accelerated filer       Non-accelerated filer       Smaller reporting company   ü  
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes       No   ü  
 
The aggregate market value of the registrant’s voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant on June 30, 2009 (the last business day of the most recently completed second fiscal quarter) was approximately $19.6 million.
 
As of February 22, 2010, the registrant had outstanding 130,324,581 shares of common stock.
 
Document Incorporated by Reference
     
Document
 
Where Incorporated
 
None   None


 

 
INDEX
 
         
       
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 EX-10.21
 EX-10.23
 EX-10.23.1
 EX-21.1
 EX-23.1
 EX-24.1
 EX-31.1
 EX-31.2
 EX-32.1
 EX-32.2


Table of Contents

 
PART I
 
ITEM 1.  BUSINESS
 
General
 
Visteon Corporation (the “Company” or “Visteon”) is a leading global supplier of climate, interiors and electronics systems, modules and components to global automotive original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”). Headquartered in Van Buren Township, Michigan, Visteon has a workforce of approximately 29,500 employees and a network of manufacturing operations, technical centers customer service centers and joint ventures in every major geographic region of the world. The Company was incorporated in Delaware in January 2000 as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ford Motor Company (“Ford” or “Ford Motor Company”). Subsequently, Ford transferred the assets and liabilities comprising its automotive components and systems business to Visteon. The Company separated from Ford on June 28, 2000 when all of the Company’s common stock was distributed by Ford to its shareholders.
 
In September 2005, the Company transferred 23 of its North American facilities and certain other related assets and liabilities (the “Business”) to Automotive Components Holdings, LLC (“ACH”), an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company. On October 1, 2005, the Company sold ACH to Ford for cash proceeds of approximately $300 million, as well as the forgiveness of certain other postretirement employee benefit liabilities and other obligations relating to hourly employees associated with the Business and the assumption of certain other liabilities (together, the “ACH Transactions”). The transferred facilities included all of the Company’s plants that leased hourly workers covered by Ford’s Master Agreement with the United Auto Workers Union (“UAW”). The Business accounted for approximately $6.1 billion of the Company’s total product sales for 2005, the majority being products sold to Ford.
 
In January 2006, the Company announced a multi-year improvement plan that involved the restructuring of certain underperforming and non-strategic plants and businesses to improve operating and financial performance and to reduce costs. The multi-year improvement plan, which was initially expected to affect up to 23 facilities, was completed during 2008 and addressed a total of 30 facilities and businesses, including 7 divestitures and 14 closures. These activities resulted in sales declines of $1 billion and $675 million during the years ended December 31, 2008, and 2007, respectively.
 
During 2008, weakened economic conditions, largely attributable to the global credit crisis, and erosion of consumer confidence, negatively impacted the automotive sector on a global basis. Significant factors including the deterioration of housing values, rising fuel prices, equity market volatility and rising unemployment levels resulted in consumers delaying purchases of durable goods, particularly highly deliberated purchases such as automobiles. Additionally, the absence of available credit hindered vehicle affordability, forcing consumers out of the market globally. Together these factors combined to drive a severe decline in demand for automobiles across substantially all geographies. Despite actions taken by the Company to reduce its operating costs in 2008, the rate of such reductions did not keep pace with that of the rapidly deteriorating market conditions and related decline in OEM production volumes, which resulted in significant operating losses and cash flow usage by the Company, particularly in the fourth quarter of 2008.


1


Table of Contents

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS — (Continued)
 
Bankruptcy Proceedings
 
On March 31, 2009, Visteon UK Limited, a company organized under the laws of England and Wales and an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company (the “UK Debtor”), filed for administration (the “UK Administration”) under the United Kingdom Insolvency Act of 1986 with the High Court of Justice, Chancery division in London, England. The UK Administration does not include the Company or any of the Company’s other subsidiaries. The UK Administration was initiated in response to continuing operating losses of the UK Debtor and mounting labor costs and their related demand on the Company’s cash flows. The effect of the UK Debtor’s entry into administration was to place the management, affairs, business and property of the UK Debtor under the direct control of the Administrators. Since their appointment, the Administrators have wound down the business of the UK Debtor and closed its operations in Enfield, UK, Basildon, UK and Belfast, UK, and made the employees redundant. The Administrators continue to realize the UK Debtor’s assets, primarily comprised of receivables.
 
Amounts related to contingent liabilities for potential claims under the UK Administration, which may result from (i) negotiations; (ii) actions of the Administrators; (iii) resolution of contractual arrangements, including unexpired leases; (iv) assertions by the UK Pensions Regulator; and, (v) material adverse developments; or other events, may be recorded in future periods. Accordingly, no assurance can be provided that the Company will not be subject to future litigation and/or liabilities related to the UK Administration. Additional liabilities, if any, will be recorded when they become probable and estimable and could materially affect the Company’s results of operations and financial condition in future periods.
 
On May 28, 2009 (the “Petition Date”), Visteon and certain of its U.S. subsidiaries (the “Debtors”) filed voluntary petitions for reorganization relief under chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code (the “Bankruptcy Code”) in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware (the “Court”). The reorganization cases are being jointly administered as Case No. 09-11786 under the caption “In re Visteon Corporation, et al” (hereinafter referred to as the “Chapter 11 Proceedings”). The Debtors continue to operate their businesses as “debtors-in-possession” (“DIP”) under the jurisdiction of the Court and in accordance with the applicable provisions of the Bankruptcy Code and orders of the Court. The Company’s other subsidiaries, primarily non-U.S. subsidiaries, have been excluded from the Chapter 11 Proceedings and continue to operate their businesses without supervision from the Court and are not subject to the requirements of the Bankruptcy Code.
 
The Chapter 11 Proceedings were initiated in response to sudden and severe declines in global automotive production and the adverse impact on the Company’s cash flows and liquidity. Under the Chapter 11 Proceedings, the Debtors expect to develop and implement a plan to restructure their capital structure and operations to reflect the current automotive industry demand. Under section 362 of the Bankruptcy Code, the filing of a bankruptcy petition automatically stays most actions against a debtor, including most actions to collect pre-petition indebtedness or to exercise control over the property of the debtor’s estate. Absent an order of the Court, substantially all pre-petition liabilities are subject to settlement under a plan of reorganization. Subsequent to the petition date, the Debtors received approval from the Court to pay or otherwise honor certain pre-petition obligations generally designed to stabilize the Debtors’ operations including employee obligations, tax matters and from limited available funds, pre-petition claims of certain critical vendors, certain customer programs, limited foreign business operations, adequate protection payments and certain other pre-petition claims. Additionally, the Debtors have been paying and intend to continue to pay undisputed post-petition claims in the ordinary course of business.


2


Table of Contents

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS — (Continued)
 
The Company’s financial statements for periods subsequent to the filing of the chapter 11 petition distinguish transactions and events that are directly associated with the reorganization from the ongoing operations of the business. Accordingly, revenues, expenses, realized gains and losses and provisions for losses that can be directly associated with the reorganization of the business have been reported separately as reorganization items in the Company’s statements of operations. Additionally, pre-petition liabilities subject to compromise under a plan of reorganization have been reported separately from both pre-petition liabilities that are not subject to compromise and from liabilities arising subsequent to the petition date. Liabilities expected to be affected by a plan of reorganization are reported at amounts expected to be allowed, even if they may be settled for lesser amounts and have been reported separately on the Company’s balance sheets as liabilities subject to compromise.
 
Section 365 of the Bankruptcy Code permits the Debtors to assume, assume and assign, or reject certain pre-petition executory contracts subject to the approval of the Court and certain other conditions. Rejection constitutes a Court-authorized breach of the contract in question and, subject to certain exceptions, relieves the Debtors of their future obligations under such contract but creates a deemed pre-petition claim for damages caused by such breach or rejection. Parties whose contracts are rejected may file claims against the rejecting Debtor for damages. Generally, the assumption, or assumption and assignment, of an executory contract requires a debtor to cure all prior defaults under such executory contract and to provide adequate assurance of future performance. Additional liabilities subject to compromise and resolution in the chapter 11 cases have been asserted as a result of damage claims created by the Debtors’ rejection of executory contracts.
 
The Debtors are currently funding post-petition operations under a temporary cash collateral order from the Court and a $150 million Senior Secured Super Priority Priming Debtor in Possession Credit and Guaranty Agreement (“DIP Credit Agreement”), under which the Company has borrowed $75 million and may borrow the remaining $75 million in one additional advance prior to maturity, subject to certain conditions. The Company’s non-debtor subsidiaries, primarily non-U.S. subsidiaries, have been excluded from the Chapter 11 Proceedings and are funding their operations through cash generated from operating activities supplemented by customer support agreements and local financing arrangements or through cash transfers from the Debtors subject to specific authorization from the Court. The Company has also entered into various accommodation and other support agreements with certain North American and European customers that provide for additional liquidity through cash surcharge payments, payments for research and engineering costs, accelerated payment terms, asset sales and other commercial arrangements. There can be no assurance that cash on hand and other available funds will be sufficient to meet the Company’s reorganization or ongoing cash needs or that the Company will be successful in extending the duration of the temporary cash collateral order with the Court or that the Company will remain in compliance with all necessary terms and conditions of the DIP Credit Agreement or that the lending commitments under the DIP Credit Agreement will not be terminated by the lenders.
 
On August 26, 2009, pursuant to the Bankruptcy Code, the Debtors filed statements and schedules with the Court setting forth the assets and liabilities of the Debtors as of the Petition Date. In September 2009, the Debtors issued approximately 57,000 proof of claim forms to their current and prior employees, known creditors, vendors and other parties with whom the Debtors have previously conducted business. An October 15, 2009 bar date was set for the filing of proofs of claim against the Debtors. Differences between amounts recorded by the Debtors and claims filed by creditors will be investigated and resolved as part of the Chapter 11 Proceedings. Accordingly, liabilities associated with such claims remain subject to future adjustments, which may result from (i) negotiations; (ii) actions of the Court; (iii) disputed claims; (iv) rejection of executory contracts and unexpired leases; (v) the determination as to the value of any collateral securing claims; (vi) proofs of claim; or (vii) other events. However, the Court will ultimately determine liability amounts, if any, that will be allowed for these claims.


3


Table of Contents

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS — (Continued)
 
On December 17, 2009, the Debtors filed a plan of reorganization (the “Plan”) and related disclosure statement (the “Disclosure Statement”) with the Court. The Plan and Disclosure Statement as filed with the Court outline a proposal for the settlement of claims against the estate of the Debtors based on an estimate of the overall enterprise value. As set forth in the Disclosure Statement, the Plan is predicated on the termination of certain pension plans to ensure the equitization of secured term lender interests. The Plan calls for settlement of the Debtors’ estate through the split of equity interests in the reorganized Debtors between the secured interests (96%) and the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (4%) on account of its controlled group underfunding claim, which is structurally superior to the claims of other unsecured interests. Disclosure Statement hearings associated with the Plan scheduled for January and February 2010 were postponed to allow more time to consider alternatives to the Plan.
 
Because a Court confirmed plan of reorganization will determine the rights and satisfaction of claims of various creditors and security holders, the ultimate settlement of such claims is subject to various uncertainties. Accordingly, no assurance can be provided as to what values, if any, will be ascribed in the Chapter 11 Proceedings to these or any other constituencies in regards to what types or amounts of distributions, if any, will be received. If certain requirements of the Bankruptcy Code are met, a plan of reorganization can be confirmed without acceptance by all constituents and without the receipt or retention of any property on account of all interests under the plan. The Company believes that its presently outstanding equity securities will have no value and will be canceled under any plan of reorganization and it urges that caution be exercised with respect to existing and future investments in any security of the Company. For a discussion of certain risks and uncertainties related to the Debtors’ chapter 11 cases and reorganization objectives refer to Item 1A. “Risk Factors” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
Additional details regarding the status of the Company’s Chapter 11 Proceedings are included herein under Note 4, “Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code,” to the consolidated financial statements included in Item 8, “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and in Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
The Company’s Industry
 
The Company supplies a range of integrated systems, modules and components to vehicle manufacturers for use in the manufacture of new vehicles. In general, the automotive sector is capital and labor intensive, operates under highly competitive conditions, experiences slow growth and is cyclical in nature. Accordingly, the financial performance of the industry is highly sensitive to changes in overall economic conditions.
 
Global economic instability and the lack of available credit negatively impacted the automotive sector on a global basis during 2009, resulting in decreased sales and significant production cuts. Although global automobile production during 2009 was lower than 2008, the true severity of the decline was masked by numerous government stimulus programs and significant growth in certain emerging automotive markets, such as China, where light vehicle sales increased to all-time record high levels surpassing the U.S. for the first time. The brunt of the 2009 decline was felt in developed markets such as the U.S. where light vehicle production levels were the lowest since the 1940s, U.S. domiciled OEM’s General Motors and Chrysler filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and manufacturing capacity and headcount were drastically cut by virtually all OEMs and suppliers with a presence in the U.S.


4


Table of Contents

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS — (Continued)
 
The after affects of the economic downturn and related credit crisis are driving new perspectives on historical industry norms and are expected to continue to drive significant change in the landscape of the global automotive industry. Such changes include shifting OEM market shares, industry consolidation, reducing production capacity and restructuring in developed markets and continued expansion in developing automotive markets. Automotive suppliers will continue to be challenged by the need to rapidly adapt accordingly, necessitating changes to operating structures and market approaches, capacity reductions and restructuring activities, business exits and divestitures, elimination of global complexity, new and/or expanded strategic alliances and partnerships, and improved financial stability. Other significant trends and developments in the automotive industry include:
 
Growth in emerging economies — Developing automotive markets including Brazil, Russia, China and India, represent significant growth opportunities attributable to the increasing income levels of the large middle class in these countries and their need to achieve basic mobility. However, vehicle affordability remains a challenge for OEMs and consumers in these markets, which has resulted in collaborative low cost vehicle development efforts between suppliers and OEMs. The low-cost car presents an opportunity for suppliers to participate with OEMs in a collaborative “design-to-cost” approach leveraging technology available in current products and applying innovative solutions to adapt the functionality to a much simpler variant with lower cost, while ensuring safety and performance. Supporting OEM low cost car development also presents suppliers with the opportunity to participate in the reinvention of how vehicles will be designed and assembled in the future.
 
Fuel efficiency and green initiatives — In the wake of the increased cost of petroleum-based fuel, global regulatory momentum to reduce emissions, and consumer demand for more environmentally friendly products, OEMs have turned to alternative fuel combustion engines, electric vehicles and other environmentally conscious technologies. Gas-electric hybrid vehicles, as well as, all-electric and hydrogen vehicles are increasing in popularity with consumers. Additionally, OEMs are designing their vehicles with more renewable materials and are reducing the level of volatile organic compounds in their vehicles. Successful suppliers must enable the green initiatives of their customers and maintain their own environmentally conscious approach to manufacturing on a global basis.
 
Vehicle safety, comfort and convenience — Consumers are increasingly interested in products that make them feel safer and more secure. Accordingly, OEMs are incorporating more safety oriented technologies into their vehicles such as air bags, anti-lock brakes, traction control, adaptive and driver visibility enhancing lighting and driver awareness capabilities. Digital and portable technologies have dramatically influenced the lifestyle of today’s consumers who expect products that enable such a lifestyle. This requires increased electronic and technical content such as in-vehicle communication, navigation and entertainment capabilities. While OEMs are taking different paths to connect their vehicles to high-speed broadband internet connections in the short-term, future vehicles are expected to be built with vehicle-to-vehicle connectivity systems. To achieve sustainable profitable growth, automotive suppliers must effectively support their customers in developing and delivering integrated products and innovative technologies at competitive prices that provide for differentiation and that address consumer preferences for vehicle safety, comfort and convenience. Suppliers that are able to generate new products and add a greater intrinsic value to the end consumer will have a significant competitive advantage.


5


Table of Contents

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS — (Continued)
 
 
Customer price pressures and raw material cost inflation — Virtually all OEMs have aggressive price reduction initiatives and objectives each year with their suppliers. Additionally, in recent years the automotive supply industry has experienced significant inflationary pressures, primarily in ferrous and non-ferrous metals and petroleum-based commodities, such as resins. These inflationary pressures have placed significant operational and financial burdens on automotive suppliers at all levels. Generally, the increased costs of raw materials and components used in the manufacture of the Company’s products have been difficult to pass on to customers and the need to maintain a continued supply of raw materials has made it difficult to resist price increases and surcharges imposed by suppliers. Accordingly, successful suppliers must be able to reduce their operating costs in order to maintain profitability. The Company has taken steps to reduce its operating costs to offset customer price reductions through operating efficiencies, new manufacturing processes, sourcing alternatives and other cost reduction initiatives.
 
Financial Information about Segments
 
The Company’s operations are organized in global product groups, including Climate, Electronics and Interiors. Additionally, the Company operates a centralized administrative function to monitor and facilitate the delivery of transition services in support of divestiture transactions primarily related to the ACH Transactions. Further information relating to the Company’s reportable segments can be found in Item 8, “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K (Note 22, “Segment Information,” to the Company’s consolidated financial statements).
 
The Company’s Products and Services
 
The following discussion provides an overview description of the products associated with major design systems within each of the Company’s global product groups and a summary of services provided by the Company.
 
Climate Product Group
 
The Company is one of the leading global suppliers in the design and manufacturing of components, modules and systems that provide automotive heating, ventilation, air conditioning and powertrain cooling.
 
     
Climate Products
 
Description
 
Climate Systems
  The Company designs and manufactures fully integrated heating, ventilation and air conditioning (“HVAC”) systems. The Company’s proprietary analytical tools and systems integration expertise enables the development of climate-oriented components, sub-systems and vehicle-level systems. Products contained in this area include: evaporators, condensers, heater cores, climate controls, compressors, air handling cases and fluid transport systems.
     
     
Powertrain Cooling Systems
  The Company designs and manufactures components and modules that provide cooling and thermal management for the vehicle’s engine and transmission, as well as for batteries and power electronics on hybrid and electric vehicles. The Company’s systems expertise and proprietary analytical tools enable development of components and modules to meet a wide array of thermal management needs. Products contained in this area include: radiators, oil coolers, charge air coolers, exhaust gas coolers, battery and power electronics coolers and systems and fluid transport systems.


6


Table of Contents

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS — (Continued)
 
Electronics Product Group
 
The Company is one of the leading global suppliers of advanced in-vehicle entertainment, driver information, wireless communication, climate control, body and security electronics and lighting technologies and products.
 
     
Electronics Products
 
Description
 
Audio / Infotainment Systems
  The Company produces a wide range of audio/infotainment systems and components to provide in-vehicle information and entertainment, including base radio/CD head units, infotainment head units with integrated DVD/navigation, premium audiophile systems and amplifiers, and rear seat family entertainment systems. Examples of the Company’s latest audio/infotainment products include digital and satellite radios, HDtm and DABtm broadcast tuners, MACH® Voice Link technology and a range of connectivity solutions for portable devices.
     
     
Driver Information Systems
  The Company designs and manufacturers a wide range of instrument clusters and displays to assist driving, ranging from standard analog-electronic clusters to high resolution, fully-configurable, large-format digital LCD devices for the luxury vehicle segment.
     
     
Electronic Climate Controls and Integrated Control Panels
  The Company designs and manufactures a complete line of climate control modules with capability to provide full system integration. The array of modules available varies from single zone manual electronic modules to fully automatic multiple zone modules. The Company also provides integrated control panel assemblies which incorporate audio, climate and other feature controls to allow customers to deliver unique interior styling options and electrical architecture flexibility.
     
     
Powertrain and Feature Control Modules
  The Company designs and manufactures a wide range of powertrain and feature control modules. Powertrain control modules cover a range of applications from single-cylinder small engine control systems to fully-integrated V8/V10 engine and transmission controllers. Feature control modules typically manage a variety of powertrain and other vehicle functions, including controllers for fuel pumps, 4x4 transfer cases, intake manifold tuning valves, security and voltage regulation systems and various customer convenience features.
     
     
Lighting
  The Company designs and builds a wide variety of headlamps (projector, reflector or advanced front lighting systems), rear combination lamps, center high-mounted stop lamps and fog lamps. The Company utilizes a variety of light-generating sources including light emitting diode, high intensity discharge and halogen-based systems.
 
Interiors Product Group
 
The Company is one of the leading global suppliers of cockpit modules, instrument panels, door and console modules and interior trim components.
 
     
Interiors Products
 
Description
 
Cockpit Modules
  The Company’s cockpit modules incorporate structural, electronic, climate control, mechanical and safety components. Customers are provided with a complete array of services including advanced engineering and computer-aided design, styling concepts and modeling and in-sequence delivery of manufactured parts. The Company’s cockpit modules are built around its instrument panels which consist of a substrate and the optional assembly of structure, ducts, registers, passenger airbag system (integrated or conventional), finished panels and the glove box assembly.
     
     
Door Panels and Trims
  The Company provides a wide range of door panels / modules as well as a variety of interior trim products.
     
     
Console Modules
  The Company’s consoles deliver flexible and versatile storage options to the consumer. The modules are interchangeable units and offer consumers a wide range of storage options that can be tailored to their individual needs.


7


Table of Contents

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS — (Continued)
 
Services
 
The Company’s Services operations provide various transition services in support of divestiture transactions, principally related to the ACH Transactions. Services to ACH are provided at a rate approximately equal to the Company’s cost until such time the services are no longer required by ACH or the expiration of the related agreement. In addition to services provided to ACH, the Company has also agreed to provide certain transition services related to other divestiture transactions.
 
The Company’s Customers
 
The Company sells its products primarily to global vehicle manufacturers as well as to other suppliers and assemblers. In addition, it sells products for use as aftermarket and service parts to automotive original equipment manufacturers and others for resale through independent distribution networks. The Company records revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery occurs or services are rendered, the sales price or fee is fixed or determinable and collectibility is reasonably assured.
 
Vehicle Manufacturers
 
The Company sells to all of the world’s largest vehicle manufacturers including BMW, Chrysler Group LLC, Daimler AG, Ford, General Motors, Honda, Hyundai, Kia, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, PSA Peugeot Citroën, Renault, Toyota and Volkswagen, as well as emerging new vehicle manufacturers in Asia. The Company’s largest customers include Ford and Hyundai Kia Automotive Group, accounting for 28% and 27%, respectively, of 2009 product sales.
 
Price reductions are typically negotiated on an annual basis between suppliers and vehicle manufacturers. Such reductions are intended to take into account expected annual reductions in the overall cost to the supplier of providing products and services to the customer, through such factors as overall increases in manufacturing productivity, material cost reductions and design-related cost improvements. The Company has an aggressive cost reduction program that focuses on reducing its total costs, which are intended to offset customer price reductions. However, there can be no assurance that such cost reduction efforts will be sufficient to fully offset such price reductions. The Company records price reductions when specific facts and circumstances indicate that a price reduction is probable and the amounts are reasonably estimable.
 
Other Customers
 
The Company sells products to various customers in the worldwide aftermarket as replacement or enhancement parts, such as body appearance packages and in-car entertainment systems, for current production and older vehicles. The Company’s services revenues relate primarily to the supply of leased personnel and transition services to ACH in connection with various agreements pursuant to the ACH Transactions and amended in 2008. The Company has also agreed to provide transition services to other customers in connection with certain other divestitures.
 
The Company’s Competition
 
The Company conducts its business in a complex and highly competitive industry. The global automotive parts industry principally involves the supply of systems, modules and components to vehicle manufacturers for the manufacture of new vehicles. Additionally, suppliers provide components to other suppliers for use in their product offerings and to the aftermarket for use as replacement or enhancement parts. As the supplier industry consolidates, the number of competitors decreases fostering extremely competitive conditions. Vehicle manufacturers rigorously evaluate suppliers on the basis of product quality, price competitiveness, technical expertise and development capability, new product innovation, reliability and timeliness of delivery, product design and manufacturing capability and flexibility, customer service and overall management.


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Table of Contents

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS — (Continued)
 
The Company’s primary independent competitors include Alpine Electronics, Inc., Automotive Lighting Reutlingen GmbH, Behr GmbH & Co. KG, Continental AG, Delphi Corporation, Denso Corporation, Faurecia Group, Harman International AKG, Hella KGaA, International Automotive Components Group, Johnson Controls, Inc., Koito Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Magna International Inc., Robert Bosch GmbH and Valéo S.A.
 
The Company’s Product Sales Backlog
 
Anticipated net product sales for 2010 through 2012 from new and replacement programs, less net sales from phased-out and canceled programs are approximately $496 million. The Company’s estimate of anticipated net sales may be impacted by various assumptions, including vehicle production levels on new and replacement programs, customer price reductions, currency exchange rates and the timing of program launches. In addition, the Company typically enters into agreements with its customers at the beginning of a vehicle’s life for the fulfillment of customers’ purchasing requirements for the entire production life of the vehicle. These agreements generally may be terminated by customers at any time. Therefore, this anticipated net sales information does not represent firm orders or firm commitments.
 
The Company’s International Operations
 
Financial information about sales and net property by major geographic region can be found in Note 22, “Segment Information,” to the Company’s consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The attendant risks of the Company’s international operations are primarily related to currency fluctuations, changes in local economic and political conditions, and changes in laws and regulations. The following table sets forth the Company’s net sales, including product sales and services revenues, and net property and equipment by geographic region as a percentage of total consolidated net sales and total consolidated net property and equipment, respectively.
 
                                         
          Net Property
 
    Net Sales     and Equipment  
    Year Ended December 31     December 31  
    2009     2008     2007     2009     2008  
Geographic region:
                                       
United States
    38 %     34 %     36 %     28 %     33 %
Mexico
          1 %           3 %     3 %
Canada
    1 %     1 %     1 %     1 %     1 %
Intra-region eliminations
          (1 )%                  
                                         
Total North America
    39 %     35 %     37 %     32 %     37 %
Germany
    2 %     3 %     4 %     2 %     2 %
France
    9 %     8 %     8 %     8 %     7 %
United Kingdom
    1 %     4 %     5 %           1 %
Portugal
    5 %     5 %     5 %     6 %     5 %
Spain
    4 %     6 %     6 %     4 %     4 %
Czech Republic
    6 %     6 %     5 %     11 %     10 %
Hungary
    5 %     5 %     4 %     4 %     4 %
Other Europe
    4 %     2 %     1 %     3 %     3 %
Intra-region eliminations
    (1 )%     (1 )%     (2 )%            
                                         
Total Europe
    35 %     38 %     36 %     38 %     36 %
Korea
    24 %     22 %     20 %     17 %     14 %
China
    6 %     3 %     2 %     4 %     4 %
India
    3 %     2 %     2 %     3 %     3 %
Japan
    2 %     2 %     2 %     1 %     1 %
Other Asia
    2 %     2 %     2 %     2 %     2 %
Intra-region eliminations
    (2 )%     (1 )%     (1 )%            
                                         
Total Asia
    35 %     30 %     27 %     27 %     24 %
South America
    6 %     5 %     5 %     3 %     3 %
Inter-region eliminations
    (15 )%     (8 )%     (5 )%            
                                         
      100 %     100 %     100 %     100 %     100 %
                                         


9


Table of Contents

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS — (Continued)
 
Seasonality and Cyclicality of the Company’s Business
 
Historically, the Company’s business has been moderately seasonal because its largest North American customers typically cease production for approximately two weeks in July for model year changeovers and approximately one week in December during the winter holidays. Customers in Europe historically shut down vehicle production during a portion of August and one week in December. Additionally, third quarter automotive production traditionally is lower as new vehicle models enter production.
 
However, the market for vehicles is cyclical and is heavily dependent upon general economic conditions, consumer sentiment and spending and credit availability. During 2008 and 2009, the automotive sector was negatively impacted by global economic instability and the lack of available credit. Although global automobile production during 2009 was lower than 2008, the true severity of the decline was masked by numerous government stimulus programs and significant growth in certain emerging automotive markets, which caused vehicle production volumes to vary from historical patterns.
 
The Company’s Workforce and Employee Relations
 
The Company’s workforce as of December 31, 2009 included approximately 29,500 persons, of which approximately 9,500 were salaried employees and 20,000 were hourly workers. As of December 31, 2009, the Company leased approximately 1,000 salaried employees to ACH under the terms of the Amended Salaried Employee Lease Agreement.
 
A substantial number of the Company’s hourly workforce in the U.S. are represented by unions and operate under collective bargaining agreements. In connection with the ACH Transactions, the Company terminated its lease from Ford of its UAW Master Agreement hourly workforce. Many of the Company’s European and Mexican employees are members of industrial trade unions and confederations within their respective countries. Many of these organizations operate under collectively bargained contracts that are not specific to any one employer. The Company constantly works to establish and maintain positive, cooperative relations with its unions around the world and believes that its relationships with unionized employees are satisfactory. There have been no significant work stoppages in the past five years, except for brief work stoppages by employees at several climate manufacturing facilities located in India and South Korea during June, July and August of 2008.
 
The Company’s Product Research and Development
 
The Company’s research and development efforts are intended to maintain leadership positions in core product lines and provide the Company with a competitive edge as it seeks additional business with new and existing customers. The Company also works with technology development partners, including customers, to develop technological capabilities and new products and applications. Total research and development expenditures were approximately $328 million in 2009, decreasing from $434 million in 2008 and $510 million in 2007. The decreases are attributable to divestitures, shifting engineering headcount from high-cost to low-cost countries as well as right-sizing efforts.
 
The Company’s Intellectual Property
 
The Company owns significant intellectual property, including a large number of patents, copyrights, proprietary tools and technologies and trade secrets and is involved in numerous licensing arrangements. Although the Company’s intellectual property plays an important role in maintaining its competitive position, no single patent, copyright, proprietary tool or technology, trade secret or license, or group of related patents, copyrights, proprietary tools or technologies, trade secrets or licenses is, in the opinion of management, of such value to the Company that its business would be materially affected by the expiration or termination thereof. The Company’s general policy is to apply for patents on an ongoing basis, in appropriate countries, on its patentable developments which are considered to have commercial significance.


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Table of Contents

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS — (Continued)
 
The Company also views its name and mark as significant to its business as a whole. In addition, the Company holds rights in a number of other trade names and marks applicable to certain of its businesses and products that it views as important to such businesses and products.
 
The Company’s Raw Materials and Suppliers
 
Raw materials used by the Company in the manufacture of its products include aluminum, resins, precious metals, steel, urethane chemicals and electronics components. All of the materials used are generally available from numerous sources. In general, the Company does not carry inventories of raw materials in excess of those reasonably required to meet production and shipping schedules. To date, the Company has not experienced any significant shortages of raw materials nor does it anticipate significant interruption in the supply of raw materials. However, the possibilities of such shortages exist, especially in light of unstable global economic conditions and the fragile state of the automotive sector.
 
Over the past few years the automotive supply industry has experienced significant inflationary pressures with respect to raw materials, which have placed operational and financial burdens on the entire supply chain. During 2008 and 2009 those inflationary pressures decreased due to the overall reduction in demand resulting from weakened economic conditions and the global credit crisis. While the costs of raw materials have receded from recent high levels, the Company continues to take actions with its customers and suppliers to mitigate the impact of these inflationary pressures in the future. Actions to mitigate inflationary pressures with customers include collaboration on alternative product designs and material specifications, contractual price escalation clauses and negotiated customer recoveries. Actions to mitigate inflationary pressures with suppliers include aggregation of purchase requirements to achieve optimal volume benefits, negotiation of cost reductions and identification of more cost competitive suppliers. While these actions are designed to offset the impact of inflationary pressures, the Company cannot provide assurance that it will be successful in fully offsetting increased costs resulting from inflationary pressures in the future.
 
Impact of Environmental Regulations on the Company
 
The Company is subject to the requirements of federal, state, local and foreign environmental and occupational safety and health laws and regulations. These include laws regulating air emissions, water discharge and waste management. The Company is also subject to environmental laws requiring the investigation and cleanup of environmental contamination at properties it presently owns or operates and at third-party disposal or treatment facilities to which these sites send or arranged to send hazardous waste. The Company makes capital expenditures in the normal course of business as necessary to ensure that its facilities are in compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations. For 2009, capital expenditures associated with environmental compliance were not material nor did such expenditures have a materially adverse effect on the Company’s earning or competitive position. The Company does not anticipate that its environmental compliance costs will be material in 2010.
 
At the time of spin-off, the Company and Ford agreed on a division of liability for, and responsibility for management and remediation of environmental claims existing at that time and, further, that the Company would assume all liabilities for existing and future claims relating to sites that were transferred to it and its operation of those sites, including off-site disposal, except as otherwise specifically retained by Ford in the Master Transfer Agreement. In connection with the ACH Transactions, Ford agreed to re-assume these liabilities to the extent they arise from the ownership or operation prior to the spin-off of the locations transferred to ACH (excluding any increase in costs attributable to the exacerbation of such liability by the Company or its affiliates).


11


Table of Contents

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS — (Continued)
 
The Company is aware of contamination at some of its properties and relating to various third-party Superfund sites at which the Company or its predecessor has been named as a potentially responsible party. The Company is in various stages of investigation and cleanup at these sites and at December 31, 2009, had recorded a reserve of approximately $1 million for this environmental investigation and cleanup. However, estimating liabilities for environmental investigation and cleanup is complex and dependent upon a number of factors beyond the Company’s control and which may change dramatically. Accordingly, although the Company believes its reserve is adequate based on current information, the Company cannot provide any assurance that its ultimate environmental investigation and cleanup costs and liabilities will not exceed the amount of its current reserve.
 
The Company’s Website and Access to Available Information
 
The Company’s current and periodic reports filed with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), including amendments to those reports, may be obtained through its internet website at www.visteon.com free of charge as soon as reasonably practicable after the Company files these reports with the SEC. A copy of the Company’s code of business conduct and ethics for directors, officers and employees of Visteon and its subsidiaries, entitled “Ethics and Integrity Policy,” the Corporate Governance Guidelines adopted by the Company’s Board of Directors and the charters of each committee of the Board of Directors are also available on the Company’s website. A printed copy of the foregoing documents may be requested by contacting the Company’s Investor Relations department in writing at One Village Center Drive, Van Buren Township, MI 48111; by phone (800) 847-8366; or via email at investor@visteon.com.


12


Table of Contents

ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS
 
The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones facing the Company. Additional risks and uncertainties, including those not presently known or that the Company believes to be immaterial, also may adversely affect the Company’s results of operations and financial condition. Should any such risks and uncertainties develop into actual events, these developments could have material adverse effects on the Company’s business and financial results.
 
The Company is subject to the risks and uncertainties associated with the Chapter 11 Proceedings.
 
For the duration of the Chapter 11 Proceedings, the Company’s operations and the Company’s ability to execute its business strategy will be subject to the risks and uncertainties associated with bankruptcy. These risks include:
 
the Debtor’s ability to obtain approval of the Court with respect to motions filed in the Chapter 11 Proceedings from time to time;
 
the Company’s ability to obtain and maintain normal trade terms with suppliers and service providers and maintain contracts that are critical to its operations;
 
the Company’s ability to attract, motivate, and retain key employees;
 
the Company’s ability to attract and retain customers;
 
the Company’s ability to fund and execute its business plan; and
 
the Debtor’s ability to obtain creditor and Court approval for, and then to consummate, a plan of reorganization to emerge from bankruptcy.
 
The Company will also be subject to risks and uncertainties with respect to the actions and decisions of the creditors and other third parties who have interests in the Chapter 11 Proceedings that may be inconsistent with the Company’s restructuring and business goals.
 
These risks and uncertainties could affect the Company’s business and operations in various ways. For example, negative events or publicity associated with the Chapter 11 Proceedings could adversely affect the Company’s sales and relationships with its customers, as well as with its suppliers and employees, which in turn could adversely affect the Company’s operations and financial condition. In addition, pursuant to the Bankruptcy Code, the Debtors need approval of the Court for transactions outside the ordinary course of business, which may limit its ability to respond timely to certain events or take advantage of certain opportunities. Because of the risks and uncertainties associated with the Chapter 11 Proceedings, the Company cannot predict or quantify the ultimate impact that events occurring during the reorganization process will have on its business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
As a result of the Chapter 11 Proceedings, the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities are subject to uncertainty. While operating as debtors in possession, and subject to approval of the Court, or otherwise as permitted in the normal course of business or Court order, the Company may sell or otherwise dispose of assets and liquidate or settle liabilities for amounts other than those reflected in the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Further, a confirmed plan of reorganization could materially change the amounts and classifications of assets and liabilities reported in the Company’s consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The historical consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments to the reported amounts of assets or liabilities that might be necessary as a result of confirmation of a plan of reorganization.


13


Table of Contents

ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS — (Continued)
 
Continued declines in the production levels of the Company’s major customers could reduce the Company’s sales and harm its profitability.
 
Demand for the Company’s products is directly related to the automotive vehicle production of the Company’s major customers. Automotive sales and production can be affected by general economic or industry conditions, labor relations issues, fuel prices, regulatory requirements, government initiatives, trade agreements and other factors. Automotive industry conditions in North America and Europe have been and continue to be extremely challenging. In North America, the industry is characterized by significant overcapacity, fierce competition and rapidly declining sales. In Europe, the market structure is more fragmented with significant overcapacity and declining sales. The Company’s business in 2008 and 2009 has been severely affected by the turmoil in the global credit markets, significant reductions in new housing construction, volatile fuel prices and recessionary trends in the U.S. and global economies. These conditions had a dramatic impact on consumer vehicle demand in 2008, resulting in the lowest per capita sales rates in the United States in half a century and lower global automotive production following six years of steady growth.
 
The financial distress of the Company’s major customers and within the supply base could significantly affect its operating performance.
 
During 2009, automotive OEMs, particularly those with substantial sales in the United States, experienced decreased demand for their products, which resulted in lower production levels on several of the Company’s key platforms, particularly light truck platforms. In addition, these customers have experienced declining market shares in North America and are continuing to restructure their North American operations in an effort to improve profitability. The domestic automotive manufacturers are also burdened with substantial structural costs, such as pension and healthcare costs that have impacted their profitability and labor relations. Several other global automotive manufacturers are also experiencing operating and profitability issues and labor concerns. In this environment, it is difficult to forecast future customer production schedules, the potential for labor disputes or the success or sustainability of any strategies undertaken by any of the Company’s major customers in response to the current industry environment. This environment may also put additional pricing pressure on suppliers to OEMs, such as the Company, which would reduce such suppliers’ (including the Company’s) margins. In addition, cuts in production schedules are also sometimes announced by customers with little advance notice, making it difficult for suppliers to respond with corresponding cost reductions.
 
Given the difficult environment in the automotive industry, there is an increased risk of bankruptcies or similar events among the Company’s customers. Both General Motors Corporation (“GM”) and Chrysler LLC have sought bankruptcy protection and obtained funding support from the U.S. federal government. While the operations of Chrysler LLC and GM have been sold to a third-party, the financial prospects of certain of the Company’s significant customers remain highly uncertain.
 
The Company’s supply base has also been adversely affected by industry conditions. Lower production levels for the global automotive OEMs and increases in certain raw material, commodity and energy costs during 2009 have resulted in severe financial distress among many companies within the automotive supply base. Several large suppliers have filed for bankruptcy protection or ceased operations. Unfavorable industry conditions have also resulted in financial distress within the Company’s supply base, an increase in commercial disputes and other risks of supply disruption. In addition, the current adverse industry environment has required the Company to provide financial support to distressed suppliers or take other measures to ensure uninterrupted production. While the Company has taken certain actions to mitigate these factors, those actions have offset only a portion of the overall impact on the Company’s operating results. The continuation or worsening of these industry conditions would adversely affect the Company’s profitability, operating results and cash flow.


14


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ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS — (Continued)
 
The Company is highly dependent on Ford Motor Company and Hyundai Kia Automotive Group and decreases in such customers’ vehicle production volumes would adversely affect the Company.
 
Ford is the Company’s largest customer and accounted for approximately 28% of total product sales in 2009, 34% of total product sales in 2008 and 39% of total product sales in 2007. Additionally, Hyundai Kia Automotive Group (“Hyundai Kia”) has rapidly become another one of the Company’s largest customers — accounting for 27% of the Company’s total product sales in 2009, and such percentage is expected to increase in the future. Any change in Ford’s and/or Hyundai Kia’s vehicle production volumes will have a significant impact on the Company’s sales volume and reorganization efforts.
 
Furthermore, the Company currently leases approximately 1,000 salaried employees to ACH, a company controlled by Ford, and Ford reimburses the Company for certain costs related to separating any of the leased employees should ACH no longer request its services. In the event that Ford is unable or unwilling to fulfill its obligations to reimburse the Company for these costs, the Company could be adversely affected.
 
Lastly, the creditors’ committee, in connection with the investigatory period provided under the ABL cash collateral order, is investigating potential claims against Ford and/or ACH in connection with, among other events, the Company’s spin-off from Ford in 2000 and the ACH Transactions in 2005. The Company believes that Ford’s continued support as a key customer is critical to the Company’s business plan and the Company’s emergence from bankruptcy. Protracted litigation against Ford, including litigation by the committee seeking derivative standing to pursue claims of uncertain merit, could delay or prevent the Company’s emergence from bankruptcy and put at risk future revenue from the Company’s relationship with Ford.
 
The discontinuation of, loss of business or lack of commercial success, with respect to a particular vehicle model for which the Company is a significant supplier could reduce the Company’s sales and harm its profitability.
 
Although the Company has purchase orders from many of its customers, these purchase orders generally provide for the supply of a customer’s annual requirements for a particular vehicle model and assembly plant, or in some cases, for the supply of a customer’s requirements for the life of a particular vehicle model, rather than for the purchase of a specific quantity of products. In addition, it is possible that customers could elect to manufacture components internally that are currently produced by outside suppliers, such as the Company. The discontinuation of, the loss of business with respect to or a lack of commercial success of a particular vehicle model for which the Company is a significant supplier could reduce the Company’s sales and harm the Company’s profitability.
 
The Company’s substantial international operations make it vulnerable to risks associated with doing business in foreign countries.
 
As a result of the Company’s global presence, a significant portion of the Company’s revenues and expenses are denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. In addition, the Company has manufacturing and distribution facilities in many foreign countries, including countries in Europe, Central and South America and Asia. International operations are subject to certain risks inherent in doing business abroad, including:
 
exposure to local economic conditions, expropriation and nationalization, foreign exchange rate fluctuations and currency controls;
 
withholding and other taxes on remittances and other payments by subsidiaries;
 
investment restrictions or requirements;
 
export and import restrictions; and
 
increases in working capital requirements related to long supply chains.


15


Table of Contents

ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS — (Continued)
 
 
Expanding the Company’s business in Asia and Europe and enhancing the Company’s business relationships with Asian and European automotive manufacturers worldwide are important elements of the Company’s long-term business strategy. In addition, the Company has invested significantly in joint ventures with other parties to conduct business in South Korea, China and elsewhere in Asia. The Company’s ability to repatriate funds from these joint ventures depends not only upon its uncertain cash flows and profits, but also upon the terms of particular agreements with the Company’s joint venture partners and maintenance of the legal and political status quo. As a result, the Company’s exposure to the risks described above is substantial. The likelihood of such occurrences and its potential effect on the Company vary from country to country and are unpredictable. However, any such occurrences could be harmful to the Company’s business and the Company’s profitability.
 
Escalating price pressures from customers may adversely affect the Company’s business.
 
Downward pricing pressures by automotive manufacturers is a characteristic of the automotive industry. Virtually all automakers have implemented aggressive price reduction initiatives and objectives each year with their suppliers, and such actions are expected to continue in the future. In addition, estimating such amounts is subject to risk and uncertainties because any price reductions are a result of negotiations and other factors. Accordingly, suppliers must be able to reduce their operating costs in order to maintain profitability. The Company has taken steps to reduce its operating costs and other actions to offset customer price reductions; however, price reductions have impacted the Company’s sales and profit margins and are expected to continue to do so in the future. If the Company is unable to offset customer price reductions in the future through improved operating efficiencies, new manufacturing processes, sourcing alternatives and other cost reduction initiatives, the Company’s results of operations and financial condition will likely be adversely affected.
 
Inflation may adversely affect the Company’s profitability and the profitability of the Company’s tier 2 and tier 3 supply base.
 
The automotive supply industry has experienced significant inflationary pressures, primarily in ferrous and non-ferrous metals and petroleum-based commodities, such as resins. These inflationary pressures have placed significant operational and financial burdens on automotive suppliers at all levels, and are expected to continue for the foreseeable future. Generally, it has been difficult to pass on, in total, the increased costs of raw materials and components used in the manufacture of the Company’s products to its customers. In addition, the Company’s need to maintain a continuing supply of raw materials and/or components has made it difficult to resist price increases and surcharges imposed by its suppliers.
 
Further, this inflationary pressure, combined with other factors, has adversely impacted the financial condition of several domestic automotive suppliers, resulting in several significant supplier bankruptcies. Because the Company purchases various types of equipment, raw materials and component parts from suppliers, the Company may be materially and adversely affected by the failure of those suppliers to perform as expected. This non-performance may consist of delivery delays, failures caused by production issues or delivery of non-conforming products, or supplier insolvency or bankruptcy. Consequently, the Company’s efforts to continue to mitigate the effects of these inflationary pressures may be insufficient if conditions worsen, thereby negatively impacting the Company’s financial results.


16


Table of Contents

ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS — (Continued)
 
The Company could be negatively impacted by supplier shortages.
 
In an effort to manage and reduce the costs of purchased goods and services, the Company, like many suppliers and automakers, has been consolidating its supply base. As a result, the Company is dependent on single or limited sources of supply for certain components used in the manufacture of its products. The Company selects its suppliers based on total value (including price, delivery and quality), taking into consideration production capacities and financial condition. However, there can be no assurance that strong demand, capacity limitations or other problems experienced by the Company’s suppliers will not result in occasional shortages or delays in the supply of components. If the Company were to experience a significant or prolonged shortage of critical components from any of its suppliers, particularly those who are sole sources, and could not procure the components from other sources, the Company would be unable to meet its production schedules for some of its key products or to ship such products to its customers in a timely fashion, which would adversely affect sales, margins, and customer relations.
 
Work stoppages and similar events could significantly disrupt the Company’s business.
 
Because the automotive industry relies heavily on just-in-time delivery of components during the assembly and manufacture of vehicles, a work stoppage at one or more of the Company’s manufacturing and assembly facilities could have material adverse effects on the business. Similarly, if one or more of the Company’s customers were to experience a work stoppage, that customer would likely halt or limit purchases of the Company’s products, which could result in the shut down of the related manufacturing facilities. A significant disruption in the supply of a key component due to a work stoppage at one of the Company’s suppliers or any other supplier could have the same consequences, and accordingly, have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial results.
 
Impairment charges relating to the Company’s assets and possible increases to their valuation allowances may have a material adverse effect on its earnings and results of operations.
 
The Company recorded asset impairment charges of $9 million, $234 million and $95 million in 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively, to adjust the carrying value of certain assets to their estimated fair value. Additional asset impairment charges in the future may result in the Company’s failure to achieve its internal financial plans, and such charges could materially affect the Company’s results of operations and financial condition in the period(s) recognized. In addition, the Company cannot provide assurance that it will be able to recover remaining net deferred tax assets, which are dependent upon achieving future taxable income in certain foreign jurisdictions. Failure to achieve its taxable income targets may change the Company’s assessment of the recoverability of its remaining net deferred tax assets and would likely result in an increase in the valuation allowance in the applicable period. Any increase in the valuation allowance would result in additional income tax expense, which could have a significant impact on the Company’s future results of operations.


17


Table of Contents

ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS — (Continued)
 
The Company’s expected annual effective tax rate could be volatile and could materially change as a result of changes in mix of earnings and other factors.
 
Changes in the Company’s debt and capital structure, among other items, may impact its effective tax rate. The Company’s overall effective tax rate is equal to consolidated tax expense as a percentage of consolidated earnings before tax. However, tax expenses and benefits are not recognized on a global basis but rather on a jurisdictional basis. Further, the Company is in a position whereby losses incurred in certain tax jurisdictions generally provide no current financial statement benefit. In addition, certain jurisdictions have statutory rates greater than or less than the United States statutory rate. As such, changes in the mix and source of earnings between jurisdictions could have a significant impact on the Company’s overall effective tax rate in future periods. Changes in tax law and rates, changes in rules related to accounting for income taxes or adverse outcomes from tax audits that regularly are in process in any of the jurisdictions in which the Company operates could also have a significant impact on the Company’s overall effective rate in future periods.
 
The Company may not be able to fully utilize its U.S. net operating loss carryforwards.
 
If the Company were to have a change of ownership within the meaning of Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code, under current conditions, its annual federal net operating loss (“NOL”) utilization could be limited to an amount equal to its market capitalization at the time of the ownership change multiplied by the federal long-term tax exempt rate. The Company cannot provide any assurance that such an ownership change will not occur, in which case the availability of the Company’s substantial NOL carryforward and other federal income tax attributes would be significantly limited or possibly eliminated.
 
The Company’s ability to effectively operate could be hindered if it fails to attract and retain key personnel.
 
The Company’s ability to operate its business and implement its strategies effectively depends, in part, on the efforts of its executive officers and other key employees. In addition, the Company’s future success will depend on, among other factors, the ability to attract and retain qualified personnel, particularly engineers and other employees with critical expertise and skills that support key customers and products. The loss of the services of any key employees or the failure to attract or retain other qualified personnel could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business.
 
Warranty claims, product liability claims and product recalls could harm the Company’s business, results of operations and financial condition.
 
The Company faces the inherent business risk of exposure to warranty and product liability claims in the event that its products fail to perform as expected or such failure results, or is alleged to result, in bodily injury or property damage (or both). In addition, if any of the Company’s designed products are defective or are alleged to be defective, the Company may be required to participate in a recall campaign. As suppliers become more integrally involved in the vehicle design process and assume more of the vehicle assembly functions, automakers are increasingly expecting them to warrant their products and are increasingly looking to suppliers for contributions when faced with product liability claims or recalls. A successful warranty or product liability claim against the Company in excess of its available insurance coverage and established reserves, or a requirement that the Company participate in a product recall campaign, could have materially adverse effects on the Company’s business, results of operations and financial condition.


18


Table of Contents

ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS — (Continued)
 
The Company is involved from time to time in legal proceedings and commercial or contractual disputes, which could have an adverse effect on its business, results of operations and financial position.
 
The Company is involved in legal proceedings and commercial or contractual disputes that, from time to time, are significant. These are typically claims that arise in the normal course of business including, without limitation, commercial or contractual disputes (including disputes with suppliers), intellectual property matters, personal injury claims and employment matters. No assurances can be given that such proceedings and claims will not have a material adverse impact on the Company’s profitability and financial position.
 
The Company could be adversely impacted by environmental laws and regulations.
 
The Company’s operations are subject to U.S. and foreign environmental laws and regulations governing emissions to air; discharges to water; the generation, handling, storage, transportation, treatment and disposal of waste materials; and the cleanup of contaminated properties. Currently, environmental costs with respect to former, existing or subsequently acquired operations are not material, but there is no assurance that the Company will not be adversely impacted by such costs, liabilities or claims in the future either under present laws and regulations or those that may be adopted or imposed in the future.
 
Developments or assertions by or against the Company relating to intellectual property rights could materially impact its business.
 
The Company owns significant intellectual property, including a large number of patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets, and is involved in numerous licensing arrangements. The Company’s intellectual property plays an important role in maintaining its competitive position in a number of the markets served. Developments or assertions by or against the Company relating to intellectual property rights could materially impact the Company’s business. Significant technological developments by others also could materially and adversely affect the Company’s business and results of operations and financial condition.
 
The Company’s business and results of operations could be affected adversely by terrorism.
 
Terrorist-sponsored attacks, both foreign and domestic, could have adverse effects on the Company’s business and results of operations. These attacks could accelerate or exacerbate other automotive industry risks such as those described above and also have the potential to interfere with the Company’s business by disrupting supply chains and the delivery of products to customers.
 
A failure of the Company’s internal controls could adversely affect the Company’s ability to report its financial condition and results of operations accurately and on a timely basis. As a result, the Company’s business, operating results and liquidity could be harmed.
 
Because of the inherent limitations of any system of internal control, including the possibility of human error, the circumvention or overriding of controls or fraud, even an effective system of internal control may not prevent or detect all misstatements. In the event of an internal control failure, the Company’s ability to report its financial results on a timely and accurate basis could be adversely impacted, which could result in a loss of investor confidence in its financial reports or have a material adverse affect on the Company’s ability to operate its business or access sources of liquidity.


19


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ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS — (Continued)
 
The Company’s pension and other postretirement employee benefits expense and funding levels of pension plans could materially deteriorate or the Company may be unable to generate sufficient excess cash flow to meet increased pension and other postretirement employee benefit obligations.
 
Substantially all of the Company’s employees participate in defined benefit pension plans or retirement/termination indemnity plans. The Company also sponsors other postretirement employee benefit (“OPEB”) plans in the United States and Canada. The Company’s worldwide pension and OPEB obligations exposed the Company to approximately $574 million in unfunded liabilities as of December 31, 2009, of which approximately $388 million and $120 million was attributable to unfunded U.S. and Non-U.S. pension obligations, respectively and $66 million was attributable to unfunded OPEB obligations.
 
The Company has previously experienced declines in interest rates and pension asset values. Future declines in interest rates or the market values of the securities held by the plans, or certain other changes, could materially deteriorate the funded status of the Company’s plans and affect the level and timing of required contributions in 2010 and beyond. Additionally, a material deterioration in the funded status of the plans could significantly increase pension expenses and reduce the Company’s profitability.
 
The Company funds its OPEB obligations on a pay-as-you-go basis; accordingly, the related plans have no assets. The Company is subject to increased OPEB cash outlays and costs due to, among other factors, rising health care costs. Increases in the expected cost of health care in excess of current assumptions could increase actuarially determined liabilities and related OPEB expenses along with future cash outlays.
 
The Company’s assumptions used to calculate pension and OPEB obligations as of the annual measurement date directly impact the expense to be recognized in future periods. While the Company’s management believes that these assumptions are appropriate, significant differences in actual experience or significant changes in these assumptions may materially affect the Company’s pension and OPEB obligations and future expense. For more information on sensitivities to changing assumptions, please see Item 7 “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and Note 14 “Employee Retirement Benefits” to the Company’s consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
The Company’s ability to generate sufficient cash to satisfy its obligations may be impacted by the factors discussed herein.
 
ITEM 1B.  UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
 
None.


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ITEM 2.  PROPERTIES
 
The Company’s principal executive offices are located in Van Buren Township, Michigan. Set forth below is a listing of the Company’s most significant manufacturing and/or assembly facilities that are owned or leased by the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries as of December 31, 2009.
 
                     
Interiors   Climate   Electronics
 
Michigan
  Benton Harbor(O)   Alabama   Shorter(L)   Pennsylvania   Lansdale(L)
Michigan
  Benton Harbor(L)   Argentina   General Pacheco, Buenos Aires(O)   Brazil   Guarulhos, Sao Paulo(O)
Michigan
  Highland Park(L)   Argentina   Quilmes, Buenos Aires(O)   Brazil   Manaus, Amazonas(L)
Belgium
  Genk(L)   Argentina   Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego(O)   Czech Republic   Hluk(O)
Brazil
  Camacari, Bahia(L)   Canada   Belleville, Ontario(O)   Czech Republic   Novy Jicin(O)
France
  Aubergenville(L)   China   Nanchang City(L)   Czech Republic   Rychvald(O)
France
  Blainville(L)   China   Dalian, Lianoning(O)   Hungary   Szekesfehervar(O)
France
  Carvin(O)   China   Chongqing(L)   Japan   Higashi Hiroshima(O)
France
  Gondecourt(O)   China   Beijing(L)   Mexico   Apodaca, Nuevo Leon(O)
France
  Noyal-Chatillon-sur-
Seiche (L)
  France   Charleville, Mezieres Cedex(O)   Mexico   Apodaca, Nuevo Leon(O)
France
  Rougegoutte(O)   India   Chennai(L)   Mexico   Chihuahua, Chihuahua(L)
Germany
  Berlin(L)   India   Bhiwadi(L)   Mexico   Chihuahua, Chihuahua(L)
Mexico
  Saltillo(L)   India   Maharashtra(L)   Portugal   Palmela(O)
Philippines
  Santa Rosa, Laguna(L)   Mexico   Juarez, Chihuahua(O)   Spain   Cadiz(O)
Poland
  Swarzedz(L)   Mexico   Juarez, Chihuahua(L)        
Slovakia
  Nitra(L)   Mexico   Juarez, Chihuahua(L)        
South Korea
  Choongnam, Asan(O)   Portugal   Palmela(O)        
South Korea
  Kangse-gu, Busan-si(L)   Portugal   Palmela(O)        
South Korea
  Kangse-gu, Busan-si(L)   Slovakia   Llava(O)        
South Korea
  Shinam-myon, Yesan-gun,
Choongnam(O)
  Slovakia   Llava(L)        
South Korea
  Ulsan-si, Ulsan(O)   Slovakia   Dubnica(L)        
Spain
  Barcelona(L)   South Africa   Port Elizabeth(L)        
Spain
  Igualada(O)   South Korea   Pyungtaek(O)        
Spain
  Medina de Rioseco,
Valladolid(O)
  South Korea   Namgo, Ulsan(O)        
Spain
  Pontevedra(O)   South Korea   Taedok-Gu, Taejon(O)        
Thailand
  Amphur Pluakdaeng,
Rayong(O)
  Thailand   Amphur Pluakdaeng, Rayong(O)        
Thailand
  Bangsaothoong,
Samutprakam(L)
  Turkey   Gebze, Kocaeli(L)        
 
(O) indicates owned facilities; (L) indicates leased facilities
 
As of December 31, 2009, the Company also owned or leased 33 corporate offices, technical and engineering centers and customer service centers in fourteen countries around the world, 29 of which were leased and 4 of which were owned. The Company considers its facilities to be adequate for its current uses. In addition, the Company’s non-consolidated affiliates operate approximately 30 manufacturing and/or assembly locations, primarily in the Asia Pacific region.


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ITEM 3.  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
 
On March 31, 2009, Visteon UK Limited, a company organized under the laws of England and Wales and an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company (the “UK Debtor”), filed for administration (the “UK Administration”) under the United Kingdom Insolvency Act of 1986 with the High Court of Justice, Chancery division in London, England. The UK Administration does not include the Company or any of the Company’s other subsidiaries. The UK Administration is discussed in Note 1, “Description of Business and Basis of Presentation” as included in Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
On May 28, 2009, the Debtors filed voluntary petitions in the Court seeking reorganization relief under the provisions of chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code. The Debtors’ chapter 11 cases have been assigned to the Honorable Christopher S. Sontchi and are being jointly administered as Case No. 09-11786. The Debtors continue to operate their business as debtors-in-possession under the jurisdiction of the Court and in accordance with the applicable provisions of the Bankruptcy Code and the orders of the Court. Refer to Note 4, “Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code,” as included in Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, for details on the chapter 11 cases.
 
Various legal actions, governmental investigations and proceedings and claims are pending or may be instituted or asserted in the future against the Company, including those arising out of alleged defects in the Company’s products; governmental regulations relating to safety; employment-related matters; customer, supplier and other contractual relationships; intellectual property rights; product warranties; product recalls; and environmental matters. Some of the foregoing matters may involve compensatory, punitive or antitrust or other treble damage claims in very large amounts, or demands for recall campaigns, environmental remediation programs, sanctions, or other relief which, if granted, would require very large expenditures.
 
Litigation is subject to many uncertainties, and the outcome of individual litigated matters is not predictable with assurance. Reserves have been established by the Company for matters discussed in the immediately foregoing paragraph where losses are deemed probable and reasonably estimable. It is possible, however, that some of the matters discussed in the foregoing paragraph could be decided unfavorably to the Company and could require the Company to pay damages or make other expenditures in amounts, or a range of amounts, that cannot be estimated at December 31, 2009 and that are in excess of established reserves. The Company does not reasonably expect, except as otherwise described herein, based on its analysis, that any adverse outcome from such matters would have a material effect on the Company’s financial condition, results of operations or cash flows, although such an outcome is possible.
 
Under section 362 of the Bankruptcy Code, the filing of a bankruptcy petition automatically stays most actions against a debtor, including most actions to collect pre-petition indebtedness or to exercise control over the property of the debtor’s estate. Absent an order of the Court, substantially all pre-petition liabilities are subject to settlement under a plan of reorganization.
 
Under section 365 of the Bankruptcy Code, the Debtors may assume, assume and assign or reject certain executory contracts and unexpired leases, subject to the approval of the Court and certain other conditions. In general, if the Debtors reject an executory contract or unexpired lease, it is treated as a pre-petition breach of the lease or contract in question and, subject to certain exceptions, relieves the Debtors of performing any future obligations. However, such a rejection entitles the lessor or contract counterparty to a pre-petition general unsecured claim for damages caused by such deemed breach and accordingly, the counterparty may file a claim against the Debtors for such damages. In addition, the Debtor’s plan of reorganization will determine the rights and satisfaction of claims of various creditors and security holders, but the ultimate settlement of those claims will continue to be subject to the uncertain outcome of litigation, negotiations and Court decisions up to and for a period of time after a plan of reorganization is confirmed. At this time, it is not possible to predict with certainty the effect of the Chapter 11 Proceedings on the Company’s business.


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ITEM 4.  SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS
 
None.
 
ITEM 4A.  EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF VISTEON
 
The following table shows information about the executive officers of the Company. Ages are as of February 22, 2010:
 
             
Name
 
Age
 
Position
 
Donald J. Stebbins
    52     Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer
William G. Quigley III
    48     Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Robert Pallash
    58     Senior Vice President and President, Global Customer Group
Dorothy L. Stephenson
    60     Senior Vice President, Human Resources
Julie A. Fream
    46     Vice President, North American Customer Group, Strategy and Global Communications
Joy M. Greenway
    49     Vice President and President, Climate Product Group
Steve Meszaros
    46     Vice President and President, Electronics Product Group
Michael K. Sharnas
    38     Vice President and General Counsel
James F. Sistek
    45     Vice President and Chief Information Officer
Michael J. Widgren
    41     Vice President, Corporate Controller and Chief Accounting Officer
 
Donald J. Stebbins has been Visteon’s Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer since December 1, 2008 and a member of the Board of Directors since December 2006. Prior to that, he was President and Chief Executive Officer since June 2008 and President and Chief Operating Officer since joining the Company in May 2005. Before joining Visteon, Mr. Stebbins served as President and Chief Operating Officer of operations in Europe, Asia and Africa for Lear Corporation since August 2004, prior to that he was President and Chief Operating Officer of Lear’s operations in the Americas since September 2001, and prior to that as Lear’s Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Stebbins is also a director of WABCO Holdings.
 
William G. Quigley III has been Visteon’s Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since November 2007. Prior to that he was Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since March 2007 and Vice President, Corporate Controller and Chief Accounting Officer since joining the company in December 2004. Before joining Visteon, he was Vice President and Controller — Chief Accounting Officer of Federal-Mogul Corporation since June 2001.
 
Robert C. Pallash has been Visteon’s Senior Vice President and President, Global Customer Group since January 2008 and Senior Vice President, Asia Customer Group since August 2005. Prior to that, he was Vice President and President, Asia Pacific since July 2004, and Vice President, Asia Pacific since joining the Company in September 2001. Before joining Visteon, Mr. Pallash served as president of TRW Automotive Japan since 1999, and president of Lucas Varity Japan prior thereto. Mr. Pallash is also a director of FMC Corporation.
 
Dorothy L. Stephenson has been Visteon’s Senior Vice President, Human Resources since joining the Company in May 2006. Prior to that, she was a human resources consultant since May 2003, and Vice President, Human Resources for Bethlehem Steel prior thereto.
 
Julie A. Fream has been Visteon’s Vice President, North American Customer Group, Strategy and Global Communications since August 2009. Prior to that, she was Vice President, North American Customer Group and Global Communications since January 2008. From August 2003 through December 2007, Ms. Fream was Vice President and General Manager for various North American customers, including DaimlerChrysler, Nissan NA, General Motors and Honda NA. She joined the Company in January 1998 as Associate Director, Global Marketing, Sales and Service for the Ford account.


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ITEM 4A.  EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF VISTEON — (Continued)
 
Joy M. Greenway has been Visteon’s Vice President and President, Climate Product Group since October 2008. Prior to that, she was Vice President, Climate Product Group since August 2005, Director, Powertrain since March 2002, and Director of Visteon’s Ford truck customer business group since April 2001. She joined Visteon in 2000 as Director of Fuel Storage and Delivery Strategic Business Unit.
 
Steve Meszaros has been Visteon’s Vice President and President, Electronics Product Group since October 2008. Prior to that, he was Vice President, Electronics Product Group since August 2005, and Managing Director, China Operations and General Manager, Yanfeng Visteon since February 2001. Prior to that, he was based in Europe, where he was responsible for Visteon’s interior systems business in the United Kingdom and Germany since 1999.
 
Michael K. Sharnas has been Visteon’s Vice President and General Counsel since September 2009. Prior to that, he was Assistant General Counsel since 2005 and Associate General Counsel since joining the Company in October 2002.
 
James F. Sistek has been Visteon’s Vice President and Chief Information Officer since April 2007. Prior to that, he was Director, Global Business Practices since joining the Company in October 2005. Before joining Visteon, Mr. Sistek served as Vice President, Global Business Practices at Lear Corporation.
 
Michael J. Widgren has been Visteon’s Vice President, Corporate Controller and Chief Accounting Officer since May 2007. Prior to that, he was Assistant Corporate Controller since joining the Company in October 2005. Before joining Visteon, Mr. Widgren served as Chief Accounting Officer for Federal-Mogul Corporation.
 
PART II
 
ITEM 5.  MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
 
Prior to March 6, 2009, the Company’s common stock was listed on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) under the trading symbol “VC.” On March 6, 2009, the Company’s common stock was suspended from trading on the NYSE and began trading over-the-counter under the symbol “VSTN.” The Company’s common stock currently trades under the symbol “VSTNQ.”
 
On May 28, 2009, the Debtors filed voluntary petitions in the Court seeking reorganization relief under the provisions of chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code. The Company’s plan of reorganization will determine the rights and satisfaction of claims of various creditors and security holders, but the ultimate settlement of those claims are subject to various uncertainties. The Company believes that its presently outstanding equity securities will have no value and will be canceled under any plan of reorganization and it urges that caution be exercised with respect to existing and future investments in any security of the Company.
 
As of February 22, 2010, the Company had 130,324,581 shares of its common stock $1.00 par value outstanding, which were owned by 95,202 shareholders of record. The table below shows the high and low sales prices for the Company’s common stock as reported by the NYSE or the Pink Sheets over-the-counter trading market, as applicable, for each quarterly period for the last two years.
 
                                 
    2009  
    First
    Second
    Third
    Fourth
 
    Quarter     Quarter     Quarter     Quarter  
 
Common stock price per share
                               
High
  $ 0.52     $ 0.48     $ 0.29     $ 0.19  
Low
  $ 0.02     $ 0.05     $ 0.08     $ 0.01  
 


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ITEM 5.  MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES — (Continued)
 
                                 
    2008  
    First
    Second
    Third
    Fourth
 
    Quarter     Quarter     Quarter     Quarter  
 
Common stock price per share
                               
High
  $ 4.39     $ 5.03     $ 3.78     $ 2.31  
Low
  $ 3.02     $ 2.63     $ 1.93     $ 0.27  
 
On February 9, 2005, the Company’s Board of Directors suspended the Company’s quarterly cash dividend on its common stock. Accordingly, no dividends were paid by the Company during the years ended December 31, 2009 or 2008. The Board evaluates the Company’s dividend policy based on all relevant factors. The Company’s credit agreements prohibit or limit the amount of cash payments for dividends that may be made. Additionally, the ability of the Company’s subsidiaries to transfer assets is subject to various restrictions, including regulatory requirements and governmental restraints. Refer to Note 11, “Non-Consolidated Affiliates,” to the Company’s consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
The following table summarizes information relating to purchases made by or on behalf of the Company, or an affiliated purchaser, of shares of the Company’s common stock during the fourth quarter of 2009.
 
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
 
                                 
                      Maximum number
 
                Total Number
    (or Approximate
 
                of Shares (or units)
    Dollar Value)
 
    Total
    Average
    Purchased as Part
    of Shares (or Units)
 
    Number of
    Price Paid
    of Publicly
    that May Yet Be
 
    Shares (or Units)
    per Share
    Announced Plans
    Purchased Under the
 
Period
  Purchased(1)     (or Unit)     or Programs     Plans or Programs  
 
October 1, 2009 to
October 31, 2009
        $              
November 1, 2009 to
November 30, 2009
                       
December 1, 2009 to
December 31, 2009
    7,700       0.06              
                                 
Total
    7,700     $ 0.06              
                                 
 
 
(1) This column includes only shares surrendered to the Company by employees to satisfy tax withholding obligations in connection with the vesting of restricted share awards made pursuant to the Visteon Corporation 2004 Incentive Plan and/or the Visteon Corporation Employees Equity Incentive Plan.
 
ITEM 6.  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
 
Not applicable.

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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
Management’s Discussion and Analysis (“MD&A”) is intended to help the reader understand the results of operations, financial condition and cash flows of Visteon Corporation (“Visteon” or the “Company”). MD&A is provided as a supplement to, and should be read in conjunction with, the Company’s consolidated financial statements and related notes appearing in Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
Description of the Business
 
Visteon is a leading global supplier of climate, interiors and electronics systems, modules and components to automotive original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) including BMW, Chrysler Group LLC, Daimler AG, Ford, General Motors, Honda, Hyundai, Kia, Nissan, PSA Peugeot Citroën, Renault, Toyota and Volkswagen. The Company has a broad network of manufacturing operations, technical centers, service centers and joint venture operations throughout the world, supported by approximately 29,500 employees dedicated to the design, development, manufacture and support of its product offering and its global customers. The Company conducts its business in the automotive sector, which is a labor and capital intensive industry that is characterized by highly competitive conditions, low growth and cyclicality. Accordingly, the financial performance of the industry is highly sensitive to changes in overall economic conditions.
 
During 2008, weakened economic conditions, largely attributable to the global credit crisis, and erosion of consumer confidence, negatively impacted the automotive sector on a global basis. Significant factors including the deterioration of housing values, rising fuel prices, equity market volatility, and rising unemployment levels resulted in consumers delaying purchases of durable goods, particularly highly deliberated purchases such as automobiles. Additionally, the absence of available credit hindered vehicle affordability, forcing consumers out of the market globally. Together these factors combined to drive a severe decline in demand for automobiles across substantially all geographies.
 
During 2009, global economic instability and the lack of available credit continued to negatively impact the automotive sector. Although global automobile production during 2009 was lower than 2008, the true severity of the decline was masked by numerous government stimulus programs and significant growth in certain emerging automotive markets, such as China, where light vehicle sales increased to all-time record high levels surpassing the U.S. for the first time. The brunt of the 2009 decline was felt in developed markets such as the U.S. where light vehicle production levels were the lowest since the 1940s, U.S. domiciled OEM’s General Motors and Chrysler filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and manufacturing capacity and headcount were drastically cut by virtually all OEMs and suppliers with a presence in the U.S. Despite actions taken by the Company to reduce its operating costs, the rate of such reductions did not keep pace with that of the rapidly deteriorating market conditions and related decline in OEM production volumes, which resulted in significant operating losses and cash flow usage by the Company.
 
Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code
 
On May 28, 2009 (the “Petition Date”), Visteon and certain of its U.S. subsidiaries (the “Debtors”) filed voluntary petitions for reorganization relief under chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code (the “Bankruptcy Code”) in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware (the “Court”). The reorganization cases are being jointly administered as Case No. 09-11786 under the caption “In re Visteon Corporation, et al” (hereinafter referred to as the “Chapter 11 Proceedings”). The Debtors continue to operate their businesses as “debtors-in-possession” (“DIP”) under the jurisdiction of the Court and in accordance with the applicable provisions of the Bankruptcy Code and orders of the Court. The Company’s other subsidiaries, primarily non-U.S. subsidiaries, have been excluded from the Chapter 11 Proceedings and continue to operate their businesses without supervision from the Court and are not subject to the requirements of the Bankruptcy Code.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
The Chapter 11 Proceedings were initiated in response to sudden and severe declines in global automotive production and the adverse impact on the Company’s cash flows and liquidity. Under the Chapter 11 Proceedings, the Debtors expect to develop and implement a plan to restructure their capital structure to reflect the current automotive industry demand. Under section 362 of the Bankruptcy Code, the filing of a bankruptcy petition automatically stays most actions against a debtor, including most actions to collect pre-petition indebtedness or to exercise control over the property of the debtor’s estate. Absent an order of the Court, substantially all pre-petition liabilities are subject to settlement under a plan of reorganization. Subsequent to the Petition Date, the Debtors received approval from the Court to pay or otherwise honor certain pre-petition obligations generally designed to stabilize the Debtors’ operations including employee obligations, tax matters and from limited available funds, pre-petition claims of certain critical vendors, certain customer programs, limited foreign business operations, adequate protection payments and certain other pre-petition claims. Additionally, the Debtors have been paying and intend to continue to pay undisputed post-petition claims in the ordinary course of business.
 
Chapter 11 Financing
 
The Debtors are currently funding post-petition operations under a temporary cash collateral order from the Court and a $150 million Senior Secured Super Priority Priming Debtor in Possession Credit and Guaranty Agreement (“DIP Credit Agreement”), under which the Company has borrowed $75 million and may borrow the remaining $75 million in one additional advance prior to maturity, subject to certain conditions. The Company’s non-debtor subsidiaries, primarily non-U.S. subsidiaries, have been excluded from the Chapter 11 Proceedings and are funding their operations through cash generated from operating activities supplemented by customer support agreements and local financing arrangements or through cash transfers from the Debtors subject to specific authorization from the Court. There can be no assurance that cash on hand and other available funds will be sufficient to meet the Company’s reorganization or ongoing cash needs or that the Company will be successful in extending the duration of the temporary cash collateral order with the Court or that the Company will remain in compliance with all necessary terms and conditions of the DIP Credit Agreement or that the lending commitments under the DIP Credit Agreement will not be terminated by the lenders.
 
Customer Accommodation Agreements
 
In connection with the Chapter 11 Proceedings, the Company has entered into accommodation and other support agreements with certain North American and European customers that provide for additional liquidity through cash surcharge payments, payments for research and engineering costs, accelerated payment terms, asset sales and other commercial arrangements. During July 2009, the Company executed support agreements with certain European customers that provide for lump sum settlement payments for invested research and engineering costs and other unrecovered amounts, as well as, accelerated payment terms and other commercial arrangements. Additionally, during July 2009, the Debtors sold their 80% interest in Halla Climate Systems Alabama Corp. to the Debtors’ 70% owned joint venture, Halla Climate Control Corporation under Bankruptcy Code Section 363 for cash proceeds of $37 million.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
With effect from October 7, 2009, the date of the final Court order, the Debtors entered into a customer accommodation agreement and related access and security agreement (together, the “GM Accommodation Agreement”) with General Motors Company (“GM”). Pursuant to the GM Accommodation Agreement, GM agreed to, among other things, pay approximately $8 million in cash surcharge payments above the purchase order price for GM component parts produced; reimburse up to $10 million for restructuring costs associated with the consolidation of certain of the Company’s Mexican facilities; reimburse $4 million in up-front engineering, design and development support costs; accelerate payment terms; reimburse the Company for costs associated with the wind-down of operations related to the production of interior and fuel tank GM component parts; and pay approximately $8 million in cure payments in connection with the assumption and assignment of purchase orders with the Company in the Motors Liquidation Company (f/k/a General Motors Corporation) chapter 11 case. In general, the rights and benefits inuring to the Company and GM pursuant to the GM Accommodation Agreement expire on the earlier of the date that resourcing of production is completed or March 31, 2010.
 
With effect from November 12, 2009, the date of the final Court order, the Debtors entered into a customer accommodation agreement and related access and security agreement (together, the “Chrysler Accommodation Agreement”) with Chrysler Group LLC (“Chrysler”). Pursuant to the Chrysler Accommodation Agreement, Chrysler agreed to, among other things, pay surcharge payments to the Company above the purchase order price for Chrysler component parts produced by the Company in an aggregate amount of $13 million; pay approximately $5 million for the purchase of certain tooling used at the Company’s Saltillo, Mexico facility to manufacture Chrysler component parts; purchase certain designated equipment and tooling exclusively used to manufacture Chrysler component parts at the Company’s Highland Park, Michigan and Saltillo, Mexico facilities; reimburse the Company for certain costs associated with the wind-down of certain lines of Chrysler component part production; accelerate payment terms; and pay approximately $13 million to the Company as cure payments in connection with the assumption and assignment of purchase orders with the Company in the Old Carco LLC (f/k/a Chrysler LLC) chapter 11 case. In general, the rights and benefits inuring to the Company and Chrysler pursuant to the Chrysler Accommodation Agreement expire on the earlier of the date that resourcing of production is completed or March 31, 2010.
 
With effect from November 12, 2009, the date of the final Court order, the Company entered into (i) a customer accommodation agreement and related access and security agreement (together, the “Nissan Accommodation Agreement”) with Nissan North America, Inc. (“Nissan”), and (ii) an asset purchase agreement (the “Nissan Purchase Agreement”) among the Company, GCM-Visteon Automotive Systems, LLC, GCM-Visteon Automotive Leasing Systems, LLC, MIG-Visteon Automotive Systems, LLC, and VC Regional Assembly & Manufacturing, LLC (collectively, the “Sellers”), Haru Holdings, LLC (the “Buyer”) and Nissan. Pursuant to the Nissan Accommodation and Purchase Agreements, the Buyer agreed to pay approximately $31 million in cash plus the (a) value of certain off-site tooling and inventory dedicated to Nissan production, (b) approximately $2.5 million in wind-down costs; and (c) the amount of certain receivables from Nissan being acquired under the purchase agreement less the amount of certain payables to Nissan and Nissan affiliates assumed by Nissan. The assets sold to the Buyer, pursuant to the November 30, 2009 asset purchase transaction closing date, were primarily used for the production and assembly of automobile cockpit module, front end module and interior parts for Nissan. The majority of these assets were located at facilities in LaVergne, Tennessee; Smyrna, Tennessee; Tuscaloosa, Alabama; and Canton, Mississippi. In general, the rights and benefits inuring to the Company and Nissan pursuant to the Nissan Accommodation Agreement expire on the date six months from the effective date of a confirmed plan of reorganization.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
With effect from December 10, 2009, the date of the final Court order, the Company entered into a customer accommodation agreement and related access and security agreement with Ford and ACH (the “Ford Accommodation Agreement”). Pursuant to the Ford Accommodation Agreement, Ford and ACH agreed to provide an exit fee of $8 million, payable in two equal installments. Additionally, the majority of Ford electronic component parts currently manufactured at the Company’s Lansdale, Pennsylvania (“North Penn”) facility will be re-sourced to Cadiz Electronica S.A. and the Company will discontinue Ford production at the Springfield, Ohio facility. In connection with the resourcing or transitioning of these product lines, Ford and ACH agreed to purchase certain inventory at cost and have been granted the option to purchase dedicated equipment and tooling. Ford and ACH agreed to fund certain costs associated with resourcing production lines at the Company’s North Penn and Springfield facilities. The rights and benefits inuring to the Company, Ford and ACH pursuant to the Ford Accommodation Agreement expire on March 31, 2010, unless otherwise extended by the parties.
 
Generally, in exchange for benefits under these agreements, the Company has agreed to continue producing and delivering component parts to these customers during the term of the respective agreements; to provide assistance in re-sourcing production to other suppliers; to build inventory banks, as necessary to support transition; to grant customers the option to purchase dedicated equipment and tooling owned by the Company; to grant a right of access to the Company’s facilities if the Company ceases production; to grant a security interest in certain operating assets that would be necessary for component part production; and, to provide limited release of certain commercial and other claims and causes of actions, subject to exceptions.
 
Termination of Other Postretirement Employee Benefits
 
In December 2009 and in connection with a ruling of the Court, the Company announced its intent to eliminate certain other postretirement employee benefits (“OPEB”) including Company-paid medical, prescription drug, dental and life insurance coverage, effective April 1, 2010, for current and future U.S. retirees, their spouses, surviving spouses, domestic partners and dependents, with the exception of participants covered by the current collective bargaining agreement (“CBA”) at the North Penn facility. OPEB plans for which the Company-paid benefits are to be terminated, include the Visteon Corporation Health and Welfare Program for Salaried Employees; Visteon Systems, LLC Health and Welfare Benefit Plan for Hourly Employees-Connersville and Bedford Locations; and the Visteon Caribbean Employee Group Insurance Plan. Additionally, Company-paid OPEB benefits under the Visteon Systems, LLC Health and Welfare Plan for Hourly Employees — North Penn Location for North Penn hourly retirees who retired prior to April 2, 2005 (the effective date of the current North Penn CBA) will also be eliminated.
 
Pre-petition Claims
 
On August 26, 2009, pursuant to the Bankruptcy Code, the Debtors filed statements and schedules with the Court setting forth the assets and liabilities of the Debtors as of the Petition Date. In September 2009, the Debtors issued approximately 57,000 proof of claim forms to their current and prior employees, known creditors, vendors and other parties with whom the Debtors have previously conducted business. To the extent that recipients disagree with the claims as quantified on these forms, the recipient may file discrepancies with the Court. Differences between amounts recorded by the Debtors and claims filed by creditors will be investigated and resolved as part of the Chapter 11 Proceedings. However, the Court will ultimately determine liability amounts, if any, that will be allowed for these claims. An October 15, 2009 bar date was set for the filing of proofs of claim against the Debtors.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
Approximately 3,250 proofs of claim totaling approximately $7.9 billion in claims against the Debtors were filed in connection with the bar date as follows:
 
•  Approximately 55 claims, totaling approximately $5.9 billion, represent term loan and bond debt claims, for which the Company has recorded approximately $2.5 billion as of December 31, 2009, which is included in the Company’s consolidated balance sheet as “Liabilities subject to compromise.” The Company believes claim amounts in excess of those reflected in the financial statements at December 31, 2009 are duplicative and will ultimately be resolved through the plan of reorganization.
 
•  Approximately 940 claims, totaling approximately $570 million, which the Company believes should be disallowed by the Court primarily because these claims appear to be duplicative or unsubstantiated claims.
 
The Company has not completed its evaluation of the approximate remaining 2,255 claims, totaling approximately $1.4 billion, alleging rights to payment for financing, trade accounts payable and other matters. The Company continues to investigate these unresolved proofs of claim, and intends to file objections to the claims that are inconsistent with its books and records. The Debtors continue to review and analyze the proofs of claim filed to date. In addition, the Debtors continue to file objections and seek stipulations to certain claims. Additional claims may be filed after the October 15, 2009 bar date, which could be allowed by the Court. Accordingly, the ultimate number and allowed amount of such claims are not presently known and cannot be reasonably estimated at this time. The resolution of such claims could result in a material adjustment to the Company’s financial statements.
 
Plan of Reorganization
 
To successfully emerge from chapter 11, in addition to obtaining exit financing, the Court must confirm a plan of reorganization, which determines the rights and satisfaction of claims of various creditors and security holders. On December 17, 2009, the Debtors filed a plan of reorganization (the “Plan”) and related disclosure statement (the “Disclosure Statement”) with the Court. The Plan and Disclosure Statement as filed with the Court outline a proposal for the settlement of claims against the estate of the Debtors based on an estimate of the overall enterprise value. As set forth in the Disclosure Statement, the Plan is predicated on the termination of certain pension plans to ensure the equitization of secured term lender interests. The Plan calls for settlement of the Debtors estate through the split of equity interests in the reorganized Debtors between the secured interests (96%) and the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (4%) on account of its controlled group underfunding claim, which is structurally superior to the claims of other unsecured interests. Disclosure Statement hearings associated with the Plan scheduled for January and February 2010 were postponed to allow more time to consider alternatives to the Plan.
 
Because a Court confirmed plan of reorganization will determine the rights and satisfaction of claims of various creditors and security holders, the ultimate settlement of such claims are subject to various uncertainties. Accordingly, no assurance can be provided as to what values, if any, will be ascribed in the Chapter 11 Proceedings to these or any other constituencies in regards to what types or amounts of distributions, if any, will be received. If certain requirements of the Bankruptcy Code are met, a plan of reorganization can be confirmed without acceptance by all constituents and without the receipt or retention of any property on account of all interests under the plan. The Company believes that its presently outstanding equity securities will have no value and will be canceled under any plan of reorganization and it urges that caution be exercised with respect to existing and future investments in any security of the Company. For a discussion of certain risks and uncertainties related to the Debtors’ chapter 11 cases and reorganization objectives refer to Item 1A. “Risk Factors” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
Visteon UK Limited Administration
 
On March 31, 2009, in accordance with the provisions of the United Kingdom Insolvency Act of 1986 and pursuant to a resolution of the board of directors of Visteon UK Limited, a company organized under the laws of England and Wales (the “UK Debtor”) and an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, representatives from KPMG (the “Administrators”) were appointed as administrators in respect of the UK Debtor (the “UK Administration”). The UK Administration was initiated in response to continuing operating losses of the UK Debtor and mounting labor costs and their related demand on the Company’s cash flows, and does not include the Company or any of the Company’s other subsidiaries. The effect of the UK Debtor’s entry into administration was to place the management, affairs, business and property of the UK Debtor under the direct control of the Administrators. Since their appointment, the Administrators have wound down the business of the UK Debtor and closed its operations in Enfield, UK, Basildon, UK and Belfast, UK, and made the employees redundant. The Administrators continue to realize the UK Debtor’s assets, primarily comprised of receivables.
 
The UK Debtor recorded sales, negative gross margin and net loss of $32 million, $7 million and $10 million, respectively for the three months ended March 31, 2009. As of March 31, 2009, total assets of $64 million, total liabilities of $132 million and related amounts deferred as “Accumulated other comprehensive income” of $84 million, were deconsolidated from the Company’s balance sheet resulting in a deconsolidation gain of $152 million. The Company also recorded $57 million for contingent liabilities related to the UK Administration, including $45 million of costs associated with former employees of the UK Debtor, for which the Company was reimbursed from the escrow account on a 100% basis.
 
Additional amounts related to these items or other contingent liabilities for potential claims under the UK Administration, which may result from (i) negotiations; (ii) actions of the Administrators; (iii) resolution of contractual arrangements, including unexpired leases; (iv) assertions by the UK Pensions Regulator; and, (v) material adverse developments; or other events, may be recorded in future periods. No assurance can be provided that the Company will not be subject to future litigation and/or liabilities related to the UK Administration. Additional liabilities, if any, will be recorded when they become probable and estimable and could materially affect the Company’s results of operations and financial condition in future periods.
 
Results of Operations
 
2009 Compared with 2008
 
                                                 
    Sales     Gross Margin  
    2009     2008     Change     2009     2008     Change  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Climate
  $ 2,535     $ 3,135     $ (600 )   $ 315     $ 209     $ 106  
Electronics
    2,171       3,276       (1,105 )     158       198       (40 )
Interiors
    1,920       2,797       (877 )     120       27       93  
Other
          271       (271 )           22       (22 )
Eliminations
    (206 )     (402 )     196                    
                                                 
Total products
    6,420       9,077       (2,657 )     593       456       137  
Services
    265       467       (202 )     4       3       1  
                                                 
Total
  $ 6,685     $ 9,544     $ (2,859 )   $ 597     $ 459     $ 138  
                                                 


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
Net Sales
 
Net sales decreased $2.86 billion during the year ended December 31, 2009 when compared to the same period of 2008, consisting of a $2.66 billion decrease in product sales and a $202 million decrease in services revenues. The decrease in product sales included a $1.7 billion decline associated with lower production volumes and customer sourcing actions in all regions and for all major customers, $610 million associated with facility divestitures and closures, $300 million of unfavorable currency primarily related to the Euro and Korean Won, and net customer price reductions. The decrease in services revenue represents lower utilization of the Company’s services in connection with the terms of various service and transition support agreements, primarily related to the ACH Transactions.
 
Net sales for Climate were $2.54 billion for the year ended December 31, 2009, compared with $3.14 billion for the same period of 2008, representing a decrease of $600 million. Lower vehicle production volumes and unfavorable product mix were experienced in all regions resulting in a decrease of $260 million. Additionally, facility divestitures and closures, including the March 2009 UK Administration and the closure of the Company’s Connersville, Indiana facility, decreased sales by $57 million. Unfavorable currency, primarily driven by the Korean Won and the Euro, further decreased sales by $153 million, while net customer pricing also contributed to the decrease.
 
Net sales for Electronics were $2.17 billion for the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to $3.28 billion for the same period of 2008, representing a decrease of $1.11 billion. Lower vehicle production volumes, unfavorable product mix and customer sourcing actions combined to decrease sales $1.04 billion, primarily in Europe and North America. Unfavorable currency, largely related to the Euro and the Brazilian Real, resulted in a reduction of $50 million, while net customer pricing further reduced sales.
 
Net sales for Interiors were $1.92 billion and $2.80 billion for the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively, representing a decrease of $877 million. Lower vehicle production volumes and unfavorable product mix in all regions resulted in a decrease in sales of $519 million, while facility divestitures and closures in the UK and Spain reduced sales $311 million. Unfavorable currency, primarily related to the Euro and Korean Won, reduced sales $97 million. Net customer pricing was favorable $50 million, primarily related to customer accommodation and support agreements in North America and Europe.
 
All remaining manufacturing facilities in the Other segment have either been divested, closed or reclassified consistent with the Company’s current management reporting structure.
 
Services revenues primarily relate to information technology, engineering, administrative and other business support services provided by the Company to ACH, under the terms of various agreements with ACH. Such services are generally provided at an amount that approximates cost. Total services revenues were $265 million for the year ended December 31, 2009, compared with $467 million for the same period of 2008. The decrease in services revenue represents lower ACH utilization of the Company’s services in connection with the terms of various agreements.
 
Gross Margin
 
The Company’s gross margin was $597 million for the year ended December 31, 2009, compared with $459 million for the same period in 2008, representing an increase of $138 million. The increase reflects $599 million in savings associated with the Company’s cost reduction efforts and restructuring programs and $96 million of favorable foreign currency, partially offset by $615 million related to lower production volumes, divestitures and closures. Gross margin was also favorably impacted by recognition of a $133 million benefit associated with the termination of Company-paid benefits under certain U.S. OPEB plans, partially offset by the non-recurrence of $63 million of OPEB and pension curtailment and settlement gains in 2008.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
Gross margin for Climate was $315 million for the year ended December 31, 2009, compared with $209 million for the same period in 2008, representing an increase of $106 million. Net cost efficiencies achieved through manufacturing performance, purchasing improvement efforts and restructuring activities of $162 million improved gross margin along with benefits associated with the termination of Company-paid benefits under certain U.S. OPEB plans. Customer production volume declines and facility divestitures and closures reduced gross margin $118 million and the non-recurrence of a $13 million gain on the sale of a UK manufacturing facility in the first quarter of 2008 resulted in a further reduction.
 
Gross margin for Electronics was $158 million for the year ended December 31, 2009, compared with $198 million for the same period in 2008, representing a decrease of $40 million. Declines in customer production volumes and unfavorable sourcing actions reduced gross margin $312 million. This decrease was partially offset by $207 million related to net cost efficiencies achieved through manufacturing performance, purchasing improvement efforts and restructuring activities as well as benefits associated with the termination of Company-paid benefits under certain U.S. OPEB plans.
 
Gross margin for Interiors was $120 million for the year ended December 31, 2009, compared with $27 million for the same period in 2008, representing an increase of $93 million. Net cost efficiencies achieved through manufacturing performance, purchasing improvement efforts, restructuring activities and customer accommodation and support agreements increased gross margin by $139 million, while benefits related to the termination of Company-paid benefits under certain U.S. OPEB plans further increased gross margin. These increases were partially offset by $105 million related to lower customer production volumes, sourcing and plant divestitures and closures.
 
During 2008 all facilities associated with the Company’s Other segment were divested, closed or reclassified consistent with the Company’s current management reporting structure.
 
Selling, General and Administrative Expenses
 
Selling, general and administrative expenses were $331 million for the year ended December 31, 2009, compared with $553 million for the same period in 2008, representing a decrease of $222 million. The decrease is primarily attributable to $138 million of cost efficiencies resulting from the Company’s restructuring and cost reduction actions, the non-recurrence of $25 million of 2008 expenses incurred to implement those restructuring and cost reduction actions, $62 million related to the termination of Company-paid benefits under certain U.S. OPEB plans and $18 million of favorable currency. These reductions were partially offset by $19 million of pre-petition professional fees.
 
Restructuring Expenses
 
The Company recorded restructuring expenses of $84 million for the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to $147 million for the same period in 2008. The following is a summary of the Company’s consolidated restructuring reserves and related activity for the year ended December 31, 2009. Substantially all of the Company’s restructuring expenses are related to employee severance and termination benefit costs.
 
                                         
                      Other/
       
    Interiors     Climate     Electronics     Central     Total  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
December 31, 2008
  $ 49     $ 3     $ 4     $ 8     $ 64  
Expenses
    22       5       17       40       84  
Utilization
    (50 )     (8 )     (5 )     (46 )     (109 )
                                         
December 31, 2009
  $ 21     $     $ 16     $ 2     $ 39  
                                         


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
The Company recorded restructuring expenses of $84 million during the twelve months ended December 31, 2009 including amounts related to administrative cost reductions to fundamentally re-align corporate support functions with underlying operations in connection with the Company’s reorganization efforts and in response to recessionary economic conditions and related negative impact on the automotive sector and the Company’s results of operations and cash flows.
 
During the first half of 2009, the Company continued to fundamentally realign, consolidate and rationalize its administrative organization structure, including the following actions:
 
•  $34 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs related to approximately 300 salaried employees in the United States and 180 salaried employees in other countries, primarily in Europe.
 
•  $4 million related to approximately 200 employees associated with the consolidation of the Company’s Electronics operations in South America.
 
In connection with the Chapter 11 Proceedings, the Company entered into various support and accommodation agreements with its customers as more fully described above. These actions included:
 
•  $13 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 170 employees at two European Interiors facilities.
 
•  $11 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 300 employees related to the announced closure of a North American Electronics facility.
 
•  $10 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs related to approximately 120 salaried employees who were located primarily at the Company’s North American headquarters.
 
•  $4 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 550 employees related to the consolidation of the Company’s North American Lighting operations.
 
Utilization for 2009 includes $81 million of payments for severance and other employee termination benefits and $28 million of special termination benefits reclassified to pension and other postretirement employee benefit liabilities, where such payments are made from the Company’s benefit plans.
 
Reimbursement from Escrow Account
 
The Company recorded reimbursement for qualifying restructuring costs of $62 million and $113 million for the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively, pursuant to the terms of the Amended Escrow Agreement. All remaining funds available under the Amended Escrow Agreement were fully utilized during 2009.
 
Deconsolidation Gain
 
On March 31, 2009, in accordance with the provisions of the United Kingdom Insolvency Act of 1986 and pursuant to a resolution of the board of directors of Visteon UK Limited, a company organized under the laws of England and Wales and an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, representatives from KPMG were appointed as administrators in respect of the UK Debtor. The effect of the UK Debtor’s entry into administration was to place the management, affairs, business and property of the UK Debtor under the direct control of the Administrators. As of March 31, 2009, total assets of $64 million, total liabilities of $132 million and related amounts deferred as “Accumulated other comprehensive income” of $84 million, were deconsolidated from the Company’s balance sheet resulting in a deconsolidation gain of $152 million. The Company also recorded $57 million for contingent liabilities related to the UK Administration, including $45 million of costs associated with former employees of the UK Debtor, for which the Company was reimbursed from the escrow account on a 100% basis.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
Asset Impairments and Other Gains and Losses
 
Section 365 of the Bankruptcy Code permits the Debtors to assume, assume and assign or reject certain pre-petition executory contracts subject to the approval of the Court and certain other conditions. Rejection constitutes a Court-authorized breach of the contract in question and, subject to certain exceptions, relieves the Debtors of their future obligations under such contract but creates a deemed pre-petition claim for damages caused by such breach or rejection. Parties whose contracts are rejected may file claims against the rejecting Debtor for damages. On December 24, 2009, the Company terminated a lease arrangement that was subject to a previous sale-leaseback transaction, ceasing the Company’s continuing involvement and triggering the recognition of $30 million of previously deferred gains on the sale-leaseback transaction. This amount was partially offset by a loss of $10 million associated with the remaining net book value of leasehold improvements associated with the facility and other losses and impairments related to asset disposals.
 
Reorganization Items
 
Financial reporting applicable to companies in chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code generally does not change the manner in which financial statements are prepared. However, it does require that the financial statements for periods subsequent to the chapter 11 petition filing date distinguish transactions and events that are directly associated with the reorganization from the ongoing operations of the business. Reorganization items of $60 million for the year ended December 31, 2009 are primarily related to professional service fees.
 
Interest
 
Interest expense was $117 million for the year ended December 31, 2009 compared to $215 million for the year ended December 31, 2008. The decrease is primarily due to the Company ceasing to record interest expense in connection with the Chapter 11 Proceedings. Interest income was $11 million for the year ended December 31, 2009 compared to $46 million for the year ended December 31, 2008. The decrease of $35 million was primarily due to lower market interest rates.
 
Income Taxes
 
The company’s 2009 provision for income taxes of $80 million reflects the inability to record a tax benefit for pre-tax losses in the U.S. and certain foreign countries and includes $118 million related to those countries where the Company is profitable and records income and withholding tax, $12 million related to the establishment of a deferred tax asset valuation allowance associated with the Company’s operations in Spain and $2 million related to the net impact of tax law changes, partially offset by benefits of $52 million related to a net decrease in reserves, including interest and penalties, associated with unrecognized tax benefits based upon results of completed tax audits and expiration of various legal statutes of limitations.
 
The company’s 2009 provision for income tax decreased by $36 million when compared with 2008, as follows:
 
•  $67 million decrease in tax expense associated with releasing reserves, including interest and penalties, as a result of closing audits in Portugal related to the 2006 and 2007 tax years, completing transfer pricing studies in Asia and reflecting the expiration of various legal statutes of limitations.
 
•  $33 million increase in tax expense attributable to changes in earnings between jurisdictions where the Company is profitable and accrues income and withholding tax.
 
•  $10 million decrease in tax expense attributable to establishing deferred tax asset valuation allowances as the $12 million charge recorded in 2009 associated with the Company’s operations in Spain was less than the $22 million non-cash charge recorded in 2008 related to the Company’s operations in Brazil.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
 
•  Tax law changes resulted in an increase in tax expense of $8 million, which includes the impact of Mexico tax reform enacted in 2009.
 
2008 Compared with 2007
 
                                                 
    Sales     Gross Margin  
    2008     2007     Change     2008     2007     Change  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Climate
  $ 3,135     $ 3,561     $ (426 )   $ 209     $ 246     $ (37 )
Electronics
    3,276       3,703       (427 )     198       287       (89 )
Interiors
    2,797       3,251       (454 )     27       82       (55 )
Other
    271       862       (591 )     22       (28 )     50  
Eliminations
    (402 )     (656 )     254                    
                                                 
Total products
    9,077       10,721       (1,644 )     456       587       (131 )
Services
    467       554       (87 )     3       6       (3 )
                                                 
Total segments
    9,544       11,275       (1,731 )     459       593       (134 )
Reconciling Items
                                               
Corporate
                            (20 )     20  
                                                 
Total consolidated
  $ 9,544     $ 11,275     $ (1,731 )   $ 459     $ 573     $ (114 )
                                                 
 
Net Sales
 
The Company’s consolidated Net Sales during the year ended December 31, 2008 decreased $1.7 billion or 15% when compared to the same period of 2007. Plant divestitures and closures accounted for $1.0 billion of the decline while production volume and mix further reduced sales by $0.8 billion, primarily in North America and Europe across all key customers. Favorable currency offset net customer pricing changes.
 
Net sales for Climate were $3.14 billion in 2008, compared with $3.56 billion in 2007, representing a decrease of $426 million or 12%. This decrease included $147 million related to the closure of the Company’s Connersville, Indiana facility, unfavorable production volumes related to key customers in North America of $95 million and net customer price reductions. Additionally, unfavorable currency of $153 million in Asia Pacific, primarily related to the Korean Won, resulted in a sales reduction. These decreases were partially offset by net new business and vehicle production volume and mix in Asia of $148 million, primarily related to Hyundai and favorable currency in Europe of $48 million, primarily due to the strengthening of the Euro.
 
Net sales for Electronics were $3.28 billion in 2008, compared with $3.70 billion in 2007, representing a decrease of $427 million or 12%. This decrease included a $565 decline related to production volumes and mix and the impact of past customer sourcing decisions, across all regions and key customers, and net customer price reductions. Favorable currency of $213 million, primarily related to the strengthening of the Euro, was a partial offset.
 
Net sales for Interiors were $2.80 billion in 2008, compared with $3.25 billion in 2007, representing a decrease of $454 million or 14%. This decrease included lower customer production volumes and mix of $411 million primarily related to Nissan in North America and Nissan/Renault and PSA in Europe, $91 million related to divestitures and closures, $76 million due to unfavorable currency in Asia and net customer price reductions. These decreases were partially offset by favorable currency of $121 million in Europe and revenue associated with customer agreements at certain of the Company’s UK operations.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
Net sales for Other were $271 million in 2008, compared with $862 million in 2007, representing a decrease of $591 million or 69%. The decrease was primarily attributable to divestitures and plant closures of $635 million, including the divestiture of the Company’s chassis operations, the Bedford, Indiana plant closure, the Visteon Powertrain Control Systems India divestiture and the North America Aftermarket divestiture. Customer production volumes and mix and the impact of past sourcing decisions further reduced sales. This reduction was partially offset by revenue associated with customer agreements at certain of the Company’s UK operations.
 
Services revenues primarily relate to information technology, engineering, administrative and other business support services provided by the Company to ACH, under the terms of various agreements with ACH. Such services are generally provided at an amount that approximates cost. Total services revenues were $467 in 2008, compared with $554 million in 2007. Services revenues and related costs included approximately $33 million related to contractual reimbursement from Ford under the Amended Reimbursement Agreement for costs associated with the separation of ACH leased employees no longer required to provide such services. The decrease in services revenue represented lower ACH utilization of the Company’s services in connection with the terms of various agreements.
 
Gross Margin
 
The Company’s gross margin was $459 million in 2008 compared with $573 million in 2007, representing a decrease of $114 million. Lower production volume and unfavorable product mix, primarily in North America and Europe, resulted in a $299 million gross margin reduction. Gross margin declines also included $135 million related to plant closures, divestitures and past customer sourcing decisions and $14 million of net commercial and other settlements. These reductions were partially offset by net cost performance of $240 million reflecting efficiencies achieved through restructuring actions, cost reduction efforts and commercial agreements. Additional partial offsets include $46 million of favorable currency, $34 million of gains associated with pension and OPEB curtailments and settlements and a $13 million reduction in accelerated depreciation year-over-year.
 
Gross margin for Climate was $209 million in 2008 compared with $246 million in 2007, representing a decrease of $37 million. This decrease included the non-recurrence of $51 million of 2007 OPEB curtailment gains, $34 million related to lower customer production volumes primarily in North America and Europe and $17 million related to the closure of the Connersville, Indiana facility. These decreases were partially offset by $31 million related to net cost efficiencies achieved through manufacturing performance, purchasing improvement efforts and restructuring activities; $17 million related to the non-recurrence of 2007 accelerated depreciation and amortization; $17 million of 2008 building sales; and $8 million of 2008 pension and OPEB curtailments.
 
Gross margin for Electronics was $198 million in 2008 compared with $287 million in 2007, representing a decrease of $89 million. This decrease includes $169 million related to lower production volumes across all regions and past customer sourcing decisions. These reductions were partially offset by $36 million related to net cost efficiencies achieved through manufacturing performance and restructuring efforts, $27 million related to 2008 OPEB curtailments and $24 million related to favorable currency.
 
Gross margin for Interiors was $27 million in 2008 compared with $82 million in 2007, for a reduction of $55 million. This reduction included $103 million from lower customer production volumes, primarily in North America and Europe and $43 million for the non-recurrence of 2007 favorable customer settlements and building sales. These reductions were partially offset by $70 million of net cost efficiencies achieved through manufacturing performance, restructuring savings and purchasing improvement efforts; $11 million related to a 2008 customer settlement; $10 million related to favorable currency; $11 million related to lower accelerated depreciation and other costs and revenue associated with customer agreements at certain of the Company’s UK operations.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
Gross margin for Other was $22 million in 2008 compared with a loss of $28 million in 2007, for an increase of $50 million. The effect of divestitures, plant closures and lower production volumes was more than offset by the restructuring savings resulting from those actions and revenue associated with customer agreements at certain of the Company’s UK operations.
 
Selling, General and Administrative Expenses
 
Selling, general and administrative expenses were $553 million in 2008 compared with $636 million in 2007, representing a reduction of $83 million. The improvement is primarily attributable to $77 million of cost efficiencies resulting from the Company’s ongoing restructuring activities, net of economics and the implementation costs associated with those restructuring activities. Additional decreases in selling, general and administrative expenses included a $20 million decrease in compensation expense related to incentive compensation programs and lower costs associated with the European Securitization facility. These improvements were partially offset by the non-recurrence of a $15 million favorable customer bad debt recovery in 2007.
 
Restructuring Expenses
 
The Company recorded restructuring expenses of $147 million for the year ended December 31, 2008, compared to $152 million for the same period in 2007. The following is a summary of the Company’s consolidated restructuring reserves and related activity for the year ended December 31, 2008, including amounts related to its discontinued operations. Substantially all of the Company’s restructuring expenses are related to employee severance and termination benefit costs.
 
                                         
                      Other/
       
    Interiors     Climate     Electronics     Central     Total  
          (Dollars in Millions)              
 
December 31, 2007
  $ 58     $ 23     $ 7     $ 24     $ 112  
Expenses
    42       20       3       82       147  
Exchange
    (3 )                       (3 )
Utilization
    (48 )     (40 )     (6 )     (98 )     (192 )
                                         
December 31, 2008
  $ 49     $ 3     $ 4     $ 8     $ 64  
                                         
 
Included in the 2008 expense is $107 million for additional actions under the previously announced multi-year improvement plan. Significant actions under the multi-year improvement plan included the following:
 
•  $33 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 290 employees to reduce the Company’s salaried workforce in higher cost countries.
 
•  $23 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 20 salaried and 250 hourly employees at a European Interiors facility.
 
•  $18 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with 55 employees at the Company’s Other products facility located in Swansea, UK.
 
•  $9 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs related to approximately 100 hourly and salaried employees at certain manufacturing facilities located in the UK.
 
•  $6 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 40 employees at a European Interiors facility.
 
•  $5 million of contract termination charges related to the closure of a European Other facility.
 
•  $5 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs related to the closure of a European Interiors facility.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
 
Utilization for 2008 included $131 million of payments for severance and other employee termination benefits, $46 million of special termination benefits reclassified to pension and other postretirement employee benefit liabilities, where such payments are made from the Company’s benefit plans and $15 million in payments related to contract termination and equipment relocation costs.
 
The Company had incurred $382 million in cumulative restructuring costs related to the multi-year improvement plan including $156 million, $129 million, $66 million and $31 million for the Other, Interiors, Climate and Electronics product groups respectively. Substantially all restructuring expenses recorded to date relate to employee severance and termination benefit costs and are classified as “Restructuring expenses” on the consolidated statements of operations. As of December 31, 2008, restructuring reserves related to the multi-year improvement plan were approximately $54 million, including $35 million and $19 million classified as “other current liabilities” and “other non-current liabilities,” respectively.
 
In September 2008, the Company commenced a program designed to fundamentally realign, consolidate and rationalize the Company’s administrative organization structure on a global basis through various voluntary and involuntary employee separation actions. Related employee severance and termination benefit costs of $26 million were recorded during 2008 associated with approximately 320 salaried employees in the United States and 100 salaried employees in other countries, for which severance and termination benefits were deemed probable and estimable. The Company also recorded $9 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 850 hourly and 60 salaried employees at a North American Climate facility. As of December 31, 2008, restructuring reserves related to these programs were approximately $10 million.
 
Reimbursement from Escrow Account
 
The Company recorded reimbursement for qualifying restructuring costs of $113 million and $142 million for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007, respectively, pursuant to the terms of the Amended Escrow Agreement.
 
Asset Impairments and Other Gains and Losses
 
The Company concluded that significant operating losses resulting from the deterioration of market conditions and related production volumes in the fourth quarter of 2008 represented an indicator that the carrying amount of the Company’s long-lived assets may not be recoverable. Based on the results of the Company’s assessment, which was based upon the fair value of the affected assets using third party appraisals, management estimates and discounted cash flow calculations, the Company recorded an impairment charge of approximately $200 million to reduce the net book value of Interiors long-lived assets considered to be “held for use” to their estimated fair value.
 
On June 30, 2008, Visteon UK Limited, an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, transferred certain assets related to its chassis manufacturing operation located in Swansea, United Kingdom to Visteon Swansea Limited, a company incorporated in England and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Visteon UK Limited. Effective July 7, 2008, Visteon UK Limited sold the entire share capital of Visteon Swansea Limited to Linamar UK Holdings Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Linamar Corporation for nominal cash consideration. The Swansea operation, which was included within the Other product group, generated negative gross margin of approximately $40 million on sales of approximately $80 million during 2007. The Company recorded asset impairment and loss on divestiture of approximately $23 million in connection with the transaction, including $16 million of losses on the Visteon Swansea Limited share capital sale and $7 million of asset impairment charges.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
During the first quarter of 2008, the Company announced the sale of its North American-based aftermarket underhood and remanufacturing operations (“NA Aftermarket”) including facilities located in Sparta, Tennessee and Reynosa, Mexico (together the “NA Aftermarket Divestiture”). The NA Aftermarket manufactured starters and alternators, radiators, compressors and condensers and also remanufactured steering pumps and gears. These operations recorded sales for the year ended December 31, 2007 of approximately $133 million and generated a negative gross margin of approximately $16 million. The Company recorded total losses of $46 million on the NA Aftermarket Divestiture, including an asset impairment charge of $21 million and losses on disposition of $25 million. The Company also recorded asset impairments and loss on divestitures of $6 million during 2008 in connection with other divestiture activities, including the sale of its Interiors operation located in Halewood, UK.
 
Interest
 
Interest expense was $215 million for the year ended December 31, 2008 compared to $225 million for the year ended December 31, 2007. Interest expense decreased $10 million due to lower borrowing rates partially offset by higher debt levels when compared to 2007. Interest income was $46 million for the year ended December 31, 2008 compared to $61 million for the year ended December 31, 2007. Interest income decreased $15 million due to lower investment rates partially offset by higher average cash balances in 2008.
 
Income Taxes
 
The income tax provisions for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007 reflect income tax expense related to those countries where the Company is profitable, accrued withholding taxes, certain non-recurring and other discrete items and the inability to record a tax benefit for pre-tax losses in the U.S. and certain foreign countries to the extent not offset by other categories of income in those jurisdictions. The Company’s 2008 provision for income taxes of $116 million represents a net increase of $96 million when compared with 2007, as follows:
 
•  Non-recurrence of $91 million tax benefit recorded in 2007 related to offsetting pre-tax operating losses against current year net pre-tax income from other categories of income or loss, in particular pre-tax other comprehensive income attributable to pension and OPEB obligations and foreign currency translation.
 
•  $38 million attributable to changes in earnings between jurisdictions where the Company is profitable and accrues income and withholding tax, and, beginning in 2008, includes withholding tax related to the Company’s undistributed earnings not considered permanently reinvested from its non-U.S. unconsolidated affiliates.
 
•  $22 million attributable to a deferred tax asset valuation allowance related to the Company’s operations in Brazil recorded in consideration of negative evidence associated with the Company’s ability to generate the necessary taxable earnings to recover such deferred tax assets.
 
•  Non-recurrence of $18 million net tax benefit recorded in 2007 resulting from the Company’s redemption of its ownership interest in a newly formed Korean company as part of a legal restructuring of its climate control operations in Asia. In connection with this redemption, the Company concluded that a portion of its earnings in Halla Climate Control Korea, a 70% owned affiliate of the Company, were permanently reinvested resulting in a $30 million reduction of previously accrued withholding taxes. This benefit was partially offset by $12 million of income tax expense related to a taxable gain from the restructuring.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
 
These 2008 year-over-year increases in tax expense items were partially offset by decreases attributable to the following items:
 
•  $60 million decrease in unrecognized tax benefits, including interest and penalties, reflects ongoing process improvements in connection with the Company’s transfer pricing initiatives, as well the receipt of an advance pricing agreement from Hungary during the fourth quarter of 2008, both of which contributed to the overall decrease in unrecognized tax benefits year-over-year.
 
•  Favorable tax law changes in 2008 resulted in tax benefits of $6 million, which includes U.S. legislation enacted in July 2008 allowing the Company to record certain U.S. research tax credits previously subject to limitation as refundable. In 2007, favorable tax law changes in Portugal which resulted in an $11 million tax benefit were more than offset by unfavorable tax law changes in Mexico which resulted in $18 million of additional tax expense.
 
Liquidity
 
Over the long-term, the Company expects to fund its working capital, restructuring and capital expenditure needs with cash flows from operations. To the extent that the Company’s liquidity needs exceed cash from operations, the Company would look to its cash balances and availability for borrowings to satisfy those needs, as well as the need to raise additional capital. However, the Company’s ability to fund its working capital, restructuring and capital expenditure needs may be adversely affected by many factors including, but not limited to, general economic conditions, specific industry conditions, financial markets, competitive factors and legislative and regulatory changes.
 
In general, the Company’s cash and liquidity needs are impacted by the level, variability and timing of its customers’ worldwide vehicle production, which varies based on economic conditions and market shares in major markets. The Company’s intra-year needs are impacted by seasonal effects in the industry, such as mid-year shutdowns, the subsequent ramp-up of new model production and the additional year-end shutdowns by its primary customers. These seasonal effects normally require use of liquidity resources during the first and third quarters.
 
As of December 31, 2009, the Company had total cash of $1.1 billion, including restricted cash of $133 million. As of December 31, 2009, the Debtors’ total cash was $558 million, of which $128 million was restricted.
 
The Debtors are currently funding post-petition operations under a temporary cash collateral order from the Court and loans pursuant to the DIP Credit Agreement. There can be no assurance that such cash collateral funds will be sufficient to meet the Company’s reorganization or ongoing cash needs or that the Company will be successful in extending the duration of the temporary cash collateral order with the Court to continue operating as debtors-in-possession, or that the Company will remain in compliance with all necessary terms and conditions of the DIP Credit Agreement or that the lending commitments under the DIP Credit Agreement will not be terminated by the lenders.
 
The Company’s non-debtor subsidiaries, primarily non-U.S. subsidiaries, have been excluded from the Chapter 11 Proceedings and are funding their operations through cash generated from operating activities supplemented by customer support agreements and local financing arrangements or through cash transfers from the Debtors subject to specific authorization from the Court.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
DIP Credit Agreement
 
On November 18, 2009, the Company entered into a $150 million Senior Secured Super Priority Priming Debtor in Possession Credit and Guaranty Agreement, with certain subsidiaries of the Company, a syndicate of lenders, and Wilmington Trust FSB, as administrative agent. The Company’s domestic subsidiaries that are also debtors and debtors-in-possession are guarantors under the DIP Credit Agreement. Borrowings under the DIP Credit Agreement are secured by, among other things, a first priority perfected security interest in assets that constitute first priority collateral under pre-petition secured term loans, as well as a second priority perfected security interest in assets that constitute first priority collateral under pre-petition secured asset-based revolving loans.
 
Also on November 18, 2009, the Company borrowed $75 million under the DIP Credit Agreement. The Company may borrow the remaining $75 million in one additional advance prior to maturity, subject to certain conditions, including a condition that the Company shall not have filed a plan of reorganization that does not provide for full payment of the obligations under the DIP Credit Agreement in cash by the effective date of such plan. Borrowings under the DIP Credit Agreement are to be used to finance working capital, capital expenditures and other general corporate purposes in accordance with an approved budget.
 
The DIP Credit Agreement matures and expires on the earliest of (i) May 18, 2010; provided, that the Company may extend it an additional three months, (ii) the effective date of the Company’s plan of reorganization, and (iii) the date a sale or sales of all or substantially all of the Company’s and guarantors’ assets is or are consummated under section 363 of the Bankruptcy Code. Borrowings under the DIP Credit Agreement are issued at a 2.75% discount and bear interest at variable rates equal to (i) 6.50% (or 8.50% in the event a default), plus (ii) a Eurodollar rate (subject to a floor of 3.00% per annum). The Company will also pay a fee of 1.00% per annum on the unused portion of the $150 million available, payable monthly in arrears.
 
Letter of Credit Reimbursement and Security Agreement
 
On November 16, 2009, the Company entered into a $40 million Letter of Credit (“LOC”) Reimbursement and Security Agreement (the “LOC Agreement”), with certain subsidiaries of the Company and US Bank National Association as a means of providing financial assurances to a variety of service providers that support daily operations. The agreement has an expiration date of September 30, 2010 and is under the condition that a collateral account is maintained (with US Bank) equal to 103% of the aggregated stated amount of the LOCs with reimbursement of any draws. As of December 31, 2009, the Company has $13 million of outstanding letters of credit issued under this facility and secured by restricted cash.
 
Cash Collateral Order and Term Loan Stipulation
 
On May 28, 2009, the Debtors filed a motion with the Court seeking an order authorizing the Debtors to provide Ford, the secured lender under the ABL Credit Agreement, certain forms of adequate protection in exchange for the consensual use of Ford’s Cash Collateral (as defined in the ABL Credit Agreement). On May 29, 2009, the Court entered an interim order (the first in a series of such orders) authorizing the Debtors’ use of Ford’s Cash Collateral and certain other pre-petition collateral (as defined in that order). Such order also granted adequate protection to Ford for any diminution in the value of its interests in its collateral, whether from the use of the cash collateral or the use, sale, lease, depreciation or other diminution in value of its collateral, or as a result of the imposition of the automatic stay under section 362(a) of the Bankruptcy Code. Specifically, subject to certain conditions, adequate protection provided to Ford included, but was not limited to, a first priority, senior and perfected lien on certain post-petition collateral of the same nature as Ford’s pre-petition collateral, a second priority, junior perfected lien on certain collateral subject to liens held by the Debtors’ term loan secured lenders, and payment of accrued and unpaid interest and fees owing Ford on pre-petition asset-backed revolving credit facility obligations.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
On June 19, 2009, the Court entered a first supplemental interim order authorizing the use of Ford’s cash collateral and granting adequate protection on substantially the same terms as those set forth in the interim cash collateral order previously entered. Thereafter, the Debtors sought, and the Court approved ten supplemental interim orders extending the consensual use of Ford’s Cash Collateral, generally on a monthly basis and materially consistent with the terms of preceding interim cash collateral orders. As of December 31, 2009, such cash collateral amounted to approximately $374 million, which includes restricted cash of $80 million.
 
On May 29, 2009, Wilmington Trust FSB, as administrative agent for the Debtors’ term loan secured lenders, filed a motion with the Court seeking adequate protection of these lenders’ collateral including, but not limited to, intellectual property, equity in foreign subsidiaries and intercompany debt owed by foreign subsidiaries, as well as certain cash flows associated with such collateral (the “Motion for Adequate Protection”). Contemporaneously with entering the Third Supplemental Interim Cash Collateral Order, the Court entered a final order in connection with the Motion for Adequate Protection (the “Stipulation, Agreement, and Final Order”). The Stipulation, Agreement, and Final Order authorizes the Debtors to use the cash collateral and certain other pre-petition collateral (as defined in the Stipulation, Agreement, and Final Order) of the term loan secured lenders and grants adequate protection to these lenders for any diminution in the value of their interests in their collateral, whether from the use of the cash collateral or the use, sale, lease, depreciation or other diminution in value of their collateral, or as a result of the imposition of the automatic stay under section 362(a) of the Bankruptcy Code. Specifically, subject to certain conditions, adequate protection provided to the term loan secured lenders included, but was not limited to, replacement liens and adequate protection payments in the form of cash payments of the reasonable and documented fees, costs and expenses of the term loan secured lenders’ professionals (as defined in the Stipulation, Agreement, and Final Order) employed in connection with the Debtors’ chapter 11 cases. As of December 31, 2009, the term loan secured lenders’ cash collateral amounted to approximately $34 million, which was recorded as “Restricted cash” on the Company’s consolidated balance sheet.
 
Foreign Funding Order
 
On May 29, 2009, the Court entered an interim order authorizing the Debtors to maintain funding to, and the guarantee of, cash pooling arrangements in Europe, or, alternatively, to fund participants of such arrangements directly, and to continue to honor pre-petition obligations owing to certain non-Debtor subsidiaries in Mexico and Europe up to an aggregate amount of $92 million. On July 16, 2009, such interim order was replaced with a final order. On July 28, 2009, the Court entered a final order increasing the amount which the Debtors are authorized to pay to honor pre-petition obligations owing to certain non-Debtor subsidiaries in Mexico and Europe up to an aggregate amount of $138 million (which amount includes the $92 million previously authorized by the Court).
 
Customer Accommodation Agreements
 
The Company has entered into accommodation and other support agreements with certain North American and European customers that provide for additional liquidity through cash surcharge payments, payments for research and engineering costs, accelerated payment terms, asset sales and other commercial arrangements.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
Cash Flows
 
Operating Activities
 
Cash provided from operating activities during 2009 totaled $141 million, compared with a use of $116 million for the same period in 2008. The increase is primarily due to higher net income, as adjusted for non-cash items, the impact of the automatic stay on accounts payable and interest, customer accommodation and support agreement payments, lower annual incentive compensation payments and a decrease in recoverable tax assets, partially offset by trade payable term contraction and lower restructuring charges as compared to cash payments.
 
Investing Activities
 
Cash used in investing activities was $123 million during 2009, compared with $208 million for the same period in 2008. The decrease in cash usage resulted from lower capital expenditures, which decreased to $151 million in 2009 compared with $294 million in the same period of 2008, partially offset by investments in joint ventures, a decrease in proceeds from divestitures and asset sales and $11 million of cash associated with the deconsolidation of the UK Debtor. The proceeds from divestitures and asset sales for 2009 totaled $69 million, which included proceeds from the Nissan divestiture compared to $83 million for the same period of 2008, which included proceeds from the divestiture of the North America aftermarket business. The Company’s credit agreements limit the amount of capital expenditures the Company may make.
 
Financing Activities
 
Cash used by financing activities totaled $259 million in 2009, compared with $193 million in the same period of 2008. Cash used by financing activities during 2009 primarily resulted from the requirement for $133 million to be classified as restricted cash, primarily pursuant to the Company’s Credit Agreement and cash collateral orders of the Court, repayment of the borrowings under the European Securitization, pay down of the Halla Climate Control Corporation bonds due in November 2009, a decrease in book overdrafts and dividends to minority shareholders, partially offset by additional borrowing under the U.S. ABL facility and DIP Credit Agreement. Cash used by financing activities decreased by $66 million when compared to $193 million used by financing activities during 2008, which included the purchase of $344 million in aggregate principal amount of the Company’s 8.25% notes and issuance of $206.4 million in aggregate principal amount of 12.25% notes, reductions in affiliate debt, a decrease in book overdrafts and dividends to minority shareholders, partially offset by a $75 million draw on the Company’s ABL Facility. The Company’s credit agreements limit the amount of cash payments for dividends the Company may make.
 
Debt and Capital Structure
 
Debt
 
Under section 362 of the Bankruptcy Code, the filing of a bankruptcy petition automatically stays most actions against a debtor, including most actions to collect pre-petition indebtedness or to exercise control over the property of the debtor’s estate. Absent an order of the Court, substantially all pre-petition liabilities are subject to settlement under a plan of reorganization. Substantially all of the Company’s pre-petition debt is in default, including $1.5 billion principal amount due under the seven-year secured term loans due 2013; $862 million principal amount under various unsecured notes due 2010, 2014 and 2016; and $127 million of other secured and unsecured borrowings. Debt discounts of $8 million, deferred financing costs of $14 million and losses on terminated interest rate swaps of $23 million are no longer being amortized and have been included as adjustments to the net carrying value of the related pre-petition debt.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
Information related to the Company’s debt and related agreements is set forth in Note 13 “Debt” to the consolidated financial statements which are included in Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
Covenants and Restrictions
 
The DIP Credit Agreement contains, among other things, conditions precedent, covenants, representations and warranties and events of default customary for facilities of this type. Such covenants include the requirement to provide certain financial reports, use of the proceeds of certain sales of collateral to prepay outstanding loans, certain restrictions on the incurrence of indebtedness, guarantees, liens, acquisitions and other investments, mergers, consolidations, liquidations and dissolutions, sales of assets, dividends and other repayments in respect of capital stock, capital expenditures, transactions with affiliates, hedging arrangements, negative pledge clauses, payment of expenses and disbursements other than those reflected in an agreed upon budget, subsidiary distributions and the activities of certain holding company subsidiaries, subject to certain exceptions.
 
Under certain conditions the lending commitments under the DIP Credit Agreement may be terminated by the lenders and amounts outstanding under the DIP Credit Agreement may be accelerated, subject to notice and cure periods in certain cases. Such events of default include, but are not limited to, failure to pay any principal, interest or fees when due, failure to comply with covenants, breach of representations or warranties in any material respect, failure to comply with the agreed upon budget, within agreed variances, certain changes in the Company’s bankruptcy case or new or existing orders of the Court, or the U.S. dollar equivalent market value of the Company’s ownership interest in Halla Climate Control Corporation closing on the KOSPI below $300 million for three consecutive trading days.
 
The obligations under the pre-petition term loan are secured by a first-priority lien on certain assets of the Company and most of its domestic subsidiaries, including intellectual property, intercompany debt, the capital stock of nearly all direct and indirect domestic subsidiaries and at least 65% of the stock of most foreign subsidiaries and 100% of the stock of certain foreign subsidiaries that are guarantors, as well as a second-priority lien on substantially all other material tangible and intangible assets of the Company and most of its domestic subsidiaries.
 
The obligations under the pre-petition ABL Facility are secured by a first-priority lien on certain assets of the Company and most of its domestic subsidiaries, including real property, accounts receivable, inventory, equipment and other tangible and intangible property, including the capital stock of nearly all direct and indirect domestic subsidiaries (other than those domestic subsidiaries the sole assets of which are capital stock of foreign subsidiaries), as well as a second-priority lien on substantially all other material tangible and intangible assets of the Company and most of its domestic subsidiaries which secure the Company’s term loan credit agreement.
 
The terms relating to both pre-petition credit agreements specifically limit the obligations to be secured by a security interest in certain U.S. manufacturing properties and intercompany indebtedness and capital stock of U.S. manufacturing subsidiaries in order to ensure that, at the time of any borrowing under the Credit Agreement and other credit lines, the amount of the applicable borrowing which is secured by such assets (together with other borrowings which are secured by such assets and obligations in respect of certain sale-leaseback transactions) do not exceed 15% of Consolidated Net Tangible Assets (as defined in the indenture applicable to the Company’s outstanding bonds and debentures).


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
The credit agreements contain, among other things, mandatory prepayment provisions for certain asset sales, recovery events, equity issuances and debt incurrence, covenants, representations and warranties and events of default customary for facilities of this type. Such covenants include certain restrictions on the incurrence of additional indebtedness, liens, acquisitions and other investments, mergers, consolidations, liquidations and dissolutions, sales of assets, dividends and other repurchases in respect of capital stock, voluntary prepayments of certain other indebtedness, capital expenditures, transactions with affiliates, changes in fiscal periods, hedging arrangements, lines of business, negative pledge clauses, subsidiary distributions and the activities of certain holding company subsidiaries, subject to certain exceptions. The ability of the Company’s subsidiaries to transfer assets is subject to various restrictions, including regulatory, governmental and contractual restraints.
 
Under certain conditions amounts outstanding under the credit agreements may be accelerated. Bankruptcy and insolvency events with respect to the Company or certain of its subsidiaries will result in an automatic acceleration of the indebtedness under the credit agreements. Subject to notice and cure periods in certain cases, other events of default under the credit agreements will result in acceleration of indebtedness under the credit agreements at the option of the lenders. Such other events of default include failure to pay any principal, interest or other amounts when due, failure to comply with covenants, breach of representations or warranties in any material respect, non-payment or acceleration of other material debt, entry of material judgments not covered by insurance or a change of control of the Company.
 
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
 
The Company has guaranteed approximately $34 million for lease payments related to its subsidiaries. During January 2009, the Company reached an agreement with the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (“PBGC”) pursuant to U.S. federal pension law provisions that permit the agency to seek protection when a plant closing results in termination of employment for more than 20 percent of employees covered by a pension plan. In connection with this agreement, the Company agreed to provide a guarantee by certain affiliates of certain contingent pension obligations of up to $30 million.
 
These guarantees have not, nor does the Company expect they are reasonably likely to have, a material current or future effect on the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
 
Fair Value Measurements
 
The Company uses fair value measurements in the preparation of its financial statements, which utilize various inputs including those that can be readily observable, corroborated or are generally unobservable. The Company utilizes market-based data and valuation techniques that maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. Additionally, the Company applies assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability, including assumptions about risk. The primary financial instruments that are recorded at fair value in the Company’s financial statements are derivative instruments.
 
Financial assets and liabilities are categorized, based on the inputs to the valuation technique, into a three-level fair value hierarchy. The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to the quoted prices in active markets for identical assets and liabilities and lowest priority to unobservable inputs.
 
•  Level 1 — Financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on unadjusted quoted market prices for identical assets and liabilities in an active market that the Company has the ability to access.
 
•  Level 2 — Financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on quoted prices in markets that are not active or model inputs that are observable for substantially the full term of the asset or liability.
 
•  Level 3 — Financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both unobservable and significant to the overall fair value measurement.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
 
The Company’s use of derivative instruments creates exposure to credit loss in the event of nonperformance by the counterparty to the derivative financial instruments. The Company limits this exposure by entering into agreements directly with a variety of major financial institutions with high credit standards and that are expected to fully satisfy their obligations under the contracts. Fair value measurements related to derivative assets take into account the non-performance risk of the respective counterparty, while derivative liabilities take into account the non-performance risk of the Company and its foreign affiliates.
 
The fair values of derivative instruments are determined under an income approach using industry-standard models that consider various assumptions, including time value, volatility factors, current market and contractual prices for the underlying and counterparty non-performance risk. Substantially all of which are observable in the marketplace throughout the full term of the instrument, can be derived from observable data or are supported by observable levels at which transactions are executed in the marketplace, therefore are categorized as Level 2 assets or liabilities in the fair value hierarchy. The hypothetical gain or loss from a 100 basis point change in non-performance risk would be less than $1 million for the fair value of foreign currency derivatives and net interest rate swaps as of December 31, 2009.
 
Critical Accounting Estimates
 
The Company’s consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes as included in Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”). Accordingly, the Company’s significant accounting policies have been disclosed in the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes under Note 2 “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies.” The Company provides enhanced information that supplements such disclosures for accounting estimates when:
 
•  The estimate involves matters that are highly uncertain at the time the accounting estimate is made; and
 
•  Different estimates or changes to an estimate could have a material impact on the reported financial position, changes in financial condition or results of operations.
 
When more than one accounting principle, or the method of its application, is generally accepted, management selects the principle or method that it considers to be the most appropriate given the specific circumstances. Application of these accounting principles requires the Company’s management to make estimates about the future resolution of existing uncertainties. Estimates are typically based upon historical experience, current trends, contractual documentation and other information, as appropriate. Due to the inherent uncertainty involving estimates, actual results reported in the future may differ from those estimates. In preparing these financial statements, management has made its best estimates and judgments of the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements.
 
Pension Plans and Other Postretirement Employee Benefit Plans
 
The determination of the Company’s obligation and expense for its pension and other postretirement employee benefits, such as retiree health care and life insurance, is dependent on the Company’s selection of certain assumptions used by actuaries in calculating such amounts. Selected assumptions are described in Note 14 “Employee Retirement Benefits” to the Company’s consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, which are incorporated herein by reference, including the discount rate, expected long-term rate of return on plan assets and rates of increase in compensation and health care costs.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
In accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, actual results that differ from assumptions used are accumulated and amortized over future periods and, accordingly, generally affect recognized expense in future periods. Therefore, assumptions used to calculate benefit obligations as of the annual measurement date directly impact the expense to be recognized in future periods. The primary assumptions affecting the Company’s accounting for employee benefits as of December 31, 2009 are as follows:
 
•  Long-term rate of return on plan assets:  The expected long-term rate of return is used to calculate net periodic pension cost. The required use of the expected long-term rate of return on plan assets may result in recognized returns that are greater or less than the actual returns on those plan assets in any given year. Over time, however, the expected long-term rate of return on plan assets is designed to approximate actual earned long-term returns. The expected long-term rate of return for pension assets has been chosen based on various inputs, including historical returns for the different asset classes held by the Company’s trusts and its asset allocation, as well as inputs from internal and external sources regarding expected capital market returns, inflation and other variables. In determining its pension expense for 2009, the Company used long-term rates of return on plan assets ranging from 4.5% to 10.25% outside the U.S. and 8.1% in the U.S.
 
Actual returns on U.S. pension assets for 2009, 2008 and 2007 were 7.5%, (7.9%) and 8%, respectively, compared to the expected rate of return assumption of 8.1%, 8.25% and 8% respectively, for each of those years. The Company’s market-related value of pension assets reflects changes in the fair value of assets over a five-year period, with a one-third weighting to the most recent year.
 
•  Discount rate:  The discount rate is used to calculate pension and postretirement employee benefit obligations. The discount rate assumption is based on market rates for a hypothetical portfolio of high-quality corporate bonds rated Aa or better with maturities closely matched to the timing of projected benefit payments for each plan at its annual measurement date. The Company used discount rates ranging from 1.8% to 10.4% to determine its pension and other benefit obligations as of December 31, 2009, including weighted average discount rates of 5.95% for U.S. pension plans, 6.1% for non-U.S. pension plans, and 5.7% for postretirement employee health care and life insurance plans.
 
•  Health care cost trend:  For postretirement employee health care plan accounting, the Company reviews external data and Company specific historical trends for health care costs to determine the health care cost trend rate assumptions. In determining the accumulated postretirement benefit obligations for postretirement employee health care plans as of December 31, 2009, the Company used weighted average health care cost trend rates of 8.3%, declining to an ultimate trend rate of 5.25% in 2015.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
 
While the Company believes that these assumptions are appropriate, significant differences in actual experience or significant changes in these assumptions may materially affect the Company’s pension and other postretirement employee benefit obligations and its future expense. The following table illustrates the sensitivity to a change in certain assumptions for Company sponsored U.S. and non-U.S. pension plans on its 2009 funded status and 2010 pre-tax pension expense (excludes certain salaried employees that are covered by a Ford sponsored plan):
 
                                 
    Impact on
      Impact on
   
    U.S. 2010
  Impact on
  Non-U.S. 2010
  Impact on
    Pre-tax Pension
  U.S. Plan 2009
  Pre-tax Pension
  Non-U.S. Plan 2009
    Expense   Funded Status   Expense   Funded Status
 
25 basis point decrease in discount rate(a)
    +$1 million       −$46 million       +less than $1 million       −$18 million  
25 basis point increase in discount rate(a)
    −$1 million       +$43 million       −less than $1 million       +$17 million  
25 basis point decrease in expected return on assets(a)
    +$2 million               +$1 million          
25 basis point increase in expected return on assets(a)
    −$2 million               −$1 million          
 
 
(a) Assumes all other assumptions are held constant.
 
The following table illustrates the sensitivity to a change in the discount rate assumption related to Visteon sponsored postretirement employee health care and life insurance plans expense (excludes certain salaried employees that are covered by a Ford sponsored plan):
 
                 
    Impact on 2010
  Impact on Visteon
    Pre-tax OPEB
  Sponsored Plan 2009
    Expense   Funded Status
 
25 basis point decrease in discount rate(a)
  +less than $ 1 million     −$ 1 million  
25 basis point increase in discount rate(a)
  −less than $ 1 million     +$ 1 million  
 
 
(a) Assumes all other assumptions are held constant.
 
The following table illustrates the sensitivity to a change in the assumed health care trend rate related to Visteon sponsored postretirement employee health expense (excludes certain salaried employees that are covered by a Ford sponsored plan):
 
                 
    Total Service and
   
    Interest Cost   APBO
 
100 basis point increase in health care trend rate(a)
  +$ 1 million     +$ 6 million  
100 basis point decrease in health care trend rate(a)
  −$ 1 million     −$ 5 million  
 
 
(a) Assumes all other assumptions are held constant.
 
Impairment of Long-Lived Assets and Certain Identifiable Intangibles
 
Long-lived assets and intangible assets subject to amortization are required to be reviewed for impairment when certain indicators of impairment are present. Impairment exists if estimated future undiscounted cash flows associated with long-lived assets are not sufficient to recover the carrying value of such assets. Generally, when impairment exists the long-lived assets are adjusted to their respective fair values.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
In assessing long-lived assets for an impairment loss, assets are grouped with other assets and liabilities at the lowest level for which identifiable cash flows are largely independent of the cash flows of other assets and liabilities. Asset grouping requires a significant amount of judgment. Accordingly, facts and circumstances will influence how asset groups are determined for impairment testing. In assessing long-lived assets for impairment, management considered the Company’s product line portfolio, customers and related commercial agreements, labor agreements and other factors in grouping assets and liabilities at the lowest level for which identifiable cash flows are largely independent. Additionally, in determining fair value of long-lived assets, management uses appraisals, management estimates or discounted cash flow calculations.
 
Product Warranty and Recall
 
The Company accrues for warranty obligations for products sold based on management estimates, with support from the Company’s sales, engineering, quality and legal functions, of the amount that eventually will be required to settle such obligations. This accrual is based on several factors, including contractual arrangements, past experience, current claims, production changes, industry developments and various other considerations.
 
The Company accrues for product recall claims related to potential financial participation in customers’ actions to provide remedies related primarily to safety concerns as a result of actual or threatened regulatory or court actions or the Company’s determination of the potential for such actions. The Company accrues for recall claims for products sold based on management estimates, with support from the Company’s engineering, quality and legal functions. Amounts accrued are based upon management’s best estimate of the amount that will ultimately be required to settle such claims.
 
Environmental Matters
 
The Company is subject to the requirements of federal, state, local and international environmental and occupational safety and health laws and regulations. These include laws regulating air emissions, water discharge and waste management. The Company is also subject to environmental laws requiring the investigation and cleanup of environmental contamination at properties it presently owns or operates and at third-party disposal or treatment facilities to which these sites send or arranged to send hazardous waste.
 
The Company is aware of contamination at some of its properties and relating to various third-party Superfund sites at which the Company or its predecessor has been named as a potentially responsible party. The Company is in various stages of investigation and cleanup at these sites. At December 31, 2009, the Company had recorded a reserve of approximately $1 million for this environmental investigation and cleanup. However, estimating liabilities for environmental investigation and cleanup is complex and dependent upon a number of factors beyond the Company’s control and which may change dramatically. Accordingly, although the Company believes its reserve is adequate based on current information, the Company cannot provide any assurance that its ultimate environmental investigation and cleanup costs and liabilities will not exceed the amount of its current reserve.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
Income Taxes
 
The Company is subject to income taxes in the U.S. and numerous non-U.S. jurisdictions. Significant judgment is required in determining the Company’s worldwide provision for income taxes, deferred tax assets and liabilities and the valuation allowance recorded against the Company’s net deferred tax assets. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recorded for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carry forwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The Company records a valuation allowance to reduce deferred tax assets when, based on all available evidence, both positive and negative, it is more likely than not that such assets will not be realized. This assessment, which is completed on a jurisdiction-by-jurisdiction basis, requires significant judgment, and in making this evaluation, the evidence considered by the Company includes, historical and projected financial performance, as well as the nature, frequency and severity of recent losses along with any other pertinent information.
 
In the ordinary course of the Company’s business, there are many transactions and calculations where the ultimate tax determination is uncertain. The Company is regularly under audit by tax authorities. Accruals for tax contingencies are provided for as it relates to income tax risks and non-income tax risks, where appropriate.
 
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
 
See Note 3 “Recent Accounting Pronouncements” to the accompanying consolidated financial statements under Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for a discussion of recent accounting pronouncements.
 
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
 
Certain statements contained or incorporated in this Annual Report on Form 10-K which are not statements of historical fact constitute “Forward-Looking Statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “Reform Act”). Forward-looking statements give current expectations or forecasts of future events. Words such as “anticipate”, “expect”, “intend”, “plan”, “believe”, “seek”, “estimate” and other words and terms of similar meaning in connection with discussions of future operating or financial performance signify forward-looking statements. These statements reflect the Company’s current views with respect to future events and are based on assumptions and estimates, which are subject to risks and uncertainties including those discussed in Item 1A under the heading “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this report. Accordingly, undue reliance should not be placed on these forward-looking statements. Also, these forward-looking statements represent the Company’s estimates and assumptions only as of the date of this report. The Company does not intend to update any of these forward-looking statements to reflect circumstances or events that occur after the statement is made and qualifies all of its forward-looking statements by these cautionary statements.
 
You should understand that various factors, in addition to those discussed elsewhere in this document, could affect the Company’s future results and could cause results to differ materially from those expressed in such forward-looking statements, including:
 
•  Visteon’s ability to satisfy its future capital and liquidity requirements; Visteon’s ability to access the credit and capital markets at the times and in the amounts needed and on terms acceptable to Visteon; Visteon’s ability to comply with covenants applicable to it; and the continuation of acceptable supplier payment terms.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
 
•  The potential adverse impact of the Chapter 11 Proceedings on Visteon’s business, financial condition or results of operations, including its ability to maintain contracts and other customer and vendor relationships that are critical to its business and the actions and decisions of its creditors and other third parties with interests in the Chapter 11 Proceedings.
 
•  Visteon’s ability to maintain adequate liquidity to fund its operations during the Chapter 11 Proceedings and to fund a plan of reorganization and thereafter, including obtaining sufficient “exit” financing; maintaining normal terms with its vendors and service providers during the Chapter 11 Proceedings and complying with the covenants and other terms of its financing agreements.
 
•  Visteon’s ability to obtain court approval with respect to motions in the Chapter 11 Proceedings prosecuted from time to time and to develop, prosecute, confirm and consummate one or more plans of reorganization with respect to the Chapter 11 Proceedings and to consummate all of the transactions contemplated by one or more such plans of reorganization or upon which consummation of such plans may be conditioned.
 
•  Visteon’s ability to satisfy its pension and other postemployment benefit obligations, and to retire outstanding debt and satisfy other contractual commitments, all at the levels and times planned by management.
 
•  Visteon’s ability to access funds generated by its foreign subsidiaries and joint ventures on a timely and cost effective basis.
 
•  Changes in the operations (including products, product planning and part sourcing), financial condition, results of operations or market share of Visteon’s customers, particularly its largest customer, Ford.
 
•  Changes in vehicle production volume of Visteon’s customers in the markets where it operates, and in particular changes in Ford’s and Hyundai Kia’s vehicle production volumes and platform mix.
 
•  Visteon’s ability to profitably win new business from customers other than Ford and to maintain current business with, and win future business from, Ford, and, Visteon’s ability to realize expected sales and profits from new business.
 
•  Increases in commodity costs or disruptions in the supply of commodities, including steel, resins, aluminum, copper, fuel and natural gas.
 
•  Visteon’s ability to generate cost savings to offset or exceed agreed upon price reductions or price reductions to win additional business and, in general, improve its operating performance; to achieve the benefits of its restructuring actions; and to recover engineering and tooling costs and capital investments.
 
•  Visteon’s ability to compete favorably with automotive parts suppliers with lower cost structures and greater ability to rationalize operations; and to exit non-performing businesses on satisfactory terms, particularly due to limited flexibility under existing labor agreements.
 
•  Restrictions in labor contracts with unions that restrict Visteon’s ability to close plants, divest unprofitable, noncompetitive businesses, change local work rules and practices at a number of facilities and implement cost-saving measures.
 
•  The costs and timing of facility closures or dispositions, business or product realignments, or similar restructuring actions, including potential asset impairment or other charges related to the implementation of these actions or other adverse industry conditions and contingent liabilities.
 
•  Significant changes in the competitive environment in the major markets where Visteon procures materials, components or supplies or where its products are manufactured, distributed or sold.


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ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS — (Continued)
 
 
•  Legal and administrative proceedings, investigations and claims, including shareholder class actions, inquiries by regulatory agencies, product liability, warranty, employee-related, environmental and safety claims and any recalls of products manufactured or sold by Visteon.
 
•  Changes in economic conditions, currency exchange rates, changes in foreign laws, regulations or trade policies or political stability in foreign countries where Visteon procures materials, components or supplies or where its products are manufactured, distributed or sold.
 
•  Shortages of materials or interruptions in transportation systems, labor strikes, work stoppages or other interruptions to or difficulties in the employment of labor in the major markets where Visteon purchases materials, components or supplies to manufacture its products or where its products are manufactured, distributed or sold.
 
•  Changes in laws, regulations, policies or other activities of governments, agencies and similar organizations, domestic and foreign, that may tax or otherwise increase the cost of, or otherwise affect, the manufacture, licensing, distribution, sale, ownership or use of Visteon’s products or assets.
 
•  Possible terrorist attacks or acts of war, which could exacerbate other risks such as slowed vehicle production, interruptions in the transportation system or fuel prices and supply.
 
•  The cyclical and seasonal nature of the automotive industry.
 
•  Visteon’s ability to comply with environmental, safety and other regulations applicable to it and any increase in the requirements, responsibilities and associated expenses and expenditures of these regulations.
 
•  Visteon’s ability to protect its intellectual property rights, and to respond to changes in technology and technological risks and to claims by others that Visteon infringes their intellectual property rights.
 
•  Visteon’s ability to provide various employee and transition services in accordance with the terms of existing agreements between the parties, as well as Visteon’s ability to recover the costs of such services.
 
•  Visteon’s ability to quickly and adequately remediate control deficiencies in its internal control over financial reporting.
 
•  Other factors, risks and uncertainties detailed from time to time in Visteon’s Securities and Exchange Commission filings.
 
•  The risks and uncertainties and the terms of any reorganization plan ultimately confirmed can affect the value of Visteon’s various pre-petition liabilities, common stock and/or other securities. No assurance can be given as to what values, if any, will be ascribed in the bankruptcy proceedings to each of these constituencies. A plan of reorganization could result in holders of the Company’s liabilities and/or securities receiving no value for their interests. Because of such possibilities, the value of these liabilities and/or securities is highly speculative. Accordingly, the Company urges that caution be exercised with respect to existing and future investments in any of these liabilities and/or securities.
 
ITEM 7A.  QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
 
Not applicable.


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ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA — (Continued)
 
 
MANAGEMENT’S REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING
 
Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting as such term is defined under Rule 13a-15(f) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Under the supervision and with the participation of the principal executive and financial officers of the Company, an evaluation of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting was conducted based on the framework in Internal Control — Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations (“the COSO Framework”) of the Treadway Commission. Based on the evaluation performed under the COSO Framework as of December 31, 2009, management has concluded that the Company’s internal control over financial reporting is effective.
 
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, has audited the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2009, as stated in their report which is included herein.


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ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA — (Continued)
 
 
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
 
To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of Visteon Corporation
 
In our opinion, the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and the related consolidated statements of operations, shareholders’ deficit and cash flows present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Visteon Corporation and its subsidiaries at December 31, 2009 and 2008, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2009 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. In addition, in our opinion, the financial statement schedule listed in the index appearing under Item 15(a)(2) presents fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein when read in conjunction with the related consolidated financial statements. Also in our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2009, based on criteria established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). The Company’s management is responsible for these financial statements and financial statement schedule, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express opinions on these financial statements, on the financial statement schedule, and on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our integrated audits. We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audits of the financial statements included examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.
 
The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, Visteon Corporation and certain of its U.S. subsidiaries (the “Debtors”) voluntarily filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on May 28, 2009. This action, which was taken primarily as a result of liquidity issues as discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, raises substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plan in regard to this matter is described in Note 4 to the consolidated financial statements. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.
 
As discussed in Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company changed the manner in which it accounts for noncontrolling interests in 2009. As discussed in Notes 14 and 16 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company changed the measurement date for its defined benefit pension and other postretirement plans and its method of accounting for unrecognized tax benefits, respectively, in 2007.


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ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA — (Continued)
 
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
 
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
 
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Detroit, Michigan
February 26, 2010


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ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA — (Continued)
 
VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
 
                         
    Year Ended December 31  
    2009     2008     2007  
    (Dollars in Millions, Except Per
 
    Share Amounts)  
 
Net sales
                       
Products
  $ 6,420     $ 9,077     $ 10,721  
Services
    265       467       554  
                         
      6,685       9,544       11,275  
Cost of sales
                       
Products
    5,827       8,621       10,154  
Services
    261       464       548  
                         
      6,088       9,085       10,702  
Gross margin
    597       459       573  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    331       553       636  
Restructuring expenses
    84       147       152  
Reimbursement from escrow account
    62       113       142  
Reorganization items
    60              
Deconsolidation gain
    95              
Asset impairments and other gains and (losses)
    11       (275 )     (95 )
                         
Operating income (loss)
    290       (403 )     (168 )
Interest expense
    117       215       225  
Interest income
    11       46       61  
Equity in net income of non-consolidated affiliates
    80       41       47  
                         
Income (loss) from continuing operations before income taxes
    264       (531 )     (285 )
Provision for income taxes
    80       116       20  
                         
Net income (loss) from continuing operations
    184       (647 )     (305 )
Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax
                24  
                         
Net income (loss)
    184       (647 )     (329 )
Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
    56       34       43  
                         
Net income (loss) attributable to Visteon Corporation
  $ 128     $ (681 )   $ (372 )
                         
Basic and diluted earnings (loss) per share:
                       
Continuing operations attributable to Visteon Corporation
  $ 0.98     $ (5.26 )   $ (2.69 )
Discontinued operations attributable to Visteon Corporation
                (0.18 )
Basic and diluted earnings (loss) attributable to Visteon Corporation
  $ 0.98     $ (5.26 )   $ (2.87 )
 
See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.


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ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA — (Continued)
 
VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
 
                 
    December 31  
    2009     2008  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
ASSETS
Cash and equivalents
  $ 962     $ 1,180  
Restricted cash
    133        
Accounts receivable, net
    1,055       989  
Inventories, net
    319       354  
Other current assets
    236       239  
                 
Total current assets
    2,705       2,762  
Property and equipment, net
    1,936       2,162  
Equity in net assets of non-consolidated affiliates
    294       220  
Other non-current assets
    84       104  
                 
Total assets
  $ 5,019     $ 5,248  
                 
 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT
Short-term debt, including current portion of long-term debt and debt in default
  $ 225     $ 2,697  
Accounts payable
    977       1,058  
Accrued employee liabilities
    161       228  
Other current liabilities
    302       288  
                 
Total current liabilities
    1,665       4,271  
Long-term debt
    6       65  
Employee benefits
    568       1,031  
Deferred tax liabilities
    159       139  
Other non-current liabilities
    257       365  
Liabilities subject to compromise
    2,819        
Shareholders’ deficit
               
Preferred stock (par value $1.00, 50 million shares authorized, none outstanding)
           
Common stock (par value $1.00, 500 million shares authorized, 131 million shares issued and 130 million shares outstanding)
    131       131  
Stock warrants
    127       127  
Additional paid-in capital
    3,408       3,407  
Accumulated deficit
    (4,576 )     (4,704 )
Accumulated other comprehensive income
    142       157  
Other
    (4 )     (5 )
                 
Total Visteon Corporation shareholders’ deficit
    (772 )     (887 )
Noncontrolling interests
    317       264  
                 
Total shareholders’ deficit
    (455 )     (623 )
                 
Total liabilities and shareholders’ deficit
  $ 5,019     $ 5,248  
                 
 
See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.


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ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA — (Continued)
 
VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
 
                         
    Year Ended December 31  
    2009     2008     2007  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Operating Activities
                       
Net income (loss)
  $ 184     $ (647 )   $ (329 )
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided from (used by) operating activities:
                       
Depreciation and amortization
    352       416       472  
OPEB and pension amortization and curtailment
    (215 )     (72 )     (29 )
Deconsolidation gain
    (95 )            
Asset impairments and other (gains) and losses
    (11 )     275       107  
Non-cash tax items
                (91 )
Equity in net income of non-consolidated affiliates, net of dividends remitted
    (38 )     5       20  
Reorganization items
    60              
Other non-cash items
    8       11       (6 )
Changes in assets and liabilities:
                       
Accounts receivable and retained interests
    (127 )     509       216  
Inventories
    33       44       6  
Accounts payable
    79       (504 )     (123 )
Postretirement benefits other than pensions
    (11 )     65       (19 )
Income taxes deferred and payable, net
    47       30       20  
Other assets and other liabilities
    (125 )     (248 )     49  
                         
Net cash provided from (used by) operating activities
    141       (116 )     293  
Investing Activities
                       
Capital expenditures
    (151 )     (294 )     (376 )
Acquisitions and investments in joint ventures, net
    (30 )     (1 )     (11 )
Proceeds from divestitures and asset sales
    69       83       207  
Cash associated with deconsolidation and other
    (11 )     4       3  
                         
Net cash used by investing activities
    (123 )     (208 )     (177 )
Financing Activities
                       
Short-term debt, net
    (19 )     28       33  
Cash restriction
    (133 )            
Proceeds from DIP facility, net of issuance costs
    71              
Proceeds from issuance of debt, net of issuance costs
    57       260       637  
Principal payments on debt
    (173 )     (88 )     (88 )
Repurchase of unsecured debt securities
          (337 )      
Other, including overdrafts
    (62 )     (56 )     (35 )
                         
Net cash (used by) provided from financing activities
    (259 )     (193 )     547  
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash
    23       (61 )     38  
                         
Net (decrease) increase in cash and equivalents
    (218 )     (578 )     701  
Cash and equivalents at beginning of year
    1,180       1,758       1,057  
                         
Cash and equivalents at end of year
  $ 962     $ 1,180     $ 1,758  
                         
Supplemental Disclosures:
                       
Cash paid for interest
  $ 126     $ 226     $ 215  
Cash paid for income taxes, net of refunds
  $ 77     $ 86     $ 91  
 
See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.


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ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA — (Continued)
 
VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT
 
                         
    2009     2008     2007  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Common Stock
                       
Balance at January 1
  $ 131     $ 131     $ 131  
                         
Balance at December 31
  $ 131     $ 131     $ 131  
                         
Stock Warrants
                       
Balance at January 1
  $ 127     $ 127     $ 127  
                         
Balance at December 31
  $ 127     $ 127     $ 127  
                         
Additional Paid-In Capital
                       
Balance at January 1
  $ 3,407     $ 3,406     $ 3,398  
Stock-based compensation
    1       1       8  
                         
Balance at December 31
  $ 3,408     $ 3,407     $ 3,406  
                         
Accumulated Deficit
                       
Balance at January 1
  $ (4,704 )   $ (4,016 )   $ (3,606 )
Net income (loss) attributable to Visteon Corporation
    128       (681 )     (372 )
Adjustment for adoption of a new accounting pronouncement
                (34 )
Shares issued for stock-based compensation
          (7 )     (4 )
                         
Balance at December 31
  $ (4,576 )   $ (4,704 )   $ (4,016 )
                         
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
                       
Balance at January 1
  $ 157     $ 275     $ (216 )
Net foreign currency translation adjustment
    (119 )     (89 )     131  
Net change in pension and OPEB obligations
    92       (29 )     158  
Net gain (loss) on derivatives and other
    12             (8 )
                         
Net other comprehensive income (loss) adjustments
    (15 )     (118 )     281  
Cumulative effect of adoption of new accounting pronouncement
                210  
                         
Balance at December 31
  $ 142     $ 157     $ 275  
                         
Other — Treasury Stock
                       
Balance at January 1
  $ (3 )   $ (13 )   $ (22 )
Shares issued for stock-based compensation
                10  
Treasury stock activity
          (1 )     (1 )
Restricted stock award activity
          11        
                         
Balance at December 31
  $ (3 )   $ (3 )   $ (13 )
                         
Other — Restricted Stock
                       
Balance at January 1
  $ (2 )   $     $  
Stock-based compensation, net
    1       (2 )      
                         
Balance at December 31
  $ (1 )   $ (2 )   $  
                         
Total Visteon Corporation Shareholders’ Deficit
  $ (772 )   $ (887 )   $ (90 )
                         
Noncontrolling Interests
                       
Balance at January 1
  $ 264     $ 293     $ 271  
Net income
    56       34       43  
Net foreign currency translation adjustment
    11       (49 )     3  
Net gain (loss) on derivatives and other
    (2 )     3       (8 )
                         
Net other comprehensive income (loss) adjustments
    9       (46 )     (5 )
Dividends to noncontrolling interests
    (12 )     (17 )     (16 )
                         
Balance at December 31
  $ 317     $ 264     $ 293  
                         
Total Shareholders’ (Deficit) Equity
  $ (455 )   $ (623 )   $ 203  
                         
Comprehensive Income (Loss)
                       
Net income (loss)
  $ 184     $ (647 )   $ (329 )
Net other comprehensive income (loss) adjustments
    (6 )     (164 )     276  
                         
Total comprehensive income (loss)
  $ 178     $ (811 )   $ (53 )
                         
 
See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
NOTE 1.  Description of Business and Basis of Presentation
 
Description of the Business
 
Visteon Corporation (the “Company” or “Visteon”) is a leading global supplier of automotive systems, modules and components to global automotive original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”). The Company’s operations are organized by global product groups including Climate, Electronics and Interiors and are conducted through a network of manufacturing operations, technical centers, service centers and joint ventures in every major geographic region of the world.
 
Visteon became an independent company when Ford Motor Company and affiliates (“Ford” or “Ford Motor Company”) established the Company as a wholly-owned subsidiary in January 2000 and subsequently transferred to the Company the assets and liabilities comprising Ford’s automotive components and systems business. Ford completed its spin-off of the Company on June 28, 2000. Prior to incorporation, the Company operated as Ford’s automotive components and systems business.
 
On October 1, 2005, Visteon sold Automotive Components Holdings, LLC (“ACH”), an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company to Ford for cash proceeds of approximately $300 million, as well as the forgiveness of certain other postretirement employee benefit (“OPEB”) liabilities and other obligations relating to hourly employees associated with ACH, and the assumption of certain other liabilities with respect to ACH (together, the “ACH Transactions”). The ACH Transactions also provided for the termination of the Hourly Employee Assignment Agreement and complete relief to the Company of all liabilities relating to Visteon-assigned Ford UAW hourly employees. Additionally, on October 1, 2005, Ford acquired from the Company warrants to acquire 25 million shares of the Company’s common stock and agreed to provide $550 million (pursuant to the “Escrow Agreement” and the “Reimbursement Agreement”) to be used in the Company’s further restructuring.
 
In August 2008, the Company, Ford and ACH amended certain agreements initially completed in connection with the ACH Transactions, including the Escrow Agreement, the Reimbursement Agreement, the Master Services Agreement, dated as of September 30, 2005, as amended, between the Company and ACH (the “Master Services Agreement”); the Visteon Salaried Employee Lease Agreement, dated as of October 1, 2005, as amended, between the Company and ACH (the “Visteon Salaried Employee Lease Agreement”); and the Intellectual Property Contribution Agreement, dated as of October 1, 2005, as amended, among the Company, Visteon Global Technologies, Inc., Automotive Components Holdings, Inc. and ACH (the “Intellectual Property Contribution Agreement”).
 
•  The “Amended Escrow Agreement” — The Escrow Agreement was amended to, among other things, provide that Ford contribute an additional $50 million into the escrow account, and to provide that such additional funds shall be available to the Company to fund restructuring and other qualifying costs, as defined within the Escrow Agreement, on a 100% basis. The additional $50 million was funded into the escrow account in August 2008.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 1.  Description of Business and Basis of Presentation — (Continued)
 
 
•  The “Amended Reimbursement Agreement” — The Reimbursement Agreement was amended and restated to, among other things, require Ford to reimburse the Company in full for certain severance expenses and other qualifying termination benefits, as defined in such agreement, relating to the termination of salaried employees who were leased to ACH. Previously, the amount required to be reimbursed by Ford was capped at $150 million, of which the first $50 million was to be funded in total by Ford and the remaining $100 million was to be matched by the Company. Any unused portion of the $150 million as of December 31, 2009 was to be deposited into the escrow account governed by the Escrow Agreement. The Reimbursement Agreement was amended to eliminate the $150 million cap as well as the Company’s obligation to match any costs during the term of the agreement. Further, Ford’s obligation to deposit remaining funds into the escrow account, which was established pursuant to the Escrow Agreement, was eliminated.
 
•  The “Amended Master Services Agreement” — The Master Services Agreement was amended to, among other things, extend the term that Visteon will provide certain services to ACH, Ford and others from December 31, 2009 to January 1, 2011.
 
•  The “Amended Visteon Salaried Employee Lease Agreement” — The Visteon Salaried Employee Lease Agreement was amended to, among other things, extend the term that ACH may lease salaried employees of the Company from December 31, 2010 to December 31, 2014.
 
•  The “Amended Intellectual Property Contribution Agreement” — The Intellectual Property Contribution Agreement was amended to, among other things, clarify the availability for use by ACH of certain patents, design tools and other proprietary information.
 
The Company continues to transact a significant amount of ongoing commercial activity with Ford. Product sales, services revenues, accounts receivable, employee benefits and liabilities subject to compromise include amounts from ongoing commercial relations with Ford and are summarized below as adjusted for discontinued operations.
 
                         
    For the Year Ended December 31
    2009   2008   2007
    (Dollars in Millions)
 
Product sales
  $ 1,809     $ 3,095     $ 4,131  
Services revenues
  $ 261     $ 451     $ 542  
 
                 
    December 31  
    2009     2008  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Accounts receivable, net
  $ 230     $ 174  
Employee benefits
  $     $ 113  
Liabilities subject to compromise
  $ 245     $  
 
On May 13, 2009, the Company entered into certain transactions whereby Ford purchased, assumed and took an assignment of all of the outstanding loans, obligations and other interests of the lenders under the ABL Credit Agreement. As of December 31, 2009, the balance owed to Ford under the ABL Credit Agreement was approximately $127 million, including $38 million related to unreimbursed draws on letters of credit.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 1.  Description of Business and Basis of Presentation — (Continued)
 
Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code
 
On May 28, 2009 (the “Petition Date”), Visteon and certain of its U.S. subsidiaries (the “Debtors”) filed voluntary petitions for reorganization relief under chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code (the “Bankruptcy Code”) in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware (the “Court”). The reorganization cases are being jointly administered as Case No. 09-11786 under the caption “In re Visteon Corporation, et al” (hereinafter referred to as the “Chapter 11 Proceedings”). The Debtors continue to operate their businesses as “debtors-in-possession” (“DIP”) under the jurisdiction of the Court and in accordance with the applicable provisions of the Bankruptcy Code and orders of the Court. The Company’s other subsidiaries, primarily non-U.S. subsidiaries, have been excluded from the Chapter 11 Proceedings and continue to operate their businesses without supervision from the Court and are not subject to the requirements of the Bankruptcy Code.
 
The Chapter 11 Proceedings were initiated in response to sudden and severe declines in global automotive production during the latter part of 2008 and early 2009 and the adverse impact on the Company’s cash flows and liquidity. Under the Chapter 11 Proceedings, the Debtors expect to develop and implement a plan of reorganization to restructure their capital structure and operations. Confirmation of a plan of reorganization could materially change the amounts and classifications reported in the Company’s consolidated financial statements, which do not give effect to any adjustments to the carrying values of assets or amounts of liabilities that might be necessary as a consequence of confirmation of a plan of reorganization. Additional details regarding the status of the Company’s Chapter 11 Proceedings are included herein under Note 4, “Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code,” to the consolidated financial statements.
 
Visteon UK Limited Administration
 
On March 31, 2009, in accordance with the provisions of the United Kingdom Insolvency Act of 1986 and pursuant to a resolution of the board of directors of Visteon UK Limited, a company organized under the laws of England and Wales (the “UK Debtor”) and an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, representatives from KPMG (the “Administrators”) were appointed as administrators in respect of the UK Debtor (the “UK Administration”). The UK Administration was initiated in response to continuing operating losses of the UK Debtor and mounting labor costs and their related demand on the Company’s cash flows, and does not include the Company or any of the Company’s other subsidiaries. The effect of the UK Debtor’s entry into administration was to place the management, affairs, business and property of the UK Debtor under the direct control of the Administrators. Since their appointment, the Administrators have wound down the business of the UK Debtor and closed its operations in Enfield, UK, Basildon, UK and Belfast, UK, and made the employees redundant. The Administrators continue to realize the UK Debtor’s assets, comprised mainly of receivables.
 
The UK Debtor recorded sales, negative gross margin and net loss of $32 million, $7 million and $10 million, respectively, for the three months ended March 31, 2009. As of March 31, 2009, total assets of $64 million, total liabilities of $132 million and related amounts deferred as “Accumulated other comprehensive income” of $84 million, were deconsolidated from the Company’s balance sheet resulting in a deconsolidation gain of $152 million. The Company also recorded $57 million for contingent liabilities related to the UK Administration, including $45 million of costs associated with former employees of the UK Debtor, for which the Company was reimbursed from the escrow account on a 100% basis.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 1.  Description of Business and Basis of Presentation — (Continued)
 
Additional amounts related to these items or other contingent liabilities for potential claims under the UK Administration, which may result from from (i) negotiations; (ii) actions of the Administrators; (iii) resolution of contractual arrangements, including unexpired leases; (iv) assertions by the UK Pensions Regulator; and, (v) material adverse developments; or other events, may be recorded in future periods. No assurance can be provided that the Company will not be subject to future litigation and/or liabilities related to the UK Administration. Additional liabilities, if any, will be recorded when they become probable and estimable and could materially affect the Company’s results of operations and financial condition in future periods.
 
Basis of Presentation
 
The Company’s financial statements have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”), consistently applied and on a going concern basis, which contemplates the continuity of operations, realization of assets and satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. However, as a result of the Chapter 11 Proceedings, such realization of assets and satisfaction of liabilities, without substantial adjustments to amounts and/or changes of ownership, is highly uncertain. Given this uncertainty, there is substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern.
 
The Company’s financial statements do not include any adjustments related to assets or liabilities that may be necessary should the Company not be able to continue as a going concern. The appropriateness of using the going concern basis for the Company’s financial statements is dependent upon, among other things, the Company’s ability to: (i) comply with terms of DIP financing; (ii) comply with various orders entered by the Court in connection with the Chapter 11 Proceedings; (iii) maintain adequate cash on hand; (iv) generate sufficient cash from operations; (v) achieve confirmation of a plan of reorganization under the Bankruptcy Code; and (vi) achieve profitability following such confirmation.
 
NOTE 2.  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
 
Principles of Consolidation:  The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and all subsidiaries that are more than 50% owned and over which the Company exercises control. Investments in affiliates of greater than 20% and for which the Company does not exercise control are accounted for using the equity method. The consolidated financial statements also include the accounts of certain entities in which the Company holds a controlling interest based on exposure to economic risks and potential rewards (variable interests) for which it is the primary beneficiary.
 
The Company consolidates the accounts of TACO Visteon Engineering Private Limited (“TACO”), which is a 50% owned joint venture that provides certain computer aided engineering and design services for Visteon along with other manufacturing activities conducted for TATA Autocomp Systems Limited and Visteon. Consolidation of this entity was based on an assessment of the Company’s exposure to a majority of the expected losses. As of December 31, 2009, TACO had total assets of $3 million and total liabilities of $2 million. These amounts are recorded at their carrying values which approximates their fair values as of December 31, 2009.
 
Reclassifications:  Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to current year presentation.
 
Use of Estimates:  The preparation of the financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates, judgments and assumptions that affect amounts reported herein. Management believes that such estimates, judgments and assumptions are reasonable and appropriate. However, due to the inherent uncertainty involved, actual results may differ from those provided in the Company’s consolidated financial statements.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 2.  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies — (Continued)
 
Foreign Currency:  Assets and liabilities of the Company’s non-U.S. businesses are translated into U.S. Dollars at end-of-period exchange rates and the related translation adjustments are reported in the consolidated balance sheets under the classification of “Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss).” The effects of remeasurement of assets and liabilities of the Company’s non-U.S. businesses that use the U.S. Dollar as their functional currency are included in the consolidated statements of operations as transaction gains and losses. Income and expense elements of the Company’s non-U.S. businesses are translated into U.S. Dollars at average-period exchange rates and are reflected in the consolidated statements of operations as part of sales, costs and expenses. Additionally, gains and losses resulting from transactions denominated in a currency other than the functional currency are included in the consolidated statements of operations as transaction gains and losses. Transaction losses of $4 million in 2009, gains of $14 million in 2008 and losses of $6 million in 2007 resulted from the remeasurement of certain deferred foreign tax liabilities and are included within income taxes. Net transaction gains and losses decreased net income or increased net loss by $18 million in 2009 and $3 million in 2008 and decreased net loss by $2 million 2007.
 
Revenue Recognition:  The Company records revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery occurs or services are rendered, the sales price or fee is fixed or determinable and collectibility is reasonably assured. The Company ships product and records revenue pursuant to commercial agreements with its customers generally in the form of an approved purchase order, including the effects of contractual customer price productivity. The Company does negotiate discrete price changes with its customers, which are generally the result of unique commercial issues between the Company and its customers and are generally the subject of specific negotiations between the Company and its customers. The Company records amounts associated with discrete price changes as a reduction to revenue when specific facts and circumstances indicate that a price reduction is probable and the amounts are reasonably estimable. The Company records amounts associated with discrete price changes as an increase to revenue upon execution of a legally enforceable contractual agreement and when collectibility is reasonably assured.
 
Services revenues are recognized as services are rendered and associated costs of providing such services are recorded as incurred. Services revenues and related costs included approximately $30 million in both 2009 and 2008 and $9 million in 2007 of contractual reimbursement from Ford under the Amended Reimbursement Agreement for costs associated with the separation of ACH leased employees no longer required to provide such services.
 
Fair Value Measurements:  The Company uses fair value measurements in the preparation of its financial statements, which utilize various inputs including those that can be readily observable, corroborated or are generally unobservable. The Company utilizes market-based data and valuation techniques that maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. Additionally, the Company applies assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability, including assumptions about risk.
 
Cash Equivalents:  The Company considers all highly liquid investments purchased with a maturity of three months or less, including short-term time deposits, commercial paper, repurchase agreements and money market funds to be cash equivalents.
 
Restricted Cash:  Restricted cash represents cash designated for uses other than current operations and includes approximately $80 million under the terms of the ABL Credit Agreement, $34 million pursuant to a cash collateral order of the Court, $13 million related to the Letter of Credit Reimbursement and Security Agreement and $6 million related to cash collateral for other corporate purposes at December 31, 2009.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 2.  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies — (Continued)
 
Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts:  Accounts receivable are stated at historical value, which approximates fair value. The Company does not generally require collateral from its customers. Accounts receivable are reduced by an allowance for amounts that may be uncollectible in the future. This estimated allowance is determined by considering factors such as length of time accounts are past due, historical experience of write-offs and customer financial condition. If not reserved through specific examination procedures, the Company’s general policy for uncollectible accounts is to reserve based upon the aging categories of accounts receivable. Past due status is based upon the invoice date of the original amounts outstanding. Included in selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses are provisions for estimated uncollectible accounts receivable of $5 million and $1 million for the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively, and recoveries in excess of provisions for estimated uncollectible accounts receivable of $19 million for the year ended December 31, 2007. The allowance for doubtful accounts balance was $23 million and $37 million at December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
Inventories:  Inventories are stated at the lower of cost, determined on a first-in, first-out (“FIFO”) basis, or market. Inventories are reduced by an allowance for excess and obsolete inventories based on management’s review of on-hand inventories compared to historical and estimated future sales and usage.
 
Product Tooling:  Product tooling includes molds, dies and other tools used in production of a specific part or parts of the same basic design. It is generally required that non-reimbursable design and development costs for products to be sold under long-term supply arrangements be expensed as incurred and costs incurred for molds, dies and other tools that will be owned by the Company or its customers and used in producing the products under long-term supply arrangements be capitalized and amortized over the shorter of the expected useful life of the assets or the term of the supply arrangement. Contractually reimbursable design and development costs that would otherwise be expensed are recorded as an asset as incurred.
 
Product tooling owned by the Company is capitalized as property and equipment, and amortized to cost of sales over its estimated economic life, generally not exceeding six years. The net book value of product tooling owned by the Company was $78 million and $90 million as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. The Company had the following amounts recorded related to production tools in progress, which will not be owned by the Company and for which there is a contractual agreement for reimbursement from the customer; as of December 31, 2009 a net advance payment of approximately $1 million and unbilled receivables of $21 million as of December 31, 2008.
 
Restructuring:  The Company defines restructuring expense to include costs directly associated with exit or disposal activities as defined in GAAP. Such costs include employee severance, special termination benefits, pension and other postretirement benefit plan curtailments and/or settlements, contract termination fees and penalties, and other exit or disposal costs. In general, the Company records employee-related exit and disposal costs when such costs are probable and estimable, with the exception of one-time termination benefits and employee retention costs, which are recorded when earned. Contract termination fees and penalties and other exit and disposal costs are generally recorded when incurred.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 2.  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies — (Continued)
 
Long-Lived Assets and Certain Identifiable Intangibles:  Long-lived assets, such as property and equipment and definite-lived intangible assets are stated at cost or fair value for impaired assets. Depreciation or amortization is computed principally by the straight-line method for financial reporting purposes and by accelerated methods for income tax purposes in certain jurisdictions. Long-lived assets and intangible assets subject to amortization are depreciated or amortized over the estimated useful life of the asset.
 
Asset impairment charges are recorded for long-lived assets and intangible assets subject to amortization when events and circumstances indicate that such assets may be impaired and the undiscounted net cash flows estimated to be generated by those assets are less than their carrying amounts. If estimated future undiscounted cash flows are not sufficient to recover the carrying value of the assets, an impairment charge is recorded for the amount by which the carrying value of the assets exceeds its fair value. The Company classifies assets and liabilities as held for sale when management approves and commits to a formal plan of sale and it is probable that the sale will be completed. The carrying value of the assets and liabilities held for sale are recorded at the lower of carrying value or fair value less cost to sell, and the recording of depreciation is ceased. Fair value is determined using appraisals, management estimates or discounted cash flow calculations.
 
Capitalized Software Costs:  Certain costs incurred in the acquisition or development of software for internal use are capitalized. Capitalized software costs are amortized using the straight-line method over estimated useful lives generally ranging from three to eight years. The net book value of capitalized software costs was approximately $31 million and $57 million at December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Related amortization expense was approximately $27 million, $41 million and $46 million for the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Amortization expense of approximately $19 million is expected for 2010 and is expected to decrease to $9 million, $2 million and $1 million for 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively.
 
Pensions and Other Postretirement Employee Benefits:  Pensions and other postretirement employee benefit costs and related liabilities and assets are dependent upon assumptions used in calculating such amounts. These assumptions include discount rates, expected returns on plan assets, health care cost trends, compensation and other factors. In accordance with GAAP, actual results that differ from the assumptions used are accumulated and amortized over future periods, and accordingly, generally affect recognized expense in future periods.
 
Product Warranty:  The Company accrues for warranty obligations for products sold based on management estimates, with support from its sales, engineering, quality and legal functions, of the amount that eventually will be required to settle such obligations. This accrual is based on several factors, including contractual arrangements, past experience, current claims, production changes, industry developments and various other considerations.
 
Product Recall:  The Company accrues for product recall claims related to probable financial participation in customers’ actions to provide remedies related primarily to safety concerns as a result of actual or threatened regulatory or court actions or the Company’s determination of the potential for such actions. The Company accrues for recall claims for products sold based on management estimates, with support from the Company’s engineering, quality and legal functions. Amounts accrued are based upon management’s best estimate of the amount that will ultimately be required to settle such claims.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 2.  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies — (Continued)
 
Environmental Costs:  Costs related to environmental assessments and remediation efforts at operating facilities, previously owned or operated facilities, and Superfund or other waste site locations are accrued when it is probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of that liability can be reasonably estimated. Estimated costs are recorded at undiscounted amounts, based on experience and assessments and are regularly evaluated. The liabilities are recorded in other current liabilities and other non-current liabilities in the Company’s consolidated balance sheets.
 
Income Taxes:  Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The Company records a valuation allowance to reduce deferred tax assets when it is more likely than not that such assets will not be realized. This assessment requires significant judgment, and must be done on a jurisdiction-by-jurisdiction basis. In determining the need for a valuation allowance, all available positive and negative evidence, including historical and projected financial performance, is considered along with any other pertinent information. Additionally, deferred taxes have been provided for the net effect of repatriating earnings from consolidated and unconsolidated foreign affiliates, except for approximately $276 million of the Company’s share of Korean earnings considered permanently reinvested. If these earnings were repatriated, additional withholding tax expense of approximately $30 million would have been incurred.
 
Debt Issuance Costs:  The costs related to the issuance or modification of long-term debt are deferred and amortized into interest expense over the life of each debt issue. Deferred amounts associated with debt extinguished prior to maturity are expensed.
 
Other Costs:  Advertising and sales promotion costs, repair and maintenance costs, research and development costs, and pre-production operating costs are expensed as incurred. Research and development expenses include salary and related employee benefits, contractor fees, information technology, occupancy, telecommunications and depreciation. Advertising costs were approximately $1 million in 2009, $2 million in 2008 and $3 million in 2007. Research and development costs were $328 million in 2009, $434 million in 2008 and $510 million in 2007. Shipping and handling costs are recorded in the Company’s consolidated statements of operations as “Cost of sales.”
 
Financial Instruments:  The Company uses derivative financial instruments, including forward contracts, swaps and options, to manage exposures to changes in currency exchange rates and interest rates. All derivative financial instruments are classified as “held for purposes other than trading.” The Company’s policy specifically prohibits the use of derivatives for speculative purposes.
 
NOTE 3.  Recent Accounting Pronouncements
 
In July 2009, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) as the only authoritative source of generally accepted accounting principles. The ASC is effective for interim and annual reporting periods ending after September 15, 2009. The Company implemented use of the ASC without a significant impact on its consolidated financial statements.
 
In June 2009, the FASB issued guidance which amends the consolidation provisions that apply to Variable Interest Entities (“VIEs”). This guidance is effective for fiscal years that begin after November 15, 2009 and the Company is currently evaluating the impact this guidance may have on its consolidated financial statements.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 3.  Recent Accounting Pronouncements — (Continued)
 
In June 2009, the FASB issued guidance which revised the accounting for transfers and servicing of financial assets. This guidance is effective for fiscal years that begin after November 15, 2009 and the Company is currently evaluating the impact this guidance may have on its consolidated financial statements.
 
In May 2009 the FASB issued guidance requiring disclosures on management’s assessment of subsequent events, the Company adopted this guidance on a prospective basis as of April 1, 2009 without material impact on its consolidated financial statements.
 
In connection with ASC Topic 820, “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures,” (“ASC 820”) which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosure requirements regarding fair value measurements, the Company provided expanded disclosures as of January 1, 2008 without a material impact on its consolidated financial statements. The application of ASC 820 to the Company’s nonfinancial assets and liabilities did not impact the Company’s consolidated financial statements. The Company also adopted guidance on estimating fair value when the volume and level of activity have significantly decreased and on identifying circumstances that indicate a transaction is not orderly as of June 30, 2009 without material impact on its consolidated financial statements.
 
In April 2009, the FASB issued guidance requiring disclosures around the fair value of financial instruments for interim reporting periods, including (a) the fair value at the period end and (b) the methods and assumptions used to calculate the fair value. The Company adopted this guidance without a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.
 
In December 2008, the FASB issued guidance requiring disclosure of (a) how pension plan asset investment allocation decisions are made, (b) the major categories of plan assets, (c) the inputs and valuation techniques used to measure the fair value of plan assets, (d) the effect of fair value measurements using significant unobservable inputs on changes in plan assets and (e) significant concentrations of risk within plan assets. These disclosures have been provided by the Company, as more fully described in Note 19, “Fair Value Measurements” to the consolidated financial statements.
 
In March 2008, the FASB issued guidance requiring disclosure of (a) how and why an entity uses derivative instruments, (b) how derivative instruments and related hedged items are accounted for and (c) how derivative instruments and related hedged items affect an entity’s financial position, results of operations and cash flows. These disclosures were provided by the Company on a prospective basis with effect from January 1, 2009, as more fully described in Note 20 “Financial Instruments” to the consolidated financial statements.
 
Effective January 1, 2009, the Company adopted new FASB guidance on the accounting and reporting for business combination transactions and noncontrolling interests. In adopting the new FASB guidance on noncontrolling interests, the Company adjusted its previously reported Net loss on the consolidated statements of operations for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007 to include net income attributable to noncontrolling interests (previously Minority interests in consolidated subsidiaries) and reclassified amounts attributable to noncontrolling interests on the consolidated balance sheets (previously Minority interests in consolidated subsidiaries) to Shareholders’ Deficit.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
 
NOTE 4.  Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code
 
On May 28, 2009, the Debtors filed voluntary petitions for reorganization relief under the Bankruptcy Code in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware. The reorganization cases are being jointly administered as Case No. 09-11786 under the caption “In re Visteon Corporation, et al.” The Debtors continue to operate their businesses as “debtors-in-possession” under the jurisdiction of the Court and in accordance with the applicable provisions of the Bankruptcy Code and orders of the Court. The Company’s other subsidiaries, primarily non-U.S. subsidiaries, have been excluded from the Chapter 11 Proceedings and continue to operate their businesses without supervision from the Court and are not subject to the requirements of the Bankruptcy Code.
 
Implications of Chapter 11 Proceedings
 
Under section 362 of the Bankruptcy Code, the filing of a bankruptcy petition automatically stays most actions against a debtor, including most actions to collect pre-petition indebtedness or to exercise control over the property of the debtor’s estate. Absent an order of the Court, substantially all pre-petition liabilities are subject to settlement under a plan of reorganization. While operating as debtors-in-possession under the Bankruptcy Code and subject to approval of the Court or otherwise as permitted in the ordinary course of business, the Debtors, or some of them, may sell or otherwise dispose of assets and liquidate or settle liabilities for amounts other than those reflected in the consolidated financial statements. Further, a confirmed plan of reorganization or other arrangement could materially change the amounts and classifications in the historical consolidated financial statements.
 
Subsequent to the petition date, the Debtors received approval from the Court to pay or otherwise honor certain pre-petition obligations generally designed to stabilize the Debtors’ operations including employee obligations, tax matters and from limited available funds, pre-petition claims of certain critical vendors, certain customer programs, limited foreign business operations, adequate protection payments and certain other pre-petition claims. Additionally, the Debtors have been paying and intend to continue to pay undisputed post-petition claims in the ordinary course of business.
 
Section 365 of the Bankruptcy Code permits the Debtors to assume, assume and assign or reject certain pre-petition executory contracts subject to the approval of the Court and certain other conditions. Rejection constitutes a Court-authorized breach of the contract in question and, subject to certain exceptions, relieves the Debtors of their future obligations under such contract but creates a deemed pre-petition claim for damages caused by such breach or rejection. Parties whose contracts are rejected may file claims against the rejecting Debtor for damages. Generally, the assumption, or assumption and assignment, of an executory contract requires a debtor to cure all prior defaults under such executory contract and to provide adequate assurance of future performance. Additional liabilities subject to compromise and resolution in the chapter 11 cases have been asserted as a result of damage claims created by the Debtors’ rejection of executory contracts.
 
To successfully emerge from chapter 11, in addition to obtaining exit financing, the Court must confirm a plan of reorganization, the filing of which will depend upon the timing and outcome of numerous ongoing matters in the Chapter 11 Proceedings. A plan of reorganization determines the rights and satisfaction of claims of various creditors and security holders, but the ultimate settlement of those claims will be subject to the uncertain outcome of litigation, negotiations and Court decisions up to and for a period of time after a plan of reorganization is confirmed. At this time, it is not possible to predict with certainty the effect of the Chapter 11 Proceedings on the Company’s business.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 4.  Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code — (Continued)
 
On December 17, 2009, the Debtors filed a plan of reorganization (the “Plan”) and related disclosure statement (the “Disclosure Statement”) with the Court. The Plan and Disclosure Statement as filed with the Court outline a proposal for the settlement of claims against the estate of the Debtors based on an estimate of the overall enterprise value. As set forth in the Disclosure Statement, the Plan is predicated on the termination of certain pension plans to ensure the equitization of secured term lender interests. The Plan calls for settlement of the Debtors estate through the split of equity interests in the reorganized Debtors between the secured interests (96%) and the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (4%) on account of its controlled group underfunding claim, which is structurally superior to the claims of other unsecured interests. Disclosure Statement hearings associated with the Plan scheduled for January and February 2010 were postponed to allow more time to consider alternatives to the Plan.
 
Chapter 11 Financing
 
The Debtors are currently funding post-petition operations under a temporary cash collateral order from the Court and a $150 million Senior Secured Super Priority Priming Debtor in Possession Credit and Guaranty Agreement (“DIP Credit Agreement”), under which the Company has borrowed $75 million and may borrow the remaining $75 million in one additional advance prior to maturity, subject to certain conditions. Additional details related to the DIP Credit Agreement are included herein under Note 13, “Debt” to the consolidated financial statements. The Company’s non-debtor subsidiaries, primarily non-U.S. subsidiaries, have been excluded from the Chapter 11 Proceedings and are funding their operations through cash generated from operating activities supplemented by customer support agreements and local financing arrangements or through cash transfers from the Debtors subject to specific authorization from the Court.
 
There can be no assurance that cash on hand and other available funds will be sufficient to meet the Company’s reorganization or ongoing cash needs or that the Company will be successful in extending the duration of the temporary cash collateral order with the Court or that the Company will remain in compliance with all necessary terms and conditions of the DIP Credit Agreement or that the lending commitments under the DIP Credit Agreement will not be terminated by the lenders. Additionally, the Company believes that its presently outstanding equity securities will have no value and will be canceled under any plan of reorganization. For this reason, the Company urges that caution be exercised with respect to existing and future investments in any security of the Company.
 
Customer Agreements
 
In connection with the Chapter 11 Proceedings, the Company has entered into various accommodation, support and other agreements with certain North American and European customers that provide for additional liquidity through cash surcharge payments, payments for research and engineering costs, accelerated payment terms, asset sales and other commercial arrangements. Specific customer agreements are as follows:
 
•  During July 2009, the Company executed support agreements with certain European customers that provide for, among other things, accelerated payment terms, price increases, restructuring cost reimbursements and settlement payments for invested research and engineering costs and other unrecovered amounts. During 2009 the Company received non-refundable settlement payments of approximately $40 million in connection with these agreements and anticipates receipt of additional non-refundable settlement payments of approximately $30 million on or before each of June 30, 2010 and June 30, 2011, subject to the terms and conditions of these agreements.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 4.  Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code — (Continued)
 
 
•  With effect from October 7, 2009, the date of the final Court order, the Debtors entered into a customer accommodation agreement and related access and security agreement (together, the “GM Accommodation Agreement”) with General Motors Company (“GM”). Pursuant to the GM Accommodation Agreement, GM agreed to, among other things, pay approximately $8 million in cash surcharge payments above the purchase order price for GM component parts produced; reimburse up to $10 million for restructuring costs associated with the consolidation of certain of the Company’s Mexican facilities; reimburse $4 million in up-front engineering, design and development support costs; accelerate payment terms; reimburse the Company for costs associated with the wind-down of operations related to the production of interior and fuel tank GM component parts; and pay approximately $8 million in cure payments in connection with the assumption and assignment of purchase orders with the Company in the Motors Liquidation Company (f/k/a General Motors Corporation) chapter 11 case. The rights and benefits inuring to the Company and GM pursuant to the GM Accommodation Agreement expire on the earlier of the date that resourcing of production is completed or March 31, 2010.
 
•  With effect from November 12, 2009, the date of the final Court order, the Debtors entered into a customer accommodation agreement and related access and security agreement (together, the “Chrysler Accommodation Agreement”) with Chrysler Group LLC (“Chrysler”). Pursuant to the Chrysler Accommodation Agreement, Chrysler agreed to, among other things, pay surcharge payments to the Company above the purchase order price for Chrysler component parts produced by the Company in an aggregate amount of $13 million; pay approximately $5 million for the purchase of certain tooling used at the Company’s Saltillo, Mexico facility to manufacture Chrysler component parts; purchase certain designated equipment and tooling exclusively used to manufacture Chrysler component parts at the Company’s Highland Park, Michigan and Saltillo, Mexico facilities; reimburse the Company for certain costs associated with the wind-down of certain lines of Chrysler component part production; accelerate payment terms; and pay approximately $13 million to the Company as cure payments in connection with the assumption and assignment of purchase orders with the Company in the Old Carco LLC (f/k/a Chrysler LLC) chapter 11 case. The rights and benefits inuring to the Company and Chrysler pursuant to the Chrysler Accommodation Agreement expire on the earlier of the date that resourcing of production is completed or March 31, 2010.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 4.  Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code — (Continued)
 
 
•  With effect from November 12, 2009, the date of the final Court order, the Company entered into (i) a customer accommodation agreement and related access and security agreement (together, the “Nissan Accommodation Agreement”) with Nissan North America, Inc. (“Nissan”), and (ii) an asset purchase agreement (the “Nissan Purchase Agreement”) among the Company, GCM-Visteon Automotive Systems, LLC, GCM-Visteon Automotive Leasing Systems, LLC, MIG-Visteon Automotive Systems, LLC, and VC Regional Assembly & Manufacturing, LLC (collectively, the “Sellers”), Haru Holdings, LLC (the “Buyer”) and Nissan. Pursuant to the Nissan Accommodation and Purchase Agreements, the Buyer agreed to pay approximately $31 million in cash plus the (a) value of certain off-site tooling and inventory dedicated to Nissan production, (b) approximately $2.5 million in wind-down costs; and (c) the amount of certain receivables from Nissan being acquired under the purchase agreement less the amount of certain payables to Nissan and Nissan affiliates assumed by Nissan. The assets sold to the Buyer, pursuant to the November 30, 2009 asset purchase transaction closing date, were primarily used for the production and assembly of automobile cockpit module, front end module and interior parts for Nissan. The majority of these assets were located at facilities in LaVergne, Tennessee; Smyrna, Tennessee; Tuscaloosa, Alabama; and, Canton, Mississippi. In general, the rights and benefits inuring to the Company and Nissan pursuant to the Nissan Accommodation Agreement expire on the date six months from the effective date of a confirmed plan of reorganization.
 
•  With effect from December 10, 2009, the date of the final Court order, the Company entered into a customer accommodation agreement and related access and security agreement with Ford and ACH (the “Ford Accommodation Agreement”). Pursuant to the Ford Accommodation Agreement, Ford and ACH agreed to provide an exit fee of $8 million, payable in two equal installments. Additionally, the majority of Ford electronic component parts currently manufactured at the Company’s Lansdale, Pennsylvania (“North Penn”) facility will be re-sourced to Cadiz Electronica S.A. and the Company discontinued Ford production at the Springfield, Ohio facility. In connection with the resourcing or transitioning of these product lines, Ford and ACH agreed to purchase certain inventory at cost and have been granted the option to purchase dedicated equipment and tooling. Ford and ACH agreed to fund certain costs associated with resourcing production lines at the Company’s North Penn and Springfield facilities. The rights and benefits inuring to the Company, Ford and ACH pursuant to the Ford Accommodation Agreement expire on March 31, 2010, unless otherwise extended by the parties.
 
Generally, in exchange for benefits under these agreements, the Company has agreed to continue producing and delivering component parts to these customers during the term of the respective agreements; to provide assistance in re-sourcing production to other suppliers; to build inventory banks, as necessary to support transition; to grant customers the option to purchase dedicated equipment and tooling owned by the Company; to grant a right of access to the Company’s facilities if the Company ceases production; to grant a security interest in certain operating assets that would be necessary for component part production; and, to provide limited release of certain commercial and other claims and causes of actions, subject to exceptions.
 
Revenue associated with payments from customers pursuant to these agreements is being recorded in relation to the delivery of associated products, assets and/or services in accordance with the terms of the underlying agreement, or over the estimated duration of the respective benefit to the customer, generally representing the average duration of remaining production on current vehicle platforms. The Company recorded $24 million of revenue associated with these settlement payments during 2009, with $70 million deferred on the balance sheet at December 31, 2009.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 4.  Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code — (Continued)
 
Financial Statement Classification
 
Financial reporting applicable to companies in chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code generally does not change the manner in which financial statements are prepared. However, it does require, among other disclosures, that the financial statements for periods subsequent to the filing of the chapter 11 petition distinguish transactions and events that are directly associated with the reorganization from the ongoing operations of the business. Accordingly, revenues, expenses, realized gains and losses and provisions for losses that can be directly associated with the reorganization of the business have been reported separately as “Reorganization items” in the Company’s statement of operations. Reorganization items included in the consolidated statement of operations include costs directly related to the Chapter 11 Proceedings, as follows:
 
         
    Year Ended  
    December 31, 2009  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Professional fees
  $ 54  
Other direct costs, net
    6  
         
    $ 60  
         
 
Cash payments for reorganization costs during the year ended December 31, 2009 were approximately $26 million.
 
Additionally, pre-petition liabilities subject to compromise under a plan of reorganization have been reported separately from both pre-petition liabilities that are not subject to compromise and from liabilities arising subsequent to the petition date. Liabilities expected to be affected by a plan of reorganization are reported at amounts expected to be allowed, even if they may be settled for lesser amounts. Liabilities subject to compromise as of December 31, 2009 are set forth below and represent the Company’s estimate of pre-petition claims to be resolved in connection with the Chapter 11 Proceedings. Such claims remain subject to future adjustments, which may result from (i) negotiations; (ii) actions of the Court; (iii) disputed claims; (iv) rejection of executory contracts and unexpired leases; (v) the determination as to the value of any collateral securing claims; (vi) proofs of claim; or (vii) other events. Liabilities subject to compromise include the following:
 
         
    December 31
 
    2009  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Debt
  $ 2,490  
Employee liabilities
    170  
Accounts payable
    115  
Interest payable
    31  
Other accrued liabilities
    13  
         
    $ 2,819  
         


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 4.  Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code — (Continued)
 
Liabilities subject to compromise at June 30, 2009 were $3,142 million. The decrease primarily includes $273 million related to the termination of Company-paid benefits under certain U.S. OPEB plans and the reclassification of $62 million of such benefits from liabilities subject to compromise associated with participants covered by the current collective bargaining agreement at the North Penn facility in Lansdale, Pennsylvania, as such benefits were determined not to be subject to compromise pursuant to a December 2009 Court order. Further details are discussed in Note 14 “Employee Retirement Benefits” to the consolidated financial statements.
 
Substantially all of the Company’s pre-petition debt is in default, including $1.5 billion principal amount under the seven-year secured term loans due 2013; $862 million principal amount under various unsecured notes due 2010, 2014 and 2016; and $127 million of other secured and unsecured borrowings. Debt discounts of $8 million, deferred financing costs of $14 million and terminated interest rate swaps of $23 million are no longer being amortized and have been included as a valuation adjustment to the related pre-petition debt. Effective May 28, 2009, the Company ceased recording interest expense on outstanding pre-petition debt instruments classified as liabilities subject to compromise. Adequate protection amounts pursuant to the cash collateral order of the Court, and as related to the ABL Credit Agreement have been classified as “Interest expense” on the Company’s consolidated statement of operations. Interest expense on a contractual basis would have been $226 million for the year ended December 31, 2009.
 
Pre-petition Claims
 
On August 26, 2009, pursuant to the Bankruptcy Code, the Debtors filed statements and schedules with the Court setting forth the assets and liabilities of the Debtors as of the Petition Date. In September 2009, the Debtors issued approximately 57,000 proof of claim forms to their current and prior employees, known creditors, vendors and other parties with whom the Debtors have previously conducted business. To the extent that recipients disagree with the claims as quantified on these forms, the recipient may file discrepancies with the Court. Differences between amounts recorded by the Debtors and claims filed by creditors will be investigated and resolved as part of the Chapter 11 Proceedings. However, the Court will ultimately determine liability amounts, if any, that will be allowed for these claims. An October 15, 2009 bar date was set for the filing of proofs of claim against the Debtors. Approximately 3,250 proofs of claim totaling approximately $7.9 billion in claims against the Debtors were filed in connection with the October 15, 2009 bar date as follows:
 
•  Approximately 55 claims, totaling approximately $5.9 billion, represent term loan and bond debt claims, for which the Company has recorded approximately $2.5 billion as of December 31, 2009, which is included in the Company’s consolidated balance sheet as “Liabilities subject to compromise.” The Company believes claim amounts in excess of those reflected in the financial statements at December 31, 2009 are duplicative and will ultimately be resolved through the plan of reorganization.
 
•  Approximately 940 claims, totaling approximately $570 million, which the Company believes should be disallowed by the Court primarily because these claims appear to be duplicative or unsubstantiated claims.
 
The Debtors have not completed their evaluation of the approximately 2,255 claims remaining, totaling approximately $1.4 billion, alleging rights to payment for financing, trade accounts payable and other matters. The Company continues to investigate these unresolved proofs of claim, and intends to file objections to the claims that are inconsistent with its books and records.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 4.  Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code — (Continued)
 
Additional claims may be filed after the October 15, 2009 bar date, which could be allowed by the Court. Accordingly, the ultimate number and allowed amount of such claims are not presently known and cannot be reasonably estimated at this time. The resolution of such claims could result in a material adjustment to the Company’s financial statements. Additionally, a confirmed plan of reorganization could also materially change the amounts and classifications reported in the consolidated financial statements, which do not give effect to any adjustments to the carrying value of assets or amounts of liabilities that might be necessary as a consequence of confirmation of a plan of reorganization.
 
Debtors Financial Statements
 
The financial statements included below represent the condensed combined financial statements of the Debtors and exclude the Company’s other subsidiaries, primarily non-U.S. subsidiaries. These statements reflect the results of operations, financial position and cash flows of the combined Debtor subsidiaries, including certain amounts and activities between Debtor and non-Debtor subsidiaries of the Company, which are eliminated in the consolidated financial statements.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 4.  Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code — (Continued)
 
CONDENSED COMBINED DEBTORS-IN-POSSESSION
 
STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS
 
         
    May 28, 2009 to
 
    December 31, 2009  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Net sales
  $ 1,593  
Cost of sales
    1,386  
         
Gross margin
    207  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    55  
Restructuring expenses
    22  
Reorganization items
    60  
Other income, net
    11  
         
Operating income
    81  
Interest expense, net
    4  
Equity in net income of non-consolidated affiliates
    60  
         
Income before income taxes and earnings of non-Debtor subsidiaries
    137  
Provision for income taxes
    8  
         
Income before earnings of non-Debtor subsidiaries
    129  
Earnings of non-Debtor subsidiaries
    89  
         
Net income
  $ 218  
         


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 4.  Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code — (Continued)
 
CONDENSED COMBINED DEBTORS-IN-POSSESSION
 
BALANCE SHEET
 
         
    December 31, 2009  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
ASSETS
Cash and equivalents
  $ 430  
Restricted cash
    128  
Accounts receivable, net
    236  
Accounts receivable, non-Debtor subsidiaries
    513  
Inventories, net
    65  
Other current assets
    90  
         
Total current assets
    1,462  
Notes receivable, non-Debtor subsidiaries
    575  
Investments in non-Debtor subsidiaries
    554  
Property and equipment, net
    313  
Equity in net assets of non-consolidated affiliates
    277  
Other non-current assets
    11  
         
Total assets
  $ 3,192  
         
 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT
Short-term debt, including current portion of long-term debt
  $ 78  
Accounts payable
    128  
Accounts payable, non-Debtor subsidiaries
    195  
Accrued employee liabilities
    58  
Other current liabilities
    78  
         
Total current liabilities
    537  
Long-term debt
    1  
Employee benefits
    405  
Deferred income taxes
    63  
Other non-current liabilities
    54  
Liabilities subject to compromise
    2,819  
Liabilities subject to compromise, non-Debtor subsidiaries
    85  
Shareholders’ deficit
    (772 )
         
Total liabilities and shareholders’ deficit
  $ 3,192  
         


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 4.  Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code — (Continued)
 
CONDENSED COMBINED DEBTORS-IN-POSSESSION
 
STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
 
         
    May 28, 2009 to
 
    December 31, 2009  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Net cash provided from operating activities
  $ 138  
Investing activities
       
Capital expenditures
    (10 )
Acquisitions and investments in joint ventures, net
    (30 )
Proceeds from divestitures and asset sales
    92  
         
Net cash provided from investing activities
    52  
Financing activities
       
Increase in restricted cash, net
    (48 )
Proceeds from DIP Facility, net of issuance costs
    71  
Other, including overdrafts
    2  
         
Net cash provided from financing activities
    25  
         
Net increase in cash and equivalents
    215  
Cash and equivalents at beginning of period
    215  
         
Cash and equivalents at end of period
  $ 430  
         
 
NOTE 5.  Restructuring Activities
 
The Company has undertaken various restructuring activities to achieve its strategic and financial objectives. Restructuring activities include, but are not limited to, plant closures, production relocation, administrative cost structure realignment and consolidation of available capacity and resources. The Company expects to finance restructuring programs through cash on hand, cash generated from its ongoing operations, reimbursements pursuant to customer accommodation and support agreements or through cash available under its existing debt agreements, subject to the terms of applicable covenants.
 
Amended Escrow Agreement
 
Pursuant to the Escrow Agreement, dated as of October 1, 2005, among the Company, Ford and Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, Ford paid $400 million into the escrow account for use by the Company to restructure its businesses. The Escrow Agreement provided that the Company would be reimbursed from the escrow account for the first $250 million of reimbursable restructuring costs, as defined in the Escrow Agreement, and up to one half of the next $300 million of such costs. In August 2008 and pursuant to the Amended Escrow Agreement, Ford contributed an additional $50 million into the escrow account. The Amended Escrow Agreement provided that such additional funds were available to fund restructuring and other qualified costs on a 100% basis.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 5.  Restructuring Activities — (Continued)
 
Cash in the escrow account was invested, at the direction of the Company, in high quality, short-term investments and related investment earnings were credited to the account as earned. Investment earnings of $28 million became available to reimburse the Company’s restructuring costs following the use of the first $250 million of available funds. Investment earnings on the remaining $200 million became available for reimbursement after full utilization of those funds. The following table provides a reconciliation of amounts available in the escrow account.
 
                 
    Year Ended
    Inception through
 
    December 31, 2009     December 31, 2009  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Beginning escrow account available
  $ 68     $ 400  
Add: Amended Escrow Agreement Funding
          50  
Add: Investment earnings
          35  
Deduct: Disbursements for restructuring costs
    (68 )     (485 )
                 
Ending escrow account available
  $     $  
                 
 
As of December 31, 2009, all of the funds under the Amended Escrow Agreement have been utilized. Approximately $7 million of amounts receivable from the escrow account were classified in “Other current assets” in the Company’s consolidated balance sheets as of December 31, 2008.
 
Restructuring Reserves
 
The following is a summary of the Company’s consolidated restructuring reserves and related activity for the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Substantially all of the Company’s restructuring expenses are related to employee severance and termination benefit costs. Information in the table below includes amounts associated with the Company’s discontinued operations.
 
                                         
    Interiors     Climate     Electronics     Other/Central     Total  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
December 31, 2006
  $ 18     $ 21     $ 2     $ 12     $ 53  
Expenses
    66       27       9       60       162  
Utilization
    (26 )     (25 )     (4 )     (48 )     (103 )
                                         
December 31, 2007
    58       23       7       24       112  
Expenses
    42       20       3       82       147  
Exchange
    (3 )                       (3 )
Utilization
    (48 )     (40 )     (6 )     (98 )     (192 )
                                         
December 31, 2008
    49       3       4       8       64  
Expenses
    22       5       17       40       84  
Utilization
    (50 )     (8 )     (5 )     (46 )     (109 )
                                         
December 31, 2009
  $ 21     $     $ 16     $ 2     $ 39  
                                         


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 5.  Restructuring Activities — (Continued)
 
Restructuring reserve balances of $39 million and $45 million at December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively, are classified as “Other current liabilities” on the consolidated balance sheets. The Company anticipates that the activities associated with the restructuring reserve balance as of December 31, 2009 will be substantially completed by the end of 2010. Other restructuring reserves of $19 million were classified as “Other non-current liabilities” on the consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2008 and related to employee benefits that were probable and estimable but for which associated activities were not to be completed within one year.
 
Utilization includes $81 million, $131 million and $79 million of payments for severance and other employee termination benefits for the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Utilization also includes $28 million, $46 million and $16 million in 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively, of special termination benefits reclassified to pension and other postretirement employee benefit liabilities, where such payments are made from the Company’s benefit plans. For the year ended December 31, 2008, utilization also includes $15 million in payments related to contract termination and equipment relocation costs.
 
Estimates of restructuring costs are based on information available at the time such charges are recorded. In general, management anticipates that restructuring activities will be completed within a timeframe such that significant changes to the plan are not likely. Due to the inherent uncertainty involved in estimating restructuring expenses, actual amounts paid for such activities may differ from amounts initially estimated, resulting in unexpected costs in future periods. Generally, charges are recorded as elements of the plan are finalized and the timing of activities and the amount of related costs are not likely to change.
 
2009 Restructuring Actions
 
The Company recorded restructuring expenses of $84 million during the twelve months ended December 31, 2009 including amounts related to administrative cost reductions to fundamentally re-align corporate support functions with underlying operations in connection with the Company’s reorganization efforts and in response to recessionary economic conditions and related negative impact on the automotive sector and the Company’s results of operations and cash flows.
 
During the first half of 2009, the Company continued to fundamentally realign, consolidate and rationalize its administrative organization structure, including the following actions:
 
•  $34 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs related to approximately 300 salaried employees in the United States and 180 salaried employees in other countries, primarily in Europe.
 
•  $4 million related to approximately 200 employees associated with the consolidation of the Company’s Electronics operations in South America.
 
In connection with the Chapter 11 Proceedings, the Company entered into various support and accommodation agreements with its customers as more fully described in Note 4 “Voluntary Reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code.” These actions included:
 
•  $13 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 170 employees at two European Interiors facilities.
 
•  $11 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 300 employees related to the announced closure of a North American Electronics facility.
 
•  $10 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs related to approximately 120 salaried employees who were located primarily at the Company’s North American headquarters.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 5.  Restructuring Activities — (Continued)
 
 
•  $4 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 550 employees related to the consolidation of the Company’s North American Lighting operations.
 
2008 Restructuring Actions
 
During 2008 the Company recorded restructuring charges of $147 million, including $107 million under the previously announced multi-year improvement plan. Significant actions under the multi-year improvement plan include the following:
 
•  $33 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 290 employees to reduce the Company’s salaried workforce in higher cost countries.
 
•  $23 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 20 salaried and 250 hourly employees at a European Interiors facility.
 
•  $18 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with 55 employees at the Company’s Other products facility located in Swansea, UK. In connection with the divestiture of that facility, Visteon UK Limited agreed to reduce the number of employees to be transferred, which resulted in $5 million of employee severance benefits and $13 million of special termination benefits.
 
•  $9 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs related to approximately 100 hourly and salaried employees at certain manufacturing facilities located in the UK.
 
•  $6 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 40 employees at a European Interiors facility.
 
•  $5 million of contract termination charges related to the closure of a European Other facility.
 
•  $5 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs for the closure of a European Interiors facility.
 
In addition to the multi-year improvement plan, the Company commenced a program during September 2008 designed to fundamentally realign, consolidate and rationalize the Company’s administrative organization structure on a global basis through various voluntary and involuntary employee separation actions. Related employee severance and termination benefit costs of $26 million were recorded during 2008 associated with approximately 320 salaried employees in the United States and 100 salaried employees in other countries, for which severance and termination benefits were deemed probable and estimable. The Company expects to record additional costs related to this global program in future periods when elements of the plan are finalized and the timing of activities and the amount of related costs are not likely to change. The Company also recorded $9 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 850 hourly and 60 salaried employees at a North American Climate facility. As of December 31, 2008, restructuring reserves related to these programs were approximately $10 million.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 5.  Restructuring Activities — (Continued)
 
2007 Restructuring Actions
 
During 2007 the Company incurred restructuring expenses of $162 million under the multi-year improvement plan, including the following significant actions:
 
•  $31 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with the elimination of approximately 300 salaried positions.
 
•  $27 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs for approximately 300 employees at a European Interiors facility related to the announced 2008 closure of that facility.
 
•  $21 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs for approximately 600 hourly and 100 salaried employees related to the announced 2008 closure of a North American Other facility.
 
•  $14 million was recorded related to the December 2007 closure of a North American Climate facility for employee severance and termination benefits, contract termination and equipment move costs.
 
•  $12 million of expected employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with approximately 100 hourly employees under a plant efficiency action at a European Climate facility.
 
•  $10 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs associated with the exit of brake manufacturing operations at a European Other facility. Approximately 160 hourly and 20 salaried positions were eliminated as a result of this action.
 
•  $10 million of employee severance and termination benefit costs were recorded for approximately 40 hourly and 20 salaried employees at various European facilities.
 
In addition to the above announced actions the Company recorded an estimate of expected employee severance and termination benefit costs of approximately $34 million for the probable payment of such post-employment benefit costs in connection with the multi-year improvement plan.
 
NOTE 6.  Asset Impairments and Other Gains and Losses
 
2009 Asset Impairments and Other Gains
 
Section 365 of the Bankruptcy Code permits the Debtors to assume, assume and assign or reject certain pre-petition executory contracts subject to the approval of the Court and certain other conditions. During 2009, the Company rejected a lease arrangement that was subject to a previous sale-leaseback transaction for which the recognition of transaction gains was deferred due to the Company’s continuing involvement with the associated property. The Company’s continuing involvement was effectively ceased in connection with the December 24, 2009 lease termination resulting in recognition of the deferred gain of $30 million, which was partially offset by a loss of $10 million associated with the remaining net book value of leasehold improvements associated with the facility and $9 million of other losses and impairments related to asset disposals.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 6.  Asset Impairments and Other Gains and Losses — (Continued)
 
2008 Asset Impairments and Other Losses
 
The Company concluded that significant operating losses resulting from the deterioration of market conditions and related production volumes in the fourth quarter of 2008 represented an indicator that the carrying amount of the Company’s long-lived assets may not be recoverable. Based on the results of the Company’s assessment, which was based upon the fair value of the affected assets using appraisals, management estimates and discounted cash flow calculations, the Company recorded an impairment charge of approximately $200 million to reduce the net book value of Interiors long-lived assets considered to be “held for use” to their estimated fair value.
 
On June 30, 2008, Visteon UK Limited, an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, transferred certain assets related to its chassis manufacturing operation located in Swansea, United Kingdom to Visteon Swansea Limited, a company incorporated in England and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Visteon UK Limited. Effective July 7, 2008, Visteon UK Limited sold the entire share capital of Visteon Swansea Limited to Linamar UK Holdings Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Linamar Corporation for nominal cash consideration (together, the “Swansea Divestiture”). The Swansea operation, which manufactured driveline products, generated negative gross margin of approximately $40 million on sales of approximately $80 million during 2007. The Company recorded asset impairment and loss on divestiture of approximately $23 million in connection with the Swansea Divestiture, including $16 million of losses on the Visteon Swansea Limited share capital sale and $7 million of asset impairment charges.
 
During the first quarter of 2008, the Company announced the sale of its North American-based aftermarket underhood and remanufacturing operations (“NA Aftermarket”) including facilities located in Sparta, Tennessee and Reynosa, Mexico (together, the “NA Aftermarket Divestiture”). The NA Aftermarket manufactured starters and alternators, radiators, compressors and condensers and also remanufactured steering pumps and gears. These operations recorded sales for the year ended December 31, 2007 of approximately $133 million and generated a negative gross margin of approximately $16 million. The Company recorded total losses of $46 million on the NA Aftermarket Divestiture, including an asset impairment charge of $21 million and losses on disposition of $25 million.
 
The Company also recorded asset impairments of $6 million during 2008 in connection with other divestiture activities, including the sale of its Interiors operation located in Halewood, UK.
 
2007 Impairment Charges
 
During the fourth quarter of 2007, the Company recorded impairment charges of $16 million to reduce the net book value of long-lived assets associated with the Company’s fuel products to their estimated fair value. This amount was recorded pursuant to impairment indicators including lower than anticipated current and near term future customer volumes and the related impact on the Company’s current and projected operating results and cash flows resulting from a change in product technology.
 
During the third quarter of 2007, the Company completed the sale of its Visteon Powertrain Control Systems India (“VPCSI”) operation located in Chennai, India. The Company determined that assets subject to the VPCSI divestiture including inventory, intellectual property and real and personal property met the “held for sale” criteria under GAAP. Accordingly, these assets were valued at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less cost to sell, which resulted in asset impairment charges of approximately $14 million.


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
NOTE 6.  Asset Impairments and Other Gains and Losses — (Continued)
 
In March 2007, the Company entered into a Master Asset and Share Purchase Agreement (“MASPA”) to sell certain assets and liabilities associated with the Company’s chassis operations (the “Chassis Divestiture”). The Company’s chassis operations were primarily comprised of suspension, driveline and steering product lines and included facilities located in Dueren and Wuelfrath, Germany, Praszka, Poland and Sao Paulo, Brazil. Collectively, these operations recorded sales for the year ended December 31, 2006 of approximately $600 million. During the first quarter of 2007, the Company determined that assets subject to the Chassis Divestiture including inventory, intellectual property and real and personal property met the “held for sale” criteria under GAAP. Accordingly, these assets were valued at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less cost to sell, which resulted in asset impairment charges of approximately $28 million.
 
In consideration of the MASPA and the Company’s announced exit of the brake manufacturing business at its Swansea, UK facility, an asset impairment charge of $16 million was recorded to reduce the net book value of certain long-lived assets at the facility to their estimated fair value in the first quarter of 2007. The Company’s estimate of fair value was based on market prices, prices of similar assets and other available information.
 
During 2007 the Company entered into agreements to sell two Electronics buildings located in Japan. The Company determined that these buildings met the “held for sale” criteria under GAAP and were recorded at the lower of carrying value or fair value less cost to sell, which resulted in asset impairment charges of approximately $15 million.
 
NOTE 7.  Discontinued Operations
 
In March 2007, the Company entered into the MASPA for the sale of certain assets and liabilities associated with the Company’s chassis operations. The Chassis Divestiture, while representing a significant portion of the Company’s chassis operations, did not result in the complete exit of any of the affected product lines. Effective May 31, 2007, the Company ceased to produce brake components at its Swansea, UK facility, which resulted in the complete exit of the Company’s global suspension product line. Accordingly, the results of operations of the Company’s global suspension product line have been reclassified to “Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax” in the consolidated statement of operations for the year ended December 31, 2007. A summary of the results of discontinued operations is provided in the table below.
 
         
    Year Ended
 
    December 31, 2007  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Net product sales
  $ 50  
Cost of sales
    63  
         
Gross margin
    (13 )
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    1  
Asset impairments
    12  
Restructuring expenses
    10  
Reimbursement from Escrow Account
    12  
         
Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax
  $ (24 )
         


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
 
NOTE 8.  Inventories
 
Inventories consist of the following components:
 
                 
    December 31  
    2009     2008  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Raw materials
  $ 125     $ 145  
Work-in-process
    159       184  
Finished products
    78       67  
                 
      362       396  
Valuation reserves
    (43 )     (42 )
                 
    $ 319     $ 354  
                 
 
NOTE 9.  Other Assets
 
Other current assets are summarized as follows:
 
                 
    December 31  
    2009     2008  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Recoverable taxes
  $ 86     $ 109  
Deposits
    55       24  
Current deferred tax assets
    32       29  
Prepaid assets
    22       18  
Pledged accounts receivable
    19        
Unamortized debt costs
          20  
Other
    22       39  
                 
    $ 236     $ 239  
                 
 
Other non-current assets are summarized as follows:
 
                 
    December 31  
    2009     2008  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Non-current deferred tax assets
  $ 17     $ 34  
Assets held for sale
    16       7  
Notes and other receivables
    10       4  
Other intangible assets
    6       7  
Other
    35       52  
                 
    $ 84     $ 104  
                 


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VISTEON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
(DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
 
NOTE 10.  Property and Equipment
 
Property and equipment, net consists of the following:
 
                 
    December 31  
    2009     2008  
    (Dollars in Millions)  
 
Land
  $ 74     $ 73  
Buildings and improvements
    817       809  
Machinery, equipment and other
    2,752       2,985  
Construction in progress
    75       112  
                 
Total property and equipment
    3,718       3,979  
Accumulated depreciation
    (1,860 )     (1,907 )
                 
      1,858       2,072  
Product tooling, net of amortization
    78       90  
                 
Property and equipment, net
  $ 1,936     $ 2,162  
                 
 
Property and equipment is depreciated principally using the straight-line method of depreciation over the estimated useful life of the asset. Generally, buildings and improvements are depreciated over a 30-year estimated useful life and machinery, equipment and other assets are depreciated over estimated useful lives ranging from 5 to 15 years. Product tooling is amortized using the straight-line method over the estimated life of the tool, generally not exceeding six years.
 
Depreciation and amortization expenses are summarized as follows: